NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
3 matches

Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges*
Date range: 2014-2014
Sort order: Award year, descending

Save this query
Create a new query
Export results to Excel

Community College of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19130-3936)
Lakshmi Gudipati (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - present)
ME-50046-14
South Asia: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

A partnership between the Community College of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania's South Asia Center to conduct a two-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on cultural divides and diversity in India.

A partnership between the Community College of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania's South Asia Center to conduct a two-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on cultural divides and diversity in India. The Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) collaborates with The South Asia Center, a Title VI National Resource Center at the University of Pennsylvania, to expand the CCP curriculum in selected periods in Indian history from the Vedic era to the Partition of 1947. Lakshmi Gudipati and David Prejsnar of CCP (English Department and History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Department, respectively) direct the project for sixteen participants, all of whom are selected from humanities faculty hired by CCP in the last ten years. Each year a cohort of eight junior faculty participate in a series of seminars, in company with University of Pennsylvania scholars of South Asia such as Daud Ali, Deven Patel, Michael Meister, Jamal Elias, and Suvir Kaul, who bring rich knowledge about Indian art, history, religion, and literature. Topics explored in light of the theme of negotiating diversity show myriad permutations of accommodation or strife amongst different religious, social, or political groups in ancient, early modern, and colonial eras. Year one encompasses the classical to pre-colonial periods, drawing on poems, plays, moral tales, and selections from religious texts and epics such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana. A tour of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's permanent collections, led by the Curator of Indian and Himalayan Art, offers direct experience with representative art. In year two, the early modern era and colonialism ending in the Partition of 1947 is examined using primary sources such as the writings of explorers, missionaries, travelers, and Victorian intellectuals; East India Company history; and twentieth-century literature and films. Mentoring by the South Asia Center scholars assists CCP faculty as they infuse content into modules for existing courses. In addition, the CCP directors create a new interdisciplinary course on South Asia to complement other area studies courses offered under the auspices of CCP's Center for International Understanding. The project supports expansion of the college's print and digital resources for teaching, as well as the creation of digital avenues for disseminating modules, bibliographies, and useful links.

Project fields: South Asian History
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $119,904 (approved); $119,904 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2016

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Robert Hayden (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - 07/14/2014); Andrew Konitzer (Project Director, 07/14/2014 - present)
ME-50053-14
East European Studies in America: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

A partnership between the Community College of Beaver County and the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and East European Studies to conduct a multi-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project on change and adaptation in East European culture and its impact on western Pennsylvania history.

The University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and East European Studies (REES) works with up to twenty regular and adjunct faculty members of the Community College of Beaver County (CCBC) on a project to incorporate East European history and literature into the community college curriculum. Two REES-affiliated scholars organize all aspects of the program: Joel Brady (history and religious studies), whose expertise is in the northern tier of countries including Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine; and Ljiljana Duraskovic (Slavic languages and literatures), an expert on the Balkans region, including Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, and Herzegovina. These two scholars also team-teach with two CCBC faculty members a new Eastern Europe-focused section of CCBC's existing world literature survey course in Fall 2015, to be taught solely by CCBC instructors the following year. Eight workshops meet January through April in 2015 to explore texts in three areas: 1) general readings such as Tony Judt's The Past Is Another Country: Myth and Memory in Postwar Europe; 2) works that narrate histories of East European immigrant communities in the United States and especially in western Pennsylvania; and 3) country- or region-specific readings (list to be finalized). The latter could include Death in Danzig, a Polish novel by Stefan Chwin about forced population movements at the end of World War II); Burden of Dreams: History and Identity in Post-Soviet Ukraine (Catherine Wanner); and The Krajina Chronicle: A History of Serbs in Croatia, Slavonia, and Dalmatia (Srdja Trifkovic). From September 2015 to April 2016, the project cohort would attend monthly Saturday morning events involving presentations by Pittsburgh-area scholars and discussions with leaders of East European ethnic communities in the region. Saturday programs would be supported by the videoconferencing of U.S. State Department-sponsored "American Corners" events from East European nations. The products of two years of activities-the new literature course and the participants' course modules-would be presented by participating faculty at the annual professional development summit of the Western Pennsylvania Community College Resource Consortium in October 2016.

Project fields: Area Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $119,622 (approved); $119,622 (awarded)
Grant period: 9/1/2014 – 2/28/2017

Bunker Hill Community College (Boston, MA 02129-2929)
Lori Catallozzi (Project Director, 08/28/2013 - present)
ME-50065-14
Asian American Studies: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

A partnership between Bunker Hill Community College and the University of Massachusetts, Boston, to conduct a three-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project in Asian American studies.

A partnership between Bunker Hill Community College and the University of Massachusetts, Boston, to conduct a three-year Bridging Cultures faculty and curriculum development project in Asian American studies. Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) builds on a relationship with the Asian American studies program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston (UMB), to integrate Asian American studies into the BHCC curriculum. Directed by Dean of Humanities Lori Catallozzi, the project engages twelve faculty members from BHCC's humanities departments in collaborative study at three summer institutes with faculty members from UMB's Asian American studies program to examine Asian American communities in Boston and in the nation as a whole. Each institute is devoted to a sub-topic: 1) Asian cultures of the Boston area, 2) intergenerational relationships, and 3) Asian Americans in civic life. Readings are drawn from studies of the history and cultures of specific communities, including Shirley Tang and James Bui on Boston's Vietnamese community, Rajini Srikanth and Esther Iwanaga on Asian American literature, and K. Scott Wong on the history of Boston's Chinatown, as well as from works in the broader field of Asian American studies. Participants also make use of oral histories, documentaries, digital storytelling, policy studies, and archival records, and visit Boston's Chinese, Khmer, and Vietnamese neighborhoods. In addition to taking part in the summer institutes, project participants engage in roundtable discussions and give public lectures during the fall and spring semesters. BHCC faculty members Henry Allen, Mizuho Arai, Aurora Bautista, Jessica Bethoney, Charles Pen Khek Chear, and Lee Santos Silva are participating, along with six additional participants chosen in the project's first year. UMB scholars include Peter Nien-chu Kiang, Shirley Tang, Loan Dao, Patricia Akemi Neilson, Rajini Srikanth, and Paul Watanabe. Faculty members from the two institutions work together to create materials and modules to enhance as many as twenty courses at BHCC. These materials are also disseminated to other institutions in the Massachusetts community college system through an online resource library.

Project fields: East Asian Studies
Program: Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges
Division: Education Programs
Total amounts: $120,000 (approved); $120,000 (awarded)
Grant period: 6/1/2014 – 5/31/2017

Create a new query