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HB-262377-19

Peter A. Kopp
New Mexico State University, Las Cruces (Las Cruces, NM 88003)

Horticulturalist Fabián García (1817-1947) and the Modernization of Agriculture along the US-Mexican Border

Research and writing a biography of Fabián Garcia (1871-1947), a horticulturalist and instructor at New Mexico State University.

I am writing a book on Fabián García (1871-1947), a horticulturist whose work transformed the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and, indeed, the world, by introducing new commercial crops to consumers. García was born in Chihuahua, Mexico, but immigrated to New Mexico and became a U.S. citizen just before attending college and beginning his career as a professional horticulturist. He earned fame for hybridizing a relatively mild and easily canned chile pepper that launched a global chile industry. Yet, his life and legacy extends beyond this one plant. By writing this book for a general audience, my aim is to highlight a variety of historical issues that are relevant to the world we live in today. I want to connect foods we eat to their agricultural origins, while also demonstrating the ways that ethnicity, race, and racism frame these stories. In an era of unprecedented global warming, the book will also consider historically how horticulturists help desert-dwellers adapt to aridity.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; History of Science; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/10/2021


HB-262532-19

Elaine Fleming
Leech Lake Tribal College (Cass Lake, MN 56633-0180)

Women of Leech Lake Nation Stories: Historical Trauma and Colonization

Collection and publication of historical narratives by Ojibwe women of the Leech Lake Nation in northern Minnesota.

This project proposes to address gaps in historical literature regarding the Leech Lake Nation in northern Minnesota. Little has been written about the Nation's history, and the impact of historical events on Leech Lake Nation's land, people, and culture. The project will create a book relating historical events and stories from families impacted by those events as recounted through the eyes of Ojibwe women, the keepers of the family's health and well being. The book will be written in the style of traditional Ojibwe storytelling and used to increase understanding of the changing historical role of Ojibwe women; the effect of historic trauma and its subsequent symptoms of loss on indigenous people; and to enhance education.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-262224-19

Katie Kapurch
Texas State University - San Marcos (San Marcos, TX 78666-4684)

Blackbird Singing: A Cultural History of African-American Musical Conversations with the Beatles

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about African American reception of the Beatles, from the late 1960s to the present.

Blackbird Singing: Black America Remixes the Beatles presents a cultural history of African-Americans’ musical conversations with the Beatles from the late 1960s to today. To date, no academic or trade book has offered a comprehensive view of this particular interracial dialogue, which informs the story of American popular music, especially mid-twentieth century rock ‘n’ roll, and, broadly, the study of American culture. My historically situated close readings show how black artists are simultaneously listeners and creators, because ignoring their roles as audiences in the global economy of the music marketplace marginalizes them in the cultural history of American popular song. Blackbird Singing is also unique in its transdisciplinary and multi-genre investigation of American music from the 1960s to today, which makes the monograph relevant to diverse and multigenerational readers in the reading public, as well as scholars and students of culture, music, and history.

Project fields:
American Studies; Media Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


HB-262280-19

Deanna Koretsky
Spelman College (Atlanta, GA 30314-4399)

British Literature, Suicide, and the Bounds of Liberalism in the Romantic Era

Completion of a book-length project on political and literary relationships between British Romanticism, suicide, the transatlantic slave trade.

This monograph traces the racialized antecedents of a well-known figure in British Romantic literature, the melancholy genius who dies by suicide. The project demonstrates how Romantic-era writers also used the idea of suicide to interrogate the roots of racial inequality based in liberal political philosophies. Individual chapters investigate the period's notions of property, personhood, citizenship, and sympathy in works by canonical and lesser-known writers of African and European descent, including Thomas Day and John Bicknell, Olaudah Equiano, Mary and Percy Shelley, William Wordsworth, William Wells Brown, and James Williams. This will be the first monograph focused on the Romantic period within a growing bibliography on the history of suicide and its role in political discourses.

Project fields:
African American Studies; British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


HB-262298-19

Anna Insolio Corwin, PhD
Saint Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA 94575-2715)

Holding the Hand of God: ‘Successful Aging’ in A Catholic Convent

Writing of a study of Catholic nuns as they confront issues related to aging and the end of life.

Epidemiological research has found that Catholic nuns experience greater physical and psychological health outcomes than their peers. Nuns not only experience longer lives than their contemporaries, they also experience greater physical health and psychological health outcomes as they age. The proposed book focuses on the everyday lives of nuns to explore how prayer and social support shape the nuns’ experiences of aging, uncovering how everyday social interactions shape how these exemplars of ‘successful aging’ approach pain, illness, and the process of growing older. Through linguistic analysis of social interactions in the convent, the research illuminates how the nuns’ interactions with the divine and with each other promote the physical and psychological health benefits they experience as they age, ultimately finding that the nuns uphold a model of aging that encourages an acceptance of decline, and an ideology of aging that contrasts with the successful aging paradigm.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Linguistic Anthropology

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 1/31/2020


HB-262738-19

Sandra Zalman
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

Monuments to Modernism: Museums of Modern Art and the Contest for Cultural Space

Preparation for publication of a book about the relationship between four museums in New York City—the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Gallery of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art—that shaped debates about modernism from 1959 to 1966.

In 1961, Art in America's special issue posed the question "What Should a Museum Be?" As arts administrators grappled with the role of the museum in contemporary life, they increasingly turned to design to make the case that museums were no longer repositories of venerated objects, but sites of cultural discourse. My book project analyzes how four prominent museums in New York City negotiated this increasingly politicized terrain, as they marshaled innovative architecture to forge competing versions of modern art for public consumption between 1959 and 1966. With chapters focusing on the Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Gallery of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, I investigate how museums expanded their visibility in the urban fabric while historicizing recent art – not as esoteric or obscure, but as a tool that had the potential to advance cultural agendas amidst the socio-political turmoil of the 1950 and 60s.

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; Cultural History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HB-262749-19

Yiman Wang
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

Cross-Media World in a Segregationist Era: Chinese-American Actress Anna May Won (1905-1961)

Preparation for publication of an open access digital publication about Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1905-1961).

This is the first book-length study to focus on the cross-media performances of Anna May Wong—a pioneering Chinese-American actress who forged a transnational career prior to the Civil Rights Movement. Grounded in my eight-year multi-continental archival research, this book answers a pressing question: how might a marginalized ethnic performer, despite her precarious citizenship status due to the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, instigate a race-gender-informed rethinking of Euro-American film/media history, and resist social injustices through performances and audience engagement? Foregrounding Wong’s perseverant labor as an actress and an anti-Fascist activist, this book retools glamor-based star studies as performer-worker studies to illuminate contributions rendered by women, minorities and all those considered “minor” players in dominant media and society. This book speaks to humanities and social sciences engagement with (post)coloniality, citizenship, precarious labor, and agency.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HB-262811-19

Courtnay Micots
Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, FL 32307-3102)

Kakaamotobe: The 20th-Century History and Culture of Fancy Dress Carnival in Ghana

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about the history and culture of Kakaamotobe, a West African carnival, from 1899 to the present.

Kakaamotobe, or Fancy Dress, is a lively carnival that has been performed in southern Ghana, West Africa, for more than a century, yet few scholars have analyzed this vibrant and engaging art form. The purpose of this project is to complete the first book on West African carnival. Fancy Dress is significant as an art form that blends local and foreign performance traditions to express public commentary on pop culture; social and cultural mores; and local, national and international politics and economy. A vital creative expression of the lower classes, the carnival is both comedic entertainment and a necessary regenerative force in Ghanaian culture. I will combine extensive field research gathered over nine years with secondary sources in art history, history, culture and politics in order to situate this artistic practice across Ghana and in comparison with other Black Atlantic carnivalesque traditions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African Studies; Art History and Criticism; Cultural History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


HB-262907-19

Sandra M. Deutsch
University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)

Engendering Antifascism: The Argentine Victory Board in Transnational and Comparative Perspective, 1930-1946

A book-length study about the Victory Board, a pro-democracy women's organization in Argentina during World War II.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Political History; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-263082-19

Nathaniel Enon Cadle
Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

American Literature, the Romantic Revival, and the Rise of Modernism

Preparation for publication of a book about the relationship between U.S. literary modernism and the Romantic Revival (c. 1880-1920), with consideration of works by Edith Wharton, Henry James, and W.E.B. Du Bois.

At the end of the nineteenth century, an unexpected resurgence of widespread interest in supposedly old-fashioned romantic fiction occurred. Historical, sensational, sentimental, and utopian romances suddenly displaced realistic novels in popular magazines and on bestseller lists. Critics have long dismissed this “Romantic Revival,” yet several important authors, including Edith Wharton, Henry James, and W.E.B. Du Bois, embraced it, using the distant settings and fantastic plots of these various genres in innovative ways. My project surveys the Romantic Revival as an important literary movement that enabled particularly skillful writers to push the boundaries of their fiction and move beyond the empiricism of Realism into the uncertainties of Modernism. In short, I argue that the Romantic Revival played a significant role in the emergence of Modernism in the United States.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HB-263199-19

Laurie Avant Woodard
CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)

A Real Negro Girl: Fredi Washington and the Politics of Performance during the New Negro Renaissance.

Research and writing a biography of Fredi Washington (1903-1994), a civil rights activist and a performing artist active in the Harlem Renaissance.

Focusing upon the life and career of performing artist and civil rights activist Fredi Washington, this project places an African American female performing artist at the center of the narrative of the New Negro Renaissance; illuminates the vital influence of performing artists on the movement; and demonstrates the ways in which Washington and the New Negro Renaissance are central components of the long civil rights narrative and our understanding of the African American quest for civil and human rights. The manuscript will consist of six chapters and a prologue and epilogue.

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HB-263188-19

Jody Arthur Benjamin
University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

The Texture of Change; Cloth, Commerce and History in Western Africa, 1700-1850

A book-length study about the history of textile commerce and consumption in western Africa during the 18th and 19th centuries.

The Texture of Change re-examines social and economic change of the 18th and early 19th centuries across a broad region of western Africa from Senegal to Sierra Leone through its history of textile commerce and consumption. Historiographical debates for this region have obscured full consideration of the multiple ways west African societies engaged global exchange beyond Atlantic slaving. This research illuminates Africans’ varied engagements with a major trade that was effectively global in scale. It argues that they were critical actors during this period of global integration — contributing in their own right to the birth of the modern era. Far from being driven solely by external demands for labor or raw commodities, this process was heavily influenced by local conditions and patterns of social and market relations. This study offers insights into a diverse array of historical actors across ethnic, religious and imperial lines in western Africa.

Project fields:
African History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


HB-263332-19

Krista Margaret Johnson
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

The End of Exceptionalism: African Americans Theorizing Race and Imperialism in South Africa and Beyond

A book-length study about the South African writings of Ralph Bunche (1904-1971) and Merze Tate (1905-1996), two major figures of African American intellectual life in the 20th century.

Project fields:
African American History; African History; African Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-263378-19

Shelley Elaine Roff
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

Treasure of the City: The Public Sphere and Civic Urbanism in Late Medieval Barcelona

A book-length study of architecture, urban development, and the emerging public sphere in Barcelona between 1350 and 1450 CE.

Treasure of the City is a book-length study that illustrates the transformative role the construction of public works, monuments and urban spaces played in the crystallization of municipal power and an emerging public sphere in late medieval Barcelona. The nascent city council’s quest for the right to tax trade as a form of income to fund public construction required negotiation with aristocratic and religious authorities, a dynamic and contentious conversation that led to the municipal government’s empowerment and to a commercial revolution in the city.

Project fields:
Architecture; Medieval History; Urban Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-257540-18

Margaret D. Garber
California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA 92831-3599)

The Literary Transformation of Alchemy, Chemistry, and Medicine in an Early European Scientific Journal

A book about the first journal of science of the 17th- and 18th-century Habsburg Empire.

“Domesticating Curiosities” is a book project that examines the first journal of science, in the Habsburg Empire, The Miscellany of Curiosities, produced by the understudied Academy of Curiosi. The project explains how this journal transformed the human interest in natural curiosities into standardized experimental science. While much literature on French and English luminaries of early science exists, this project will support the first long-term study on the Academy of Curiosi. It proposes to show how this vast Continental network of local, regional and court physicians, who claimed alchemical and medical expertise, played a crucial role in establishing the sciences of chemistry and chemical medicine in the German territories. In exploring the historical roots of emerging experimental fields of chemical sciences the project offers an illuminating case study about how the transformative potential of this new literary genre shaped the relationship between humans and the natural world.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; Renaissance History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-257679-18

Charissa Joy Threat
Chapman University (Orange, CA 92866-1099)

Race, Gender, and African American Pin-up Girls during World War II

Research and writing of a scholarly article about efforts to collect pin-up photographs of African American women and distribute them to African American soldiers during World War II.

Project fields:
African American History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-257685-18

Julia Ornelas-Higdon
California State University, Channel Islands (Camarillo, CA 93012-8599)

Race, Labor, and the Industrialization of California Wine, 1769-1920

A book-length study of the history of winemaking in California from 1769 to 1920 with emphasis on labor relations during the Spanish colonial, Mexican national, and U.S. eras.

Project fields:
Labor History; Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HB-258191-18

Catherine Komisaruk
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

Gender, Migration, and Native Uprisings in New Spain, 1519-1821

A book that examines native uprisings and political activism in Mexico and Guatemala from the 16th to the 19th centuries.

This book project takes a new approach to the history of native communities in Mexico and Guatemala during the colonial era (ca. 1519-1821). Foregrounding gender, the analysis uncovers previously unrecognized patterns in native labor, migration, and legal and political activism. It shows that colonial demands and changing demographics transformed migration patterns as well as native family structures across the centuries of Spanish rule. Indigenous individuals confronted these changes with strategies that varied by gender. Yet both men and women often sought to preserve families, ethnic affiliations, and forms of native sovereignty. For scholars and college students, the book will deepen knowledge about the survival of native societies in the Americas and in the larger Atlantic World. The project also speaks to broader current concerns, as it demonstrates colonial-era origins of today’s migrations across cultural and national borders.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American History; Native American Studies; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HB-258195-18

Robert Lawrence Gunn
University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)

Literature, Timekeeping, and the Production of Space in Early Western North America

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on how European and Native inhabitants of the American West kept track of time during the 17th to 19th centuries.

In case studies spanning from the 17th to the 19th centuries, American Horologics examines the relationship of multiple time-keeping practices to literary and storytelling form in the context of a shifting tableau of encounter and conflict between Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. peoples in the western North American borderlands. Throughout, I argue that changing technologies of time-keeping and differing standards of temporal experience organized competing regional conceptions of western spaces and of the peoples who inhabited them. While scholars have explored the social, economic, and cultural transformation that the standardization of time and synchronized time-keeping brought about in the latter half of the 19th Century, little attention has been paid to local, culturally-specific forms of nonstandardized time orientation and their relation to imaginary projections of national space across the contested geographies of the American west prior to the U.S./Mexico War.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 5/31/2019


HB-258214-18

Irfana Mohayuddin Hashmi
Whittier College (Whittier, CA 90601-4446)

The Cosmopolitan World of Learning at al-Azhar, an Islamic School in Cairo, 14th to 17th Centuries

A book investigating the social practices and material culture at al-Azhar, an Islamic center of learning in Cairo, from the 14th to the 17th centuries.

Founded in 972 in Cairo, al-Azhar is the leading religious authority for Sunni Islam. My book is a cultural biography of al-Azhar from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries, a formative 250-year period, which straddles Egypt’s Mamluk and Ottoman eras. It investigates the complex interplay between the social structures and material culture that scaffolded Islamic learning at al-Azhar (from the rise of fraternities to lockers) and the social practices performed by people in day-to-day life that gave structure and meaning to its rich landscape. Scholarly consensus asserts that al-Azhar rose in prominence as an Islamic center of learning in the sixteenth century. The project reformulates the problématique of al-Azhar’s rise into an investigation of the transition of the Arab provinces to Ottoman rule, specifically the effect of the new administration on educational institutions. It combines sources in Arabic and Ottoman Turkish, including untapped Ottoman court records.

Project fields:
Area Studies; History of Religion; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 5/31/2019


HB-257251-18

Sonja Stephenson Watson
University of Texas, Arlington (Arlington, TX 76019-9800)

Globalization, Transculturation, and Hybrid Identity in Panamanian Music: Reggae en Español

Preparation of a book-length study of the musical genre reggae en español and national and black identity in Panama, 1970s to the present.

Research on Panama has primarily focused on the Canal and the United States’ relationship to the construction of the “eighth wonder of the modern world.” The Canal brought to Panama not only international recognition but also thousands of black English-speaking laborers from Jamaica and Barbados. West Indian workers labored on the Canal, made Panama their permanent home, and in turn transformed the ethnic, racial, and linguistic composition of the nation. This project inserts black West Indian heritage into the Panamanian nation-state by analyzing the emergence and continuing influence of a black musical genre (reggae en español) as emblematic of national identity in Panama. Specifically, it interrogates Panamanian reggae en español artists’ engagement with the Panamanian nation-state and their articulation of national and black identity in a nation with a long history of exclusion of blacks.

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$8,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


HB-257235-18

William Conrad Corley, Jr
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Pomona, CA 91768-2557)

The Voice of the Veteran in 18th- and 19th-Century American Literature

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on depictions of war veterans in American literature of the 18th and 19th centuries.

This project provides a genealogy of veteran depictions in literature by popular and influential American authors, most of whom are not themselves veterans, because the trope of the veteran as it has developed in American history, literature, and culture is the product of many intersecting forces and constituencies. This genealogy reveals how the type of knowledge and authority attributed to veterans has shifted over time, with varying effects on the perceptions of veterans and the ability of veterans to participate in the public sphere through writing. Over the course of the nineteenth century, veteran characters become the locus for a particular form of authoritative knowledge that is both empirical and revelatory, but the possession of such knowledge comes to be seen in the post-bellum period as exceeding human capacity, thus leading either to the death or silencing of the veteran.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HB-257369-18

Leena Dallasheh
Humboldt State University (Arcata, CA 95521-8299)

Contested Citizenship: Nazareth’s Palestinians in the Transition from British Mandate to Israel, 1940-1966

A book that chronicles the political history of the city of Nazareth, Israel’s only all-Arab city, from the 1940s through the 1960s.

I will complete a book manuscript tracing Palestinian local politics and identity formation in British-ruled Palestine and in Israel as two parts of a single story of transition, thus bridging the historiographic rupture of 1948. It focuses on Nazareth, a Palestinian city that was already an important center during the Mandate and became Israel’s only all-Arab city and primary urban center for its Palestinian citizens. Drawing on archival research in Arabic, Hebrew, and English-language sources, I show how Palestinians built on strategies they developed during the Mandate to assert their collective rights as a national group within Israel. I study the interactions between local politics and the colonial state in the context of global decolonization in the mid-20th century, highlighting how Palestinian political strategies were shaped by the realities of colonialism: both colonial states’ policies and Palestinians’ understanding of their political possibilities as a colonized group.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


HB-257740-18

Valerian Three Irons
Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College (New Town, ND 58763-0490)

Online Database of Mandan, a Native American Language

The collection of multimedia materials and creation of an open-access online archive of the Native American language Mandan.

This one-year research project will gather all extant video, audio and textual documentation of the Mandan language from a number of archives in the United States for the purpose of creating a comprehensive, online database, Mandan Community Archives, which will be a vital language resource freely accessible to the public. My work will also consist of creating a list of unrecorded words in Mandan to be added to the Mandan Community Archives.

Project fields:
Languages, Other; Native American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 5/31/2019


HB-257867-18

Andras Kisery
CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)

Forming English Literature in the Early Modern World

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the dissemination and consumption of English literature in and beyond England during the 16th to 18th centuries.

My monograph is a study of the changing idea of English literature between the late 16th and the late 18th centuries, through the lens of the production and distribution of books and of information about books across Britain, England's colonies, and Europe. The project is based on the recognition that a reading public and its experience are shaped by where and how, through what networks of agents and what mechanisms of transmission they access their books. My aim is therefore to reveal how urban and national, colonial and international geographies impacted the mediation and perception of English literature in the key period when England rose from the cultural periphery of Europe to global significance, when literature separated from other fields of learning, and recreational reading became the repository of aesthetic value and national identity. I am requesting support for researching and drafting the second half of this project.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


HB-258040-18

Jennifer D. Williams
Morgan State University (Baltimore, MD 21251-0001)

Gender, Segregation, and Urban Life in Literature by African American Women

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on urban literature written by African American women between the Great Depression and the civil rights era.

Intimate Cities examines urban literature after the Great Depression and before the civil rights movement in order to demonstrate the ways that black women’s imaginative claims to the city betray a longing for freedom and full access to American citizenship. Black women’s urban narratives complicate spatial divisions, such as those between home and the street or spaces of privacy and sociality. Indeed, the negotiation of urban space charted in black women’s literary and cultural texts displays a dynamic interplay among bodies, structures, and technologies. Many literary studies of American cities rest on urban crisis discourses that highlight men’s struggles to find employment, feelings of isolation, and incidents of violence and criminality. Intimate Cities refocuses the masculine, crisis centered gaze toward everyday practices of living. It also broadens the parameters of “the city” to incorporate public as well as domestic spaces.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


HB-257208-18

Etienne Helmer
University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (San Juan, PR 00925-2512)

Ancient Greek Philosophers on Economics

Preparation of a book-length study about ancient Greek philosophy and economics.

This award will support completion of research started five years ago on ancient Greek philosophers on economics, producing a scholarly book on this understudied but decisive topic. My claim is that the ancient Greek approach to economic issues is not a prescientific or immature one as it has been unduly viewed up so far, but a philosophical one, based on specific methods, problems and concepts. The purpose of the Greek philosophers on economics was to understand not only economic issues but also their significance for human life, raising questions rather than providing us with explanatory scientific tools. Ancient Greek economics was not a mere profit-oriented skill but an art and a thought dealing with the management of our needs, with all their ethical and political implications. This book will benefit both anthropological studies on ancient Greece and contemporary reflections on what economy is and means.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Economic History; History of Philosophy

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 1/31/2019


HB-251297-17

Rachel Kathleen Watson
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

Race and Forensic Science in American Literature, 1894-1959

A book-length study of the relationship between race and forensic science in American crime fiction by Mark Twain, William Faulkner, Rudolph Fisher, Richard Wright, and Chester Himes, 1890s-1950s.

Capturing the Individual argues that in crime fiction of the segregation era, forensic science takes an unexpected turn—one of undercutting the ideology of inequality that animated Jim Crow. Located in the body but independent from and even contrary to the typifying ideology of race, the “biological individual” posited by forensics ran counter to theories of black criminality and essentialist race science by depending instead upon notions of a biological equality. This book project claims that through forensic preoccupations in the crime novels of Mark Twain, Rudolph Fisher, Richard Wright, William Faulkner, and Chester Himes the humanity of the black individual is not only asserted through sentiment and psychology, but is, more radically, marked as a fact already “self-evident”—a forensic certainty that “speaks for itself.”

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Legal History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


HB-251183-17

Francis Hugh Wilford
California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

The History of the “Special Relationship” between Great Britain and the U.S. from the Colonial Era to the Present

Research for and writing of a book-length study of British-U.S. relations as viewed through family and emotional ties.

This project examines the history of the “special relationship” between Great Britain and the United States from the perspective of intimate relations. Influenced by the recent cultural and emotional turns of diplomatic history, and drawing on a wide range of historical sources and cultural texts, it examines how matters of the heart have linked – and divided – British and American men and women from the colonial era to the present. It also considers how the language and imagery of intimate affiliation – in particular, of gender, emotion, and sex – have both reflected and shaped political relations between the two English-speaking empires. By turning its focus on the personal sphere of trans-Atlantic relations, The Anglo-American Romance provides a new, critical lens for interrogating the evolution of an alliance that continues to hold tremendous global significance in the twenty-first century, for both good and ill.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British History; Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


HB-251108-17

Karen Bassi
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

Facing Death in Ancient Greek Tragedy

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on attitudes toward death in ancient Greek tragic drama.

Studies of death in Greek tragedy have a long history in Classical scholarship, complemented by anthropological and archaeological work on ancient Greek views of the afterlife, death rituals, and funerary monuments. Although the idea that Greek tragedy offers readers and viewers insight into how to live with the knowledge that they will die seems obvious, there is no sustained treatment of the ways in which tragedy both exposes and responds to the contingencies of human mortality. Imitating the Dead: Facing Death in Ancient Greek Tragedy will be the first book to make the link between these contingencies and the emergence of tragic drama in Greece. It will also be the first to bring Greek tragedy to bear on questions of prolonging life in contemporary American culture. Positioning Greek tragedy within the long history of confronting death as a "condition of national life," and intended for a broad, educated audience, the book is inspired by the NEH Initiative on the Common Good.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Classics; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


HB-251199-17

Robin Runia
Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125-1056)

Displaced Britons: Africans and Creoles in the Work of British Author Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) and her views of race and national identity.

With this reduction from my teaching load, I will complete research and write new material on Maria Edgeworth’s plays, Whim for Whim (1798) and The Two Guardians (1817). This work will comprise two chapters of the monograph, Displaced Britons. The completion of these chapters and the revision of the entire manuscript for publication submission contributes to current efforts to develop a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of race in the Atlantic world. Specifically, this project offers close and historically contextualized readings of dramatic and fictional works by the late eighteenth- early nineteenth-century Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth. Its purpose is to introduce some of Edgeworth’s largely neglected works and to correct previous and partial interpretations of some of her more well-known writing. By focusing on works that depict the practice and consequences of the British slave trade in Jamaica, this book argues that Edgeworth offers a model of inclusive national identity regardless of race.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


HB-251138-17

Lawrence A. Peskin
Morgan State University (Baltimore, MD 21251-0001)

U.S. Consuls in the Mediterranean and Latin America and the American Trading Nation, 1785-1850

Research for a history of American consuls in the Mediterranean and Latin America in the first decades after American independence.

Following recent interest in transnational contours of American history, this project examines the development of American national identity from the outside in. The applicant proposes to look at early national history through the lens of Americans living abroad -- first in the Mediterranean region and then in Latin America. The primary focus is on American consuls who sought to build up and protect new national trading networks in the wake of independence. Consuls served at the head of a developing American trading nation consisting of diplomats, merchants, naval officers, ship captains, and common mariners. They were acknowledged leaders of the American community and were treated as representatives to the federal government by other Americans. In the eyes of many non-Americans, these individuals literally represented the United States.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


HB-251153-17

Anadelia A. Romo
Texas State University - San Marcos (San Marcos, TX 78666-4684)

Race and the Art of Tourist Promotion in Bahia, Brazil: Crafting an Urban Landscape, 1900-1964

Completion of a book-length study of how promotion of tourism forged and reinforced racial stereotypes in Bahia, Brazil, from the abolition of slavery in 1888 through the 1950s.

My project examines the reinvention of a former sugar zone in Brazil’s Northeast and probes how the promotion of tourism forged and reinforced racial stereotypes in the aftermath of abolition. To do this I turn to sources neglected by historians: illustrated tourist guides for Brazil’s colonial capital of Salvador, Bahia, written from the 1920s through the 1950s. I show how the budding tourism industry of this era developed a distinctive iconography that placed Afro-Bahians as central to the city’s landscape, an apparently inclusive visual culture that worked well with Brazil’s promotion of itself as a racial democracy. Yet I argue that the intersection of tourism and a new visual landscape of the city shaped and consolidated pernicious stereotypes of blackness and exoticized visions of African culture that continue to dominate the visual culture of the city today. I am seeking an NEH grant for a year of full-time work to be able to write three central chapters of my book manuscript.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


HB-251216-17

Sandrine Sanos
Texas A & M University, Corpus Christi (Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5503)

Representations of Violence, Displacement, and Gender in Post-World War II France

Completion of a book on the cultural and intellectual history of war and violence in post-World War II France.

This book is a cultural and intellectual history of political imagination in Cold War France from 1954 to 1967. It analyzes how war, genocide and displacement shaped political ideas and cultural identities in a "postwar" time rife with conflicts in France and abroad. While in the shadow of the Holocaust, the French empire was consumed by violence--especially the bloody and brutal Algerian War of Independence. This interdisciplinary project explores how two groups (Francophone writers and artists who had migrated to France after experiencing war, genocide, or torture as well as French anti-colonial authors) proposed new ways of thinking about political community and belonging. The gendered rhetoric they used anchored their vision of politics and framed how injured and violated bodies were discussed. While most histories of the postwar tend to cast war and displacement as exceptional, this project shows how they are central to political imagination in a post-colonial global society.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Gender Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


HB-251276-17

Swati Rana
University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)

Eccentric Characters in 20th-Century Ethnic Literature

A book-length study of race and character in American ethnic literature, 1900-1960.

Retrograde Minorities studies the vexed, conservative, and recalcitrant characters that elude the oppositional framework of ethnic literary criticism, which prioritizes resistance to dominant power structures. My chapters range from Ameen Rihani’s The Book of Khalid (1911) to Paule Marshall’s Brown Girl, Brownstones (1959), including work by José Garcia Villa, José Antonio Villarreal, and Dalip Singh Saund. I develop a hermeneutic for reading the problem characters in these works across formal and social spheres, and in so doing enliven the study of race and character both. This project presents a new comparative paradigm for ethnic literature and for the neglected writings of the early twentieth century, itself a retrograde period in a field that generally privileges post-1965 works. My readings reveal a new protagonist of the American dream: the racialized minority whose retrograde disavowal of race represents a crucial archetype of American exceptionalism and postracial ideology.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HB-251279-17

Alaine Hutson
Huston-Tillotson College (Austin, TX 78702-2753)

Enslaved Africans and Balochis on the Arabian Peninsula, 1926-1938

Completion of a book on the history of slavery on the Arabian peninsula.

I will spend a year writing full-time to produce a manuscript on slavery on the Arabian Peninsula. I am asking for support for the last 7 months. In four chapters and an epilogue I will describe and analyze the lives of African and Baloch slaves including a short history of Africans’ presence in Arabia and the Makran Coast (Balochistan), an examination of slaves' specific ethnic and national origins, a description of the “seasoning” process for Arabian Peninsula slaves, an analysis of slave naming and exchanging practices, and detail of slaves’ work lives, families, and networks. This research contends that the power dynamics of slave holder-enslaved coupled with abolitionist and global economic pressures resulted in Arabian slaveholder practices and patterns that were in some ways similar to those of Atlantic slavery. This research will be disseminated as a published monograph intended for students and scholars of slavery and Middle East and South Asian Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African History; Near and Middle Eastern History; South Asian History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


HB-251102-17

Tyler Dunsdon Parry
California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA 92831-3599)

Slave Matrimony in the African Diaspora during the 18th and 19th Centuries

Completion of a history of marriage in slave communities in the Anglophone Atlantic during the 18th and 19th centuries.

"Bound in Bondage" interrogates how slave marital practices intersected with legislation, cultural practice, and political discourse in the United States and British West Indies throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. While past analyses have addressed the social, cultural, and legal dimensions of slave matrimony in specific regions, I contend that slave marriage was imbedded within transatlantic discourses that influenced the cultural and political maneuvers of both black and white people throughout the British Atlantic. My project reveals how African-descended peoples reckoned with the circumstances of slavery by creatively re-imagining various marital traditions in each Anglophone slave society. As this institution was a central factor in formulating kinship alliances throughout Western Africa, I examine how enslaved people used various marital patterns and practices to overcome the “social death” commonly associated with slavery in the Americas.

Project fields:
African American History; African History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


HB-251059-17

Mikhal Dekel, PhD
CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)

The Trail of WWII Refugees: From Poland to the Middle East

Completion of a book on Jewish refugees from Poland who fled Nazi forces and the communities in Iran and the Muslim Soviet Union that accepted them.

Of the roughly 350,000 Polish Jews who escaped genocide during WWII, approximately 230,000, two-thirds, survived as refugees in the Muslim Soviet Union--Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan--and (in smaller yet significant numbers) Iran. We do not often think of the story of the Holocaust as one of Jews surviving in Muslim lands, and we do not often think of the networks that were in place in these areas. Tehran Children tells the story of these networks and of the complex web of aid groups, conflicting and converging national interests, diplomatic maneuvers, and local attitudes towards these refugees. It studies the experience of both the refugee and the host nation; of foreign and local aid; of trans-national diplomacy; of hunger--its relief and its use as a weapon; and of memory: how refugees remember and are remembered by the Muslim nations with which they had come in contact. The book has been accepted for publication by W.W. Norton.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies; International Studies; Jewish Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


HB-251162-17

Angela Vergara-Marshall
California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)

Unemployment in 20th-Century Chile

Completion of a book on the history of unemployment in Chile from the Great Depression through the 1980s.

In this project, I examine how social, racial, and gender categories shaped public efforts to regulate the labor market and selectively protect workers facing unemployment in Chile throughout the twentieth century. I argue that traditional efforts to distinguish between vagrants and the “real” unemployed, social fears toward the non-working poor, legal definitions of formal work and people’s own expectations about work influenced the experience, protections, and rights of unemployed and non-formally employed men and women in modern Chile. More generally, I contribute to the humanities by looking at unemployment beyond exclusively class and economic analyses and outside traditional industrial countries. Using the tools of social history and based on a wide range of archival and periodical sources, I narrate the story of the unemployed and the efforts of the State to define and control the labor market in Chile from the 1930s-Great Depression to the Debt/Oil crisis of the early 1980s.

Project fields:
Labor History; Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


HB-232147-16

Ameenah Shakir
Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, FL 32307-3102)

Helen Dickens and Medical Activism in Philadelphia, 1935-1980

Writing and additonal research for a book about the medical activism of Helen Dickens during the years of 1935 to 1980.

I am applying for a twelve month grant for full funding to complete additional research and revise dissertation chapters into a manuscript. Specifically, my project focuses on obstetrician and gynecologist Helen Dickens, an African American woman and dynamic champion for reproductive rights who worked alongside clubwomen to establish community maternal clinics, as well as desegregate medical schools and hospitals. A groundbreaking study, it pushes the perimeters of the literature on the history of African-American women's claims for citizenship to encompass the emergence of female demands for improved access to health care during the Great Depression and throughout the post-World War II period. African-American women's construction of health care reform in Philadelphia provides a necessary corrective to prior assumptions regarding a perceived dearth of physicians' civil rights efficacy. Based on previously untapped archival sources, my book project demonstrates that women's articulation of health care politics in the urban milieu not only challenges traditional temporal boundaries of civil rights advocacy it reinforces the current shift toward analyzing female agency within the medical field.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


HB-232154-16

Vaclav Paris
City College of New York (New York, NY 10016-4309)

Epic after Evolution: Modernism's National Narratives

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on selected works of early 20th-century modernist prose and their relationship to national identity, treating examples in English, Portuguese, and Czech.

Epic after Evolution is a book project that tells the history of the modernist epic from 1900 to 1930. Although recent work in transnational modernist studies suggests that modernism can be understood as a global phenomenon, my book points out that many of the founding narratives of modernist prose are nation-specific. Studying five such texts in detail, Epic after Evolution places modernist epic back into its local contexts. In doing so, however, it also proposes a more general common feature of the genre: namely that modernist national epics of this period all explore alternatives to biological, racial, or ethnic modes of defining and narrating nationality. Discussing the ramifications of this finding, my book models a way of studying modernist epic within and without national canons. During the period of my grant, I will complete two chapters for this book and submit them both to peer-reviewed journals.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


HB-232042-16

Clifford E. Trafzer, PhD
University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

Indigenous and Western Medicine Ways Among Southern California Indians, 1900-1955

Writing a book on the cooperation between tribal communities, doctors, and nurses to curb death and disease in southern California during the first half of the 20th century.

This project will analyze research that will culminate in a book, “Changing Medicine: Intersection of Indigenous and Western Medicine Ways Among Southern California Indians.” The project will also disseminate data in healthcare disparities, infant mortality, and crude death rates for major causes of death between 1900-1955, detailing the intersection of Native and Western medicine among 29 tribes of the Mission Indian Agency. The researcher will analyze the intersection of Indians and non-Indians regarding healthcare and medicine. The research offers examples of the ways in which public health nurses built relationships with tribal people through a network of Native and non-Native women to improve the health of children. Tribal communities and individual Natives worked cooperatively with nurses and doctors to lower crude death rates from every form of infectious disease plaguing the Indian communities, especially tuberculosis.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$49,531 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


HB-232176-16

Bertis Deon English
Alabama State University (Montgomery, AL 36104-5716)

Civil Wars and Civil Beings: Societal Construction, Reconstruction, and Post-Reconstruction in Perry County, Alabama, 1860-75

Writing and research toward the publication of a book about racial cooperation in Reconstruction-era Perry County, Alabama.

"Civil Wars and Civil Beings" is a scholarly book manuscript about Perry County, Alabama, during the Civil War era. Reconstruction is foremost. Unlike neighboring places in the Black Belt, one of the South’s most violent areas during Reconstruction, Perry County experienced few major economic, political, or racial clashes following Confederate defeat. Nostalgic whites threatened several activist blacks and white Republicans in Perry, but only a handful of individuals were hanged, maimed, shot, whipped, or killed in the county due to prejudice. Instead, whites and blacks in Perry usually developed the types of relationships and institutions that helped African Americans enjoy citizenship. This occurrence was uncharacteristic for Alabama and the remainder of the South from 1865 through 1874, the orthodox years of Alabama Reconstruction.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


HB-232111-16

Kirsten S. Gruesz
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

Language, Identity, and American Memory in Cotton Mather's La fe del christiano (1699)

Preparation of a book-length study of La fe del christiano (Boston, 1699), the first Spanish-language publication in English North America, written by Puritan minister Cotton Mather (1663-1728).

La fe del christiano (Boston, 1699) is the first Spanish publication in English North America. This study will examine different facets of the pamphlet, from conception to production to dissemination. The chapters radiate outward from La fe del christiano to consider topics as wide-ranging as the Sephardic diaspora, the Elizabethan invention of modern-language tutoring manuals, Jesuit vs. Puritan theories of Bible translation, the Salem Witch Trials, and the way the news of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 traveled to Mexico City—always returning again to the central text. It reconstructs the philosophies of language—and the related, but not identical, notions of race and ethnicity—in circulation at this moment, and speculates on the traces they have left for us today.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


HB-232187-16

Omar Santiago Valerio-Jimenez
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

The US-Mexican War (1846-1848): Mexican Americans, Memory, and Citizenship

The writing of a book on the legacy of memories about the Mexican-American War among successive generations.

The U.S.-Mexican War (1846-48) is known as the America’s “forgotten war” because few Americans know the causes or consequences of the conflict that transformed the U.S. into a continental power. Yet, the war is central to Mexicans’ collective memory because it created the first generation of Mexican Americans and influenced the identity of subsequent generations. My book project addresses this paradox by identifying Mexican Americans’ choice of remembered events, exploring how memories were transmitted, and analyzing their meaning. My project uses a transnational approach by examining the political and social uses of memories of war in Mexico and in the United States. It will contrast each nation’s official histories with Mexican Americans’ depictions to illuminate ways in which alternative histories challenged, modified, or reinforced official portrayals. The study contributes to Mexican American history, memory studies, and American cultural history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


HB-231968-16

Michael J. Cholbi
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Pomona, CA 91768-2557)

A Philosophical Treatment of the Ethics of Grief

Research and writing leading to publication of a book in the field of philosophy on grief arising from the death of intimates and loved ones.
 

Despite grief at the death of intimates or loved ones being a universal and perennial feature of human experience, contemporary philosophy has contributed very little to our understanding of the diverse ethical questions raised by grief. The proposed project will support the writing of the first ever book-length philosophical treatment of grief. The book will address such issues as whether grief responses are rational, how grief contributes to well-being, whether grief should ever be classified as a psychiatric illness, the place of anger in individual and collective grief, and ethical concerns about the exploitation of the vulnerability experienced during bereavement. This work will appeal to popular audiences curious to know how humanistic methods and knowledge can provide insight and consolation; to academic philosophers interested in death and dying, well-being, and moral psychology; and to scholarly experts in other disciplines seeking an atypical disciplinary perspective.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy, General; Philosophy, Other

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


HB-231942-16

Naomi J. Stubbs
CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)

A Critical Edition of the Diary of Harry Watkins, 19th-Century American Actor

Preparation of a scholarly edition of the diary of 19th-century American actor Harry Watkins (1825-1894).

This grant will support the creation of a critical edition of the diary of nineteenth-century American actor Harry Watkins. Written from 1845-1860, it is the only known diary of its size and scope by an American actor during the decade prior to the Civil War. The diary documents performances by famous actors, political events, business transactions, and personal matters, and our edition will provide researchers, teachers, and general readers interested in nineteenth-century US entertainment, politics, economics, and culture an accurate and accessible edition of this unique diary. During the award period, I will prepare six chapters of the printed edition according to our style guide. I will write annotations for basic information needed to understand the diary’s content (e.g., names, places, and terms) and form (e.g., noting redacted and amended text), drawing upon research conducted at the Harvard Theatre Collection and New York Public Library.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$8,400 (approved)
$8,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


HB-232107-16

Peter Limbrick
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

Moroccan Director Moumen Smihi (b.1945): Arab Modernities and Cinema

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the films of Moroccan director Moumen Smihi (b. 1945) and the history of colonialism in the Arab world.

This project investigates films by Moroccan director Moumen Smihi to better understand the relationship between Arab cinema and the historical experiences of colonialism and modernity. In addressing Smihi's rich images and narratives of colonial encounter, the project analyzes the ways that Euro-American critical discourses have struggled to understand the relationship of Arab cultural production to a modernity that is often conceived as exclusively Euro-American. Using Smihi's films as a lens, my book rethinks those relationships, stressing long histories of mutual influence and exchange that destabilize accounts of Arab modernisms as derivative products of cultural borrowing or colonial imposition. Smihi's cinema offers a compelling vision of the way that cinema, a quintessentially modern technology, has animated relationships between Arab and non-Arab worlds, thus transforming the way we think about the axes of history, colonialism, nationalism, and modernity across the Middle East.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Film History and Criticism; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


HB-50517-15

Candace Bailey
North Carolina Central University (Durham, NC 27707-3129)

Music and the Performance of Women's Culture in the South, 1840-1870

This study examines music in the context of the lives of women who lived in the South between 1840 and 1870. I will measure music as an "ideal" accomplishment and situate the "real" practice throughout the region, including a mix of rural and urban communities, racial and ethnic backgrounds, and economic status. The focus is predominantly on the antebellum period, but the effects of the Civil War on southern women's musical experiences will also be considered because they contrast in several significant ways, including repertory, work, and education. This research will demonstrate that previous explanations of women and music in the parlor do not account for the musical experiences of the majority of women. Through the study of a larger population that also considers geographical location, we can better understand broader issues of gender and social structure, interactions among social classes, and can more successfully interpret postbellum women's activities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


HB-50518-15

Christopher Tozzi
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

Mixed-Race Military Units in the French Colonial World

This project studies colonial military units in the eighteenth-century French empire in which soldiers of different ethnicities served alongside one another. It focuses on the way in which ideologies and practices of organized violence became hybridized among these troops as a result of the blending of European and non-European conceptualizations of how warfare and other forms of violence should be carried out. A better understanding of such hybridization will highlight the contributions made by ordinary people of diverse backgrounds living in the colonial world, as opposed to governing elites in European capitals, to the military ideologies and institutions that were a key component of societies at the outset of the modern era. It also underscores the divergence between abstract theories and actual practices of early-modern state-building and highlights the ethnic, religious, cultural and religious diversity of early-modern societies, which scholars have often overlooked.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Military History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 7/30/2016


HB-50536-15

Robert Gary Azzarello
Southern University at New Orleans (New Orleans, LA 70126-0002)

New Orleans, Literature, and the Transatlantic World

A year of funding from the NEH (ten months half-time, and two months full-time) will allow me to complete The Big Uneasy: New Orleans, Decadence, and the Transatlantic World, a major book project that will thicken the literary scholarship on New Orleans by addressing key problems of "uneasiness" through the city's three-hundred year history and across different genres and languages.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Comparative Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


HB-50562-15

Natale A. Zappia
Whittier College (Whittier, CA 90601-4446)

Food Frontiers: Indigenous and Euro-American Ecologies in Early America

This study explores the evolution of food systems in the early American West. It closely examines the transformations that helped create new food systems across vast distances of continental North America. Within this region, food systems required myriad supporting components, including infrastructure, producers, consumers, and irrigation. In similar ways, Natives and Euro-Americans employed varying agricultural techniques over a period of three centuries, ultimately converging on complex, overlapping systems of grass management by the early 1800s. As in the Great Plains, grass supported large herbivores like livestock (especially horses, mules, sheep, and cattle) that simultaneously fueled regional and global markets for hides, wool, tallow, and slaves. By closely examining the intimate connections between families, villages, and land use that stitched together indigenous and Euro-American food systems, we can better understand the forces that paved the way for the modern West.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Economic History; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 1/31/2016


HB-50590-15

Emily Berquist Soule
California State University, Long Beach (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

The Politics of Slavery and Antislavery in the Late Spanish Empire

This manuscript examines the dynamics of slavery and antislavery in the late Spanish Empire. It traces early antislavery and abolitionist sentiment prior to the independence of the Spanish American mainland, and it also examines the pro-slavery policies of the Spanish crown at the imperial level, including attempts to create slave trading companies and a slave trade depot in the Gulf of Guinea. Neither of these topics have been adequately addressed in the scholarship. My proposed work aims to confront this lacuna through tracing how the competing forces of economic interest in the slave trade and moral concerns for slave welfare created a uniquely tense program for the politics of slavery. By unpacking it, my work will add a previously unexplored dimension to our understanding of early antislavery in the Atlantic world, and the politics of governance in the late Spanish Empire.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


HB-50610-15

Jose Carlos de la Puente
Texas State University - San Marcos (San Marcos, TX 78666-4684)

Andean Cosmopolitans: Indigenous Journeys to the Habsburg Royal Court

I am applying for a grant to complete the first in-depth study about the travels of native Andeans to the Habsburg royal court in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Andean Cosmopolitans brings to the fore the indigenous leaders and legal agents who played an active part in gaining access to the Spanish system of justice for native Andeans. They influenced Crown policies at the highest level, turning stays at the court into a negotiation about the nature of the state in the New World. The story unfolds simultaneously in distant settings of the early modern Atlantic world. The focus is less on fixed ethnic and legal identifications, or on discontinuous places and regions, as it is on fluid identities, interconnections, and the interplay between local and global scenarios. I highlight the role played by native Andeans in the formation of a 'legal Atlantic,' an organic network of litigants, petitioners, attorneys, and ideas of law and justice bridging courtrooms in Spain and America.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
European History; History, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


HB-50617-15

Siraj Ahmed
CUNY Research Foundation, Lehman College (Bronx, NY 10468-1527)

Philology, Colonial Law, and the Origins of Literary Studies

Since the nineteenth century, philology has governed critical method in the humanities. According to the scholarly consensus, philology's authority begins with the research university. My book argues that its authority derives instead from colonial law, which transformed indigenous life on a global scale. Scholars who have written disciplinary genealogies of literary studies have overlooked the fact that, long before the nineteenth-century research university, colonial rule imposed a philological approach to native languages and literatures. The privilege literary scholars now place on philology repeats a colonial hierarchy, which privileged a historical approach to literature above all others. My book aims instead to unearth the approaches to language and literature that philology buried in its colonial past.

Project fields:
British Literature; Comparative Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


HB-50575-15

Keith M. Jordan
California State University, Fresno Foundation (Fresno, CA 93740-0001)

Pre-Columbian Art of the Western and Northern Frontiers of Mesoamerica

I seek NEH funding to improve the quality/scope of a new art history class surveying West/North Mexican pre-Columbian art by replacing the current visual aids with new digital slides of architecture and artifacts, and increasing the breadth/depth of content by field research in Mexico (Sinaloa, Durango, Zacatecas, and Jalisco). My project is a step towards rectifying a major gap in education about Mexico’s cultural heritage and reclaiming neglected indigenous art traditions from the margins to which they have been historically relegated in the field of art history. While these regions receive most of their scant coverage in archaeology publications, this course explores them using the methods of art history: iconographic analysis, social and economic contextual approaches, and select application of structuralist, poststructuralist, feminist, etc., perspectives. While drawing on archaeology for background, it is the first to approach the subject from within the humanities.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$8,400 (approved)
$8,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


HB-50448-14

Renee Marilyn Silverman
Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

The Popular and the Traditional in Spanish Avant-Garde Poetry (1925-1936)

A Lyric Revival: the Avant-Garde, Popular, and Traditional in Spanish Poetry (1925-1936) analyzes the entwining of the popular with the vanguard in the so-named Generations of 1925 and 1927, as a response to Spain's felt need to readdress cultural memory, and to modernize conceptions of national and regional identity in relation to this cultural memory. This book challenges the idea that the avant-garde must oppose the recuperation of the collective past: in contrast with the first avant-garde's "forgetting" in the form of cosmopolitanism, the synthesis between the popular and the vanguard achieved by the Generations of 1925 and 1927 had a positive effect on the reassessment of cultural memory and identity. Three poets of these generations, G. Diego, R. Alberti, and F. Lorca, led the way to the rediscovery of the common past by accessing Spain's rich popular forms of poetic expression, melding them with the technical and aesthetic advances made by the previous avant-garde wave.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Spanish Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 7/31/2015


HB-50419-14

Mohammad Gharipour
Morgan State University (Baltimore, MD 21251-0001)

Jewish Synagogues and their Urban Environment in the Jubareh District of Isfahan, Iran

One of the earliest Jewish settlements in Iran was the city of Isfahan, which was probably established at the time of the deportations of Jews by the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian kingdoms in the first millennium BCE. Isfahan, located in the center of Iran, gained world renown as the capital of the Seljuk and Safavid empires. Jubareh, the Jewish quarter of Isfahan, which was in proximity to the Friday Mosque, housed the majority of Jews as well as their synagogues. These synagogues were not only religious centers, but also core of communal organization. This project attempts to explore urban aspects of synagogues of Jubareh by examining the physical and metaphoric links between the city and synagogues. Studying formal, spatial, and symbolic qualities of synagogue architecture and their connections to the city, this book proposes to analyze the connections between synagogues and the urban fabric, while answering specific questions about the architecture and culture of the synagogue.

Project fields:
Architecture; Near and Middle Eastern History; Urban Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HB-50437-14

Susmita Roye
Delaware State University (Dover, DE 19901-2202)

Women Writers and the Portrayal of Women in British Indian Fiction

I plan to complete the three remaining chapters of my book manuscript. This book project will concentrate on early Indian women's fiction in English, evaluating their contribution to the rise of Indian Writing in English, and how they reassessed and challenged stereotypes about Indian womanhood, generated by both the British rulers and the Indian patriarchy. Among other questions, in the late 19th century, when India was only forming a vague idea of her nationhood and was increasingly portrayed in terms of femaleness (via the figure of an enchained "Mother India"), what role did women and their literary endeavors play in shaping both their nation and their femininity/feminism? How and how far did these pioneering authors use fiction as a tool of protest against and resistance to the Raj and/or patriarchy, and in expressing gender-based solidarity? How do they view and review the stereotypes about their fellow-women, and thereby 'mother' India by redefining their image?

Project fields:
Gender Studies; South Asian Literature; South Asian Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


HB-50471-14

Jill Graper Hernandez
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

Acquainted with Grief: Early Modern Feminist Conceptions of God, Evil, and Theodicy

The following is a plan of action to complete a book manuscript entitled Acquainted with Grief: Early Feminist Conceptions of God, Evil, and Theodicy. This book follows a recent uptick in scholarship on early modern feminism in philosophy, directly responds to contemporary, atheistic feminist critiques of theodicy, and meets a need for a comprehensive analysis of feminist contributions to theodicy. My research bridges gaps between distinct but related humanities disciplines--history of philosophy, philosophy of religion, feminist epistemology, and women's studies and so will attract a broad readership. The fellowship will allow me to participate in several activities that will strengthen my manuscript: to frequent Rice University's rare 18th-19th century works, to participate in the Texas A&M Glasscock Humanities Women's and Gender Studies Working Group, and to study at the 'Woman's Collections' at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


HB-50504-14

Terri L. Snyder
California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA 92831-3599)

Marriage, Race, and the Meaning of Freedom in Early America

I am seeking a Faculty Fellowship to support my book-length study of the changing meanings of marriage, race, and freedom in early North America from the earliest period of settlement through the American Revolution. My study relies on the collective histories of free families of color in the early South, especially those in which wives headed households, in order to understand the legal means by which families protected their precarious freedom against escalating odds. After the turn of the eighteenth century, colonial North American policymakers increasingly restricted the rights of free people of color in efforts to push them closer to slavery. In response, free people of color made the most of the legal protections of marriage, the anomalous position of women of color under the law, and local and regional networks in order to maintain the fragile freedom of their families. Their actions constituted, I argue, some of the earliest, if individualistic, anti-slavery activism in early North America.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 10/31/2015


HB-50510-14

Jesse Wolfe
California State University, Stanislaus Foundation (Turlock, CA 95382-3200)

The Muddle and the Dream: Intimacy, Utopia, and the Legacies of Bloomsbury in Contemporary Novels

Funding would support the completion of "The Muddle and the Dream," the author's second scholarly book, and two journal articles derived from the book. The book will be of value to scholars and general readers interested in contemporary marriage and intimacy as topics of sociological and philosophical study, as well as those interested in psychology, gender studies, and 20th-century literature, including the "legacies" of modernist authors such as Virginia Woolf and Sigmund Freud. "The Muddle and the Dream" builds on concepts developed in the author's first book "Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy" (Cambridge UP 2011) which has received very enthusiastic reviews. By supplying historical and demographic contexts, and by engaging with ideas from the emerging field of intimacy studies, the proposed book promises to shed new light on six major contemporary novelists.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 5/31/2015


HB-50274-13

Stanley Harrold
South Carolina State University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-4427)

The Abolitionist Movement's Involvement in American Politics, 1750-1865

I propose to write a comprehensive book analyzing the impact on American politics of the radical movement to abolish slavery. This subject is important because the relationship, during the 18th and 19th centuries, between abolitionist agitators and practical politicians has never been clear. The issue is: what was the impact of morally-based radicals who urged rapid emancipation on practical politicians who led the US into the Civil War in 1861. Currently historians either ignore the issue, deny that abolitionists had significant influence, or make vague references to abolitionist impact on popular opinion. Therefore I shall investigate direct unambiguous abolitionist relations with politicians, political parties, and government bodies between the years 1750 and 1865. The book will clarify not only a significant part of Civil War causation, but also how a major American reform movement functioned politically.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2013 – 7/31/2014


HB-50277-13

Dirk Peter Philipsen
Virginia State University (Petersburg, VA 23803-2520)

A History of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Since the Great Depression, U.S. economic policy-making has depended on a set of accounts first developed by Simon Kuznets during the height of the Great Depression. Today better known as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), national income accounts were adopted, in the aftermath of World War II, by nations around the world. Soon, they became a national and international shorthand for economic performance, and are commonly used as a key indicator for national welfare. Initially a great accomplishment, GDP is increasingly criticized for failing to measure all that matters. Scholars' critiques of GDP are widely understood by now, yet no history exists to explain how an income and product account moved from national bookkeeping tool to become an international economic benchmark and subsequently morphed into a worldwide standard for progress, well-being, and success. This is such a history.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 8/31/2013


HB-50329-13

Sara Elizabeth Pugach
California State University, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)

African Students and the Politics of Race in the German Democratic Republic, 1957-1990

This study will be a book-length history of African students in the former German Democratic Republic. I plan to research the students’ lives before, during, and after their experience in the GDR. I am interested in the question of race and whether perceptions of racial difference in communist East Germany remained consistent with those of previous eras, or underwent a radical shift after 1945. However, I also insist that the issue of race must be embedded within the much broader political context of the Cold War and decolonization, which are seminal for understanding how Africans approached the GDR, as well as how East Germans interacted with Africans living in their country. Racist sentiments coexisted uneasily alongside the doctrine of international solidarity in socialism sanctioned by East Germany’s Socialist Unity Party (SED), and transmitted among exchange student populations by the socialist Free German Youth (FDJ).

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 8/31/2014


HB-50333-13

Benjamin Lindsay Lapidus
CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)

The History of Spanish Caribbean Music in New York City and the Shaping of an International Sound, 1940-1990

I am requesting funding from the NEH to complete a book on the unwritten history of Spanish Caribbean music in New York City from 1940-1990 that will detail how musicians, educators, composers, arrangers, folklorists, and instrument builders collaborated to shape the course of both popular and folkloric genres in profound ways. I have conducted numerous interviews, acquired scores, and done archival research. Funding for one year starting in Fall 2013 will allow me to organize this research and write the manuscript. This project is intellectually significant to the humanities, because it revises and corrects the dominant historical narrative of Latin music in New York that has overlooked and underestimated the nature and scope of the connections among these distinct groups of specialists.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 8/31/2014


HB-50356-13

Christopher Powers
University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Mayaguez, PR 00680-6475)

Translation of Two Novels by Contemporary Puerto Rican Author Edgardo Rodriguez Julia

As an academic researcher in the field of comparative literature, experienced in multi-lingual research in world literatures, I intend to translate two novels by a great Caribbean and Latin American author, Edgardo Rodríguez Juliá, the most critical and consistently innovative living literary writer from Puerto Rico. The Spirit of the Light is a formally experimental, historical novel with a pan-Caribbean, cosmopolitan perspective written in multiple voices that record the experiences of four artists in their attempt to capture the enigmatic light of the Caribbean. The Woman in the Panama Hat, written in a style similar to the noir detective novel, is a portrait of social classes in Puerto Rico with a postmodern edge. My project will enable these great works to be appreciated as cultural ambassadorship and for their broad import for the humanities as such. The translations will be disseminated through their publication by university and/or literary presses.

Project fields:
Latin American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


HB-50375-13

Cristian Horacio Ricci
University of California, Merced (Merced, CA 95344-0039)

Moroccan Literature and the Broadening of Postcolonial Literary Studies

As the result of labor migration and family reunification (twenty percent of Moroccan citizens now live in Europe), combined with the geographic proximity of Europe and North Africa, the notion of a national or ‘native’ literature is slightly unstable with regard to Morocco. Morocco’s literary production is not limited by the borders of the nation-state, but spills over to the European continent, where the largest communities with members of Moroccan descent are to be found in France (over a million), Spain (800,000), the Netherlands (370,000), and Belgium (200,000). Moreover, the works of Morocco-based writers, who are also compelled to write in a language that is not their mother tongue, constitute a form of diasporic writing from within. It is not the aim of this study to tie such writings to their “national” place of origin, but to re-conceptualize the idea of a “Moroccan” literature with regard to the transnational and plurilingual experiences from which it arises.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


HB-50377-13

Amanda H. Podany
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Pomona, CA 91768-2557)

Ancient Syrian Kings and their Subjects, 1600-1200 BCE

A key to understanding the nature of government and society in Syria during the era from 1600 to 1200 BCE lies in a number of cuneiform tablets, from many different archaeological sites, which have not previously been studied as a group. These are the focus of this book project. The documents are for the most part legal contracts bearing the impression of a king's seal, often accompanied by the observation that the contract was drawn up "in the presence of" the king. I propose to examine these contracts as a corpus, using historical, philological, and "diplomatic" approaches. Although they were drawn up in different places and at different times, a shared culture and institution underlies them, one that will be elucidated by their examination as a group. Syria's role in the history of this era is increasingly proving to be a pivotal one, as it was the prime force in the creation of the international community of the Late Bronze Age and one of the Great Powers of that era.

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 8/31/2013


HB-50283-13

Dior Konate
South Carolina State University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-4427)

A History of Prison Architecture and Punishment in Colonial Senegal

This study explores the history of prison architecture in colonial Senegal as a way to illustrate the connection between penal architectural forms and punishment. First, it analyzes prison buildings and their changing architectural forms throughout the colonial period to understand how the French used prisons to control Africans through architectures. Second, it describes the connections between the internal layout of prison spaces and punishment to show how the design of prisons expressed the notions of punishment and reforms, and how inmates adapted to prison conditions, undermined or re-appropriated those spaces. Third, the study discusses the legacy of colonial prisons in independent Senegal. Its main contribution is to identify what was unique about the architecture of colonial prisons in Senegal and how it fitted into a larger architectural project designed by the French to control and discipline certain segments of the population and to segregate Europeans from Africans.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 3/31/2014


HB-50293-13

Dana A. Williams
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

Toni at Random: Author Toni Morrison's Work as Editor at Random House

This application proposes a full-time award over eight (8) months ($33,600) to conduct archival research at Howard University, Columbia University, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on Toni Morrison's role as an editor at Random House Publishing Company from 1965-1984. During the award period, I will complete drafts of chapters of a manuscript already in progress and gather additional information needed to construct other chapters. Upon completion, the manuscript will be submitted to Random House Publishing Company or to an academic press for publication. The award will allow me to take a full year sabbatical at half-pay to complete the manuscript.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2014


HB-50200-12

David Carlson
California State University, San Bernardino (San Bernardino, CA 92407-2318)

The Discourse of Sovereignty in American Indian Print Culture

With the support of an NEH Fellowship, I propose to complete a book manuscript (provisionally titled The Discourse of Sovereignty in American Indian Print Culture) that examines the relationship between various models of sovereignty and contemporary American Indian literature, a relationship mediated through a broader Indian print culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


HB-50201-12

Emily Joan Greble
City College of New York (New York, NY 10016-4309)

Islam and the European Nation-State: Balkan Muslims between Mosque and State, 1908-1949

What did it mean to be Muslim in Europe as empires collapsed and nation-states emerged? How did Islamic institutions adapt and transform their legal, property, and cultural institutions to meet--or challenge--the demands of the secularizing states? How did Muslims in Europe respond to and incorporate new political, religious, and cultural movements emerging in the Middle East? These questions are central to my project, which examines how Balkan Muslims negotiated Islamic law, practice, and politics under liberalism, fascism, and socialism. I contend that Muslim leaders adapted the norms and customs of the practice of Islam in order to define "Muslim" in their own terms; and moreover, that they confronted being dispossessed--of property, Sharia law, institutional autonomy, and the right to define Islam--by seeking to be possessed by an international community of Muslims. The project sheds new light on questions of Islam in Europe, transnational Islam, and the history of the Balkans.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2013


HB-50182-12

Janice Hawes
South Carolina State University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-4427)

Shaping Proper Citizens of the British Empire: H. E. Marshall's Translation of Beowulf for Children

This project places the work of Victorian and Edwardian women scholars of Old English, particularly those interested in the Old English epic Beowulf, within the context of imperialistic discourse, a project that will culminate in an in-depth study of H. E. Marshall’s translation of Beowulf for children. The major goal of this study is to determine how a female scholar such as Marshall, known for authoring several popular history books and literary retellings aimed at children, employed Beowulf to teach her young British audience how to be proper citizens of the British Empire. Via a critical post-colonial lens, the study considers how Marshall’s Edwardian-era translation of the medieval epic was meant in part to support the imperialist cause. In addition, the project explores how Marshall’s use of her scholarship to author works for young children was a result of the limits placed on female scholars by academic circles in Victorian and Edwardian Britain.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 5/31/2013


HB-50224-12

Gregory Patterson Downs
City College of New York (New York, NY 10016-4309)

The Ends of the War: American Reconstruction and the Problems of Occupations

This request for 12-month full-time funding supports a book project to rethink American Reconstruction through the lens of occupation. Through close examination of the process and impact of demobilization upon freedpeople and Confederates in the South, as well as upon Indians and settlers in the West, and upon Northern towns and cities, this projects recasts the narrative of Reconstruction, emphasizing its deep inherent limitations. The project traces the roots of its disappointments less to intentional undermining than to powerful, often unconscious drives toward demobilization and budget reduction, as well as confusion about the relationship between democracy and stability. The project also participates in broader discussions of comparative occupations, democracy, nineteenth-century state building, sovereignty claims, and the construction of legal and national authority in the relationship between centers and peripheries.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 7/31/2013


HB-50225-12

Debra Lynn Klein
Gavilan College (Gilroy, CA 95020-9599)

Reclaiming the Òrìsà in Nigeria: The Intersection of Traditional Indigenous Religion and Islam in Yorùbá Popular Culture

My project will show that despite the popularity of evangelicalism in southern Nigeria, traditional religious beliefs and practices have been making a steady comeback among Yorùbá Muslims who have continued to incorporate the òrìsà—indigenous spirits—into their Islamic, popular culture, and business practices and worldviews. My hypothesis is that predominantly Muslim Yorùbá towns, in dialogue with òrìsà-focused communities throughout the globe, provide the necessary conditions for a Nigeria-based òrìsà reclamation movement; thus, analyzing the nexus of òrìsà and Islam in popular culture and business contexts will shed light on how Nigerians negotiate and reinvent Yorùbá òrìsà culture through local performance and global networks. This research contributes to analyses of culture reclamation processes in which communities invoke cultural and spiritual traditions in order to claim meaningful identities and lives against the grain of globalizing religious paradigms and practices.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$12,600 (approved)
$12,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 9/30/2012


HB-50237-12

Suzanne Robyn Oakdale
University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)

Kawaiwete Perspectives on 20th-Century Brazilian Indigenous Policies

Centering on the autobiographical narratives of two Kawaiwete Brazilian indigenous men, this book project develops a picture of how state processes connected to visions of modernity and progress, such as “pacification,” the push toward “acculturation,” and, more recently, the encouragement to maintain a distinctive indigenous culture, were experienced, understood, and shaped by indigenous individuals. Insights from anthropological work on how social relationships are formed through bodily practices in Amazonia are used to explore the culturally specific ways these men describe interethnic networks and alliances being formed from the 1920s to the 1990s in the Brazilian frontier. Archival records are used to substantiate these narratives as well as cast them into relief. Through its focus on autobiographical narrative, this project covers the Kawaiwete's "first contact," with the Brazilian national society, induction into wage labor, and the creation of a celebrated indigenous park.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 2/28/2013


HB-50006-11

Denise Low
Haskell Indian Nations University (Lawrence, KS 66046-4800)

Cultural Sovereignty: Two Northern Cheyenne Ledger-Art Notebooks

This project will create an online resource of 1879 ledger notebooks with my researched commentary. Wild Hog and six other Cheyenne men, while in a Dodge City jail, recorded their experiences in unique narrative drawings. These indirectly refer to the tragic 1878 Ft. Robinson Breakout conflict. They also depicted other topics, including environmentally descriptive entries. This project annotates the Northern Cheyenne drawings for future scholars. The final product will be an online posting at the Plains Indian Ledger Art Project site (University of California-San Diego) and a manuscript addition to the Kansas State Historical Society Library and Archives. I have discussed this project with Norman Frank of UC-San Diego, director of the PILA project, and with Nancy Sherbert, Curator Special Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society. The Jan. 1, 2011 to July 31, 2001 project contributes primary historic/literary texts from the point-of-view of Cheyenne people.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$29,400 (approved)
$29,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2011 – 1/31/2012


HB-50065-11

Daniel Albert Engster
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

Justice and the Welfare State: A Non-Ideal Comparative Approach

Most philosophical accounts of welfare state justice are highly abstract and idealized. As a result, they often fail to yield clear and useful guidance for policy-makers and citizens concerned with supporting just welfare state policies in the real, non-ideal world. My project develops a non-ideal, comparative approach to welfare state justice that offers clear and concrete guidance on the best welfare policies for promoting human well-being. I first outline a normative account of the specific goals that welfare states should aim to achieve given human vulnerabilities and recent shifts in family life, work, and ageing. I then draw on empirical data from 20 or so Western industrialized countries to identify the welfare state policies that best promote these normative goals in the areas of child well-being, education, health care, and old age and disability support. The ultimate result will be a book that outlines a clearer and more useful theory of welfare state justice.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2012


HB-50086-11

Susan Carlile
California State University, Long Beach (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

Charlotte Lennox: A Powerful Mind

Charlotte Lennox: A Powerful Mind is a critical biography of a mid-eighteenth-century London author who in her seventeen works, including novels, plays, translations, a critical work on Shakespeare, and a women’s periodical, was at the cutting edge of debates about literature and gender during the Enlightenment. Unlike earlier writing about her life, this biography takes Lennox’s skill as a writer as its focal point. Also earlier biographers did not have the benefit of a cache of seventy-two letters, which brings to light Lennox’s skill as a marketer of her works. Through my extensive research and close reading, it has become clear that Lennox’s primary goal was to foster female intelligence. I have written and published on Lennox for twenty years and during this fellowship I will be able to complete this biography by finishing two chapters, writing the last one, and polishing the entire manuscript to submit to publishers.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 7/31/2012


HB-50100-11

Ethan Bumas
New Jersey City University (Jersey City, NJ 07305-1596)

Colonial Appropriations

My interdisciplinary book studies colonial Hispanic-Anglo relations, a conflict that persists in the political and cultural antagonisms of our hemisphere. It combines literature, historiography, and art history to promote a pan-American understanding of the origins of the idea and practice of America by uncovering the legacy of Spanish influence shared with Latin America. Long before the term American gained common usage, British politics defined colonial identity as not being Spanish. Primarily because of language differences, the teaching of American literature, in course selections and literary anthologies and histories, while allowing for the borders determined by the Mexican War, replicate the British colonial exclusion of the Spanish influence in our understanding of what being American is.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


HB-50124-11

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)

The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1877-1910

With the support of an NEH Fellowship, I will complete the last three chapters of a book manuscript titled "The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico (1877-1910)." This study examines the ways in which the Mexican government took control of the nation’s pre-Hispanic remains and used them for the purposes of state and nation building during the Porfiriato, the regime of Porfirio Díaz. It argues that the Porfirian regime was the first in Mexico to develop a concerted project to gather, preserve, and display pre-Hispanic antiquities. It underscores how this project stemmed from an elite counterimperial consciousness that sought to shape and defend Mexico’s national image. At the same time, however, it also reveals how the process of making the national archaeological patrimony reinforced patterns of domination.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


HB-50136-11

Julie Meira Weise
California State University, Long Beach (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the U.S. South, 1910-2010

This project reshapes the fields of Mexican American, U.S. Southern, and Mexican history by bringing them into dialogue with one another. The historical actors under study are the thousands of Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans who lived and worked in the U.S. South throughout the twentieth century. My book manuscript, the first to recover these migrants' stories, shows how their experiences in the South differed from those of their counterparts in the Southwest, due to the South's distinct racial systems. I show that Mexican state actors, stationed at consulates in the region, both influenced and were influenced by the Jim Crow system, and later, the rise of "color-blind" conservatism. Finally, I demonstrate that the "provincial" U.S. South actually existed within a transnational field of racial politics and ideologies, in which binary ideas of "black" and "white" encountered more flexible and culturally-based racial systems in the form of Mexican immigrants fighting for rights.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


HB-50140-11

Barry Steven Levitt
Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)

Laughing at "Lo Politico": Mass Media Political Humor in Contemporary Latin America

What's so funny about politics? And why might political humor differ across time and place? This project examines contemporary political humor in seven Latin American societies. Drawing on a multidisciplinary cache of humor theory, I first ask what, exactly, makes different pieces funny and demonstrate that "what's funny" is itself a political issue. I explain why different modes of political humor are delivered through particular mass media, highlighting the dynamic cultural shifts that new communications technologies are driving in the region. And I examine whether the prevalence of different modes of political humor is shaped by national-level political regimes and laws. The project will produce a publicly-accessible online database of Latin American political humor, two journal articles (which will undergird a book project), and an undergraduate course syllabus, helping to advance the NEH's Bridging Cultures initiative.

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011


HB-50027-11

Richard McCallister
Delaware State University (Dover, DE 19901-2202)

A Reconstruction of the Nawat Literary Corpus

An annotated collection and reconstruction of the Central American Nawat literary corpus (200-300 pp.), with an accurate, relevant translation, notes and introductory articles into English and Spanish. The outstanding works are Myths in Their Mother Tongue (El Salvador), a mythological cycle similar to the Guatemalan Popol Vuh and the Mexican Legend of the Suns, and El Gueguence (Nicaragua), a farcical play written in a mixture of Spanish and Nawat Niquirano language and prosody. These works are masterpieces of world literature, equivalent to the Popol Vuh or El Cantar del Mio Cid. Other works in Nawat Pipil include songs, prayers, stories, ecclesiastical documents, short poems and a Nativity play. While these works have been printed in Spanish, virtually none has been adequately translated and they are all scattered and out of print.

Project fields:
Latin American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$16,800 (approved)
$16,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2011 – 8/31/2011


HB-50032-11

Michael Clay Hooper
Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77446-0519)

Emigration, Nationalism, and Pragmatism in Post-Reconstruction African American Literature

With NEH funding, I will produce two studies--one on Frederick Douglass and the other on African American novelist, Sutton Griggs--to submit to peer-reviewed journals and include as chapters within an academic manuscript. The manuscript traces the emergence of black pragmatism through debates over emigration and nationalism as responses to Jim Crow-era racial oppression. As part of a current effort among literary critics, historians, and philosophers to rethink and reevaluate the history of black pragmatism, the manuscript demonstrates that black pragmatists theorized power and resistance in ways that have made classic philosophical pragmatism relevant within past and current efforts to think through the problems and possibilities of democracy. In doing so, the manuscript argues that black pragmatism is a central component of African American (and therefore all American) identities as they have been and continue to be negotiated within complex social, cultural, and political contexts.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011