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13 matches

Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants*
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Hope College (Holland, MI 49423-3607)
Christian Spielvogel
HK-50070-13
Scaling Digital Gaming to Humanities Pedagogy and Praxis

Development of a platform that would allow educators across humanities disciplines to create web-based, multiplayer historical role-playing games. The platform would also include tools to facilitate peer review of game materials.

This project proposes five activities over the implementation grant period to simplify, scale and further legitimize the scholarly production and pedagogical application of games and simulations: 1) Development of nine new multiplayer simulations in the humanities. 2) Development of an authoring workflow that enables teacher/scholars with no programming background to develop and scaffold their own multiplayer simulations in five simple steps. 3) Incorporation of a digital peer review methodology and process to validate the quality of humanities games and simulations. 4) Refinement of a dual-sided interface that allows students to rotate between immersion as a character in a "role-play mode," and an out-of-character "reflection mode" to promote critical inquiry and self-reflection. 5) Development of community features to promote sharing of supplemental simulation content, exercises, and assessment.

Project fields: Communications
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $299,221
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2016

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
James Paradis (project director)
Kurt E Fendt (co-project director)
HK-50072-13
Annotation Studio: Multimedia Annotation for Students

Further development and wide-scale implementation of Annotation Studio, a platform to enhance student learning through annotation of digital texts, images, and video resources.

Annotation Studio is a web-based annotation application that integrates a powerful set of textual interpretation tools behind an interface that makes using those tools intuitive for undergraduates. Building on students’ new media literacies, this Open-source application develops traditional humanistic skills including close reading, textual analysis, persuasive writing, and critical thinking. Initial features of the Annotation Studio prototype, supported by an NEH Start-Up Grant, include aligned multi-media annotation of written texts, user-defined sharing of annotations, and grouping of annotation by self-defined tags to support interpretation and argument development. The fully developed application will support annotation of image, video and audio documents; annotation visualization; export of texts with annotations; and a media repository. We will also identify best practices among faculty using Annotation Studio in a broad range of humanities classes across the country.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $324,833
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305)
Dan Edelstein (project director)
Paula Findlen (co-project director)
HK-50087-13
Networks in History: Data-driven tools for analyzing relationships across time

A project to develop a general-purpose suite of visualization and analytical tools based on the prototypes created for the Mapping the Republic of Letters project, which examines the scholarly communities and networks of knowledge during the period 1500-1800.

Previous NEH-funding made it possible for "Mapping the Republic of Letters" project to develop a series of visualization prototypes to analyze the geographic breadth, historical shape, and social composition of intellectual networks; tools that support a domain expert's capacity to make sense of complexity, rather than relying on automated reasoning. With this project we will develop our most successful visualization techniques to serve historical research with three user groups in mind: 1. Digital humanities scholars with the technical expertise to integrate our code into their own projects and web applications (the "widget" model); 2. Scholars seeking easy upload, exploration, and analysis of historical data sets, without having to touch any code; 3. Early modern scholars who want to use these tools to explore and analyze their own data in the larger context of data already collected for "Mapping the Republic of Letters."

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $297,137
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 12/31/2015

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Peter K. Bol (project director)
Suzanne P. Blier (co-project director)
HK-50091-13
Extending WorldMap to Make It Easier for Humanists and Others to Find, Use, and Publish Geospatial Information

Continuing development of the WorldMap platform, a system that allows scholars, teachers, and students to explore, visualize, edit, and publish geospatial information.

WorldMap is being developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University as an open source and open access online platform for visualizing and sharing spatial data. It has attracted considerable use since released in July of 2011. We propose making improvements to WorldMap which will transform it from mapping portal to geospatial node on the web. We will develop a new data catalog to expose WorldMap contents for interactive use in systems outside WorldMap. We will gather map metadata from map servers around the world to add to this catalog, eventually maintaining a complete index of map services. To improve search in a metadata-weak map services environment we will add the capability to search by time; develop a mechanism for exposing feature level text to layer search; and use rankings, usage statistics and internal links to weight search results. We will also enable users to create temporal gazetteers and contribute them to a common crowd-sourced gazetteer.

Project fields: Geography
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $320,888
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Kimberly Ann Christen
HK-50120-13
Mukurtu Mobile: Empowering Knowledge Circulation Across Cultures

The development of Mukurtu Mobile, an open-source mobile platform for collecting and exhibiting indigenous digital cultural heritage.

This project will implement Mukurtu Mobile (mukurtumobile.org), an innovative iPhone application that empowers indigenous communities to collect, share and preserve their cultural and environmental resources. Mukurtu Mobile provides a platform for individuals to bring their own knowledge base to the common concerns of local, traditional and indigenous communities worldwide. With an interface directly to Mukurtu CMS, Mukurtu Mobile will link the power of a robust, culturally responsive CMS to the direct collection of knowledge on-the-ground. Adopted by communities globally, Mukurtu CMS (mukurtu.org) was built to address the specific needs of indigenous communities to manage, share and preserve their digital heritage. From citizen archivists to citizen scientists Mukurtu Mobile will enable the connection of local sets of knowledge and data to fuel research hubs and educational environments that unite local communities around global issues such as natural and cultural resource management.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $319,331
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10018)
Benjamin Vershbow
HK-50128-13
Scribe: Turning Text into Structured Information through the Power of the Crowd

Further development of Scribe, an open-source, extensible software platform for crowdsourced transcription of cultural heritage collections, including tools for transcription management, quality control, and data sharing.

The New York Public Library seeks to partner with the renowned citizen science team at Zooniverse to build Scribe: an open source transcription engine geared toward flexible, structured data extraction from a wide range of humanities documents. The final deliverable would be a developer-ready, open source transcription engine with an adjustable data schema, enabling scholars and curators to easily decide on a wide range of interactions with a document, keeping technical hurdles to a minimum. Based on an initial prototype built by Zooniverse, the tool would be developed collaboratively over two years through the release of several new humanities projects from the respective teams. At the end of the project, all code would be open sourced alongside a website publishing best practices and live demos of the various out-of-the-box modes of the engine.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $325,000
Grant period: 9/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94720-1501)
Marti Hearst
HK-50011-12
WordSeer: A Text Analysis Environment for Literature Study

Further development of the WordSeer platform, which provides computational analysis and visualization tools for literary researchers. The platform will be available for general use but also will include three new case studies based on three different text collections: interviews and writings of North American slaves (University of California, Berkeley); the works of Stephen Crane (Emory University); and the complete works of Shakespeare (University of Calgary).

This project will continue on the success of a Digital Humanities Startup grant (HD-51244-11) to produce a software environment for literary text analysis. Literature study is a cycle of reading, interpretation, exploration, and understanding. Called WordSeer, this software system integrates tools for automated processing of text with interaction techniques that support the interpretive, exploratory, and note-taking aspects of scholarship. Development of the tool follows best practices surrounding user-centered design and evaluation. At present, the system supports grammatical search and contextual similarity determination, visualization of patterns of word context. This implementation grant will allow for incorporating additional tools to aid comparison, exploration, grouping, and hypothesis formation, and to make the software more robust and therefore sharable and usable by a wide community of scholars.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $228,546
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 5/31/2014

Drew University (Madison, NJ 07940-1493)
Martin Kennedy Foys (project director)
Shannon Bradshaw (co-project director)
HK-50015-12
The DM Environment: From Annotation to Dissemination

The further development and testing of the annotation and online publishing capabilities of the DM (formerly Digital Mappaemundi) tool, an online environment that allows users to assemble collections of images and texts for humanities research and scholarship.

DM (formerly Digital Mappaemundi) is an online environment that allows users to easily assemble collections of images and texts for study, produce their own rich analysis data, and publish online resources for individual, group or public use. DM is ready for multi-year work with five partner projects (including a new partnership with the British Library) to implement a publicly available user-friendly environment that enables users to 1) assemble collections of resources from any combination of accessible repositories; 2) create richly linked data (e.g., annotation networks involving combinations of images, texts, fragments, web resources, and other annotations) and collections, sequences and indices that organize this data; 3) export data in a number of linked data formats; and 4) easily produce publicly accessible and interactive websites based on such data and linked data published elsewhere.

Project fields: Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $246,566
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 10/31/2014

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755)
Mary D. Flanagan
HK-50021-12
Metadata Games: Improving Access to Humanities Artifacts

The implementation of a software system that would use game play to allow users to contribute high-quality descriptive information about digital collections of humanities materials held by cultural heritage institutions.

Our team received Level II Start Up funding to create a pilot of Metadata Games (MG), a software system that uses computer games to collect information about artifacts in libraries and archives as they strive to go digital. Games are useful in that they can entice those who might not visit archives to explore humanities content while contributing to vital records, and they create much more metadata than typical staff can do alone in the same timeframe. The system is open-source and is easily customized to meet each institution’s needs. The full project employs new techniques to make the system smarter and more trustworthy. We will also create new game components. MG can be used to enhance knowledge about artifacts in particular disciplines and fields, or with interdisciplinary collections. MG has the potential to unearth new knowledge that could radically enhance scholarship in the humanities, expanding what records we can encounter in our quest to understand the human experience.

Project fields: Archival Management and Conservation
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $324,872
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2015

Ithaka Harbors, Inc. (New York, NY 10065-8112)
Nancy Maron
HK-50022-12
Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support Beyond the Start Up Phase

An analytical report on institutional support frameworks and administrative attitudes toward sustaining digital humanities projects in higher education, as well as on-campus sustainability workshops and a research toolkit to facilitate the continuation of this research.

This project builds on the Ithaka Case Studies in Sustainability, which helped to surface the significance of the host institution as a key element in the survival of digital humanities projects. To unwrap the layers of assumptions concerning the sort of support a host institution is expected or hoped to be providing, this research will be based on a sector-wide scan to map key points in a project’s lifecycle when the host institution is likely to play a role and "deep dives" at two institutions to develop an in-depth picture of the range of digital humanities projects on these campuses. By examining the institutional support ecosystem and the value system that undergirds it, we will provide both project leaders and university decision-makers the data, examples, and guidance they need, including a toolkit to conduct their own research, to work together to encourage the long-term sustainability of the digital humanities resources that continue to enrich the scholarly landscape.

Project fields: Economics
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $157,204
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 3/31/2014

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
David Lee Miller
HK-50032-12
PARAGON: Intelligent Digital Collation and Difference Detection

The further development of advanced collation and difference detection software that allows for the robust comparison of scanned images of texts, even if those scans include errors like warping of the page.

PARAGON builds on a successful prototype funded by an NEH startup grant in 2009. This prototype demonstrated that combining SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform) and TPS (Thin-Plate Spline) algorithms makes it possible to automate the detailed comparison of scanned images captured under varying circumstances, whether scanned, camera-taken from different heights or angles, rotated, differently lighted, or even slightly warped. PARAGON will develop this prototype into a robust, open-source software capable of analyzing and collating large sets of digital images.

Project fields: Literature, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $300,171
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2014

Alexandria Archive Institute (San Francisco, CA 94127-2036)
Eric C. Kansa
HK-50037-12
Applying Linked Open Data: Refining a Model of Data Sharing as Publication

The further development of a platform and refinement of workflows to store, describe, and publish archeological datasets, using an initial collection of data related to trade and exchange patterns in the ancient Near East and East Mediterranean.

Twenty-first century humanistic research has unprecedented opportunities to advance new models of scholarly communication together with new data-driven avenues of investigation. This project will help establish "data sharing as publication" as a scalable and professionally-valued model for the dissemination of humanistic research data. The project will develop case studies involving cross-collections research on trade and exchange in the Ancient Near East and East Mediterranean. In developing publishing workflows toward Linked Open Data, the project will help align the needs of the research profession with rapidly expanding capabilities of the Web of Data.

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Project fields: Archaeology
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $261,056
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 9/30/2015

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195)
S. Max Edelson (project director)
William Ferster (co-project director)
HK-50048-12
MapScholar: A Web Tool for Publishing Interactive Cartographic Collections

The further development of MapScholar, an online interactive tool that allows humanities scholars and students to combine digitized maps from disparate humanities collections to generate dynamic visualizations for use in online scholarly publications.

MapScholar is an interactive visualization tool for historic map collections. It offers an open-source portal that gives individual scholars the independent means of gathering high-resolution images, analyzing them in rich geospatial contexts, and using them to illustrate new interpretations in the history of cartography and related humanities fields. It joins together data in industry-standard file formats with free and effective data-serving sites such as Flickr and Google Docs to display its on-the-fly visualizations. MapScholar enhances traditional books and articles by making it possible -- at no cost to publishers -- to mount stunning web displays of map collections assembled from libraries around the world. MapScholar’s key innovation is how it brings maps together -- regardless of the archive in which they sit -- for the purpose of generating new knowledge about human perceptions of geographic space.

Project fields: History, General
Program: Digital Humanities Implementation Grants
Division: Digital Humanities
Total amount awarded: $297,115
Grant period: 9/1/2012 – 8/31/2015

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