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Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges*
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Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2497)
Rebecca Trivison (Project Director, 11/25/2014 - present); Molly Uline-Olmstead (Project Director, 08/15/2012 - 11/24/2014)
ME-50031-13
Native Americans in the Midwest: An NEH Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a three-year faculty and curriculum development project on the history of nine midwestern Native American groups for thirty-six community college faculty and academic administrators in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma.

A cooperative agreement for a three-year faculty and curriculum development project on the history of nine midwestern Native American groups for thirty-six community college faculty and academic administrators in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Noting that the removal of midwestern Indians is not as well known or studied as the southern Trail of Tears, the Ohio Historical Society (OHS), in partnership with Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College, received support for a three-year project on the history of the nine Native American tribes removed from Ohio in the nineteenth century. Faculty and administrators from community colleges in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma - states through which these tribes traveled and in which they resettled - participate in a series of conferences and webinars designed to help them include the history and cultures of these groups in their courses. The project begins with a conference at OHS on Ohio's Native American history. In addition to content sessions with scholars John Bowes (Eastern Kentucky University), Randal Buchman (emeritus, Defiance College), Linda Sue Warner (Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College), Stephen Warren (Augustana College), Melissa Rinehart (Miami University), Dawn Marsh (Purdue University), and Sharon Dean (OHS), participants also visit prehistoric mounds at Hopewell Culture National Historic Park, discuss ways to teach Native American history, and conduct research in the Ohio Historical Society's collections. The second conference takes place in Miami, Oklahoma, and features sessions on the removal of midwestern tribes. Other experts would join the scholars from the first conference: George Ironstack (University of Miami) and tribal representatives, including Glenna Wallace, chief of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Seneca-Cayuga language preservationist Paul Barton; and Wyandot artist Richard Zane Smith. Conferences are supplemented by webinars led by scholars and tribal representatives on a variety of topics, including working with primary sources related to Indian history, tribal governance, Native American arts, and the challenges of language preservation. Finally, participants share the outcomes of their projects at a closing conference. Participants work with a range of primary sources--maps, treaties, letters, diaries, artifacts--and read secondary works by project scholars and other historians, anthropologists, and linguists.

[Grant products] [Media coverage]
Project fields: Ancient History
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,994 (approved); $359,994 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2013 – 2/28/2015

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
Leonard Schoppa (Project Director, 04/15/2014 - present); Rachel Stauffer (Project Director, 08/15/2012 - 04/15/2014)
ME-50023-13
Strengthening Global Humanities at Virginia's Community Colleges: An NEH Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a two-year faculty and curriculum development project on the religions and cultures of Asia, the Middle East, and Russia for thirty-six faculty and academic administrators from five Virginia community colleges.

A cooperative agreement for a two-year faculty and curriculum development project on the religions and cultures of Asia, the Middle East, and Russia for thirty-six faculty and academic administrators from five Virginia community colleges. In partnership with Blue Ridge Community College, the University of Virginia's Asia Institute received support for a project to help community colleges incorporate new content on Asia, the Middle East, and Russia in their curricula. In the first year, participants recruited from Southwest Virginia Community College, Piedmont Virginia Community College, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Blue Ridge Community College, and Virginia Western Community College focus on the ancient heritages of Japan, China, India, the Middle East, and Russia, with emphasis on literature, arts, and religion. In the second year, they study the modern societies that have developed in those regions through literature and film, with attention paid to their interactions with the West. A symposium each year introduces participants to the topics through common readings, discussion, and lectures from scholarly experts. In addition, participants choose a geographic or thematic area on which to focus, tailored to the specific needs of their institutions. Between symposia, participants work with each other and with the scholars using discussion forums, video conferencing, and site visits as they develop and implement new curricular materials. The Asia Institute draws on the expertise of project director Rachel Stauffer, as well as University of Virginia faculty members Daniel Ehnbohm, Paul Groner, Gustav Heldt, Haruko Yuda, Karen Lang, Robert Hueckstedt, Richard Cohen, Ahmad Obiedat, Edith Clowes, John Nemec, Michiko Wilson, Allison Alexey, Charles Laughlin, Mehr Farooqi, and Farzaneh Milani, Reginald Jackson (University of Chicago), and Matthew Marshall (Hollins University). Readings include such classic texts as The Dream of the Red Chamber, Doctor Zhivago, and The Tale of Genji, as well as secondary works by scholars including Jonathan Spence, Diana Eck, Leila Ahmed, and several of the presenting scholars. Participants also view and discuss several documentaries and feature films, including Mr. and Mrs. Iyer, Monsoon Wedding, Rashomon, Battleship Potemkin, and The Vanished Empire.

Project fields: Asian Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,769 (approved); $359,769 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2013 – 5/31/2015

Association of American Colleges and Universities (Washington, DC 20009-1604)
David Paris (Project Director, 01/31/2013 - present); Caryn Musil (Project Director, 08/30/2011 - 01/31/2013)
ME-50016-12
Difference, Community, and Democratic Thinking: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a three-year professional and curriculum development project on American cultural diversity and democracy for faculty and administrators from twelve community colleges.

The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and The Democracy Commitment: An American Community College Initiative (TDC) offer a three-year curriculum and faculty development program for community college faculty and administrators. The program enables 12 teams from selected community colleges to infuse questions about difference, community, and democratic thinking into transfer courses in the humanities; promote greater adoption of proven high-impact practices that advance important civic learning outcomes; create a series of humanities-enriched professional development opportunities for community college faculty, especially adjunct faculty; and expand the project’s impact through collaboration with additional community colleges and partnerships with state humanities councils. It includes a summer faculty development institute in August 2012 and culminates in a symposium planned for October 2014. The program’s impact is strengthened by a partnership with the New York Times’ Epsilen online learning network, which is partnering with TDC in their national initiative. Through this partnership, project participants use the online learning platform to develop forums and to share and co-create resources and course materials.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,995 (approved); $359,995 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2012 – 1/31/2015

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Andrew Konitzer (Project Director, 07/14/2014 - present); Robert Hayden (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - 07/14/2014)
ME-50053-14
East European Studies in America: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A partnership between the Community College of Beaver County and the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and East European Studies to conduct a multi-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on change and adaptation in East European culture and its impact on western Pennsylvania history.

The University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and East European Studies (REES) works with up to twenty regular and adjunct faculty members of the Community College of Beaver County (CCBC) on a project to incorporate East European history and literature into the community college curriculum. Two REES-affiliated scholars organize all aspects of the program: Joel Brady (history and religious studies), whose expertise is in the northern tier of countries including Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine; and Ljiljana Duraskovic (Slavic languages and literatures), an expert on the Balkans region, including Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, and Herzegovina. These two scholars also team-teach with two CCBC faculty members a new Eastern Europe-focused section of CCBC's existing world literature survey course in Fall 2015, to be taught solely by CCBC instructors the following year. Eight workshops meet January through April in 2015 to explore texts in three areas: 1) general readings such as Tony Judt's The Past Is Another Country: Myth and Memory in Postwar Europe; 2) works that narrate histories of East European immigrant communities in the United States and especially in western Pennsylvania; and 3) country- or region-specific readings (list to be finalized). The latter could include Death in Danzig, a Polish novel by Stefan Chwin about forced population movements at the end of World War II); Burden of Dreams: History and Identity in Post-Soviet Ukraine (Catherine Wanner); and The Krajina Chronicle: A History of Serbs in Croatia, Slavonia, and Dalmatia (Srdja Trifkovic). From September 2015 to April 2016, the project cohort would attend monthly Saturday morning events involving presentations by Pittsburgh-area scholars and discussions with leaders of East European ethnic communities in the region. Saturday programs would be supported by the videoconferencing of U.S. State Department-sponsored "American Corners" events from East European nations. The products of two years of activities-the new literature course and the participants' course modules-would be presented by participating faculty at the annual professional development summit of the Western Pennsylvania Community College Resource Consortium in October 2016.

Project fields: Area Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $119,622 (approved); $119,622 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 2/28/2017

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter Hershock (Project Director, 08/30/2011 - present)
ME-50013-12
Asian Traditions and Cultural Differences: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a three-year project on cultural pluralism in the context of East and Southeast Asian history and traditions for faculty and academic administrators from fifteen community colleges.

The East-West Center develops a professional and curriculum development project that engages community college faculty and academic administrators in an examination of "the historical dynamics of cultural interaction in China and Southeast Asia," focusing on the arts, literature, religious traditions, knowledge systems, and trade. Participating campuses are organized in geographically based clusters led by Middlesex Community College (MA), Community College of Philadelphia, Johnson County Community College (KS), City College of San Francisco, and Community College of Baltimore County. Project activities open with a ten-day symposium in Honolulu where participants engage in intensive study with leading scholars and develop plans for new courses or curricular revisions. Symposium readings include historical studies of East and Southeast Asia, The Analects of Confucius, and a philosophical examination of the concept of diversity, as well as supplemental readings on the regions drawn from history, politics, philosophy, religion, art, and literature. Over the next two years, Asian studies scholars visit each community college cluster in order to mentor participants as they implement plans developed at the opening symposium. In addition to conducting faculty development workshops, the mentors give public lectures. These activities are supplemented by an online conference featuring project-related research. The project concludes with a two-day conference (site to be determined). In addition to the project director, lead scholars include Thomas Kasulis (philosophy, Ohio State University), Stanley Murashige (art history, School of the Art Institute of Chicago), Morris Rossabi (history, Columbia University), and University of Hawai'i faculty members Roger Ames (philosophy), Paul Lavy (art history), and Barbara Andaya (history). Mentoring scholars are chosen based on the interests and needs of the participants.

Project fields: Asian Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $360,000 (approved); $357,699 (awarded)
Grant period: 1/1/2012 – 10/31/2015

Community College of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19130-3936)
Lakshmi Gudipati (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - present)
ME-50046-14
South Asia: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A partnership between the Community College of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania's South Asia Center to conduct a two-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on cultural divides and diversity in India.

A partnership between the Community College of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania's South Asia Center to conduct a two-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on cultural divides and diversity in India. The Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) collaborates with The South Asia Center, a Title VI National Resource Center at the University of Pennsylvania, to expand the CCP curriculum in selected periods in Indian history from the Vedic era to the Partition of 1947. Lakshmi Gudipati and David Prejsnar of CCP (English Department and History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Department, respectively) direct the project for sixteen participants, all of whom are selected from humanities faculty hired by CCP in the last ten years. Each year a cohort of eight junior faculty participate in a series of seminars, in company with University of Pennsylvania scholars of South Asia such as Daud Ali, Deven Patel, Michael Meister, Jamal Elias, and Suvir Kaul, who bring rich knowledge about Indian art, history, religion, and literature. Topics explored in light of the theme of negotiating diversity show myriad permutations of accommodation or strife amongst different religious, social, or political groups in ancient, early modern, and colonial eras. Year one encompasses the classical to pre-colonial periods, drawing on poems, plays, moral tales, and selections from religious texts and epics such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana. A tour of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's permanent collections, led by the Curator of Indian and Himalayan Art, offers direct experience with representative art. In year two, the early modern era and colonialism ending in the Partition of 1947 is examined using primary sources such as the writings of explorers, missionaries, travelers, and Victorian intellectuals; East India Company history; and twentieth-century literature and films. Mentoring by the South Asia Center scholars assists CCP faculty as they infuse content into modules for existing courses. In addition, the CCP directors create a new interdisciplinary course on South Asia to complement other area studies courses offered under the auspices of CCP's Center for International Understanding. The project supports expansion of the college's print and digital resources for teaching, as well as the creation of digital avenues for disseminating modules, bibliographies, and useful links.

Project fields: South Asian History
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $119,904 (approved); $119,904 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2016

American Historical Association (Washington, DC 20003-3889)
James Grossman (Project Director, 08/27/2013 - present); Robert Townsend (Project Director, 08/30/2011 - 08/28/2013)
ME-50005-12
American History, Atlantic and Pacific: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a multi-year project for faculty and academic administrators from twelve community colleges to integrate the Atlantic and Pacific Worlds into the U. S. history survey course.

Building upon a three-year study of history teaching at community colleges, the American Historical Association (AHA) helps instructors take an international approach to the U.S. history survey, one of the most widely taught humanities courses on community college campuses. The project opens with a conference at the Huntington Library, where participating community college faculty members study the history and cultures of the Pacific Rim in relation to North America from 1600 to 1850. They spend the next year exploring ways to incorporate the new material into their survey courses. A second conference - to be held at the Library of Congress - similarly takes up the Atlantic World from 1450 to 1850. Following this conference, participants implement their course revisions. A third conference in New York City serves as a showcase for presentations on results. William Deverell (University of Southern California) leads the study of the Pacific Rim, and Philip Morgan (Johns Hopkins University) leads the study of the Atlantic World. They present at the conferences and take part in online seminars, along with faculty mentors Cheryll Cody (Houston Community College, Southwest) and Kevin Reilly (Raritan Valley College). Core readings include works by David Abulafia, David Armitage, Bernard Bailyn, Jean Heffer, Patrick Kirch, and Matt Matsuda, among others. Participants also have opportunities to work with the collections at the Huntington Library and the Library of Congress.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,844 (approved); $359,844 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2012 – 2/28/2015

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Daniel Greene (Project Director, 08/30/2011 - present); Christopher Cantwell (Co Project Director, 02/06/2012 - present)
ME-50001-12
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Out of Many - Religious Pluralism in America: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a multi-year professional and curriculum development project for faculty and administrators from five community colleges on religious pluralism in America.

Project fields: History of Religion
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $326,803 (approved); $326,803 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Community College Humanities Association (Newark, NJ 07102)
Diane Eisenberg (Project Director, 01/18/2012 - present); David Berry (Project Director, 08/30/2011 - 01/18/2012)
ME-50010-12
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Advancing the Humanities at Community Colleges: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a two-year professional and curriculum development project for faculty and academic administrators from eighteen community colleges to improve introductory humanities courses.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,529 (approved); $359,529 (awarded)
Grant period: 2/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Bunker Hill Community College (Boston, MA 02129-2929)
Lori Catallozzi (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - present)
ME-50065-14
Asian American Studies: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

To support: A partnership between Bunker Hill Community College and the University of Massachusetts, Boston, to conduct a three-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project in Asian American studies.

A partnership between Bunker Hill Community College and the University of Massachusetts, Boston, to conduct a three-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project in Asian American studies. Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) builds on a relationship with the Asian American studies program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston (UMB), to integrate Asian American studies into the BHCC curriculum. Directed by Dean of Humanities Lori Catallozzi, the project engages twelve faculty members from BHCC's humanities departments in collaborative study at three summer institutes with faculty members from UMB's Asian American studies program to examine Asian American communities in Boston and in the nation as a whole. Each institute is devoted to a sub-topic: 1) Asian cultures of the Boston area, 2) intergenerational relationships, and 3) Asian Americans in civic life. Readings are drawn from studies of the history and cultures of specific communities, including Shirley Tang and James Bui on Boston's Vietnamese community, Rajini Srikanth and Esther Iwanaga on Asian American literature, and K. Scott Wong on the history of Boston's Chinatown, as well as from works in the broader field of Asian American studies. Participants also make use of oral histories, documentaries, digital storytelling, policy studies, and archival records, and visit Boston's Chinese, Khmer, and Vietnamese neighborhoods. In addition to taking part in the summer institutes, project participants engage in roundtable discussions and give public lectures during the fall and spring semesters. BHCC faculty members Henry Allen, Mizuho Arai, Aurora Bautista, Jessica Bethoney, Charles Pen Khek Chear, and Lee Santos Silva are participating, along with six additional participants chosen in the project's first year. UMB scholars include Peter Nien-chu Kiang, Shirley Tang, Loan Dao, Patricia Akemi Neilson, Rajini Srikanth, and Paul Watanabe. Faculty members from the two institutions work together to create materials and modules to enhance as many as twenty courses at BHCC. These materials are also disseminated to other institutions in the Massachusetts community college system through an online resource library.

Project fields: East Asian Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $120,000 (approved); $120,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 5/31/2017

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Pennee Bender (Project Director, 08/15/2012 - present)
ME-50019-13
Bridging Historias through Latino History and Culture: An NEH Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges Project

To support: A cooperative agreement for a two-and-a-half-year faculty and curriculum development project on Latino/a history for thirty-six community college faculty and academic administrators in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania.

A cooperative agreement for a two-and-a-half-year faculty and curriculum development project on Latino/a history for forty-two community college faculty and academic administrators in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and eastern Pennsylvania. In partnership with Queensborough Community College, the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center (ASHP/CML) organizes a program of sustained study for community college faculty and administrators on the history and cultures of Latino/a communities in the United States leading to the development of curricular materials on these topics. Under the leadership of Pennee Bender and Donna Thompson Ray of ASHP/CML, the project begins with a series of six full-day seminars on Latino/a history from the colonial period to the present. Speakers for the seminar series include Virginia Sánchez Korrol (Brooklyn College, CUNY), Andrés Reséndez (University of California at Davis), Pablo Mitchell (Oberlin College), John Nieto-Phillips (Indiana University), Orlando Hernández (Hostos Community College, CUNY), Cristina Beltrán (New York University), María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo (New York University), Ramona Hernández (City College of New York, CUNY), María Montoya (New York University), and Lisandro Pérez (John Jay College, CUNY). These seminars are supplemented by an online reading discussion series and mentoring from Queensborough faculty members Megan Elias, Aránzazu Borrachero, and Amy Traver; Carlos Hernández and Patricia Mathews-Salazar from Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY; and Karen Miller (LaGuardia Community College, CUNY) as participants develop and implement curricular materials. A separate program helps administrators develop strategies to support the project on their campuses. The closing conference features Vicki Ruiz of University of California at Irvine, and provide opportunities for participant teams to present on their progress. Readings are drawn from the works of the project faculty, as well as from historians Samuel Truett, Raúl Ramos, María Cristina Garcia, and Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof; anthropologist Arlene Davila; and sociologist Robert Smith, among others.

[Grant products]
Project fields: U.S. History
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $359,659 (approved); $359,659 (awarded)
Grant period: 3/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

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