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Grant programs:Awards for Faculty*
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Brian S. Bauer
University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60612-4305)

HB-281350-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Fragments of History: Reconstructing Blas Valera’s Lost Historia Occidentialis

Research and editing a critical edition of Blas Valera’s Historia Occidentialis (1596), a chronicle of Incan history.

In this project, I will reconstruct parts of a lost chronicle titled Historia Occidentialis (History of the West) which was completed in 1596 by Blas Valera, a controversial Jesuit chronicler. Valera’s original chronicle was composed in Latin, Spanish, and Quechua, and focused on the history of the Incas. Parts of Valera’s work was copied into Garcilaso de la Vega’s The Royal Commentaries of the Incas [1609 and 1616], and can be extracted and parts of his lost chronicle can be reconstructed. The reconstruction of Valera’s lost work represents an excellent project for an NEH Award for Faculty at HSIs. The completion and publication of this project will establish Blas Valera has the first author of mix-Hispanic/Andean descent to complete a major chronicle on the history of the Incas and the events of the American-European contact period. It will be of interest to a wide range of scholars and individuals who are interested in the history of the Americas and the works of native peoples.

Riya Das
Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77445-6850)

HB-281426-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

Women at Odds: Indifference, Antagonism, and Progress in Late Victorian Literature

Research and writing leading to a book reassessing female solidarity in the Victorian novel.

My monograph project challenges traditional accounts of female solidarity as a driver of narrative and social success for women. By contrast, my project shows that in prominent novels of the late nineteenth century, antagonism and indifference are surprisingly effective tools for women looking to break out of traditionally defined roles. On the one hand, this antagonism disrupts the status quo in unanticipated ways—a patriarchal society that has come to expect solidarity between women finds it difficult to deal with female competition—and it helps open new domestic and professional pathways for women. On the other hand, in the effort to achieve gender equality, the professional New Woman’s rhetoric recycles distinctly sexist, racist, and classist mid-Victorian conventions, thereby bringing middle-class Englishwomen dialectically into the labor pool of the British empire, even as they resist patriarchal institutions.

Joseph Stenberg
San Jose State University (San Jose, CA 95192-0001)

HB-281442-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2023

The Ethics of 14th-Century French Philosopher Jean Buridan

Preparation of an annotated translation of the first volume of Questions on the Ten Books of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics by medieval French philosopher John Buridan (c. 1300-c. 1360).

John Buridan (c.1300-c.1360) was an extraordinarily influential thinker. His massive Quaestiones super decem libros Ethicorum Aristotelis ad Nicomachum (QNE) or “Questions on the Ten Books of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics” was among his most influential works. Despite its outstanding historical importance and clear merits, Buridan’s Quaestiones is little studied today. The fundamental aim of my project is to make this fascinating and influential text far more accessible by producing a translation of the work with a variety of scholarly aids.

Liz Przybylski
Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

HB-281490-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream, 2008-2018

Completion of a book and two open-access articles about Indigenous hip hop musicians, media professionals and the concept of sonic sovereignty.

What does sovereignty sound like? The book Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream answers this question through ethnographic research and media analysis undertaken with Indigenous hip hop musicians and media professionals. The research is rooted in Winnipeg, an Indigenous music broadcasting center in Canada whose resonance is heard across borders. It reveals the wide and deep impacts of Streetz FM, the first Indigenous hip hop station, and probes the forces that led to the station’s closure, even as its music continued to find popularity with audiences. I extend research that explores the racialization and gendering of urban-format popular music and detail the implications on how Indigenous artists are heard—and silenced—through popular music distribution. Musicians are actively building what I call sonic sovereignty, navigating the expectations of mainstream airplay while pushing aesthetic and political boundaries.

Anthony Jerome Barbieri
Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)

HB-281500-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2023 – 6/30/2024

Political Economy in Ancient China: Annotated Translation of the Discourses on Salt and Iron

Translation and critical annotations of a Han Dynasty manuscript called the Discourses on Salt and Iron, dating from the first century BCE.

I will write the first complete English translation of one of the most important political and economic texts from early imperial China, the Yantielun (Discourses on Salt and Iron). An English translation of this text from nearly a century ago is quite dated and more than half incomplete. This project will generate an entirely new English translation of the whole text, with significant annotation based on the latest scholarship. A lengthy introduction will also discuss various aspects of the text, such as dating, and the economic and political arguments advanced.

Yinghong Cheng
Delaware State University (Dover, DE 19901-2202)

HB-281575-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

“Two Lives For One Mile”: African American Soldiers Building the Burma Road

Writing leading to a book on race and the building of the Burma Road, a major infrastructure project in the China-Burma-India theater of World War II.

This study will become the first book on African-American GIs building the Burma Road, including pipelines to transport Lend-Lease Act supplies to China, America’s ally in WWII. Accomplished during wartime in difficult terrain and at the mercy of subtropical elements, the Road was not only an engineering miracle but unique in U.S. military history with Black GIs as the major force, engaging in the most racially and ethnically diverse region in WWII, and resulting in a casualty rate higher than the army’s WWII combat average. The subject spans the histories of WWII, African Americans, and Afro-American-Asian encounters, but has been largely neglected by scholarship in these fields while also remaining absent from public memory. The book’s historical narrative is established within an analytical framework that examines America’s race issues in the context of the global politics of (anti)racism and (de)colonization and reassesses African Americans' contribution to the victory of WWII.

Michelle Elizabeth Tusan
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (Las Vegas, NV 89154-9900)

HB-281641-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

The Last Treaty: The Middle Eastern Front and the End of the First World War

Research and writing leading to a book on the final years of World War I, focusing on conflict and humanitarian disaster in the Middle East.

“The Last Treaty: The Middle Eastern Front and the End of the First World War” rewrites the final years of the war as a story of failed diplomacy and humanitarian crisis. The 1923 Treaty of Lausanne, I argue, marked the true end of WWI. This book integrates the path to peace in the Middle East after the 1918 armistices and 1919 Versailles Treaty into WWI’s grand narrative to show how the protracted nature of the war challenged old certainties about a European-led imperial order. It also traces Allied assumptions about the role of diplomacy and humanitarianism in war and peacemaking while exposing the deep imperial institutions and attitudes rooted in ideas of minority protection and humanitarian intervention that guided the war’s prosecution, settlement and aftermath.

Courtney Brannon Donoghue
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

HB-281863-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$55,000 (approved)
$55,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

How Female-Driven Films Are Valued From Pitch to Premiere

Research and writing leading to a book about women working in the contemporary U.S. and global film industry, with a particular focus on producers, writers, and directors.

How Female-Driven Films Are Valued From Pitch to Premiere explores the realities of women working above-the-line as producers, writers, and directors in the U.S. and global film industry since the emergence of the #metoo and Time’s Up movements. The book examines how industry cultures and business practices “value” female-driven projects (starring, written, produced, and/or directed by women) and the barriers women must face to get their films made. Grounded in five dozen in-depth interviews conducted from 2016 to 2020, this longitudinal study traces individual creatives and their female-driven projects across each filmmaking stage—development, financing, production, film festivals, marketing and distribution. The Award for Faculty at HSIs will support the completion of the first scholarly book length account that highlights the value of contemporary women’s labor, voices, and storytelling from the point of view of filmmakers who are working to change a historically male-dominated system.

Cindy Ermus
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

HB-281904-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

The Great Plague Scare of 1720: Disaster and Society in the Early Modern World

Writing and researching the history of a plague epidemic in southern France (1720-1722), tracing its impact on global trade and the development of early modern public health policy.

From 1720 to 1722, the French region of Provence and surrounding areas experienced one of the last major epidemics of plague to strike Western Europe. The Plague of Provence was a major disaster that left in its wake as many as 126,000 deaths, as well as new understandings about the nature of disaster and disease and how to best manage their threat. While emergency measures in France and surrounding states successfully prevented the infection from spreading beyond Provence, the social, commercial, and diplomatic effects of the epidemic extended across Europe and to the colonies in the Americas and Asia. My book is thus a transnational study that explores the responses to this biological threat in some of the foremost port cities of the 18th-century world. In this way, my study reveals how a crisis in one part of the globe can yet transcend geographic and temporal boundaries to influence society, politics, and public health policy in regions far removed from the epicenter of disaster.

Adrian Finucane
Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)

HB-281905-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2023

Captive Exchanges: Prisoners of War and the Trade in Secrets, 1700-1760

Research and writing leading to a book on prisoners of war and their role in imperial competition in 18th century British and Spanish America. 

Captive Exchanges addresses themes of warfare and incarceration as well as empire and cultural contact in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Prisoners of war acted as crucial conduits in the development of military and commercial intelligence in the long conflict between the growing British colonies of the southeast and the Caribbean and Spanish Florida. This monograph uncovers the experiences of prisoners of war before the codification of international laws about the taking and holding of captives. People seized by an enemy might be closely confined, subject to interrogation, allowed to wander freely, or quickly returned to their countrymen. British, Spanish, and French agents of empire, enslaved Africans, and Indigenous people from throughout the southeast experienced captivity in culturally specific and shifting ways. Investigating the impact of intelligence-gathering by prisoners reveals networks of information inadvertently created by captives and officials on the edges of empire.

Mary J. Henderson
Morgan State University (Baltimore, MD 21251-0001)

HB-281926-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Africanjujuism in Nnedi Okorafor's Akata Books and the Relaunch of Sankofa: A Journal of African Children’s Literature

Research and writing for an article on the young adult fiction of Nigerian-American author Nnedi Okorafor and to facilitate the migration of Sankofa, a journal dedicated to children’s literature by African authors. from print to online format.

I am applying for a twelve-month grant of part-time funding (50% course reduction) to produce a peer-reviewed article and to establish a digital repository in the form of an online journal. This grant would allow a partial teaching release for the year to compose an article about Africanjujuism in Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata books and to provide time to transition Sankofa: A Journal of African Children’s Literature from a paper-base to an open access, peer-reviewed online journal. Sankofa’s objective is to disseminate information on African children’s and young adult literature. Sankofa’s mission is to recognize common inaccuracies and biases in books set in Africa; to provide book reviews and scholarly articles on emerging trends in African and African diaspora literatures; and to stimulate global conversation on the comparative patterns in children’s literature. The Okorafor article would be part of the new content for the Sankofa relaunch.

Bianca Murillo
California State University, Dominguez Hills Foundation (Carson, CA 90747-0001)

HB-282015-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$37,500 (approved)
$37,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Financing Africa’s Future: A Socio-Economic History of Ghana, 1950-80s

Research and writing leading to a history of debt and finance in post-independence Ghana, 1950-1980.  

Financing Africa’s Future will be the first book-length study to situate Africa’s postcolonial past within a broader history of international business, private investment, and financial crime. As the first sub-Saharan African country to gain independence in 1957, Ghana became a hot economic opportunity zone attracting businessmen and investors from around the world. I argue that decolonization and the process of nation-building rested on intricate and intimate negotiations of credit, contracts, and massive loans. Such financial transactions not only funded vital development projects, but were also social affairs connecting networks of people and institutions in and beyond the continent. By fusing financial and business history with social and cultural analysis, Financing Africa’s Future brings human relationships to the center of a dynamic economic history that has all too often been reduced to national narratives of disappointment and decline.

Patricia Akhimie
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark (Newark, NJ 07104-3010)

HB-282116-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

Editing Shakespeare's Othello

Research and writing leading to a new edition of Shakespeare’s Othello to be published as part of the Arden Shakespeare Fourth Series. 

An edition of Othello for the Arden Shakespeare Fourth Series, the internationally recognized scholarly standard of excellence in Shakespeare editions, and one of the first to be edited by a woman of color. Othello has a great deal to teach us about the work of language in the production of racist thinking and the creation and perpetuation of damaging stereotypes. Grounded in critical race theory, this edition addresses the dichotomy between an increasingly diverse readership and a relatively homogenous group of mediators, including editors and critics, endowed with the privilege of deciphering and disseminating Shakespeare’s plays. Projected to be one the best-selling plays in the series, slated to be distributed in print and digital editions, and designed to reach an even wider readership amongst high school and undergraduate students, as well as scholars, this edition—now under contract—is positioned to change scholarship and teaching for decades to come.

James David Reid
Metropolitan State College of Denver (Denver, CO 80217-3362)

HB-282146-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Novalis's Philosophical Fictions: An Important Chapter in the History of German Romantic Philosophy and Poetry

Preparation of a book interpreting the work of German Romantic philosophical poet Novalis (1772-1801) plus a one-volume selected edition of his philosophical and literary writings.

This two-pronged project offers the first comprehensive philosophical account of the German Romantic thinker Novalis that takes into consideration his work as a philosopher, poet, and natural scientist. It promises to shed light on a figure essential to the history of humanistic efforts to understand ourselves and our world and should be of value to specialists and educated laypersons alike. It provides an integrative reading that shows his late lyric poems and novels to be essential in any adequate interpretation of his philosophical achievement. Its publication goals are twofold: (1) a monograph offering the first comprehensive interpretation in English of the totality of Novalis’s oeuvre, including his poetic writings, as a sustained contribution to philosophy, centered on the idea and conditions of a philosophical system in Kant and his earliest successors, and (2) a one-volume translation of a comprehensive, carefully edited selection of Novalis’s philosophical and literary writings.

Ranin Kazemi
San Diego State University Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-1931)

HB-282175-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

The Making of the First Revolutionary Movement in Modern Iran, 1850-1892

Research and writing leading to a book on popular uprisings in Iran, 1890-1891.

I seek 12 months of fulltime work to finish my first book manuscript on the origins of a protest movement in Iran in 1891-92. If granted the NEH award, I will use the grant period to complete this monograph and submit it to Cambridge University Press by January 2023. This book is about the economic and social forces that transformed Iran over the course of the 19th century. Based on a wide range of archival and published sources in five languages and from six different countries, this work disentangles the long-term causes and context of a nation-wide insurrectionary movement known as the Tobacco Protest. Focusing on one country as a case study, this book makes a number of interventions in the scholarship on the Middle East and global history. It contends that the emergence of democratic sentiments and religious involvement in politics in the modern Middle East had much to do with the arrival of capitalism, colonial violence, and modern state building in the 19th century.

Manu Samriti Chander
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark (Newark, NJ 07104-3010)

HB-282233-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

The Complete Works of Egbert Martin

Writing and revision for an edition of the collected works of Guyanese belletrist, Egbert Martin (c. 1861-1890).

Following emancipation in the 1830s, Guyana (then British Guiana) witnessed a boom in literary output. Technological advancements in printing in the colonies and the rise of a new Black middle class meant that, for the first time, Afro-Guyanese voices were being heard. At the forefront of a growing group of Black literary figures was Egbert Martin, the colony’s “most important nineteenth-century poet,” according to Laurence Breiner’s Introduction to West Indian Poetry (Cambridge UP, 1998) and, in the words of the Harlem Renaissance writer Arthur Schomburg, “one of the greatest Negro poets in history.” The Complete Works of Egbert Martin brings together all of Martin’s known writings, many of which have been remained unpublished since they first appeared in Guyanese periodicals in the 1880s and many of which I have newly discovered.

Christine M. Ami
Navajo Nation Tribal Government (Tsalie, AZ 86556-9998)

HB-282314-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

A Study of Diné (Navajo) Traditional Sheep Butchering

Research and writing a book and development of two undergraduate courses on the practice of butchering in Diné history and culture.

This proposal requests twelve months of funding to support the completion of my first book that re-writes the significance of sheep and the practices of traditional sheep butchering in Diné history and culture from Diné perspectives. Grounded within the Diné practice and philosophy of Dibé éí Diné be’ iiná át’é (Sheep Is Life), this project explores the nuances of sheep butchering techniques, stories, and philosophies in order to understand how dibé actively co-construct Diné identities, histories, and ways of sensing the world even during the dismembering process of traditional butchering. This award period will be spent (1) preparing and submitting a book proposal to a top tier academic press, (2) completing the first full draft of the manuscript, and (3) developing two new course syllabi derived from the book project, which will contribute to the growth of the growing Native American Studies program at Diné College in general and food sovereignty initiatives of the Navajo Nation.

Farhana Ferdous
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

HB-282414-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2024

The (pathogenic)-CITY: A Segregated Landscape of Urbanization, Urbanicity, and Wellbeing in the city of Baltimore (1900s to present)

Research leading to the revision of an undergraduate course and a peer-reviewed article on minority health and urban design in Baltimore since 1900.

My project “The (pathogenic)-CITY” is intended as a significant step towards rectifying a major gap in education about the chronological history of racial disparities by focusing on how urbanization, urbanicity, and residential segregation have transformed minority health and well-being in Baltimore since the early 1900s. My proposed course will be a substantial effort to change viewpoints and contribute to the development of new methodological and theoretical notions for a broader interdisciplinary discourse by discussing the role of urban designers, theorists, and town planners. I will study the historiography of urbanization, racial segregation, and its consequence on health disparities in Baltimore, which is a “living archive” and witness its changing urban landscape. This project will expand knowledge by filling the gaps in the multi-discipline arena that is timely and urgent for broader humanities disciplines and HBCU institutions.

Maria Auxiliadora Rey-Lopez
Metropolitan State College of Denver (Denver, CO 80217-3362)

HB-282459-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Geographies of Belonging: Spanish Place-names in Colorado

Research leading to the revision of an intensive Spanish grammar review course for heritage speakers.

This project will research and analyze Spanish toponymy in Colorado including the place-names of cities, counties and geographical accidents. Rather than creating a list of names in order to collect information about the origin and meaning of each (as could be expected from a more traditional etymological or taxonomic study), the project will instead focus on how place-names practices and politics have produced spaces imbued with cultural significance and social power. Therefore, the toponymic study of Colorado Spanish places will be approached from a historical, political and personal point of view. I plan to use the collected materials, sources and subsequent research to revise and improve one of the intermediate grammar courses I usually teach by providing a cultural and historical thematic thread to the class SPA 2750-Intensive Spanish Grammar Review, a class initially created for Spanish heritage speakers that is offered year-round.

Catherine Ann Nolan-Ferrell
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

HB-282616-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Migrants or Refugees? Violence and Forced Migration in Southern Mexico and Guatemala, 1950-2000

My book project, Migrants or Refugees? Violence and Coerced Migration in Southern Mexico and Guatemala, 1950-2000 investigates the causes and impacts of Guatemalan migration into southern Chiapas. Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, the border between Guatemala and Mexico had little impact on social and economic networks that developed with the regional coffee economy. Lasting economic, social, and cultural ties formed between communities on both sides of the border. By early 1981, violence from the Guatemalan Civil War (1963-1996) and deepening poverty pushed growing numbers of Guatemalan campesinos to migrate for work on Mexican coffee fincas. Simultaneously, intensifying conflict led thousands of indigenous villagers to abandon their homes and seek safety in Mexico. Some Guatemalans were depicted as unwitting ‘victims’ who deserved asylum and assistance. Others were labeled as “too political” or “opportunistic” and received little support.

Martha Schoolman
Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

HB-282635-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2023

Green Abolitionisms in the Hemispheric 1850s

Research and writing to complete a book on the literary history of abolitionism among writer-activists operating in the US and Jamaica. 

Green Abolitionisms in the Hemispheric 1850s rewrites the literary history of the United States-based abolitionist movement to highlight an unexplored set of connections among writer-activists operating within and between the US and Jamaica.

Shirin Azizeh Khanmohamadi
San Francisco State University (San Francisco, CA 94132-1722)

HB-282649-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Translating Empires of the Saracens in European Epic

Research and writing leading to a book that will reconsider Christian/Muslim relationships and the concept of translatio studii et imperii in medieval epic by analyzing examples of object exchange in selected texts.

My second book project, Translating Empires of the Saracens in European Epic, analyzes 12th-14th century medieval European epics, tracing within these narratives the movement from ‘Saracen’ or Muslim possession into ‘Frankish’ or Latin Christian possession of a set of symbolic objects conferring the imperial authority upon their bearers, among them swords, oliphants, horses, and sovereign tents. I argue that these object transfers serve as the material expression of the widespread (otherwise linguistic) trope of ‘translatio imperii et studii’, the transfer of past imperial authority and cultural prestige to Europe. Read in this way, these objects allow us to make a fresh case both for the central role of ‘Saracen’ or medieval Muslim empires in Europe’s earliest imperial self-fashioning and for medieval Europe’s inclusion of a Muslim inheritance among its cultural forebears.

Charles Vincent Reed
Elizabeth City State University (Elizabeth City, NC 27909-9913)

HB-282684-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 11/30/2022

An Empire of Justice: Britishness, Respectability, and Citizenship in Colonial South Africa, 1841-1923

Research and writing leading to an intellectual history of political activists and intellectuals of color in colonial South Africa, 1840-1923.

This book project explores how colonial subjects of color in southern Africa and their allies in Britain and the empire fought for an inclusive “empire of justice” against the assembled forces of white supremacy. It will trace the intellectual and political lives of three generations of activists and intellectuals of color in colonial South Africa who, through an imagined community of print, made claims on a non-racial imperial citizenship and co-ownership of Britain’s global empire.

Maria Sarita See
Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

HB-282777-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Make Do: Filipino American Visual Culture and the Everyday Arts of Survival

Research and writing leading to a book about contemporary Filipino American art and visual culture.

This book-length manuscript is about contemporary Filipino American artists and small businesses that create and exhibit visual culture with resourceful, do-it-yourself modes of inventive survival. This project merges “high art” shown in galleries and film festivals with “low” visual culture in ordinary small businesses in order to document and theorize, across these very different exhibition venues, a continuous pattern of inventive artistic and everyday cultural practices that emanate out of material need, racialized experience, and everyday resilience.

Valerie A. Martinez
Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78207-4689)

HB-282804-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Embajadoras: Latina Servicewomen and Hemispheric Politics during World War II

Research and writing leading to a book on the Benito Juárez Squadron, a U.S. Army unit of Mexican American servicewomen recruited during World War II. 

Embajadoras, Ambassadors, reconceptualizes traditional notions of diplomacy and international actors by investigating how the recruitment and service of Latina women in the Benito Juárez Squadron during World War II embodied the Pan-American ideal of an imagined hemispheric system of unity and reciprocity in the Americas. Embajadoras examines this pivotal moment in the history of U.S.-Latin American relations and Mexican American Civil Rights and argues that while male officers and civilian leaders utilized the women's bodies and military participation to further their diplomatic and social justice goals, Latina servicewomen in turn defined a gendered civil rights project that included the legal rights afforded to all U.S. citizens as well as full ownership of their highly policed lives, bodies, and sexuality.

Derrais Armarne Carter
Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)

HB-273567-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Blaxploitation: A Narrative History

Research and writing leading to a narrative history book of Blaxploitation film framed in relation to multiple, contemporaneous politics of Black self-representation.

Blaxploitation: A Narrative History investigates the emergence of a Civil Rights Movement Black cultural discourse that wrestled over cinematic representation throughout the 1970s. Coined in 1972 by activist Junius Griffin, the term highlighted how upon “discovering” Black filmgoing audiences, the (white) film industry exploited Black actors to create and promote cheaply made films for Black people. Rather than overtax the theme of white exploitation of Black labor, my book argues that the term blaxploitation also identifies lesser known, yet ongoing, intraracial conflicts among Black artists, activists, and intellectuals.

Katherine R. Morales Lugo
University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Mayaguez, PR 00680-6475)

HB-273677-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 5/31/2022

English in Puerto Rico: Ideologies, and Identities and Social Uses among the Puerto Rican Youth

Research and writing leading to a book on English language use among Puerto Rican youth living on the island. 

Recent statistics suggest that there are more Puerto Ricans in the mainland United States than on the island of Puerto Rico. Despite undeniable presence, scholarship depicts islanders as holding conflicting beliefs that place being “Puerto Rican” and “Being American” at ideological odds. The presence/absence of English is often treated as key to negotiating aspects of identity relations, as English is projected as the language of “the Other,” “the colonizer,” and “the island elite.” My ethnographically grounded study of adolescent communities challenges previous findings about resistance to English, the uses of English, and the ideologies attached to the language. Under a framework of identity construction, I explore how the island youth make sense of the meanings of English, and subsequently draw on and orient to these meanings in interaction. This will be the first monograph that focuses on English in island Puerto Ricans, contributing to the growing bibliography of English in the U.S. and World Englishes.

Neil Emory Hultgren
California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

HB-273687-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Cosmic Romance: The Universe in British Fiction, 1885-1930

Research and writing leading to a book on British speculative fiction of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

A scholarly monograph, Cosmic Romance considers British fiction of the late 19th century and early 20th century that attempts to expand human awareness through a particular kind of narrative. Cosmic romances challenge conceptions of literary realism and the everyday via estranged points of view and representations of time that exceed the human lifespan. Cosmic Romance breaks new ground by bringing a study of narrative technique to popular British speculative fiction that explored increasingly complex notions of the space and time of the universe. My research is also unique in examining popular fiction’s eclectic power as it synthesized disparate discourses of the period: mystical writings stemming from new hybrid religions, popular representations of scientific discoveries in astronomy and physics, as well as pseudoscientific treatises on eugenics.

Jason Timothy Sharples
Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)

HB-273689-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Tangled Roots: Florida's Revolving Empires and the Opportunities of Changing Borders, 1760-1830

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of Florida during the colonial period, offering a new interpretation of early American history rooted in the Caribbean.

Colonial Florida offers an alternative origin story for the United States with roots in the Caribbean, Latin America, Native America, and anglophone North America. These influences became tangled as successive empires -- Spain, Britain, Spain (again), and the US -- claimed the territory. This book is organized around three pivotal moments of transition between empires: 1763, 1784, and 1821. With each, how did inhabitants and newcomers -- indigenous people, enslaved people, free people of color, and settlers -- experience the change in governance and take advantage of overlaps and tensions between imperial powers? And how did a new colonizing power attempt to govern a "foreign" people who had established roots and transformed the landscape, economy, customs, and Native American diplomatic relations? The answers speak to the common historical phenomenon of conquered and annexed territories and illuminate how people conceived of, and used, subjecthood and citizenship when borders moved.

Jinah Kim
California State University, Northridge (Northridge, CA 91330-0001)

HB-273711-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$42,500 (approved)
$42,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 6/30/2022

Against Forgetting: Memory, Care, and Feminist Arts across the Transpacific

Writing resulting in a book length study of Korean diasporic practices memorializing the “Comfort Woman” experience.

The NEH grant will allow me to finish writing my book, “Against Forgetting: Memory, Care, and Feminist Arts across the Transpacific" which focuses on how memorials and public memorializing threaten powerful systems of historical revisionism and silencing around the Comfort Women, nearly 200,000 young girls taken as sexual slaves by the Japanese military in the WWII era. In less than 9 years over 40 statues and memorials have been erected that commemorate Comfort Women history. I argue that artists and activists have positioned themselves as protectors of the Comfort Women and inheritors of their silenced history, activating a language of care.The transpacific aspect of this organizing is significant because the Korean diaspora in the US can intervene and enable the homeland to negotiate contested and painful histories.

Adam D. McKible
CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)

HB-272764-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Jim Crow Modernism, The Saturday Evening Post, and the Harlem Renaissance

Writing and revision to finalize the manuscript of a book examining how some Harlem Renaissance artists challenged the racial discourse circulating in a major mass market periodical.  

“Jim Crow Modernism, The Saturday Evening Post, and the Harlem Renaissance” makes three interrelated claims. First, I argue that early twentieth century American modernism is best understood as “Jim Crow modernism.” Second, I pursue this argument by focusing on George Horace Lorimer’s editorship of The Saturday Evening Post and his long running practice of publishing black dialect stories written by white authors in order to describe the politics and practices of stereotyping that occupied a central position in American print culture. Third, I argue that we can better understand the achievements of African American authors of the Harlem Renaissance by reading their work as being in dialogue and contestation with the Post’s white authors, and with Jim Crow modernism more broadly. Ultimately, my project provides a greater understanding of the constructions of blackness that dominated American print culture, and an enhanced contextualization of the literature of the Harlem Renaissance.

Dydia DeLyser
California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA 92831-3599)

HB-272928-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

“Neon signs and unseen histories of the American landscape”

Writing leading to a book on neon signs and the American landscape from the late 19th century to the present.

A book revealing how neon signs have transformed the American landscape, "Hidden in Bright Light: The Untold Story of Neon Signs in America" will be the first book to detail the history of neon signs in America. Mustering extensive archival research and lengthy experience in the sign industry, the book dispels previous myths about neon’s history and uses the geographical tools of landscape interpretation to show what went previously unseen: how important it is to be able to “read” the landscape in all its detail; how landscapes must not only be read, they must also be made; how advertising is also art; and how a technology like neon can create community around the past and the present. Accessibly written, the book brings scholarly research and geographical insights to a broad audience just as museums and sign restorations lend neon’s hidden histories wide appeal.

Kathryn Jean Edgerton-Tarpley
San Diego State University (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)

HB-272955-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

The Loss of Heaven: Changing Responses to Famine from Late Imperial to Maoist China

Research and writing leading to a book on state responses to famine in China, 1800-1976.

My book project maps changing Chinese responses to calamity by employing case studies of three major famines that struck North China under governments with very different ideological foundations. Because the prospect of fellow humans starving to death is so disturbing, famines generate intense discussion of a given culture’s ultimate values. Yet conceptions of what ethical responses to famine entail are neither static nor universal. China experienced radical change between the late-Qing (1800-1912), Republican (1912-49) and Maoist (1949-76) periods. I examine how such change impacted state and societal responses to the North China Famine of 1876-79, the Henan Famine of 1942-43, and the Great Leap Famine of 1958-62. I find that in twentieth-century China, the rejection of long-held cosmological interpretations of famine made it easier for the state to engineer disasters in the name of a supposedly greater good, and harder for leaders to accept blame for and relieve calamities.

Dior Konate
South Carolina State University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-4427)

HB-272999-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2022

Constructing Death: Capital Punishment in Colonial Senegal

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of capital punishment in Colonial Senegal between the 1820s and the 1960s.

Introduced in Senegal in 1824, capital punishment was a key element in the mechanism of colonial repression. Yet, it was not enforced until 1899 when the first public guillotine execution took place in Saint-Louis, the colony’s administrative capital, thus setting in motion the machinery of death. This book investigates the history of capital punishment in Senegal from the 1820s to the 1960s by exploring the role it played to mete out punishment and to maintain law and order. It also analyses its role in citizenship building to unlock the multiple and complex determinants in its practice. Its main objective is to analyze the evolution of capital punishment and its impact on the development of the colonial state by highlighting the construction of death sentences and what it reveals about the French’s concerns with citizenship building. The book will contribute to the scholarship on colonialism and punishment in colonial Africa and enhance the global debates about capital punishment.

Teresa Fiore
Montclair State University (Montclair, NJ 07043-1624)

HB-273184-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021

Memoria Presente: The Common Spanish Legacy in Italian and Latin American Cultures

A course revision project resulting in a digital repository of materials to facilitate cultural comparison in Italian language instruction for Spanish speakers and oral testimonies of Italian-Latino/a bicultural identity.

The project Memoria Presente (i.e., “present memory”, which translates into the same expression in both Spanish and Italian) proposes the expansion of an existing course, “Italian for Spanish Speakers,” to include advanced-level humanities content and a preliminary set of oral histories. The project leverages the cultural commonalities between Italy and Latin America as the result of shared colonial and migratory experiences which have affected numerous aspects of life. The goal is to organize materials from interdisciplinary sources that connect the linguistic and cultural experiences of Italy, Spain and Latin America and embed them in an advanced class so that Hispanic students can become further aware of trans-national affiliations rooted in a common past, and develop tri-lingualism and tri-culturalism through an accelerated path. A second goal is seeding a digital repository with resources that can be useful to other teachers for both existing classes and new extensions.

Ofosuwa M. Abiola
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

HB-273227-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Unwitting Witnesses: Unearthing Narratives of African Dance in Pre-Colonial Logs

Archival research leading to a book about dance in West Africa prior to 1880.

"Unwitting Witnesses: Unearthing Narratives of African Dance in Pre-Colonial Logs," explores cultural and ideological narratives embedded in African dance and inadvertently documented by travelers to the Senegambia region of West Africa prior to 1880. The project’s methodology utilizes primary sources including government report logs, diaries, surveyor’s reports, journals, and missionary reports, among others, to analyze the conveyance of ideological and cultural tenets through African dance during the pre-colonial period. These primary sources are typically not consulted for research on African dance history. Yet, they contain a plethora of unknown and under-researched information. Full-time funding for 3 months to travel to The Gambia to consult these and other primary sources at The Gambian National Archives, and for conducting research in the Library of Congress in Washington, DC is requested. The final outcome of the project will be a monograph published in an academic press.

Mary Elizabeth Turner
Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, FL 32307-3102)

HB-273355-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 4/30/2022

A History of African American Theatre Through the Lens of "Black Masks" Publication, 1984–2020

Preparation for publication of a book about African American theater and Black Masks magazine (1984-2020), which will include essays about significant African American administrators, playwrights, actors, directors, and designers.

The book I propose, "A History of African American Theatre Through the Lens of 'Black Masks' Publication, 1984–2020, will be an historical overview of the disciplines in Black theatre, told through the life stories of their respective African American theatre practitioners: administrators, playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. I will write an original essay for each chapter, providing historical context and addressing some of the challenges particular to each discipline. Each of the five chapters will also contain selected original biographical articles about significant Black theatre professionals in the discipline. These will be drawn from the archives of "Black Masks" magazine, my 35-year old publication on the Black performing arts. The articles, based on firsthand interviews, will be arranged chronologically within each chapter. Ultimately, the book will be a vibrant, discipline by discipline chronicle of Black theatre through the lives of those who lived it.

Zachary Brittsan
Texas Tech University System (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)

HB-273356-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Trying Modernity: Murder and Justice in Mexico’s Age of Conflict, 1848-1871

Research and writing leading to a book on the evolution of legal culture in Mexico between 1848 and 1871.

By examining hundreds of wrongful death investigations in nineteenth-century Jalisco, Trying Modernity captures how witnesses and alleged criminals drew from their life experiences, cultural foundations, and legal understandings to acquit themselves in the courtroom. In part, such testimonies tell us something about how everyday members of civil society understood and asserted their rights. Plotting the trajectory of these frequently unlettered voices across gender, racial, and social lines also reveals their active engagement with the contentious language deployed by lettered judges, defense attorneys, and journalists. The quiet battle of words in the courtroom, too often overshadowed by the overt violence of military conflict and civil war in midcentury Mexico, ultimately shaped a cultural consensus in 1871 that would be foundational for both the authoritarian peace of the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship and notions of citizenship and criminality that extend into the present.

Thomas Ort
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)

HB-273359-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

The Afterlife of a Death: Meaning, Memory, and the Assassination of Reinhard Heydrich

Research and writing leading to a book on the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942), Nazi governor to Bohemia and Moravia and an architect of the Final Solution.

The May 1942 assassination in Prague of Reinhard Heydrich—the second highest ranking official of the Nazi SS, one of the principal architects of the Final Solution, and the governor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia—was one of the boldest acts of resistance in World War II. It was also one of the most controversial in that it precipitated horrific mass reprisals that led to the deaths of approximately 5,000 people. The Afterlife of a Death explores the curious transformation in the Czech lands of the memory of the killing of Heydrich. Whereas in 1942 and for years thereafter the assassination was widely understood as a reckless and ill-conceived endeavor, by the 1990s it came to be celebrated as the single most important act of Czech resistance. This book project traces the shifts in its interpretation under Nazi, Communist, and liberal democratic rule, suggesting that what is commonly termed “memory” is better understood as the social framework of meaning.

Costanza Gislon Dopfel
St. Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA 94575-2715)

HB-273416-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 7/31/2021

The Impact of Plague Mortality and Demographic Depression on the Arts of Early Renaissance Florence

Research and writing leading to a book on the connection between the Black Death and the origins of the Italian Renaissance.

The project explores the relationship between epidemics and artistic production in 15th century Italy. Its goal is to understand how the horror of recurring plagues fueled the exceptional intellectual and artistic energy of the Renaissance. The focus is on Florence, as its responses to pandemics are particularly well documented. Paradoxically, as the town braced itself every ten years for a new plague event and faced the threat of societal extinction, it also became the center of artistic innovation. The study suggests an innovative approach that analyzes how art mediates and reflects modifications of social behavior as a response to stress and population decline. The link between human and intellectual fertility unveils not only a connection between female reproductive duties and the iconography of childbirth, but also between art, literature and the public trauma caused by depopulation.

Megan DeVirgilis
Morgan State University (Baltimore, MD 21251-0001)

HB-273443-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 7/31/2022

The Female Vampire in Hispanic Short Fiction at the Turn of the 20th Century: A Critical Anthology

Writing and translation activities culminating in a critical anthology of Latin American short stories exhibiting Gothic aesthetics.

My project will be a critical anthology on the female vampire in 19th- and early 20th-century Hispanic short fiction. Through transatlantic, historical, and feminist interpretive frameworks, my critical introduction will contextualize Latin American and Spanish Gothic-inspired, female-vampire stories in relation to the greater European Gothic tradition. In particular, it will synthesize and expound upon existing scholarship on the lesser or unknown works of established authors, such as Leopoldo Lugones and Carmen de Burgos. It will thus be a revision of my dissertation, “Blood Disorders: A Transatlantic Study of the Vampire as an Expression of Ideological, Political, and Economic Tensions in Late 19th and Early 20th Century Hispanic Short Fiction,” which focused on both male and female vampires. The majority of the project will be dedicated to translating their stories to English, a task that would introduce these texts into the Eurocentric field of Gothic Studies for the first time.

Kency Cornejo, PhD
Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)

HB-273461-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Contemporary Art of El Salvador, 1977-2018

Research and writing leading to a book about contemporary art in El Salvador and its US-based diaspora, from 1977 to 2018.

Contemporary Art of El Salvador, 1977-2018 will be the first art historical book to research forty years of art from El Salvador and its US-based diaspora. The time frame covers prewar, civil war, and post-war periods which led to waves of migration to the U.S. and a reputation as the most dangerous country in the Americas. Simultaneously, artistic production reached unprecedented growth leading to decades of art that gained international attention but have yet to be critically researched. How did the social-historical context lead to experimentation in art that responds to violence, memory, migration, and diaspora? I argue it is through art production that Salvadoran artists counter the narratives of death, poverty, and victimhood that dominate popular opinion about the smallest country in the isthmus and reveal the creative resilience of humanity. It contributes to the humanities by analyzing how artists use creativity to document and theorize global phenomena across borders.

Bianca Premo
Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

HB-273481-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 4/30/2022

The Smallest Subject: History, Science and Peru's Youngest Mother in the World

Research and writing leading to a book on the popular and scientific media coverage of Lina Medina, the youngest mother in the world, in mid-twentieth century Peru.

In 1939, Lina Medina, from a desert pueblo in the foothills of the Andes, delivered a healthy baby boy in Lima, Peru. She was five years old. The Smallest Subject is the first scholarly study of the girl still known as the youngest mother in the world. But this is not a simple history of Lina Medina. Sensitive to how she was objectified as well as protected by medical experts, state officials, curiosity-seekers and the press, The Smallest Subject focuses precisely on that protection by means of objectification. Drawing from a wide range of sources including the popular and medical press, oral interviews, state and charitable institutional records, medical studies of precocious puberty and international conventions concerting female adolescence, the book shows how Lina’s young, non-white body was a repository for the development of contradictory modern ethical standards concerning research with vulnerable subjects.

Michael Cucher
University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus (San Juan, PR 00931)

HB-273505-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$22,500 (approved)
$22,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 4/30/2022

Boychiks and Boricuas: Representations of Jewish Masculinity in the Literature of the Puerto Rican Diaspora

Research and writing resulting in an article examining representations of Jewish masculinity in the work of three Puerto-Rican American authors.

In the spirit of the NEH Special Initiative “A More Perfect Union,” this peer-reviewed article will investigate the “modern, pluralistic society” of the United States through three Puerto Rican authors who represent Jewish masculinity in their works. Each author represents a specific relationship to the Puerto Rican diaspora from the early 20th century to the present. Arturo Schomburg, Piri Thomas, and Aurora Levins Morales use representations of Jewish manliness to explore issues from upward social mobility and spirituality to diaspora and nationalism. Some of these representations reflect conflicts between Puerto Ricans and Jewish people. Others reference historical examples – or dreams of a future – in which these communities work together. My thesis is that some representations of Jewish men in Latinx literature help readers to reimagine U.S. models of masculinity as opportunities for cooperation, generosity, and compassion rather than contests for supremacy and domination.

Keith Douglas Revell
Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

HB-273518-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

Reinventing the Consumer City: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of Miami Beach, 1915-2000

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of Miami Beach, tracing its evolution as a consumer city and the implications for understanding the development of urban spaces.

Scholars and policymakers recognize that advanced urban economies have shifted from industry to services, but they have not yet understood that cities are becoming primarily sites of consumption. This NEH Award will allow me to spend a year writing the first book-length study of a modern consumer city – Miami Beach, Florida: an urban area devoted to consumption, leisure, and recreation which thrives by appealing predominantly to consumers rather than business or labor. I will use my skills as a historian to demonstrate that the defining feature of the modern consumer city is the struggle to sustain a collective urban leisure experience (symbiosis) against the tendency of capital investment to privatize urban space (enclosure). By identifying the modern consumer city as a distinctive urban form, my book will help scholars, policymakers, and historic preservation advocates protect the cultural heritage of our cities while rendering them more sustainable economically and environmentally.

Benjamin Patrick Breen
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

HB-273539-21
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$32,500 (approved)
$32,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Experimental Drugs, Cold War Science, and the Future That Never Arrived, 1945-1965

Writing leading to a book on scientific and social scientific experimentation with mind- or body-altering drugs during the postwar era (1945-1965).

During the period between 1945 and 1965, some of the world’s leading scientists grew convinced that a newly-developed constellation of experimental drugs could help reshape postwar society. These substances (synthetic hormones, psychedelics like LSD, and sedatives used in a novel form of therapy called narcosynthesis) occupied an entirely new technological category. Unlike, say, penicillin, these new treatments didn’t just cure diseases — they held out the promise of enlarging the very boundaries of the human. It was a utopian future that never arrived. In its place came the past that we now remember: transformative pills refigured either as prosaic “mother’s little helpers” or as stigmatized drugs; the ploughshares of an idealistic postwar moment beaten back into swords. The proposed book is a history of this largely forgotten era of experimental drug research: the ambitious visions that energized it, the reasons that it failed, and the lessons it holds for today.

Kristina Lynn Richardson
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)

HB-267428-20
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021

Stranger Studies: 'Gypsies' and Race-Making in the Premodern Middle East

Research and writing leading to a book about Roma language and culture in the premodern Middle East.

Historians of the Roma (Gypsies) work under the assumption that the earliest written records about their subject were produced by fifteenth-century non-Roma in Europe and the Ottoman Empire. My recent work identifies the classical Arabic term for Roma and Roma-affiliated wandering groups as Strangers (ghuraba') and uses this ethnonym as an entry into the reconstruction of the community’s medieval languages and its material and intellectual cultures. This new transhistorical and transregional discipline—which I call Stranger Studies—will generate a full reimagination of the make-up of Central Asian, Middle Eastern, North African, and European societies.

Elizabeth S. Manley
Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125-1056)

HB-267485-20
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$55,000 (approved)
$55,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021

Imagining the Tropics: Women, the Professionalization of Caribbean Tourism, and the Conjuring of Island Fantasy, 1890 - 1980

Research and writing leading to a book on women’s role in the development of the Caribbean tourism industry during the 20th century.

I am applying for a 12-month award (full funding for summer 2020 and spring 2021 and three-fourths funding for fall 2020) to complete the final three chapters of a proposed book entitled Imagining the Tropics: Women, the Professionalization of Caribbean Tourism, and the Conjuring of Island Fantasy 1890 – 1980. The book addresses women’s roles in Caribbean tourism development across the twentieth century. The award will facilitate the second stage of the project, including completion of research (3 months) and writing (9 months). While often neglected in the historical narrative, my research reveals that women were crucial to the development of Caribbean tourism. Imagining the Tropics complicates a history that views modern tourism as a predominantly male-constructed fantasy, clarifies the mechanisms that built Caribbean visions of tropical escape, and frames a regional approach that highlights the incredible impact of women – Caribbean and otherwise – on this ever-expanding industry.

Mary Barr
Kentucky State University (Frankfort, KY 40601-2355)

HB-267551-20
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/30/2021

Housing Discrimination in Chicago's Northern Suburbs, 1853-1966

Research and writing a book on the history of the North Shore Summer Project, a 1965 collaboration between civil rights groups and women’s organizations in Chicago’s northern suburbs working to address housing discrimination in those communities.

In this book project, I recount the little-known but significant story of the 1965 North Shore Summer Project (NSSP). Through the joint efforts of suburban housewives and established civil rights organizations, the summer project sought to expose and defy housing discrimination in eight suburbs collectively referred to as Chicago’s North Shore. NSSP was modeled after the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project, a voting rights campaign, and is possibly the only white protest consciously patterned after southern black models. It was the first direct action civil rights movement in a suburban area. Even though the campaign fell short of its hoped-for impact, it paved the way for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1966 Chicago Freedom Movement.

David Frederic Overstreet
College of Menominee Nation (Keshena, WI 54135-1179)

HB-267584-20
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021

Seeking Kiash Matchitiwuk (The Ancient Ones)-The Menominee Struggle for Ethnic Identity

Writing an archeological monograph describing the pre-history of the Menominee nation of northern Wisconsin.

Vintage archaeological investigations on the Menominee reservation in northeastern Wisconsin linked the resident population to local prehistoric sites, a construct that supported oral traditions and the Menominee creation narrative. The tribe has been historically associated with wild rice harvesting as their Algonquian-derived name implies. By the turn of the 21st century this traditional framework was challenged by a new paradigm stating their claimed homeland may have been elsewhere, but retained their purported life-ways as hunters and gatherers. Multidisciplinary research by the Menominee tribe utilized archaeology, ethno-history, soil science, oral traditions, agronomy, and geography to construct a new paradigm in support of its traditional ethnic identity and culture history. The new model moves the Menominee tribe across history’s doorstep into the past they claim, but with a previously unrecognized adaptation of sustainable organic agriculture.