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Program: Summer Stipends*
Date range: 2015-2017
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FT-254173-17

Laura Morowitz
Wagner College (Staten Island, NY 10301-4479)

Art Exhibitions in Vienna, Austria, during the Nazi Occupation

Preparation of two chapters of a book on art exhibitions in Vienna under Nazi rule between 1939 and 1945.

From 1938 to 1945 Austria was annexed into the German Reich and placed under Nazi rule; an independent Austria ceased to exist and it became the Ostmark, or Eastern-most region of the German nation. As in all other realms of culture, art exhibitions and art history were enlisted in reshaping the public memory and the identity of Ostmark. In the city of Vienna, one of the most important cultural capitals of the world, art exhibitions took on a special charge. This book examines three exhibits held at the Vienna Künstlerhaus between 1939 and 1945, focusing on the way in which art was used to replace a contested image of Vienna—a city with a particularly rich, complex relation to the arts, including tremendous contributions from Jewish artists and patrons—with an invented Ostmark. The motivations and functions of the exhibits under study, as well as the art historical interpretations and texts connected with them reveal a great deal about the fate of Austrian identity and Nazi ideology.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/30/2017


FT-254197-17

Stephen James Shoemaker
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

A Translation of the First Christian Hymnal: The Songs of the Ancient Jerusalem Church

Preparation for publication of an annotated translation of the earliest known Christian hymnal, created in Jerusalem in the early 5th century.

I will produce the first English language translation of the earliest known Christian hymnal. This collection of ancient Christian hymns was compiled in Jerusalem during the later 4th or early 5th century. It offers an unmatched resource for understanding the development of early Christian worship and piety, as well as the transmission of Christian doctrine to the unlettered. Nevertheless, this invaluable collection has been almost completely ignored by scholars of early Christianity. Such neglect is almost certainly a consequence of the fact that this collection of theological poetry survives only in an Old Georgian translation, a language known by very few scholars of early Christianity. Compounding this problem is the inaccessibility and complexity of its critical edition. The resulting book will be of interest not only to scholars and students of early Christianity, but to members of the general public interested in sacred music as well.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254202-17

Matthew Simonton
Arizona State University, West Campus (Glendale, AZ 85306-4900)

Demagogues and Popular Culture in Ancient Greece

Preparation of a book-length study on the popular political leaders of ancient Greece known as demagogues.

My book project, “Watchdogs of the People: Demagogues and Popular Culture in Ancient Greece,” represents the first comprehensive history of the demagogue ("leader of the people") in antiquity. Along with tracing the development and practice of demagoguery, it will utilize a popular culture-based approach to illuminate the concerns of everyday people as reflected in the rhetorical appeals of the demagogues. The book will ask timely questions concerned with the common good, such as when and why polarizing political figures arise, by what cultural appeals they attract a significant following, and how democratic societies can produce responsible leadership while remaining in touch with the concerns of average citizens.

Project fields:
Classical History; Classical Languages; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254220-17

Melissa Joy Homestead
University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)

The Creative Partnership of American Novelist Willa Cather and Editor Edith Lewis

A book-length study of the collaboration between Willa Cather and Edith Lewis.

I propose to spend summer 2017 working on two chapters of my book “The Creative Partnership of Willa Cather and Edith Lewis,” which reconstructs and analyzes the relationship between Cather, an American novelist, and Lewis, a magazine editor and advertising writer with whom Cather shared a home in New York City for nearly four decades. The book, which will consist of an introduction and seven chapters, is under contract with Oxford University Press with a final delivery date of 1 September 2019. By May 2017, I anticipate having produced complete drafts of the introduction and three chapters. During the fellowship term, I propose to write two more chapters, one on Cather and Lewis’s shared Southwestern travels and Cather’s two novels drawing on those experiences, and another on Lewis’s career as an advertising copywriter and Cather’s engagements with commercial and celebrity culture in the 1920s.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254227-17

Emily Bruderle Baran
Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)

The "Siberian Seven" and the Global Campaign for Religious Freedom

Preparation of a monograph on international Christian human rights during the Cold War.

My project explores the intersection of religious activism and human rights through the first scholarly examination of the Siberian Seven incident. In 1978 seven Pentecostals from Siberia entered the American Embassy in Moscow. They had endured decades of persecution, and refused to leave the embassy, ultimately winning emigration after five years in residence. My project uses this incident to chart the global human rights campaign on behalf of Soviet Christians in the late Cold War. It examines the dialogue between Soviet citizens and western activists, and their difficult relationship with their governments and society at large. The Siberian Seven demonstrate the need to understand the interplay, exchange, and conflict between Christians on both sides of the Iron Curtain. I am requesting NEH support to fund critical research in the Russian state archives. This will allow me to produce a compelling monograph that reaches a broad audience of scholars, students, and the general public.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254559-17

Michael David McNally
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)

Native American Religious Freedom beyond the First Amendment

Writing a book on the role of Native American religious traditions in legal debates over religious freedom.

The category of "religion" as it has come to be defined in the law has had mixed results for Native American communities who have strategically appealed to the legal/political discourse of "religious freedom" to protect sacred places, practices, knowledge, objects, and ancestral remains that are not easily assimilated into modern Western senses of "religion." In turn, those communities have articulated such arguably "religious" claims in other legal and political discourses: cultural property, historic preservation and environmental law, treaty-based federal Indian law, and indigenous rights in international human rights law. The book to be completed under the grant, Native American Religious Freedom Beyond the First Amendment, explores these Native American claims, and the various legal discourses of their articulation, to inform contemporary discussions about religious freedom, the cultural history of the category of religion, and the vitality of indigenous religions in today's world.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Law and Jurisprudence; Native American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254572-17

Rachel Teukolsky
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)

The Aesthetic Life of Images in Britain's Machine Age

A book-length study on new media technology in Victorian England and its influence on literature and aesthetics.

“New media” today conjures cyberspace, hypertext, and other digital innovations. Yet media invention itself is not new, and every epoch has had to confront the disruptive and transformative effects of new communications technologies. This project looks back to the new visual media of Britain’s nineteenth century, to demonstrate their centrality to Victorian ideas about aesthetics, politics, and visual value. Each of the book’s chapters considers a different kind of emergent visual media object, including pictorial newspapers, stereoscopic views, illustrated bibles, advertising posters, and early film. The book shows how these mass-produced visual objects, usually considered disposable ephemera, in fact offer access to some of the Victorian era’s foundational aesthetic concepts, keywords such as character, illustration, realism, sensation, and the picturesque.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British Literature; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254581-17

Kelly Jane Shannon
Florida Atlantic University Libraries (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)

U.S.-Iranian Relations, 1905-1953

A book-length study of U.S.-Iranian relations, 1905-1953.

This book-length project will offer a critical and comprehensive examination of US-Iran relations during the period between Iran’s first revolution and the 1953 US coup against Iran’s prime minister. Based on extensive multi-national, multi-lingual archival research in government, non-government, and cultural sources, this book will provide a deep understanding of the roots and drivers of early US-Iran engagement. By writing a history of the broad array of interactions between Americans and Iranians--official diplomacy, geopolitics, military matters, missionary activities, business and financial relationships, oil, travelers and tourism, women and gender, human rights and humanitarianism, and culture--I will argue that Americans had an indelible impact on Iranian nationalism and understanding of the West, while Iran served as an ally for US attempts to upend the European-dominated global system, a lens for understanding the Islamic world, and a site for the exercise of growing US power.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Near and Middle Eastern History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254602-17

Urmila Shree Seshagiri
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

A Scholarly Edition of Virginia Woolf's "A Sketch of the Past"

Preparation of a scholarly edition of British writer Virginia Woolf’s (1882-1941) memoir, A Sketch of the Past.

I seek an NEH Summer Stipend to prepare the first scholarly edition of Virginia Woolf’s "A Sketch of the Past." Composed between 1939-1940 but undiscovered until 1976, "A Sketch" is at once a vibrant archive of English literary culture; a record of historical change following Queen Victoria's death; a complex treatise on life-writing; and, above all, a self-portrait of artistic growth. Updated to reflect a detailed, historically rich understanding of Woolf’s literary and professional achievements, a scholarly edition of "A Sketch of the Past" would shine crucial new light on the author’s conception of “the whole world as a work of art.” I will work with Woolf’s original manuscripts and typescripts in the British Library and the University of Sussex, producing an new textual edition of this memoir, the sole piece of autobiographical writing Woolf intended for publication.  My critical introduction will demonstrate scholarly advancements made in the 40 years since the book's original publication.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254607-17

Daniel Aaron Weiskopf
Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)

The Philosophical Inquiry into the Nature of Concepts, Vehicles of Thought

Writing two chapters toward completion of a book on the nature of concepts.

Concepts are the building blocks of higher thought, particularly the sorts of thought that are involved in categorization, reasoning and inference, judgment and decision making, planning, and similar processes. This project defends a theory of concepts that portrays them as cognitive tools, biologically and culturally shaped to serve an array of practical and theoretical ends. The crucial fact about concepts is that they display striking adaptive fluidity, which enables human cognition to adjust itself to a wide range of domains, tasks, and contexts. While currently dominant approaches to concepts largely neglect or marginalize this phenomenon, exploring the origin, scope, and limits of this adaptive fluidity leads to a theory that has greater empirical adequacy and theoretical depth. This work will inform research in the philosophy of mind, psychology, and other fields, such as anthropology and the history of science, that study the processes by which humans categorize the world.

Project fields:
Philosophy of Science; Psychology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254230-17

Evan Haefeli
Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)

Religious Toleration in America, 1660-1714

A book-length study about the development of transatlantic religious pluralism in the British colonies between 1660 and 1714.

Researching, in English archives, a book-length study of the growth of religious pluralism in colonial America. Treating toleration as a practice as much as an idea, it sets the creation and growth of colonies like New York and Pennsylvania within the religious and political context of the British Isles and other parts of the empire, from Jamaica to India, to determine just how exceptional or pragmatic the toleration in America was. Emphasizing the role of imperial politics in opening up new possibilities for toleration, the research also shows local efforts in America to restrict pluralism. In this crucial phase of the creation of American pluralism, religious toleration was far from universally accepted. It was contested in some areas, very limited in others, existing in different ways from one colony to another. By examining American developments within the context of the whole empire, this book shows that what we think of as distinctly American was actually an imperial product.

Project fields:
British History; History of Religion; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254240-17

Joseph Eugene Hower
Southwestern University (Georgetown, TX 78626)

Jerry Wurf (1919-1981) and the Rise of Public Sector Unions in Postwar America

A book-length study of public sector unionism in the post-WWII United States, focusing on Jerry Wurf (1919-1981), a leader in the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) union.

My book explores the significance of public sector labor unions to broader transformations in American politics and society during the second half of the twentieth century through a social biography of Jerry Wurf (1919-1981). Building on recent work that looks to the 1970s as the “critical decade” in the postwar era, I show how the growing size, power, and visibility of public sector unions bolstered the ranks of a stagnating labor movement while transforming popular perceptions of organized labor; it created new and powerful constituencies for government programs while forever altering the politics of taxes and public services; it provided an effective vehicle for African Americans and women to secure dignity and equity at the public workplace while undermining the status and security of public employment; and it lent crucial support to a liberalism shaken by Vietnam and the fiscal crisis while inadvertently facilitating the success of Reagan-era conservatism.

Project fields:
Labor History; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254241-17

Andrew Joseph Hogan
Creighton University (Omaha, NE 68178-0133)

Changing Understandings among Physicians of Developmental Disabilities, 1950-1980

Research and writing of a book on medical understandings of developmental disabilities in the second half of the 20th century. 

After 1950, the understanding and management of developmental disabilities were impacted by two countervailing trends. As public support for the unique needs and experiences of affected individuals increased, physicians began to link developmental disabilities to genetic causes. Genetic associations led to new identities and resources, but also reified disability as a pathological target for medical intervention. Scholars have extensively explored increasing postwar social support for disability. Less has been done to examine how evolving societal views of disability influenced the medical community. This project draws on archives, published literature, and interviews to examine evolving clinical narratives of developmental disabilities. The PI examines how and why new narratives of developmental disabilities entered the medical community, how clinicians responded to alternative viewpoints, positively and negatively, and the role of some professionals in promoting broader adoption.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254248-17

Leif Weatherby
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)

Early Digital Humanities: German Idealism and the Development of Cybernetics in the mid 20th Century

Research and writing leading to a book-length study of mid-20th century philosophers of German Idealism who theorized cybernetics and digital technology.

The book project tells the story of a small group of thinkers I call the "cybernetic metaphysicians," who developed the first metaphysics for the digital. They shared the conviction that information theory and German Idealism (especially the philosophy of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel) would have to be combined to reinvent the humanities in the age of the computer. Warren McCulloch, Jacques Lacan, Max Bense, and Gotthard Günther came to share this conviction through a series of glancing contacts that I reveal from the archive for the first time. They never formed a movement, but their thought, once reconstructed together, shows us a very different kind of "digital humanities."

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 11/30/2017


FT-254626-17

Andrew A Latham
Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)

Ideas of Sovereignty in the Later Middle Ages

A book-length study on the medieval origins of the concept of sovereignty.

The conventional wisdom in the field of International Relations (IR) is that "sovereignty" is an unambiguously modern political concept invented by decidedly modern political thinkers like Jean Bodin. The major contribution of this study is to challenge this conventional wisdom by demonstrating the existence of a robust discourse on sovereignty during the high and late Middle Ages. In so doing, this study will call into question the radical “Otherness” of the medieval era that is so central to the identity of the field of IR. It will also complement a body of work within the field of Medieval Political Thought that addresses issues of political authority, but that neither adequately theorizes the idea of sovereignty nor provides a unified account of its evolution during the later Middle Ages.

Project fields:
International Relations; Medieval History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254643-17

Tom Keeline, Jr
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)

Latin Textual Scholarship in the Digital Age: An Open-Access Critical Edition of Ovid's Ibis

Preparation of an online critical edition of Ibis by the Roman poet Ovid for the Digital Latin Library.

I propose to prepare an open-access critical edition of the Ibis, a poem by the Latin poet Ovid. The edition will be submitted to the Digital Latin Library, a new cooperative venture established to provide a home for innovative Latin textual scholarship in digital form and to make that scholarship accessible to the world. The Ibis itself, although written by one of ancient Rome’s best-known poets, has long been neglected, in large part because of the lack of a suitable edition. My research has shown that the standard text, issued some 60 years ago, can be improved in a number of ways. I have laid the groundwork for my project in a lengthy study of the manuscript tradition and text of the poem, which has been published in a leading Classics journal, as well as in publications and conference presentations on textual criticism in the digital age. My project will both make a contribution to scholarship on Ovid and serve as a pilot project for digital critical editions of Latin texts.

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classical Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254686-17

Jennifer Grant Germann
Ithaca College (Ithaca, NY 14850-7002)

A Study of the Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, an 18th-century British Artwork

Preparation of two scholarly articles related to the double portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, a British painting from the late 18th century at Scone Palace, Scotland.

The investigation into the Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray engages questions about identity construction in portraiture in Georgian Britain. This anonymous portrait presents them as cousins and subjects, but it uses imagery that denied subjectivity to black figures in art. It presents them together at Kenwood, the family villa, where it was displayed. My interdisciplinary project examines the contradictory imagery by situating the portrait and their lives within the circuits of global exchange, colonialism, and slavery, as well as within the structures of gender, race, and social rank in Great Britain and its empire. I propose to do research for two journal articles that will examine this portrait, attendant portraits in general, and eighteenth-century identity construction in visual representations. This project will contribute to the essential widening of art history’s scope to include new subjects who have been historically marginalized in the field.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 9/30/2017


FT-254689-17

Tara Fickle
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

A Digital Edition and Reconsideration of a Foundational Anthology of Asian American Literature

Creation of a digital edition of Aiiieeeee! An Anthology of Asian-American Writers (1974), a formative text in the development of Asian American Studies.

“Behind Aiiieeeee!” is a digital humanities project that examines the genesis of Asian American literature and its political and aesthetic role in contemporary America. It undertakes the first comprehensive archival analysis of Aiiieeeee!, a foundational Asian American literary anthology from the 1970s formed in the crucible of national post-civil rights struggles and global “Third World Movements” in Asia. These unpublished materials will be showcased through a series of online interactive learning modules, including an annotated hypertext version of the original edition and a visual map of the inter-ethnic and transnational networks involved. It will provide educators and students with the resources to appreciate a number of unfamiliar but seminal Asian American texts, while contributing to a scholarly understanding of how literary fiction became a powerful vehicle for synthesizing the political and aesthetic aspirations of the first generation of self-proclaimed Asian Americans.

Project fields:
American Literature; Asian American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 9/30/2017


FT-254697-17

Mary I. Unger
Ripon College (Ripon, WI 54971-1465)

Cultures of Reading in the Black Chicago Renaissance

A book-length study on reading communities and audience reception during the Chicago Renaissance.

This book recovers forgotten African American reading communities on Chicago’s South Side that helped create the Black Chicago Renaissance, a flourishing of African American literary expression from the 1930s through the 1950s. In Bronzeville, Chicago’s predominantly black neighborhood, writers such as Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks discovered lively reading communities that responded to and shaped their work. Through extensive archival research, I analyze how--in public forums, book clubs, the black press, and local businesses--Bronzeville readers served as agents of critique and reception who proved central to the work of Wright, Brooks, and other black writers of the era. My project thus demonstrates how local readers--rather than the white literary establishment--dictated the norms and tastes of African American literature in the mid twentieth century. In this way, my book uncovers the impact of Chicago’s South Side on the development of American life and letters.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254700-17

Allie Terry-Fritsch
Bowling Green State University (Bowling Green, OH 43403-0001)

Cosimo de’Medici, Fra Angelico, and the Public Library of San Marco

Preparation of a book-length study on the patronage of Cosimo de'Medici in the fifteenth century and the fresco paintings by Beato Angelico in the monastery of San Marco, Florence.

This research project reconstructs the original fifteenth-century audience for Beato Angelico’s frescoes at the monastery of San Marco in Florence to challenge traditional art-historical assumptions regarding both the reception of the artist’s work and the motivations for its patronage by the Renaissance statesman and merchant, Cosimo de’Medici. Based on art-historical and archival evidence of an elite group of humanist scholars who gathered at the site’s library under the auspices of Cosimo, the project takes into account the coexistence of religious and secular viewers during the fifteenth century and thus opens up the analysis of Fra Angelico’s imagery for the first time to a larger social body that had political motivations. The reception of the paintings by these secular viewers extends the political and social significance of Cosimo’s patronage to the larger Florentine public outside the monastery's walls.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254705-17

Allison Lange
Wentworth Institute of Technology (Boston, MA 02115-5901)

The Visual Politics of the Woman Suffrage Movement from American Independence through the Nineteenth Amendment

A book-length study about the strategic use of images in the woman suffrage movement from the 1780s through 1920.

Images of Change will be the first book to demonstrate the centrality of visual politics—the strategic use of images to promote a cause or candidate—to US woman’s rights campaigns from the late 18th century through 1920, when the 19th Amendment granted women suffrage. Reformers used images to contest women’s relationships with the state, while opponents used them to reinforce existing ones. In response to pictures satirizing political women as masculine threats to society, suffragists changed their public image with visual campaigns that laid the foundations for modern ones. I analyze the visual and historical contexts of popular public images, ranging from engraved cartoons and photographic portraits to the earliest newspaper halftones and colorful propaganda posters. My work expands on recent studies of race, pictures, and politics by focusing on gender. This book and exhibition will promote a better understanding of the gendered political images that still spark public debates.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254708-17

Jonathan Marc Gribetz
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)

Reading Herzl in Beirut: The PLO's Research on Judaism and Israel

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Palestinian research into Zionism and the role of that research in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

In mid-September 1982, just as they invaded West Beirut, Israeli forces raided a high-rise in the Lebanese capital. Though the building belonged to the Palestine Liberation Organization, the targets inside were neither militants nor weapons. The Israeli soldiers were there to capture a library—a library that was filled with books about Jews, Zionism, and Israel. Reading Herzl in Beirut, the monograph I am writing, is a book about that library, the institution that collected it (the PLO Research Center), the researchers who used it, the scholarship they produced in it, and, ultimately, the impact of the knowledge produced there on the course of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. How did learning about the enemy inform Palestinian politics and the acceptance of a two-state solution? With an NEH Summer Stipend, I will travel to Beirut and Jerusalem to gain access to archives, libraries, and the many scholars of the PLO, Palestinian intellectual history, and the conflict based there.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Jewish Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254263-17

José Luis Venegas
Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)

Modern Conceptions of Medieval Muslim Spain

A book-length project on modern political, religious, and cultural conceptions of medieval Muslim Spain and Spanish national identity.

Inventing modern Spain in the twentieth century meant Europeanizing, but also revising and at times discarding Orientalist images of its southern region, Andalusia, the fabled land of Carmen the Gypsy cigar-maker, the Alhambra Palace, and the Muslim civilization of Al-Andalus. My project, an interdisciplinary analysis of visual art, literary texts, music, and architecture from the late 1800s until the present, will be the first systematic account of how Spanish artists and intellectuals represent Andalusia as a space of encounter between Spain’s modernizing aspirations and its Moorish past. Neither identical nor antithetical to the Arab world, Andalusia challenges ethnocentric notions of Spanish culture while disrupting such oppositions as Oriental vs European and primitive vs modern. In tracing the development of this ambivalent image, the project demonstrates its overlooked yet pivotal role in formulations of national identity in modern Spain.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254264-17

Cristina Stanciu
Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA 23284-9066)

The Makings and Unmakings of Americans: Indians and Immigrants in American Literature and Culture, 1879-1924

Research and writing of a book comparing how Native Americans and immigrant communities understood Americanization at the beginning of the twentieth century.

This NEH summer stipend will be essential to completing and submitting this first book-length study of how Native American and New Immigrant writers and public intellectuals intervened in the debates over Americanization at the beginning of the twentieth century. The book, under contract with Yale University Press, illuminates in fundamental ways the debates over what it meant to be an American at the turn of the twentieth century, debates which continue to resonate in contemporary discourses over national identity. The book builds on previously unexamined or under-examined archives of Indigenous and New Immigrant materials ranging from manuscripts and publications of the Carlisle Indian School to the Society of American Indian papers, from Yiddish newspapers to the Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey. The book charts the intersecting visions of the campaigns to assimilate Native Americans (1879-1924) and to Americanize the New Immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe (1883-1924).

Project fields:
American Literature; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254269-17

David Fedman
University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)

Forestry and the Politics of Conservation in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on conservationism and forest management in colonial Korea, 1910-1945.

This project examines Japanese efforts to rehabilitate, exploit, and showcase Korea’s forests during the period of colonial rule (1910-1945). Building on previous studies of the tangled roots of empire and conservationism, I argue that the forestry enterprise in colonial Korea was as concerned with the seed as it was with the saw: it placed reforestation at the very heart of its efforts to modernize the Korean landscape and the ecological sensibilities of its inhabitants. But forest reclamation in Korea was far from benevolent: it siphoned off forests to Japanese corporations, cut off communities from resources that had long sustained them, and placed vast stands of timber under state control. Afforestation, in other words, was a process rife with conflict and fraught with contradiction. By chronicling this intensive, contested, and largely forgotten forestry project, this book offers a path-breaking case study in the promise and perils of natural resource management in Japan’s empire.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 10/30/2017


FT-254303-17

Abigail L. Swingen
Texas Tech University (Lubbock, TX 79409)

The Financial Revolution and the British Empire during the 17th and 18th Centuries

A book-length study on the financial revolution in the British Empire during the 17th and 18th centuries.

Britain’s Financial Revolution was key to the origins of capitalism in the early modern period. The Financial Revolution is usually associated with the creation of the national debt on the part of the British government to help pay for increasingly expensive military endeavors at turn of the eighteenth century. The widespread use of credit was not new, but the move away from using limited, personalized credit mechanisms toward more impersonal, state-supported instruments of public debt and credit fundamentally transformed British society by creating new investment opportunities for a variety of people throughout Britain and the empire. My book, The Financial Revolution and the British Empire, will place the Financial Revolution properly within the history of capitalism and take into consideration how and why imperial expansion played a role in developing many of the financial institutions and mechanisms associated with the Financial Revolution.

Project fields:
British History; Economic History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254744-17

Eduardo D. Elena
University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2503)

Argentina and the Emergence of Modern Transportation and Communication Systems, 1860-1910

A book-length study about the emergence of modern transportation and communication systems in Argentina between 1860 and 1910.

Conquering Distance: Argentina and the Fortunes of Steam-Age Globalization, 1860-1910 considers how historical actors engaged with the opportunities and dilemmas of a shrinking world. It investigates changing understandings of distance in a time when steam-age systems like the railways enabled movement on a scale and speed never before seen. The study profiles the individuals and institutions that competed to profit from new spatial connections: central among them, financiers, transporters, and state officials based in Argentina and Western Europe. Yet rather than presenting steam-age globalization as a story of inexorable contraction—in which the world becomes ever smaller, seamless, and “flat”—the study accounts for the uneven impact of connecting mechanisms on different places and peoples. Accordingly, it sheds light on the women and men who confronted the perils of a more tightly-linked world and the commentators who assessed the shortcomings of steam-age advances.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254758-17

Mark van Roojen
University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)

Moral Rationalism: Making Sense of the Reasons that Justify and Explain Morally Right Action

Writing two chapters in a book on a new theory of justification.

Moral rationalism identifies the norms of morality with norms of practical reasoning, explaining why we have reason to act rightly. Most contemporary rationalists adopt ideal advisor accounts of rationality—you have most reason to do what your ideal all-knowing advisor tells you. This has costs. It prevents reasons from playing certain explanatory and justificatory roles and obscures how we know what reasons and morality require. I work with an example model—an agent has most reason to do what a rational agent would do in her shoes. I build from there to the objective reasons captured in the advisor model by adding in information and more. But I do not need to leave the agent’s perspective to talk about advisors distinct from the agent. The resulting view unifies objective and subjective reasons, and makes sense of what we should do when we lack full information or certain abilities. It captures the idea that reasons motivate rational agents in an ordinary sense.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254773-17

Simon Balto
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)

A History of Race, Policing, and the Urban Experience in 20th-century Chicago

A book-length history of police administration, crime, and citizen activism in Chicago from 1919 through the 1970s.

This book manuscript explores how policing systems shaped black experiences, black politics, and the urban fabric in Chicago and cities like it during the twentieth century. It documents how, between the late 1910s and the early 1970s, Chicago built an intricate, powerful carceral machinery whose most noticeable feature was an extreme racial selectivity. Within that machinery’s cogs, black communities increasingly articulated themselves as being both “overpatrolled” and “underprotected.” They highlighted escalating harassment and violence and worsening neglect from the police department, and the intransigence of the city’s power structure to address the problem. Deeply aligned with the NEH mission of using the humanities to understand the conditions of American life, this book speaks directly to modern crises in policing and conflicts in police-community relations, as well as to the steep racialization of what is popularly known as “mass incarceration.”

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254841-17

James Arthur Schafer, Jr
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

The American Medical Profession, Militarization, and the State in the First World War

Research and writing of a book on the professional and social impact of the mobilization of physicians during World War I.

As the U.S. prepared for the First World War, editorials warned that thousands of civilian doctors would be needed to voluntarily enlist in the Army and Navy Medical Corps to support the war effort. These predictions proved accurate; in the nineteen months from declaration of war in April 1917 to Armistice in November 1918, roughly 32,000 American doctors enlisted as medical officers — what amounted to twenty-two percent of all licensed doctors nationwide. In my book project, “Mobilizing Doctors: The American Medical Profession, Militarization, and the State in the First World War,” I argue that this sudden, unprecedented mobilization of doctors transformed American medicine in the short- and long-term. Based in the medical humanities, my research uses archival sources to examine the wartime experiences of doctors, the rhetoric of medical leaders, and the evolution of medical careers and institutions. “Mobilizing Doctors” thereby demonstrates the lasting effects of war on American society.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254856-17

Megan Sarah Nutzman
Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA 23529-0001)

Ritual Cures Among Christians, Jews, and Pagans in Roman and Late-Antique Palestine

Preparation of a book-length study on healing rituals practiced in Roman and late antique Palestine.

My project is the first book-length study to synthesize evidence for the full range of healing rituals practiced in Roman and late antique Palestine. Using literary and archaeological evidence, I identify four sources of ritual power believed to transmit divine cures: holy men, sacred places, performative acts, and amulets. Close cultural contacts enabled pagans, Jews, and Christians to borrow each other's rituals, altering them to fit new cultic frameworks. This project's aggregate nature enables me to challenge the common inclination among historians of Greco-Roman religions to compartmentalize the study of ritual healing according to a putative divide between "magical" and "religious" cures or by focusing on a single cultural or linguistic group. Ultimately, I contribute to two ongoing debates on religious identity by reevaluating the role that ritual healing played in conversion experiences and by using it as a lens to assess the "parting of the ways" between Jews and Christians.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Jewish Studies; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254859-17

Matthew J. Christensen
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)

The State and the Individual Subject in African Detective Fiction

Research leading to publication of a book on the role of detective novels in social and political debate in twentieth-century Africa.

Unsovereign Bodies: The State and the Individual Subject in African Detective Fiction traces the history of the detective genre as a mode of critique in Anglophone African writing. By playing on narrative codes that promise full disclosure of criminal deception and justice for hardworking, innocent individuals, Anglophone African writers, I argue, have transformed the detective novel’s ideological preoccupation with liberal capitalism and its discontents into a broader critical engagement with the collectivist ideals of decolonization, the valences of vulnerability, and the untenable governmentalities available to the postcolony. For their local readerships, the novels consequently ask how do individuals and communities manage risk and resources given the radical instability of the sovereignty of the state and rights-bearing citizen?

Project fields:
African Literature; African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254873-17

Jefferson Decker
Rutgers University, New Brunswick (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)

The Stock Market and the Politics of Financial Security, 1974-2000

A book-length study of the late 20th-century stock market and its impact on public policy and on the public's understanding of the national economy.

Bull: The Stock Market and the Politics of Financial Security, 1974-2000 describes an era of “good times” that helped to transform social institutions and reshape public policy, namely the 1982-2000 bull market in U.S. stocks. During that nearly two-decade stretch, the S&P 500 index of major U.S. stocks increased in value thirteen times over, generating annual returns nearly twice their historical average. And what happened in the market itself was not nearly as interesting as its impact on U.S. politics and intellectual life. The long bull market became the prism though which many Americans understood changes in the national economy and passed judgment on public policies. It weighed on policymakers as they discussed how to reform pensions, manage budget deficits, regulate Wall Street, or plan for the future of Social Security. It was a period in U.S. financial history that was also a period in U.S. political history.

Project fields:
American Studies; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254891-17

Anne G. Hanley
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)

An Institutional History of the 1872 Brazilian Census and Adoption of the Metric System

An article-length study about the economic history of Brazil focusing on the introduction of the metric system and the conduct of the first national census in the 1870s.

My research looks at two major events that took place in Brazil in 1872: the first national census and the adoption of the metric system of weights and measures. These events are important to Brazil's history because of their potential to integrate the domestic economy. Prior to the adoption of the metric system Brazilians used regional weights and measures of differing values, making long-distance exchange difficult. Prior to the national census, Brazilian planners lacked much beyond a general understanding of the demographics of the internal market. Both innovations brought Brazilians into closer contact with state officials whose policies had powerful effects on their livelihoods This project opens an investigation into the history of Brazil's domestic economy, where most Brazilians lived and worked and where government initiatives had the greatest potential to affect their quality of life and standard of living.

Project fields:
Economic History; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254897-17

Clare Holloway Croft
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

A Biography of American Dance Critic Jill Johnston (1929-2010)

A book-length cultural biography of American dance critic and feminist Jill Johnston (1929-2010).

This project undertakes research on important American arts critic and activist, Jill Johnston, as a window into examining the role of embodiment in American histories of arts and activism in the 1960s and 1970s.

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254401-17

Lisa Rebekah Arnold
North Dakota State University, Main Campus (Fargo, ND 58102-1843)

Rhetoric and Identity at Syrian Protestant College, 1866-1920

Completion of a book on the history of writing and language teaching at the Syrian Protestant College in Beirut, Lebanon, from 1866 to 1920. 

This project examines the history of writing policies and practices at Syrian Protestant College (SPC), located in Beirut, Lebanon, in order to reveal how rhetorical negotiations among faculty, students, administrators, and the local community around the turn of the twentieth century produced an unsettled, and sometimes unsettling, vision of “America.” The example of SPC demonstrates how “America” was imagined rhetorically through educational practices and policies prior to the nation’s direct political involvement in the Middle East-North Africa region. As American models of schooling traveled across national borders, so too did the ideology of an “ideal American identity” travel through the promotion of literacy abroad. Rhetorical negotiations at SPC illuminate the high stakes and implicit promises of the global spread of American-style institutions of higher education, particularly in relation to questions of American identity, culture, and citizenship.

Project fields:
American Studies; Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254415-17

Katherine Turk
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

A History of the National Organization for Women

A book-length history of the National Organization for Women, 1966-2016

In 1966, a diverse group of activists created the National Organization for Women (NOW) to build “a civil rights movement to speak for women.” Claiming NOW will yield the first comprehensive account of the largest and most significant feminist membership organization in American history. Over the decades, NOW’s leaders and hundreds of local chapters built undeniable momentum that made feminism mainstream. But NOW’s mass appeal and open-ended blueprint also produced new adversaries as it fought to “desexigrate” American citizenship and destabilized the very category of “woman.” By foregrounding NOW in the past half-century of American history, Claiming NOW reveals how centrist feminism transformed as it took shape, intersecting with conservative forces to produce our own social and political landscape.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254416-17

Kristina Killgrove
University of West Florida (Pensacola, FL 32514-5750)

Death Comes to Oplontis: Recording and Analyzing Skeletons of Victims of Mt. Vesuvius (79 AD)

Analysis and digital preservation of 54 skeletons from the Roman town, Oplontis, destroyed by Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D., leading to the creation of digital models, datasets, a project website, and an interpretive article.

Numerous urban centers in the Bay of Naples were completely destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD. Pompeii and Herculaneum are the most famous of these, primarily because of the extent of excavation and the creation of plaster casts of dozens of dead bodies. Other areas were equally affected but are less understood, even today, because of their location underneath modern development. The villa complex of Oplontis is one of these. The 54 skeletons from Oplontis have been partially excavated, but they have never been conserved or analyzed. This project therefore has two goals: 1) to digitally preserve this cultural heritage through 3D scanning and photogrammetry; and 2) to create and publish a comparative database of key information from the skeletons themselves. This proposed research connects the dots between archaeological context, historical records, and physical bodies and invites the public to interact with this little-known Vesuvian site.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254429-17

Kate Bredeson
Reed College (Portland, OR 97202-8199)

An Edition of The Diaries of American Actress, Writer, and Director Judith Malina, 1947-2015

Research and digital preservation of documents leading to the publication of a scholarly edition of the diaries and papers of Judith Malina (1926-2015), co-founder and director of The Living Theater.

My book is an edited collection of Living Theatre co-founder and director Judith Malina’s diaries, accompanied by my critical introduction that situates Malina in theater history. This book provides an in depth historical account of Malina’s over sixty years as a director, performer, manager, radical activist, and woman. Because it is the aspect of her life least touched by scholars, my book focuses on revealing Malina’s work as a director—her approach with her actors, artistic vision, and rehearsal techniques. While two versions (1947-57 and 1968-69) of Malina’s diaries have been published to great acclaim, the rest of her papers remain unpublished. In her writings, Malina’s wit, passion, and vivacious observations about her life’s work and her political and social milieux are made abundantly clear. This book appeals to theater scholars, artists, students, and cultural historians. I apply for NEH support to work with the 2008-2015 diaries, which are in a storage locker in NYC.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254443-17

Travis Michael Timmerman
Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ 07079-2697)

Accounting for Moral Responsibility in an Agent's Free Actions

Writing two papers to present at academic conferences in preparation for writing a book on moral responsibility.

Virtually all normative ethical theories hold that whether an action is morally right depends upon the alternative acts available to the agent. But what exactly are the relevant alternative acts available to an agent? The answer to this question is far from obvious once we consider facts about how an agent would freely act in various situations. Actualists say that the relevant acts are determined by how agents would act in any situation. Possibilists deny this. Hybridists posit an actualist and a possibilist ought. The actualism/possibilism debate has important, heretofore, overlooked implications for the philosophical debate about the nature of moral responsibility. I will write two papers which collectively demonstrate that (a) actualism cannot accommodate an essential desideratum for any plausible account of blameworthiness, yet which (b) hybridism can easily be developed to accommodate. Consequently, I will identify another reason to accept hybridism and reject actualism.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254451-17

Anne Ayer Verplanck
Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg (Middletown, PA 17057-4846)

The Business of Art: Transforming the Graphic Arts in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction

Preparation of a book-length study on the history of business and graphic arts in 19th-century Philadelphia.

The book analyzes how the art world functioned amid changing business structures, technological innovations, and rapid urban development. Using Philadelphia as its locus, the book positions the city in both national and international contexts, asking how the interplay of place, economics, and social relations affected the creation and use of art, individual businesses, and the ascent and decline of high-caliber graphic arts in Philadelphia. At its core, the book analyzes why seemingly contradictory innovative and retardataire practices and mindsets in the city enabled the infrastructure surrounding the graphic arts to expand during the antebellum period, yet ultimately cede prominence as the nation’s artistic center to New York City. The project analyzes the financial underpinnings and creative output of artists, printers, publishers, and others in the art world to provide new perspectives on artistic patronage, production, and distribution; urban development; and business practices.

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254468-17

Wayne A. Wiegand
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)

The American Public School Library: A History

Preparation of a monograph about the American public school library and its history.

As of this writing, more than 94,000 school library/media centers exist in the United States, 80,000 of which are public school libraries. For the 20th century alone the American public school library can boast a rich history of service to tens of thousands of schoolteachers and administrators and millions of K-12 users of both sexes, all creeds, races, sexual orientations, ethnicities, and social classes. Despite the fact that the American public school library is ubiquitous, however, no one from the education or the library and information science (LIS) research communities has yet written a comprehensive history of the institution to help identify and deepen understanding of its multiple roles, and to provide perspective to leaders now creating policy, planning its future, and fighting for its funding. I intend to write a 300-page history of the American public school library.

Participating institutions:
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL) - Applicant/Grantee
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar () - Participating institution

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254470-17

Edward Cahill
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

Benjamin Franklin and Upward Mobility in British America

Research and writing of a study of class mobility in colonial America and other British colonies, with the life of Benjamin Franklin as a case study.

This project explores the cultural history of upward mobility in colonial British America by examining the ideas of striving and rising that Benjamin Franklin inherited and the ways in which he and others adapted and revised them. Long considered an avatar of the ‘American Dream,’ Franklin was in fact indebted to a 17th-century English tradition that understood mobility as appealing but dangerous, as well as a colonial one that often satirized radical mobility while limiting prosperity to elites. Such tensions persisted throughout the 18th century, even as American opportunity widened and moral scruples about ambition grew more flexible. After achieving wealth and status himself, Franklin demanded the virtuous moderation of his ambitious contemporaries and ridiculed hasty striving. But he also affirmed the legitimacy of mobility, extended its intellectual and social means to a broader audience, and revolutionized the formal literary means by which its stories could be told.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254487-17

Catherine P. Batza, PhD
University of Kansas, Lawrence (Lawrence, KS 66045-7505)

Local and Regional Responses to AIDS in the American Heartland during the 1980s and 1990s

A book-length historical study of local and regional responses to AIDS in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri in the 1980s and 1990s.

In the early AIDS crisis, the Heartland became a cultural and political battleground over sexuality, morality, and citizenship. The disease inspired the sick, their families, and LGBTQ people to fight AIDS and the homophobia it fueled; without this tragic impetus, many would have stayed closeted, remained apathetic, or left the region. Most LGBTQ historical scholarship depicts the Heartland as inspiring an LGBTQ exodus, a foil to coastal cities, or a backdrop to sexual secrecy. As the first in-depth historical study of AIDS in the Heartland, this work recasts the region as an important site in national AIDS history. An NEH Summer Stipend would fund research and the writing of chapter 2, which unearths local responses to early AIDS and serves as the bedrock for the argument that the respectability politics most resonant and effective in the politically and religiously conservative Heartland deeply shaped the initial AIDS response and the national LGBTQ political agenda for a generation.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254502-17

Sharon Ann Murphy
Providence College (Providence, RI 02918-7000)

Banking and Slavery in the Antebellum South

A book-length study of the financial links between southern banks and the institution of slavery in the United States during the nineteenth century.

Despite the rich literature on the history of slavery, the scholarship on bank financing of slavery is quite slim. My research demonstrates that commercial banks were willing to accept slaves as collateral for loans and as a part of loans assigned over to them from a third party. Many helped underwrite the sale of slaves, using them as collateral. They were willing to sell slaves as part of foreclosure proceedings on anyone who failed to fulfill a debt contract. Commercial bank involvement with slave property occurred throughout the antebellum period and across the South. Some of the most prominent southern banks, as well as the Second Bank of the United States, directly issued loans using slaves as collateral. This places southern banking institutions at the heart of the buying and selling of slave property, one of the most reviled aspects of the slave system. This project will result in the first major monograph on the relationship between banking and slavery in the antebellum South.

Project fields:
African American History; Economic History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254515-17

Kristen M. Turner
North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)

Opera on the American Popular Stage, 1890-1915

A book-length study of the impact of European opera on the American popular stage, 1890-1915.

My proposed book, Opera on the American Popular Stage, 1890–1915, examines the use of opera in vaudeville, early musical comedies, and American comic operas written and performed by African American and white musicians. Opera contributed a rich palette of music, plot lines, and cultural stereotypes that nourished new productions. The genre had a widespread presence on the popular stage and took on a range of meanings that sometimes were contradictory and, depending upon the context, often race-specific. During the era when Jim Crow laws were being passed, blacks and whites viewed opera through the lens of race, class, and gender, coming to different conclusions as to its social and cultural meanings. Each chapter of the book will focus on a particular manifestation of opera drawing upon methodologies from gender, African American, theater, and American studies using examples from all three types of entertainments.

Project fields:
American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254532-17

Jose Amador
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)

A History of Healthcare Rights and Brazilian Politics, 1964-2007

A book-length study about the politics of healthcare rights in Brazil, 1964-2007.

My book project examines how the institutions of medicine, media, and the state came to constitute “trans” as a flexible and politically useful category of identification. At first glance this might seem like a narrow historical topic, but the emergence of this category as an epistemic formation and a culturally-situated practice is central to the formation of Brazilian modernity. To reconstruct this history, the project traces the development of trans activism in Brazil from the mid-twentieth century to 2007, when the public health care system began providing free sex reassignment surgeries and hormone treatment. It follows the evidence trail left by trans persons, health activists, and cultural producers to reveal the struggles that led to state-subsidized transition therapies. Lastly, it offers new critical insights into the contingencies of deploying nonnormative categories by recovering the voices and actions of trans people who lived in rapidly changing political circumstances.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-254546-17

Michael Joseph McVicar
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)

A History of Religious Activism and Intelligence Gathering in the U.S. after the Civil War

Writing of a book on the surveillance of political and religious opponents by American Christian organizations between the Civil War and the early 21st century.

“God’s Watchers” seeks to rethink the history of religion in the United States by focusing on the problem of surveillance in American culture. Unlike recent works in American religious history that focus on the problems of secularism and the legal boundaries of church and state, this project concentrates on techniques of surveillance to argue that historians have paid far too much attention to problems of belief, theology, and legal precedent while paying far too little attention to the mechanisms of social regulation and policing that have characterized American religious organizations. The resulting narrative offers a complex story of overlapping alliances between religious activists and law enforcement agents, violent conflict between business interests and the forces of organized labor, and the mixing and melding of the agents of church, state, and voluntary associations into a dense tangle of political intrigue and social upheaval.

Project fields:
African History; American Studies; History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254899-17

Sun-Young Park
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)

A History of French Disability Architecture and Design, 1750-1975

A book-length study on the architecture of disability accommodations in France, 1750-1975.

This project will explore how architectural and urban developments in France accommodated, and at times failed to accommodate, the disabled subject between 1750 and 1975. It will analyze the evolving design of pedagogical institutions for the deaf and the blind, as well as urban reform measures that gradually made cities more legible and navigable, alongside changing medical and cultural constructions of the different kinds of sensory disabilities. In the era when conceptions of disability were shifting from moral to scientific terms, material and spatial interfaces played increasingly formative roles in programs of education, therapy, and integration. By recovering the ways in which the modern built environment shaped, and was shaped by, non-normative human experiences, this project situates disability studies at the heart of humanistic inquiry into the forces—whether cultural, environmental, or political—mediating the relationship between individuals and society.

Project fields:
European History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254930-17

Katherine M. Boivin
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)

The Medieval City and the Politics of Pilgrimage

Preparation of a chapter for a book on medieval art and civic identity in the German city of Rothenburg and the sculptor Tilman Riemenschneider.

My current book, "The Medieval Urban Complex and the Politics of Pilgrimage," investigates the dynamic interactions among artworks created in a variety of media across the space of the late medieval city. Through an integrated study of administrative structures, urban planning, and visual culture, I examine the spatiality of artistic programming and its role in processes of civic-identity construction. While recent scholarship has begun to look at resonances among works created in different media within the space of a single church, the originality of my project lies in its exploration of the deliberate, though aggregated, programming of art spread throughout the late medieval city. An NEH Summer Stipends Award would allow me to complete "Chapter 5: Geographies of the Altarpiece," which proposes a new approach for studying the work of early modern artists by considering the landscape of pieces by Tilman Riemenschneider that once formed a network across the city of Rothenburg, Germany.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254970-17

Gesa Elizabeth Kirsch
Bentley University (Waltham, MA 02452-4705)

Legacies of Thought and Action: The Professional Networks of 19th-century Women Physicians

Research and writing of a book on the professional networks and intellectual leadership of women physicians in the late 19th century.

This book investigates the rhetorical strategies, professional networks, and intellectual leadership of a group of late 19th century American women physicians. Drawing on several case studies and the rarely examined Woman’s Medical Journal, I argue that we can better understand the rhetorical practices and professional performances of early women physicians by attending to how they shared resources, knowledge and ideas, using both formal and informal ways to educate and mentor one another. This project illuminates the scope, range, and contours of professional networks that enabled women to collaborate, communicate across generations and geographical boundaries, and advocate for social change. This research has important implications for today: it highlights the powerful impact of professional networks for women and other underrepresented groups, whether they work in the medical professions, STEM fields, the social sciences or humanistic fields.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254971-17

Kenton Martin Camper
Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)

The Role of Rhetoric and Argumentation in Doctrinal Shifts since the Reformation

Completion of a book on the rhetorical strategies employed in religious debates from the Reformation to the present.

Since the 16th century, various segments of the Christian church have reversed their official stances on a number of biblical issues, including usury, heliocentricity, racial equality, women’s preaching, and homosexuality. In each case, the Bible was interpreted as first supporting one position and then the opposite one. While scholars have explored the social, cultural, political, theological, and economic motivations for these reversals, less well understood is how these changes in biblical meaning were accomplished through argument. This project examines the dynamic, dialogic, rhetorical nature of these five ecclesiastic debates and charts the argumentative steps that led to changes in official denominational positions. This analysis will yield patterns in how the church’s biblically grounded positions have changed through argument, and these patterns will help scholars of religious and non-religious texts better understand the nature of other past and contemporary textual disputes.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-254972-17

Samantha Nicole Pinto
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

Cultural Representations of the 1810 British Trial of Saartjie Baartman

The research and writing of a book chapter on representations of the trial of Saartjie Baartman, known as "The Venus Hottentot."

This proposed project will examine ongoing cultural representations of the 1810 British trial involving African performer Saartjie Baartman, known as "The Venus Hottentot." Her managers were brought up on charges of false imprisonment by abolitionists appealing to the state on behalf of Baartman, whom they argued could not consent to an employment contract without extreme coercion or force. The trial amplified Baartman's fame and held the attention of both 19th century London and many future generations of those looking at cultural representations for signs of racial, sexual, and gendered difference. This proposed book chapter interrogates the specific connection between those cultural representations of Baartman and the legal discourses surrounding race, gender, contract, and labor that they touch upon throughout the 200 years of fascination with Baartman's body and performance.

Project fields:
African American Studies; African Studies; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255008-17

John F. Lopez, PhD
Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1698)

The Aquatic Metropolis: Mapping Water and Urban Form at Viceregal Mexico City

A book-length study about the drainage of lakes in Mexico City during the 16th and 17th centuries based on maps, city plans, paintings, diagrams, and other visual material.

The Aquatic Metropolis examines the centuries-old efforts by the Aztec and Spanish to combat catastrophic inundation in Mexico City via urban planning, water management, and environmental change. Unlike the Aztec who built a city of causeways to mitigate flooding, the Spanish undertook drainage, transforming the city from an island in 1524 to a mainland settlement by 1700. Analysis of Western and non-Western images demonstrates the differing epistemes undergirding Spanish and Aztec conceptions of nature, thus revealing the underlying objective of drainage: to dehistoricize Mexico City from its pre-Hispanic form, freeing it from the hydro-spatial practices of Aztec Tenochtitlan by eliminating its most iconic feature: water. In scrutinizing a Spanish response to flooding, this book sheds light on how a shift from causeways to drainage speaks to a new epistemological orientation to nature that had transformative urban implications.

Project fields:
Architecture; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255030-17

Jennifer A. Glancy
Le Moyne College (Syracuse, NY 13214-1301)

The Ancient Christian Understanding of Slavery and Contemporary Discourse on the Meaning of Being Human

Writing of a book connecting ancient Christian understandings of slavery and contemporary scholarship on the meaning of being human.

I am applying for a 2017 NEH Summer Stipend to support work on a monograph on ancient Christian slavery and contemporary discourses about the human. Modern scholars of slavery have often stressed the humanity of slaves and the inhumanity of slavery, but typically without examining assumptions about what is understood by humanity. Situating Christian sources from the first to third centuries in the wider currents of Jewish, Greek, and Roman thought to which they contribute, my project revisits the nexus of slavery and humanity in antiquity. I argue that twenty-first century discourses on the human have the potential to reframe discussions of ancient slavery. At the same time, attention to the place of slavery in ancient discourses has the potential to illuminate vexed questions in contemporary discussions of humanities and even to expose some limitations of those discourses.

Project fields:
Classics; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255049-17

Erin Kathleen Rowe
Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)

Devotion to African Saints in Early Modern Global Catholicism

Research for a book on the development of devotion to African saints in Europe and the Americas during the early modern period. 

My project explores the global circulation of devotion to black saints, examining the intertwined histories of race and religion on local, national, and global scales. I argue that the promotion of black saints led the clergy to develop complex and ambivalent ideas about the spiritual meaning of blackness, which could resist the emerging discourses of early modern embodied racism while reinforcing the brutal regimes of slavery. It centers the role played by African diasporic communities in creating cults to black saints in ways that had a lasting impact on devotional practice. One of the key sources for the circulation of cults to black saints can be found in baroque polychrome sculpture that survive on the altars of former black confraternities (lay religious organizations) throughout the Catholic world. By bringing together visual and textual evidence, my project transforms our understanding of the role of religious ritual, the evolution of global devotion, and Atlantic identities.

Project fields:
European History; History of Religion; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255079-17

Monica W. Varsanyi
CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)

The Contentious Evolution of Hispanic Identity during the Chicano Movement in New Mexico, 1962-1974

Research and writing of an article and book on the relations between Latino communities in twentieth-century New Mexico.

New Mexico has the largest Hispanic population in the United States, mainly native-born Hispanos who trace their ancestry to Spanish settlers of the 1600s. And it is currently one of the most pro-immigrant states in the nation. One might assume a direct connection between demography and the state’s contemporary pro-immigrant stance, but the reality is more complicated. Hispanos have long had a fraught relationship with Mexico and more recent Mexican immigrants, making New Mexico’s current pro-immigrant stance far from assured. This project traces the evolving relationship between Hispanos and Mexican immigrants during the Chicano Movement in New Mexico between 1962 and 1974. This historical period in the state has received little scholarly attention, yet it offers an excellent window into understanding the evolution of pan-ethnic relations, given tensions between the Chicano Movement’s focus on ethnic solidarity, and strained relations between Hispanos and Mexican immigrants.

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-255083-17

John Bezis-Selfa
Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)

A History of Latino Voting Rights, 1840-1980

A book-length historical study of Latinos' ability to exercise the right to vote.

This book project, “A Latino Right to Vote," explores and seeks to explain how Latino struggles to preserve, gain, regain, and exercise the right to vote shaped how Latinos and Anglos have conceived of and defined citizenship and Latinos' place within the United States. Through this project, for which I seek a wide audience, I aim to bring Latinos, who most Americans and most historians have long considered marginal to our nation’s past, to its center and to make them central to questions that have long animated study of that past. Who has been able to participate directly in our democracy and on what terms? What has it meant to be a citizen?

Project fields:
Latino History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255089-17

Teresa Raczek
Kennesaw State University Research and Service Foundation (Kennesaw, GA 30144-5588)

Indus Valley Civilization in the Context of South Asian Societies in the Third Millennium BCE

Writing three chapters for book on the relationships between the Harappan civilization and surrounding Indian cultures.

The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC), also known as the Indus Civilization, or Harappan society, has been embraced in the US as a standard part of a World Civilization historical canon, alongside ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China. Rooted in culture history, many traditional treatments of this ancient society emphasize its uniqueness compared to other contemporaneous societies in South Asia. However, recent field research on the “Ahar Culture,” one of the Indus’ nearest neighbors in the Mewar Plain of northwest India, suggests that many of the daily practices of the inhabitants resembled those of the greater Indus region. The proposed monograph, Indus Imagined presents an analysis that integrates these ancient societies, highlighting the broader South Asian context. Indus Imagined challenges commonly accepted notions of the “Indus Valley Civilization” and presents an alternative vision that emphasizes the fluid nature of communities across a wide range of rural and urban areas.

Project fields:
Archaeology; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-255104-17

Lofton Leon Durham
Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5200)

Jacques Milet's Destruction of Troy and the Making of the French Nation

Preparation of a book-length study on the 15th-century French play, The Destruction of Troy, by Jacques Milet.

My book project, Medieval Theatre at the Center: Jacques Milet’s Destruction of Troy and the Making of a Nation, looks at how theatre, both live and in its documentary afterlife, shaped and reflected widely-held beliefs about the emergent French nation from the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Milet's 1452 play embodied the movement happening in many quarters to connect the ancient royal family of Troy and the people of France. But Milet also saw the errors of France’s past rulers reflected in the fall of Troy’s leaders, and sought to use the play to advise and educate France’s current rulers and her people alike. Milet’s works, designed for circulation in performance, manuscript, image, and finally in print, engaged these ideas through the early 17th century. The 2017 Summer Stipend will support two separate activities: the revision of part one of the manuscript; and translations of all extant performance records and the critical edition of the play’s Letter of Epilogue.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FT-255121-17

Molly T Blasing
University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)

The Influence of Photography on Modern Russian Poetry

Completion of a book-length study on the influence of photography on modern Russian poetry.

This book considers how photography’s pervasiveness in 20th-c. culture has intervened in and shaped modern poetic thinking and writing. While much has been written on the impact of photography on realist fiction and autobiography, this project’s explicit focus on poetry illuminates a form of cultural production that speaks to both long-standing and present-day anxieties about the threat visual culture poses to verbal culture. I offer case studies of five major 20th-c. Russian poets to argue that poets who engage photography in their writing are drawn to certain affinities and tensions that exist between the lyric and the snapshot. The advent of photography gave poetry a new lexicon, new ways of conceiving vision, memory and loss, and opportunities to construct metaphors around photochemical processes. Yet at the core of each poet’s approach to “writing the photograph” is an urge to ultimately demonstrate the superior ability of poetic language to capture and convey human experience.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255126-17

Honor Sachs
Western Carolina University (Cullowhee, NC 28723)

The Life of Bartholomew Fenton: A Story of Revolution, Transformation, and Violence in Early America

A book-length study about the rags-to-riches story of Bartholomew Fenton, whose life encompassed many of the complications of the American Revolution and early republican era.

This project follows the life of a man named Bartholomew Fenton in his passage through the Atlantic World during the Age of Revolution. Fenton was exiled from London in 1770 as a convict servant and transported to colonial Virginia on the eve of the American Revolution. When war broke out, he took up arms against the empire that banished him and made his way to Kentucky. There he forged new status fighting Indians in the frontier militia. He acquired land and slaves, and in 1792, Fenton was arrested a second time for brutally beating a female slave to death. Arrested and tried for murder, Fenton was acquitted on all charges. This book reconstructs Fenton's journey from London to colonial Virginia to early national Kentucky and traces the complex ways that violence, race, and status were historically contingent in the vast Atlantic upheavals of the late eighteenth century.

Project fields:
British History; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255128-17

Michael R. Ebner
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

Mussolini's Empire: How the Fascists Ruled in Africa

A monograph on Italy’s empire in Africa (1922-1943).

'Mussolini’s Empire,’ a newly begun book-length project, examines Fascist rule in Italy’s African colonies (Libya, Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia) between 1922 and 1943. Building upon new research on violence and atrocity within European empires, the book will analyze Italy’s conquest of African territories through the lens of violence. Arguing that Mussolini’s quest for 'spazio vitale' (vital space) constituted the culmination of Fascist Italy’s political and social project, ‘Mussolini’s Empire’ will make the case that, for Fascists, the violence of empire building constituted the means and end for creating both a new Italian (the new “Fascist man”) and the newly fashioned, “inferior” colonial subjects over whom the Italians would rule. The book will also interpret Italian Fascist imperialism as a coherent, distinct system of rule that featured elements of both nineteenth-century (French, British) and twentieth-century totalitarian imperialisms (German, Japanese).

Project fields:
African History; European History; History, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 9/30/2017


FT-255150-17

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)

Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940

A book-length study about the connections between archeology and nation-building during the first two decades after the Mexican Revolution.

“Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940” examines the making of archaeological patrimony and an official Indian past during the first two decades of Mexico's revolutionary regime. The manuscript also looks at how the government's archaeological projects impacted native peoples at the ruins. With the NEH Summer Stipend, I will explore this formative stage in Mexican archaeology through research in Mexico City archives. My goal is to spend two consecutive months analyzing documents in two Mexico City archives that are essential to the completion of my manuscript: the Historical Archive of the National Museum of Anthropology (AHMNA) and the National Library of Anthropology and History (BNAH).

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-255157-17

Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire
Winterthur Museum (Winterthur, DE 19735-1819)

Diderot and d’Alembert’s Encyclopedia and the Color Printing Revolution: A Translation and Critical Study

Preparation of a critical study and translation into English of articles on print-making in Denis Diderot and Jean d'Alembert's Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, 1751-1772.

This project is a critical study and English translation of the three most important articles on printmaking published in Diderot and d’Alembert’s Encyclopédie between 1755 and 1758. The articles were collaboratively written by several scholars, practitioners, and amateurs of printed images: Claude-Henri Watelet (1718-1786), Antoine Gautier de Montdorge (1701-1768), Jean-Michel Papillon (1698-1776), and Louis de Jaucourt (1704-1779). They formulated, for the first time, the aesthetic and epistemological consequences of the eighteenth-century color printing revolution: the emergence of a modern concept of art reproduction, and the notion that a printed image taught not only through its representation but also through its own material production. The translated articles will be part of the Encyclopedia of Diderot & d’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project, a free, collaborative digital humanities endeavor hosted by the University of Michigan Library.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-255197-17

James S. Leve
Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ 86011-0001)

Sounds, Sights, and Silences: Disability in Musical Theater

Preparation of a book-length study about the representation and impact of disability on American musical theater.

I request an NEH Summer Stipend to write two chapters of my book, "Sounds, Sights, and Silences: Disability in Musical Theater,” the first major study of disability as it is constructed and experienced in musical theater. The funding will support on-site visits to Theater by the Blind and Deaf West in Los Angeles. I will observe how the staff of these organizations interacts with and prepares the disabled performers. Following these visits, I will incorporate this material into the relevant chapters of my book. My study approaches disability in musical theater from three distinct perspectives: the narrative structure, the composition, and accommodation for performers and audience members. It also explores the impact of the ADA on the repertory. My book speaks to a diverse audience of scholars in the humanities by enlarging the scope of disability studies to include musical theater.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-254548-17

Caroline E. Shaw
Bates College (Lewiston, ME 04240-6028)

A History of the Legal Concepts of Reputation and Defamation in the British Court System

A book-length study on the history of reputation and defamation laws in Britain.

Freedom of expression has become a right. Yet, it is qualified by the responsibility to respect the reputation of others. The “right” to reputation fits somewhat uncomfortably in the canon of liberal rights, however. Rights to property or the right to vote, for example, seem like individual possessions to be safeguarded by the state. Reputation, by contrast, exists within the minds of others in a particular community. In the modern era, worldly individuals were supposed to be indifferent to frivolous gossip. Nevertheless, defenses of reputation have remained peculiarly robust in British legal culture. This project offers the first historical account of reputation and British law over the last two centuries. It examines the intellectual debates and the social contexts in which laws of libel and slander were remade in the modern era. It asks why Britain is an outlier and asks us to think more deeply about the role of community in the constellation of individual, liberal rights.

Project fields:
British History; Cultural History; Legal History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255252-17

Aeron Hunt
Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)

Representations of Veterans in the Victorian Literature and Culture

A book-length study on the representation of veterans in 19th-century British literature and culture.

“Discharged Honorable: Veterans in the Victorian Social Imagination” examines the nearly ubiquitous but often unremarked figure of the veteran in Victorian literature and culture. I argue that the Victorian veteran was a profoundly social figure more than an emblem of psychological trauma, representing a complex transitional role, in which subjects were poised between economic and social activities oriented toward larger collectives—especially, in this case, the nation, the state, and the military itself—and others oriented toward the capitalist marketplace or the individual family. By analyzing how writers engaged and shaped the characters, plots, and genres through which veterans’ stories emerged or were muted, my book generates new perspectives on Victorian concepts of service and labor, social responsibility and welfare, and gender and identity, and suggests that the social imagination of Victorian veterans holds lessons for reimagining citizenship and care in our own moment.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-255259-17

Jared Manasek
Pace University, Pleasantville (Pleasantville, NY 10570-2700)

Humanitarianism and Refugees at the End of Empire, 1848-1918

A book-length study on refugees and humanitarianism in the Ottoman Empire from 1848-1918.

My book manuscript, “The Politics of Caring: Humanitarianism and Refugees at the End of Empire, 1848-1918,” examines the evolution of humanitarian discourse and action in international politics and civil society over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Using the local and international responses to the human catastrophe of the Near Eastern Crisis of 1875-1878 as a centerpiece for investigating the deep roots of modern humanitarianism and refugee aid and protection, “The Politics of Caring” finds the roots of modern humanitarianism in nineteenth century Europe and the Middle East. With the help of an NEH summer stipend, I intend to complete Chapter One of the manuscript and begin revisions to the introduction.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; European History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2017


FT-249073-16

Jeffrey Levenberg
Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong 19047-8025 China)

Italian Compose Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613): Insights from Giovanni d'Avella's Regole di musica

Preparation of an article and monograph on the music of Renaissance composer Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613).

Italian Renaissance composer and prince Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613) composed both secular and sacred music, gaining notoriety due to the unusual style of his music as well as his scandalous personal life.  Gesualdo’s sacred music raised such controversy during his lifetime that the Church placed him under edict at the height of the Roman Inquisition.  While the style of his music remains difficult to understand, Gesualdo influenced later generations and thus remains important in the historiography.  Yet, lacunae among the primary source records from the Gesualdo castle and the Kingdom of Naples have precluded a complete understanding of the original conception and reception of his music, both secular and sacred.  A newly recovered Neapolitan treatise on music, however, stands to fundamentally transform current notions about Gesualdo’s life and works. Giovanni d’Avella penned a defense of Gesualdo after the public censuring of his music. The wide range of cultural contexts underpinning this singular document await exploration in the Franciscan Order’s archive in Naples.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Music History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249074-16

Dorian Borbonus
University of Dayton (Dayton, OH 45469-0001)

Tombs and Burial Practices in Ancient Rome

A book-length survey of tombs and funerary culture in Rome from 200 BCE to 200 CE.

This research project analyzes tomb monuments in Rome and its immediate surroundings during the period of Roman hegemony in the Mediterranean (200 BCE to 200 CE). It will result in the first historical monograph on the imperial capital that is based primarily on funerary culture, which provides an alternative to conventional histories that are oriented towards events, historical figures, or texts. In contrast, my project visualizes the continuous growth and consolidation of Rome’s empire and its effects on an urban population that lived and operated close to its center of power. This narrative relates to ongoing research in the Humanities by showing how the timeless human experience of mortality was translated into concrete cultural expressions in a specific historical context. I am seeking the support of a NEH summer stipend to carry out personal autopsy of Roman funerary monuments and consult photographic archives in Rome.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Architecture

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249089-16

Jane Degenhardt
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)

Chance, Providence and Overseas Exploration in Early Modern English Drama

Completion of a book-length study on British maritime exploration, ethics, and the concept of fortune in 17th-century English drama.

My book-in-progress, Fortune's Empire, focuses on the shifting meaning of "fortune" in early modern English drama to explore the ways that England's early forays into overseas trade and colonial exploration forged a new connection between financial and cosmic "fortune." As I demonstrate, England's nascent overseas ventures heightened awareness of the role of fortune in the world--both as a cosmic force of chance and as an emerging understanding of wealth that was earned rather than inherited. I show how the theater played an active and vital role in shaping and critiquing these evolving understandings of fortune and cultivating proper ethical responses to new forms of economic investment. Drawing attention to an archive of plays dramatizing maritime travel, trade, and exploration, I identify "fortune" as a pivotal keyword in early modern English drama, arguing that it distinguishes England's incipient struggle to enter the world of empires.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-249028-16

Matthew Rebhorn
James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)

Mind-Body Relationship in Animate Body in Antebellum American Literature

A book-length study of the relationship between mind and body in antebellum American literature.

This project explores the interface between debates about the mind-body relationship in the antebellum period and the production of American letters. Building on early medical archives, this project explores the way artists imagined the animate body--that is, a body that seems to have a mind of its own--using it to achieve two interrelated ends. First, by wrestling with this conceptualization of the body, they changed how people read a novel, why people acted the way they did, and what constituted the rhythm of poetic expression. Second, by understanding the body in this way, these artists articulated a new kind of subjectivity for figures often linked to their bodies, such as chattel slaves, working-class laborers, and women. As I argue, some of the most aesthetically innovative as well as some of the most politically resistant modes of expression in the antebellum period were catalyzed by the way these various artists “minded the body.”

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249036-16

Ben Preston Robertson
Troy State University Main Campus (Troy, AL 36082-0001)

The Plays of English Author and Critic Elizabeth Inchbald (1735-1821)

Preparation of the first complete scholarly edition of plays by English writer, Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821).

This project involves the collection and publication of authoritative versions of the complete plays of actor, novelist, playwright, and literary critic Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821). Having collected copies of the manuscripts of all of Inchbald's plays at the Huntington Library (San Marino, California), I would like to use the research period (June and July 2016) to work on transcriptions, critical reception studies, and introductions for each of the twenty plays. The project is already underway and has an estimated completion date of 2020.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249058-16

Ken Koltun-Fromm
Haverford College (Haverford, PA 19041-1392)

Depiction of the Sacred in Visual and Textual Forms

A book-length study of the visual features of religious expression.

My work in comic studies focuses on representations of the sacred in graphic mediums to better interrogate the visual features of religious expression. Questions concerning textual authority, text/image relation, cultural dimensions of seeing, and conflicting modes of visual representation dominate this research agenda, as they do much of the humanities. Graphic narratives can help us see how claims to the sacred arise in visual and textual forms, and the ways in which argumentative structures lay claim to reader assent. These methodological and humanistic interests engage three interrelated projects: 1) the preparation of an outline for the introductory chapter of Sacred Texts and Comics, a volume I am co-editing with Assaf Gamzou; 2) the design of a Wordpress website for contributors to the co-edited volume and the broader public; and 3) the drafting of “Representations of the Sacred in Craig Thompson’s Habibi,” my independent chapter for the edited volume.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249063-16

Christopher J. Lukasik
Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)

The Image in the Text: Intermediality, Illustration, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature

An book-length study of the relationship between illustration and text in American literature.

The Image in the Text examines the spectacular growth of illustration within American literary culture in the fifty years running from 1825—when steel-plate replaces copper-plate engraving and facilitates the rise of the literary annual in the United States—to 1875—when the photographic half-tone will emerge and once again transform how images appear in print. My project expands our sense of nineteenth-century American literature to embrace not only the full range of print media in which literature was published—illustrated novels, literary annuals, illustrated magazines, and pictorial weeklies—but, more broadly, to include the images that were often so vital to their circulation and consumption. Upon its completion, The Image in the Text will be the first cultural history of illustration that synthesizes literary, book, and art history with theoretical work from visual and media studies.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249066-16

Jacob Michael Jewusiak
Valdosta State University (Valdosta, GA 31698-0100)

Aging and the Elderly in 19th- and 20th-Century British Novels

Completion of a book-length study on aging and the elderly in 19th and 20th-century British novels.

Literary criticism provides compelling models for understanding youthful plots such as the bildungsroman and the rapid social transformations of modernity, but does not often account for the elderly subject who lingers on the margins of such culturally dominant narratives. NARRATING AGING: TEMPORAL REALISM AND THE VICTORIAN NOVEL addresses this gap by analyzing the formal significance of old age and aging in the novels of Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Virginia Woolf. I argue that the difficulty of representing aging as a continuous process provokes novelists to theorize narrative duration and contest the conventions of realism. Focusing on aging masculinity, “redundant” women, queer sexuality, and the otherness of old age, my chapters show how the formal problem of duration becomes a political problem for the elderly, who vanish—in the Victorian novel and contemporary literary criticism—amidst the proliferation of youthful metaphors and plots.

Project fields:
British Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249413-16

Rachel Heiman
New School (New York, NY 10011-8871)

Retrofitting the American Dream: An Ethnography of Suburban Re-Design

Research and writing for a book-length study of the future of suburbanization in America.

There is much speculation about the future of the suburban American dream as volatile economic conditions, energy concerns, and climate change make the low-density landscape of single-family homes increasingly unviable. There has been growing literature on design, planning, and policy efforts to reimagine automobile suburbs for a more sustainable and equitable future. Yet there has been little ethnographic research that explores the transformation of sedimented ideals and ways of being as people’s everyday routines and familiar spaces shift amid efforts to retrofit the physical and social landscape of suburbia. I am proposing, as part of a longer-term project aligned with NEH’s new Common Good initiative, two months of fieldwork in Utah at an award-winning suburban community built on reclaimed mining lands with an environmentally friendly, transit-oriented design. This project sheds light on the formation of new subjectivities amid spatial, racial, class, and environmental change.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249415-16

Irene Cheng
California College of the Arts (San Francisco, CA 94107-2247)

The Shape of Utopia: Architecture and Radical Reform in 19th-Century America

A book-length study of geometric ideal plans for cities and buildings that reflect utopian movements in 18th- and 19th-century America.

The Shape of Utopia explores six American “geometric utopias,” plans for ideal cities and buildings published between 1776 and 1880 by reformers affiliated with movements such as anarchism, phrenology, Spiritualism, vegetarianism and land reform. The book asks what led some nineteenth-century Americans to see a link between gridded territories, hexagonal cities, and octagonal houses, on one hand, and a more perfect liberal democracy, on the other. It investigates the political ideologies and visual cultural contexts of the nineteenth-century American utopian imagination.

Project fields:
American Studies; Architecture; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249421-16

Matthew Willard Butterfield
Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, PA 17603-2802)

The Swing Phenomenon: A History of Meaning

Preparation of an article on the term "swing" and African American music, 1890s-1930s.

The mysterious rhythmic quality known as “swing” is taken by many today to be one of the essential characteristics of jazz. However, it has never been entirely clear what exactly the term means: it has been used to designate everything from a particular way of dividing the beat (i.e., swing eighth notes) to a general rhythmic ethos characterized by a sense of forward propulsion. As a manifestation of what was called “hot rhythm,” swing is also inextricably bound up with the modern American discourse of race. This project traces the early genealogy of the term as it was applied to rhythm in black music, specifically Negro spirituals, ragtime, and jazz. It draws on a variety of early jazz history books as well as newspaper and magazine articles published in the first decades of the twentieth century to explore how “swing” came to be understood as the defining essence of jazz rhythm by the late 1930s--an essence that was explicitly racialized as an expression of black identity in music.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248983-16

Allison Noelle Madar
California State University, Chico Foundation (Chico, CA 95929-0001)

A People Between: Servitude and the Law in Eighteenth-Century Virginia

A book-length study of the legal and social conditions of slavery and servitude in colonial Virginia.

My project offers new answers to one of the longest-standing questions in early American history: What was the nature of the transition from indentured servitude to slavery? A People Between examines the legal and social dynamics of servitude. It explores the labor system itself and the role the law played in managing servants in a society dominated by racial slavery. Historians of slavery in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic often narrate the development of slave law as a counterpoint to the laws of servitude. They contend that the legal framework colonists developed to control slaves also made life more tolerable for the temporarily bound. I argue that the legal structures designed to control slaves enhanced masters’ power over their servants. The laws themselves did not always distinguish between slaves and servants, and with the expansion of slavery during the eighteenth century there was also a retrenchment of temporary bondage.

Project fields:
History, Other; Labor History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249000-16

Julie Hubbert
University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)

Music in New Hollywood Film

Archival research leading to publication of a book on the history of cinematic sound and sound technology in Hollywood film of the 1960s and 1970s.

The 1960s and 70s has long been valued as an important moment in the history of Hollywood studio filmmaking, a period of intense experimentation known as “New Hollywood.” In describing the “new” of New Hollywood, most scholars have focused on the visual and thematic aspects of style and genre that surfaced during the period. Little has been said, however, about the equally extraordinary revolution happening in film sound. This book corrects this gap by focusing on the most transgressive element in the New Hollywood soundtrack: music. By uniquely rooting this soundtrack revolution in the “high-fidelity” movement of the 1950s and 60s, this book considers the degree to which new technical and aesthetic standards of recorded sound also shaped film sound. It examines the new preference for recorded music, the striking stylistic range of musical repertoire that surfaced in these films, and the radical collapse of cinematic space the new high fidelity aesthetic encouraged.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249004-16

Paula Susan De Vos
San Diego State University Research Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)

Apothecaries and the Art of Pharmacy in New Spain and the Hispanic World

A history of the pharmaceutical craft and its development as a major industry in Latin America.

I am applying for a 2016 NEH Summer Stipend to support the completion of a book manuscript by August. At present, I have final drafts of 4 of the book’s 9 chapters and need time to finish revising the other 5 drafted chapters. A Summer Stipend would allow me to forgo teaching a summer school course (which I have taught each of the past four years) in order to finish revisions and submit the full manuscript by August to the University of Chicago Press. The book, a history of pharmacy in colonial Mexico and the Spanish Atlantic, traces the ancient and medieval Mediterranean origins of pharmaceutical practice, its transmission to colonial Mexico, and its subsequent transformation from a highly specialized “art,” or artisanal practice, to the beginnings of an industrialized enterprise of chemical synthesis, mass manufacture, and big business.

Project fields:
History of Science; Latin American History; Medieval History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249015-16

Joan Marie Titus
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)

Dmitry Shostakovich (1906-1975) and Music for Stalinist Cinema

Research for a book on Soviet film music composed by Dmitry Shostakovich (1906-1975) from 1936 to 1953.

Despite Dmitry Shostakovich’s celebrated reputation as a concert and stage composer, his film music only recently has garnered attention from audiences and scholars. A history of his scoring for Soviet cinema, and generally of Russian film music, has yet to be substantively written. My proposed research project fills this gap. This project will result in a book, titled Dmitry Shostakovich and Music for Stalinist Cinema, which traces his rise as one of the Soviet Union’s preeminent film composers from 1936 until Josef Stalin’s death in 1953. This book provides an examination of his scoring practices, his unique relationship with directors and with the film industry, and his engagement with cultural politics and audiences. It will be based on archival materials, provide detailed musical and cinematic analysis, and provide a review of contemporaneous reception. The NEH summer stipend would be used to begin the phase of Russia-based research in summer 2016 for this new book project.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Media Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248887-16

Kate Merkel-Hess
Pennsylvania State University, Main Campus (University Park, PA 16802-7000)

The Regional Warlords in Modern China

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the role of regional warlords in twentieth-century Chinese history.

The Warlords addresses the collapse of the Chinese Republic, founded in 1912, into rule by regional warlords. It challenges the typical story of the young republic’s disintegration and failure by examining the personal lives of the warlords and the ways that their personal intimacies—of love, marriage, family, friendship, enmity, and patronage—were wrapped up in the politics of the day. In exploring the stories of these men, their families, and their relationships with each other, two narratives of the Republic come into alignment: on the one hand, the crumbling of the early Republic’s optimism; and on the other hand, the social and cultural experimentation and openness that characterized the period. The resulting study sheds light not only on the ways that the warlords contributed to the affective communities that sustained the new nation but also on our understandings of the ways that private life, intimacy, and sentiment became critical building blocks for modern China.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248888-16

Kim Felicia Hall
Barnard College (New York, NY 10027-6909)

"Othello Was My Grandfather": Shakespeare and Race in the African Diaspora

Research for a book on the relationship between William Shakespeare's play Othello and African American culture, 19th century to the present.

This book project uses versions of Shakespeare’s Othello to connect Shakespeare and freedom dreams in the African Diaspora. It examines stage, print, transnational and digital "performances" of Othello from the 19th century until today to discuss several linked phenomena: the role of Shakespeare in constructions of blackness and race; discussions of race and genealogy in Afrodiasporic thought; the appropriation of Shakespeare by black communities; the policing of canonical literature along racial lines; and the race/gender politics of the American stage and popular media. Othello the play and its performance history become a space through which black writers explore issues of racial belonging, interracial relationships, gender, migration and power.

Project fields:
African American Studies; British Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


FT-248889-16

John Lennon
University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)

Detroit is Conflict Graffiti from a Global Perspective

The ethnographic and cultural analysis of conflict graffiti in Detroit and cities in the Middle East.

Detroit Graffiti: The Roots and Routes of Conflict Graffiti from a Global Perspective addresses these questions: what can graffiti tell us about the everyday resistive practices of citizens in post-bankruptcy Detroit and how do these practices compare to resistive graffiti practices in other conflict areas around the world? Using theoretical framing with ethnographic detail, I will live in Detroit for a month, interviewing native Detroit graffiti writers, photographing the city’s walls, and analyzing the materiality of protest in Detroit, exploring how paint on walls contextualizes, informs, and changes the spatial geography of the protest movements. I examine graffiti as an evolving language of protest that is rooted in the specific material culture of a particular area but is read, interpreted, and remixed by a global audience. My work in Detroit is part of a comparative study linking Detroit’s protest graffiti scene with similar scenes in other national and international cities.

Project fields:
American Studies; Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248890-16

Michael Blake
University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)

Justice, Migration, and Mercy

A book-length study on the morality of migration, the rights of citizenship, and asylum law.

I hope to write, in the summer of 2016, the central chapters of a monograph on the morality of migration. My thesis will be that many commentators who have looked at this issue have missed the point; by focusing on justice, at the expense of other virtues, they have ignored the true moral complexity of migration. I want to demonstrate that justice has some role to play in how we understand migration—in particular, in the analysis of who ought to count as a refugee. Many more people, though, do not have a right in justice to move, nor a right to remain where they are if they have crossed borders without legal permission. My argument, however, is that we have good moral reasons to develop programs by which many of these people will be given the rights of citizenship. These moral reasons, though, have less to do with the rights of the migrant, and more to do with the creation of a domestic political society that demonstrates and practices the virtue of mercy.

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy, Other; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248894-16

Rachel Judith Weil
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)

Prisoners and Gaolers in Early Modern England

A book-length project pertaining to imprisonment and detention in England, 1600-1800.

I seek funding to complete archival research in the United Kingdom on conflicts between prisoners and gaolers in Early Modern England, and to write up the results. Prisoner-goaler conflict sheds light on relations of power and notions of freedom and rights as they played out in the early modern English prison. My analysis of these conflicts forms a section of a longer manuscript in progress which explores the phenomenon of custodial (as opposed to punitive) detention from approximately 1600-1800. The larger project asks what "mere detention" that was not intended as punishment looked like, and what it meant for English society to hold in custody people who were not in any formal sense "guilty."

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248911-16

Erik R. Scott
University of Kansas, Lawrence (Lawrence, KS 66045-7505)

Soviet Defectors and the Borders of the Cold War World, 1945-1991

Two months of archival work toward a book-length manuscript on Soviet defectors during the Cold War (1945-1991).

This project examines the history of defection and uses it to investigate how the national and ideological borders of the socialist world were defined, disputed, and sometimes transgressed. It focuses on Soviet defectors and the development of the Soviet border regime in particular but also considers how defection developed in other settings. Tracing the winding journeys of defectors from the Soviet Union to the West through border zones, transit hubs, extraterritorial spaces, and disputed areas beyond the limits of state jurisdiction, such as international waters and airspaces, the project draws on Soviet and American archival documents to challenge the notion of the Cold War world as a place of stable boundaries and offer a granular perspective on how states operate in liminal spaces and how people navigate them.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248921-16

David Head, PhD
Spring Hill College (Mobile, AL 36608-1791)

"Wavering on a Tremendous Precipice": George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the Continental Army

A book-length study of George Washington's Continental Army and the Newburgh Conspiracy of 1783 as a significant event in the formation of the new nation.

My project investigates the challenge of reintegrating the military into civilian life as seen in the Newburgh Conspiracy, a still mysterious affair at the end of the American Revolution when angry officers apparently collaborated with nationalist-minded politicians to pressure Congress to approve new taxes that would be used to pay the army, satisfy the nation’s creditors, and strengthen the central government. The book will be the first full study of the episode and its significance for the new nation. Works on the revolution often move from the victory at Yorktown to the origins of the Constitution, and when Newburgh is discussed, it is to praise Washington's leadership, condemn the scheming founders, or evaluate whether it was a true conspiracy. I approach the episode broadly, using it to see how the U.S. transitioned to peace; that is, how soldiers are reestablished in civilian life, how a nation does justice to its soldiers, and how civilians adjust to the return of peace.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Military History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248929-16

Jamieson Clifford Donati
Unknown institution

Urban Spaces and Social Realities in the Peloponnese (700-100 BCE)

An article on the development of ancient Peloponnesian urbanization based on a synthesis of existing fieldwork and digital mapping.

This research project explores how the relationships between Greek urban forms and sociocultural and political realities shaped the worlds in which people lived in the Peloponnese (Southern Greece) from 700-100 BCE. Its methodological approach moves beyond conventional procedures by forming an interdisciplinary rapport between Archaeology and novel technologies. Notably, research incorporates a vast collection of new geophysical data from fieldwork recently completed at three Classical period settlements in the Peloponnese (Elis, Heraia, and Mantinea). This original material gives a comprehensive overview of the spatial characteristics of these Greek cities on an impressive scale, and, along with contextual evidence from excavations, field survey, and historical sources, it forms the basis for a broader survey of the diverse urban landscapes of the Peloponnese.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248934-16

Garry Sparks
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)

Translating Kislak Manuscript 1015: A Priest’s Early Fieldnotes Among the Maya

A scholarly transcription, annotation, and translation of sections of a sixteenth-century Mayan manuscript.

This research project will consist of a critical, annotated, interlinear translation of Library of Congress Kislak Manuscript 1015 – an anonymous set of texts in K’iche’ Maya language. Particular attention will focus on, and thus lead to a polished English translation of, those few sections of Kislak 1015 that seem to date to 1552 and correspond to the later “Theology of the Indians,” which was originally written in K’iche’ Maya in 1553-4 by Spanish friar Domingo de Vico in Guatemala. This critical and comparative intertextual analysis will help to further identify this recently acquired document by the Library of Congress and prepare a planned exact reproduction of it for publication for the wider public. It will also add more detailed understanding of Kislak 1015 to an increasing body of current scholarship on the first documents written in Mayan languages by Catholic missionaries and highland Maya elites within the period of first contact of the early sixteenth century.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248958-16

Jennifer Leslee Derr
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

A History of Hepatitis C in Egypt

Archival and field work in Cairo and Geneva towards a history of the hepatitis C virus in Egypt.

With an infection rate of between 14 and 22% of the total population, the incidence of hepatitis C virus in Egypt is the highest of any single country in the world. The Making of an Epidemic: Hepatitis C in Egypt will trace the history of the disease in Egypt, focusing on the experiences of scientists, doctors, and patients, the virus' entanglements with the Egyptian state and medical establishment, and the story that the epidemic tells about global biomedicine in the second half of the twentieth century. Consisting of six book length chapters, the manuscript will begin with the virus' spread through a nationwide treatment campaign for the parasitic infection schistosomiasis organized by the Egyptian government and the World Health Organization. It will then chart the experiences of those suffering from the infection, before the virus' identification. The final two chapters of the manuscript will detail the epidemic's trajectory since its 1989 discovery.

Project fields:
History of Science; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248819-16

Neeti Nair
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)

A History of Blasphemy Laws in South Asia

Research and writing of a book-length study of the history of laws regulating relations between religious communities in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The proposed book project will trace the trajectory of a set of criminal and penal codes that were instituted over the course of a century in South Asia. A consequence of the British tendency to view each major religious community as imbued with characteristics that were presumed to be mutually antagonistic, these laws seeking to regulate relations between religious communities have had contradictory afterlives in the postcolonial successor states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. This history will unravel the specific, contingent circumstances that produced these laws, draw out their relationship with religiously informed politics, and account for whether, as many others claim, the laws themselves are responsible for the increasing targeting of religious minorities across South Asia.

Project fields:
Legal History; South Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248846-16

Yoav Fromer, PhD
Tel Aviv University (Tel Aviv 69373 Israel)

The Literary Origins of Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s Political Imagination

Research and writing on the literary influences on Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan's political imagination and rhetoric.

This project seeks to explore the manner through which literature shaped some of Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s most salient policy initiatives and legislative proposals. In his four decades in public office, Senator Moynihan championed an array of issues including welfare reform, poverty eradication, foreign policy and government secrecy. But behind many of his notable achievements (such as the Moynihan Report and his opposition to the UN resolution equating Zionism with racism) lay a subtle – and entirely overlooked – literary inspiration. This project aims to highlight the counterintuitive correlation between the particular fiction that Moynihan read and the actual politics he pursued in order to demonstrate how literature helped frame his distinct political imagination and breed some of his key initiatives. By revealing the literary origins of Moynihan’s political vision, I wish to illuminate the broader import of the humanities to sustaining a healthy and vibrant democratic society.

Project fields:
American Government; American Studies; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-248848-16

Febe Dalipe Pamonag
Western Illinois University (Macomb, IL 61455-1390)

Patients' Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s

A book-length study of the leper colony on Culion Island, the Philippines, during the period of American governance, 1898-1950

This project will advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients' engagement with American colonial officials, an understudied theme in the literature on empire and public health policy, and U.S. occupation of the Philippines. In 1905, American health authorities established a leper colony in Culion, an isolated island in Palawan. Suspected lepers were forcibly removed from their homes and relocated to Culion. Most scholarship on Culion highlights its role as a laboratory for civic experimentation and how it was embroiled in major political issues of the day. In this project, I consider the views and practices of leprosy patients to show their resistance, as well as adaptation and accommodation of certain regulations in order to improve their daily lives on the island. This project also addresses such issues as the criminalization of disease and the degree to which individual rights may be compromised in the name of public health, all of which have contemporary resonance.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248850-16

Megan Kaes Long
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1099)

Modality and Tonality in English, French, German, and Italian Vernacular Songs, 1590-1620

Preparation of a book on western European music and the transition from the church modes to the major and minor system, 17th-19th centuries.

The transition from the modal system of pitch organization that governed Western art music through the late Renaissance (ca. 1600) to the tonal system that defines music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries has been a vexing problem for music scholars for the past fifty years or more. My in-progress monograph explores the role of an often overlooked repertoire of secular partsongs in this transition. I argue that popular, widely circulated vernacular song of Italy, England, Germany and France contributed substantially to musical change from the late 1590s through the 1620s. Completion of the manuscript requires that I see many of the musical sources in person; many critical sources are housed in the British Library in London, the Staats und Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg, and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. I seek NEH support for travel to these collections, transcription and analysis of the sources, and incorporation of new findings into the monograph.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248851-16

Peter B. M. Vranas
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)

New Foundations for Imperative Logic

A book-length study on imperative logic.
 

Standard logic deals with statements, like “the door is open,” not with imperatives, like “open the door”. Just as statements follow from other statements (e.g., “the door is open” follows from “the door and the window are open”), imperatives follow from other imperatives (e.g., “open the door” follows from “open both the door and the window”). In standard logic, a conclusion follows from a premise if the truth of the premise guarantees the truth of the conclusion. In imperative logic, one cannot say this, since imperatives cannot be true or false. So what is it for an imperative conclusion to follow from an imperative premise? In a series of publications, I have proven several theorems which provide a novel answer to this question. My project is to make these results more widely accessible by organizing them into a book. This project is important because logic deals with the foundations of correct reasoning, and correct reasoning is essential in every field, including the humanities.

Project fields:
Logic

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248802-16

John Tofik Karam
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3620)

Arabs at a South American Border Remaking the Hemisphere

A book-length study of Arab immigrants in the border region of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina.

I am applying for a NEH Summer Stipend to complete my book, "Manifold Destiny: Arabs at a South American Border Remaking the Hemisphere." It asks "How did Arabs at the "tríplice fronteira" (tri-border) between Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina transform these Americas?" Arab traders and activists built a plural hemisphere and brought an end to the U.S. dominance enshrined in the doctrine of "manifest destiny." In the 1950s, Lebanese and Palestinians began settling on the Brazilian and Paraguayan sides of the tri-border. Starting in the 1970s, their economic and political networks consolidated Brazil’s clout over the once Argentine-dominated Paraguay. Since the 1990s, they leveraged this new sphere of influence in relation to Mercosul and U.S. impositions. Arabs served as transformative agents of this hemisphere whereby no single authority rules, collaborating and competing in the many-sided struggles among Brazilian, Paraguayan, Argentine, U.S., and other powers.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248806-16

Allison Hobgood
Willamette University (Salem, OR 97301-3922)

Disability in English Renaissance Literature

Completion of a book-length study of disability in English Renaissance literature.

My project excavates an archive of literary and other cultural texts to explore disability in Renaissance England. I argue that the drive to establish forms of physical and mental difference was a key shaping force in this period, and I give readers tools for grappling with mental and physical variation before the advent of "norms" as we know them. I read English Renaissance poetry and drama to uncover “early modern ideologies of ability”: to illuminate the “commonsense,” pervasive privileging of ablebodiedness in early modernity that energized a range of approaches to science, art, religion, and politics. I demonstrate how linguistic, spiritual, and intellectual capacities often aligned with Renaissance humanism and the Protestant Reformation were in fact reliant upon powerful fictions of ability. I reveal not only the diverse logics of ability operating in early modernity but illustrate the surprising ways these ableist norms were generative material for Renaissance writers.

Project fields:
British Literature; Literary Criticism; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


FT-248808-16

Patricia Ann Tilburg
Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28036-9405)

The Parisian Workingwoman, 1880-1936

A book-length study of French women garment workers in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

From the late eighteenth-century, France has been a center of fashion and luxury craft production. At around that same time, the Parisian garment trade worker held a special place in French popular culture. In the 1830s and 40s, these women became common cultural currency with the creation of indelible fictional creations like the grisettes of romantic literature. My book manuscript assesses the legacy and cultural meaning of this type, particularly in its early twentieth-century incarnations, when the working Parisienne became an especially weighted icon and a meeting point of concerns about women’s work, labor reform, and national taste. This book brings together the lived experience of Parisian workingwomen—gleaned through letters, contemporary interviews, and other archival materials—with the deeply romantic and deeply gendered cultural screen through which they were understood in this period.

Project fields:
European History; Labor History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248812-16

Jeffrey Scott Ahlman
Smith College (Northampton, MA 01063-0001)

History, Culture, and the Power of Postcolonial Afterlives of Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972), Leader of Ghana

Two months of field-work and archival research in Ghana for an ethnographic study on the legacy of Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972), Ghana's first prime minister and president.

In death, few African politicians feature as prominently in their country’s and the continent’s political imaginings as Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah. Viewed as an icon of African liberation, Nkrumah not only led Ghana to its 1957 independence, but, more importantly, linked Ghana’s fortunes to Africa’s at large. This project focuses on the decades following the Ghanaian president’s 1966 overthrow and 1972 death as it interrogates competing secular and spiritual worldviews that center a deceased, yet active Nkrumah in broader Ghanaian debates over the “spirit” and integrity of the postcolonial nation. In doing so, the project presents an ancestral Nkrumah as a vehicle for reflecting on Ghanaians’ changing relationships to a postcolonial reality marked by the passing of decolonization’s promises.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 11/30/2016


FT-248818-16

John Ott
James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)

The Visual Culture of Racial Integration, 1931-1954

Research toward a book-length study on African-American art in the 1930s and 40s.

This project investigates black and white artists' efforts towards racial integration, both in terms of imagery and within art institutions, during the decades just before the Civil Rights movement: from the infamous 1931 trial of the Scottsboro Boys until Brown v. Board's desegregation of public schools in 1954. Individual chapters address images of racial solidarity produced within the arts programs of the New Deal, graphics commissioned by multiracial labor unions, Jacob Lawrence’s paintings of the desegregation of the military in the late 1940s, the "enlightened capitalist” vision of integration in mass-market magazines like Life, Fortune, Ebony, and Sepia, and efforts by black modernists like Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, and Hale Woodruff to claim abstraction as an integrationist visual style.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248759-16

Barry Lam
Vassar College (Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0001)

Soldier Philosophers: The Ethics of War from Soldiers who Served

A digital one-hour audio podcast on soldier-philosophers.

For the first time in a generation, people are entering academic philosophy after having served as soldiers in protracted oversees wars. These Soldier Philosophers are using their war experiences to re-evaluate the philosophy of war. Armies and navies are no longer the only combatants, and on the battlefield, the line between combatant and noncombatant seems to shift almost by the minute, requiring a change in conception of the proper targets of wartime killing. The military experiences of Solider Philosophers and their philosophical reflections build a timely bridge between advanced philosophical research in the ethics of war and public interest in the humanities. From their stories, reflections and interviews, I raise new questions about the ethics of war and relate them to daily life and public policy, culminating in an entertaining, accessible pilot episode of a digital audio miniseries aimed at the general public.

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248762-16

Linda Marguerite Rupert
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)

Flight to Freedom: How Fugitive Slaves Shaped Imperial Policy in the Early Modern Caribbean

A study of the impact of fugitive slaves on colonial relationships in the early modern Caribbean.

I request funding to complete the first two chapters of my monograph, a study of fugitive slaves who found freedom in Spanish America by fleeing from English, French, Dutch, and Danish possessions in the early modern circum-Caribbean. This will be the first book-length study of inter-imperial marronage (slave flight) throughout the Caribbean. The evidence shows that these migrations in some of the most remote parts of the area created ripples and waves that extended far beyond immediate shores, with regional, imperial, and geopolitical repercussions. This project explores the interplay between colonial policy, slave agency, developing legal systems, and geopolitics in eighteenth-century Atlantic empires. In considering the complex dynamic between individual human agency, wider socio-economic processes, and overarching political structures, and their impact on push and pull factors, this study also has potential for comparison with other refugees and asylum seekers past and present.

Project fields:
African American History; Immigration History; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248791-16

Amy Rebecca Gansell, PhD
St. John's University, New York (Queens, NY 11439-9000)

Feminine Beauty in the Neo-Assyrian Royal Court at Nimrud, c. 883-612 BCE

A book-length study of the depiction of women in the art and artifacts at the Assyrian Northwest Palace at Nimrud.

My book invites readers inside the first-millennium BCE Neo-Assyrian Northwest Palace at Nimrud, an ancient Iraqi site that can never again be physically accessed. In March 2015, terrorists obliterated Nimrud’s excavated remains. It is therefore more imperative than ever that we interpret and publish the site’s rich history. With a narrative that aims to reconstruct the ancient human experience at Nimrud, I illuminate the bedecked bodies, images, artifacts, and identities of the queens who once lived and were buried here. As emblems of empire and fecundity, I propose that adorned queens and female imagery complemented the king’s potency and played a vital role in ideological conceptions of the empire and cosmos. Putting a story of people back into the palace at Nimrud, I hope that my book will inspire researchers, faculty, students, and interested members of the public around the globe to cherish and protect our world heritage of human history.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Art History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248792-16

Julia Osman
Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS 39762-6156)

Warfare and the Changing Relations Between French Soldiers and Civilians, 1600-1789

A book-length project on warfare and the changing relationship between French soldiers and civilians, 1600 to 1789.

My book project, “Disciplining War and the Civilian Imagination in France, 1600-1789” traces the relationship between soldiers and civilians over this two-hundred-year period in order to prove that attempts to distance civilians from war only makes them more susceptible to it in the long run. I will argue that war and military violence went from an everyday reality for people in the seventeenth century, to something experienced only in the imaginations of those living in the eighteenth century, when soldiers were isolated from the rest of the populace. The “imagined reality” of war, experienced through reading juicy, sensationalized, literature, may have paved the way towards mass citizen armies and “total wars” by the French Revolution of 1789. My project speaks to the NEH initiative ‘Standing Together: Humanities and the Experience of War’ and uses the humanities to help better understand the fluctuations and complications of soldiers’ relationships with the people they fight for.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Military History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249349-16

Elora Shehabuddin
Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)

Feminism, Muslim Women, and Empire

A book-length study about the development of various forms of Muslim feminism from the early modern period to the twenty-first century.

Visions of Progress traces the long history of the construction of Muslim and Euro-American feminist agendas against the backdrop of empire. It brings together recent scholarly research that has sought to complicate familiar tropes about women, gender, and Islam and presents it in an accessible manner for a larger readership, but also intervenes in this very scholarship by charting the specific ways in which Muslim feminisms, particularly in South Asia, and Anglo-American feminisms have developed in tandem rather than in isolation, in the process even helping to construct one another. By historicizing the shared past of the many feminisms in the West and in the Muslim world, by highlighting the relationships between them, this book seeks to confront notions of superiority (in terms of the treatment of women) that persist in the wider Western public as well as the charges of imperialism used by many nationalists and Islamists alike to oppose feminist movements in many Muslim contexts.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; History, General; Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-249362-16

Jason P. Leddington
Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)

The Art of the Impossible: A Philosophical Inquiry into the Aesthetics of Magic

A book-length philosophical analysis of the aesthetics of theatrical magic.
 

The Art of the Impossible is a book project in philosophical aesthetics. It focuses primarily on the art of theatrical magic (think Copperfield, not Potter), which the American Society for Aesthetics recognizes as a “neglected art.” The project builds on my prize-winning essay, “The Experience of Magic,” which is the first philosophical treatment of theatrical magic in the analytic—or, to my knowledge, any—tradition. Yet The Art of the Impossible targets not only academics within and without philosophy, but also popular audiences, for in breaking new theoretical ground it also raises questions of general interest. Despite longstanding academic neglect, magic remains popular on stage, TV, and in film. Arguably, then, it is an important contemporary art form that is badly understood. This project aims to change this, both within and without the academy, and, in the process, to establish a new area of inquiry in aesthetics.

Project fields:
Aesthetics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


FT-249364-16

Eileen Mary Kane
Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)

Muslim Migrants between Russia and the Ottoman Empire, 1800s-1910s

Archival research for a book-length manuscript on Muslim migration between the Russian and Ottoman Empires from the 1880s to the 1910s.

My project is a book, titled Black Sea Crossings: Muslim Migrants and the Worlds They Made. A study of migrations between the Russian and Ottoman empires at a time of rising human mobility (1880s-1910s), this book will reconstruct patterns of Muslim movement between the Black Sea ports of Odessa and Constantinople (Istanbul)—the two largest and most economically vibrant port cities of the Russian and Ottoman empires, respectively—as a way to understand how Muslims navigated new policies toward Islam introduced by the tsarist and Ottoman governments in the decades before World War I, and the collapse of both empires. In telling this story, my aim is to challenge stark and ahistorical divisions between Europe and Islam, and bridge the histories of Russia and the Middle East, regions that have deeply entangled pasts and yet are rarely studied in relation to each another.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Near and Middle Eastern History; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249372-16

Brian Marshall Duvick, PhD
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (Colorado Springs, CO 80918-3733)

A Translation of Proclus’ 5th-Century Commentary on the Republic

An annotated English translation of Proclus' Commentary on the Republic from the 5th century CE, which discusses Plato’s Republic from the 4th century BCE.

I am working on the first English translation of Proclus' Commentary on the Republic (In Remp). Originally written in the 5th century C.E., the In Remp survived the closing of the Athenian Academy and the Neoplatonic flight to the Middle East, but only one medieval manuscript still exists today. Prior to the Renaissance, this was torn in two by an avaricious man, according to the modern editor, and sold to different collectors. Eventually, one half of the manuscript landed in the Laurentian Library in Florence, the other in the Vatican Library. Here they lay unnoticed for 400 years. My translation is based on Kroll’s modern Greek edition, which contains nearly 200 lacunae. Kroll simply identifies them as illegible. I intend to travel to Italy, fill in as many of the lacunae as possible and otherwise propose likely reconstructions. My translation of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic will be the standard reference in the field for years to come.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Ancient Languages; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249279-16

Daniel Aaron Law
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

Syntactic Structure and Political Authority in Classic Mayan Texts

Writing two articles and the preparation of a third on the use of complex sentence structures in texts by Maya and later Spanish missionaries.

This project will investigate the use of complex sentence structures in Classic Mayan (hieroglyphic) text, as well as later appropriations of these same linguistic forms in Colonial manuscripts written by, or on behalf of, Spanish missionaries in the Maya area. The overall claim to be examined is that these complex structures were a salient site for expressing social hierarchies, authority, and ritual and cosmological power and their use was adopted by both Classic Maya elites, and Colonial Spanish priests. This approach highlights the interconnectedness of linguistic form with other elements of social practice. The data-gathering component of this project is currently funded with a Humanities Research Award from the University of Texas at Austin. An NEH summer stipend would provide valuable time for analysis of the gathered textual corpus and for the writing of two of the three major articles that are the projected outcome of the project.

Project fields:
Linguistic Anthropology; Linguistics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249280-16

Kathryn Anne Schumaker
University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)

Civil Rights at the Schoolhouse Gate: Student Protest and the Struggle for Racial Reform

Archival research in Mississippi, Colorado, and Washington, DC on the struggle for constitutional rights by students during the 1960s and 1970s.
 

"Civil Rights at the Schoolhouse Gate: Student Protest and the Struggle for Racial Reform," examines how young African Americans participated in the emergence of a new regime of public school students' constitutional rights from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s. In the midst of the Black Freedom Struggle, African American students sought reforms at school-- though at their own peril. Until 1969, the US Supreme Court had not recognized public school students as possessing any constitutional rights, putting students who protested at the risk of suspension or expulsion for their actions. Ultimately, student protest and the litigation initiated on students' behalf pushed the courts to recognize that students did have some rights, including due process. At the same time, the courts mainly protected the rights of students who were not disruptive.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249295-16

Michael Gerard Devine, PhD
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Plattsburgh (Plattsburgh, NY 12901-2637)

Poetry, Film, and the Battle for a National Art, 1895-1930

Research and writing leading to a book-length study of the connections between poetry and cinema in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

My book project offers a timely prehistory of writing in an age of new media. It tells the story of poetry’s crisis in the early twentieth century—a machine age not unlike our own—when many considered the humanities doomed to disappear. Poetry, instead, became startlingly visible through films like Vitagraph’s The Battle Hymn of the Republic (1911), which deeply influenced boosters of a modern and American art. Interdisciplinary in scope, my project shows the revitalizing interplay between poetry and film: both poetry’s transformation on the screen and page and the efforts of Walt Whitman’s disciples—poets, but also painters, photographers, and filmmakers—to shape film into a mode of national expression. An archival account of how the humanities reemerged in the cinematic public square a century ago, my project explores what the NEH calls The Common Good—a primer for understanding our current moment when new media technologies promise again to transform the arts.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-249296-16

Paul Petzschmann, PhD
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)

Student Exchanges Between the United States and Nazi Germany 1933-1941

Archival research on student exchanges between the US and Fascist Germany during the 1930s.

I seek an NEH Summer Stipend to research student exchanges between the United States and Nazi Germany. The existence of such exchanges complicates our understanding of transnational cultural networks as means of escaping from the restrictions of the state. Exchanges between the U.S. and Nazi Germany show that these networks served to support nationalist agendas. To develop this argument, I will work in the hitherto unexplored archives of an organization at the heart of transatlantic exchanges during the 1930s: the Institute of International Education (IIE) based in New York City. My project seeks to explore the workings of transatlantic networks during an isolationist period, to question the assumption that politics (rather than culture or education) determined the relationship between regimes as different as the United States and Nazi Germany, and to assess the implications of this episode.

Project fields:
European History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249314-16

Omar Youssef Cheta
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)

Empire, Law and Capitalism in the Modern Middle East

Archival work in Istanbul toward a book-length manuscript on law in the 19th-century Ottoman Empire.

My book project, "Empire, Law and Capitalism in the Modern Middle East," is an original study of the legal and economic foundations of the contemporary Middle East. It locates the inception of novel interpretations of modern law and capitalism in the history of the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire. Through tracing government decision-making processes, intellectual debates and professional practices in Istanbul, the imperial capital, and Cairo, the Empire's largest provincial capital, I show how a common economic and legal culture materialized in the Middle East. The project aims to explicate the genealogy of contemporary economic and legal practices, and ideas, especially in relation to the period preceding formal European colonization. Ultimately, it helps us understand the logic of contemporary legal and economic regimes, and accordingly, how to engage with them in informed and effective ways.

Project fields:
Economic History; Legal History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248726-16

Jason Cameron White
Appalachian State University (Boone, NC 28608-0001)

The Levant Company Between the English State and the Muslim World, 1581-1688

Preparation of a monograph on the English Levant Company, a trading company which had a monopoly on all English trade with the Ottomon Empire until 1754.

During the seventeenth century, the English Levant Company operated between two worlds. In England, it had to negotiate the many political tumults of the century, which included civil war, regicide, restoration, and revolution, as well as many calls to revoke its monopoly on all trade between England and the Ottoman Empire. On the other end of its trading network, the Company had to negotiate the complexities of the empire's administrative and legal apparatus, navigate Ottoman political turmoil, which included the murders of two Sultans, and establish working relationships with Turkish, Greek, Armenian, and Jewish merchants, factors, growers, and traders. This project will analyze how the Company bridged these two worlds in order to better understand the origins of globalization, capitalism, the British Empire, and the historical relationship between the west and the Muslim world.

Project fields:
British History; Economic History; Literary Criticism; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248733-16

Jyotsna G. Singh
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)

Muslim and Christian Identities in the Early Modern World

A study of Christian-Muslim encounters in the early modern period.

This is an interdisciplinary study that looks afresh at the expanding early modern European world with an emphasis on Christian-Muslim cross-cultural encounters. Recent scholarship has often focused on Europeans casting their gaze on the Islamic domains, especially on Anglo-Ottoman (Turkish) interactions. Transcultural Islam pluralizes that gaze by identifying distinct yet often overlapping processes of identity formation in both the Muslim and Christian worlds, with a particular emphasis on Mughal India from the mid-sixteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries. Developing five case studies on the shifting and diverse constructions of Islam within inter-cultural and intra-cultural contexts, this book draws on varied works, ranging from Anglican travel narratives, Western discourses on the Qur'an, and Mughal biographies and paintings, among others. In doing so, it charts historical struggles over the meaning of "religion" within Christian and Islamic histories and cultures.

Project fields:
Comparative Religion; Renaissance Studies; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248749-16

Jennifer Ann Adair
Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)

The Politics of Human Rights and Argentina's Transition to Democracy in the 1980's

A history of Argentina's transition to democracy in the 1980s.

In Search of the Lost Decade is the first in-depth history of Argentina's transition to democracy following years of military rule and fiscal crisis. Through a focus on state programs to alleviate hunger and to fortify the foundations of a faltering welfare state, the book traces how citizens and government leaders forged an everyday politics of human rights that defined basic necessities and food security as the litmus tests of constitutional return. The study draws on unpublished sources and oral histories that illuminate the less commonly known actors and events that established the meanings of a just, democratic society. While grounded in an investigation of the daily contests that shaped post-dictatorship Argentina in the 1980s, the book reveals the social logics that justified the rise of neoliberalism at the end of the twentieth century, and offers a critical reinterpretation of the aftermath of Cold War authoritarian regimes and Latin America’s so-called "lost decade."

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248750-16

Michael Woods
Marshall University Research Corporation (Huntington, WV 25701-2218)

Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy

A book-length study of the disagreements between Senators Stephen Douglas and Jefferson Davis that led to pre-Civil War division in the Democratic Party.

I propose to use a Summer Stipend to complete the archival research for my third book, Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy. I use the rivalry between Democratic Senators Stephen Douglas of Illinois and Jefferson Davis of Mississippi to reinterpret the breakup of the Democratic Party prior to the Civil War. By 1860, the division between northern and southern Democrats facilitated the election of Republican Abraham Lincoln, which triggered secession. By tracing the struggle between northern and southern Democrats back to the 1840s, this book uncovers the deep roots of the party's dramatic rupture. The incompatibility of Davis and Douglas’s views on democracy, property rights, and territorial expansion meant that their shared racism and anti-abolitionism could not prevent a disastrous political estrangement. My book’s dual-biographical format will also enhance its appeal to specialists and lay readers alike.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249099-16

Katy L. Chiles
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

The Idea of Authorship in Early African American and Native American Literatures

A book-length study of collaborative authorship in early African American and Native American literature.

Raced Collaboration tells the rich story of how-often against significant odds-early African Americans and Native Americans produced English language texts. Despite the fact that the majority of these works were produced through collaboration, Raced Collaboration is the first comprehensive study of the crucial role that collaboration played in early African American and Native American literatures. While much scholarship on antebellum American literature still has a propensity to focus on writers who we tend to think created their writings alone, this book investigates the remarkable--but heretofore unremarked upon--ways that these writers practiced many kinds of collaboration, in order to open up new understandings of the primary works and of the broader issue of authorship; to deepen our appreciation of what early African Americans and Native Americans have done with forms of communication; and to broaden our understanding of the literatures produced in antebellum America.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Native American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249101-16

Jessica Homan Clark
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)

Subordinated Heroes: Junior Officers in the Roman Army

A book-length study on the literature and history of junior officers (military tribunes) in the Roman army.

Political success and military success went hand in hand in the Roman Republic: great leaders fought, won, and then advertised how they fought and why they won. This generalization is well supported by ancient evidence and modern analyses. It is often coupled with an untested assertion, however — that young men who aspired to political heights sought glory and distinction as junior officers in the Roman army. That might seem likely, but ancient evidence contradicts this representation of young men’s service. A position as a junior officer was not a stage on which to perform one’s exceptionalism, but rather a complicated proving ground for a host of civic virtues or their opposites. In a broader sense, Rome’s young officers united enlisted men with commanders, allied auxiliaries with legions, and service in war with its corollary at home. They captured the imagination of poets and historians, but left us no concrete definitions for their roles in the Roman army. They deserve a book.

Project fields:
Classical History; Classical Literature; Military History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249114-16

Gregory Zinman
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (Atlanta, GA 30332-0001)

The Moving Image Without Photography

Writing and website development leading to publication of a book on the 19th- and 20th-century history of moving images created without cameras and an online supplement presenting related essays and videos.

Handmade: The Moving Image Without Photography reveals a new history of the moving image, told through its engagement with other media and art forms. Think of a Jackson Pollock painting that moves, or a hand-drawn score that produces music when read by a film projector, or a hand-crafted machine that fractures light and bends time without a camera. Through a traditional scholarly monograph complemented by a custom-designed digital companion, Handmade provides a historical and theoretical framework for understanding these artisanal moving-image works and the technologies that make them. Handmade moves from film to performance to video, crossing from the Americas to Asia, so as to demonstrate the global, cross-disciplinary impact of this seemingly anomalous subset of experimental films and practices. In doing so, Handmade also illuminates the intersection of global cinema with other arts, and fundamentally reorients our understanding of the moving image’s past, present, and future.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249124-16

Jennifer K. Ladino
University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)

Affect and Environment at American Memory Sites

Research for a book on the impact of affect and memory on national memorial sites and their landscapes.

I seek support for Memorials Matter, a scholarly monograph that investigates how landscapes, built structures, and written texts at national memorial sites in the American West contribute to emotions about historical conflict and national identity. Working at the confluence of ecocriticism and affect theory, I ask: What emotions (such as nostalgia, shame, grief, and anger) do particular memorial sites promote? What roles do landscapes and built structures play in shaping public memory of, and emotions about, war and other conflicts? What new (often mixed) emotions emerge when we consider not just the written texts but also the physical environment at a memorial? The book features six memorials across a range of landscapes, a comparative approach that highlights the history of violence faced by multiethnic inhabitants of the West and suggests a better understanding of affect will help gauge how effective memorials are at healing a fractured nation and promoting cultural pluralism.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248139-16

Mark D. Usher
University of Vermont (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)

Ancient Greek Thought on Sustainability and Complex Systems

A book-length study tracing ideas about sustainability and complex systems from the ancient world to today.

Sustainability studies and the field of Complex Systems are often presented as new areas of human endeavor. To the extent that these approaches to understanding and living in the world utilize new technologies and scientific advances, they are indeed new, and important. However, the fundamental tenets of both are rooted in ancient Greek thought and culture. This project—-a book—-traces the trajectory of modern ideas about sustainability and complexity theory back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Its aim is to invigorate and inform current thinking in these areas, and to underscore the extent of the Greco-Roman contribution to these topics of contemporary, global concern.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Classics; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248228-16

Judith Steinhoff
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

Grief in Italian Gothic Art

A book-length study of the relationship between images of grieving in paintings and the public display of grief in late medieval Italy.

My project is a book on the ways that 14th-century Italian religious images shaped viewers’ understanding of religiously and socially acceptable grieving behaviors. While the focus is religious images in the church and in the home, also integral to the project are their relationships to sermons, religious plays, conduct literature, and laws regulating funerals. All of these “media”, widely known to the 14th-century public, I argue, informed each other and reinforced acceptable expressions of grief, particularly, but not only, for women. My work reveals that gendered social behaviors were encoded even in pictures created primarily for purposes of prayer and spiritual edification. It thus brings a wholly new perspective to the functioning of religious visual and performative imagery, and identifies a previously unexamined path of transmission for gendered behavioral expectations in 14th-century Italy.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248295-16

Bryan Daniel Lowe
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)

Beyond Founders, Sects, and the Nation-State: A Networks Approach to Buddhism in Ancient Japan

The translation and analysis of a 9th century text describing the spread of Buddhism in medieval Japan.

My project offers a new perspective on early Japanese Buddhism. In contrast to past scholars' focus on elite monks, powerful institutions, and national identity, I will highlight the lives of decidedly non-eminent preachers active in the provinces and illuminate teachings and practices that transcend sectarian and national borders. To do so, I will utilize a manuscript referred to as “Draft of Todai-ji Homilies (Todaiji fujumon ko),” as well as a variety of other sources including tales, gazetteers, and archaeological surveys. These materials record information about non-elite clerics who traveled from the capital to the provinces to perform sermons and conduct rituals. I will introduce a networks based approach, which illuminates exchange amongst individuals, teachings, and regions, to reassess the period. This research will result in the publication of a monograph of six chapters and an annotated translation of “Draft of Todai-ji Homilies.”

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


FT-248386-16

Myles Gregory Osborne
University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)

Pan-Africanism: The Mau Mau Revolt and Its Impact on Rural Society in the Caribbean

Two months of interviews towards a transnational history of the Mau Mau revolt in Kenya and its impact in the Caribbean.

Few social movements have greater significance than Pan-Africanism. With origins in the late 19th century—but peaking in the 1950s—Pan-Africanists sought to mobilize peoples of African descent across the world. Pan-Africanism has, however, been conceived largely as the brainchild and organ of “great men” (consider W.E.B. Du Bois or Marcus Garvey). But what of the bulk of the population in Africa and the Caribbean—what of their aspirations and efforts? My work explores how the rural poor, women, and uneducated of the Caribbean linked themselves to—and participated in—the African diaspora community during the 1950s. Moreover, it brings Africa’s most important anti-colonial war—Mau Mau—into global context, revealing how fighters based in central Kenya’s forests linked their struggle to wider waves of anti-imperialism in the Caribbean. This research rejects the nation state as a useful model, instead drawing transnational connections between peoples across the globe.

Project fields:
African History; History, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248538-16

Pablo Fernando Muchnik
Emerson College (Boston, MA 02116-4624)

Rawls and Kant on the Public Use of Reason

A chapter of a book-length study on Kant’s notion of religion and politics.
 

I will use the NEH summer stipend to work on the fourth chapter of my new book, Faith’s Labor Lost: Kant on Religion and Liberal Politics. This book offers a new conceptual framework to deal with religious claims in advanced liberal democracies. The standard strategy is to appeal to some version of John Rawls' "public reason"—a form of argumentation based on fundamental political values and beliefs one’s fellow citizens could not reasonably reject. This approach, however, forces religious citizens to privatize their deepest convictions. To avoid this problem, I will turn to Kant. For, although the notion of public reason has unmistakable Kantian origins, Rawls’ appropriation overlooks the fact that for Kant religion is an eminently public matter and plays an essential role in advancing the emancipatory goals of the Enlightenment. I want to understand the motivations of Rawls’ highly selective reading of Kant’s notion, and evaluate the consequences of such an approach.

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy of Religion; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


FT-249146-16

Michael Gallope
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)

Musical Notation and the Mid-Century Avant-Garde

Completion of an e-book about the philosophy and practice of avant-garde performance in the twentieth century.

This project has two aims. 1) It will offer a new philosophical account of the role of the musical score in the mid-century avant-garde. And 2) It will ground this argument in a media-rich e-book publication that showcases and animates a trove of relevant primary materials. In the 1950s and 1960s, the musical score emerged as the essential form for new directions in the nascent avant-garde fields of conceptual and performance art. The project argues that these scores are distinguished by the fact that they allow us to question, in ways that are unique and specific to each score, the minimal conditions and rules for an artwork to take place. These works challenge conventions of notation and performance at the same time that they dramatize specific collisions of different sensuous media: word, image, and sound. In advancing its arguments, the e-book adopts a media-rich digital format that will revitalize the presentation of hundreds of ephemeral documents, images, films, and recordings.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Comparative Literature; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249149-16

Kendra D Smith-Howard
SUNY Research Foundation, Albany (Albany, NY 12222-0001)

The Evolving Definition of "Clean" in 20th-Century America

A book-length study of how changing technologies and industry transformed the idea of cleanliness in American culture during 20th-century.

Between 1900 and 2000, Americans revised what they thought “clean” meant and altered the ways they attained it. These changes in the meaning and technologies of cleanliness carried important consequences for Americans’ understanding of and relationship to the natural world. Through case studies about laundry, paper products, and cleaning fluids, the proposed book examines the labor, environmental resource management, and policy developments related to the practices of cleaning up in the twentieth-century United States. It will deepen understanding of the post-World War II rise in the service sector of the economy and the effects of environmental policy on consumers and businesses. Ultimately, the book asks readers to think of the seemingly mindless tasks of scrubbing floors and sorting laundry as worthy of contemplation and challenges them to confront their shifting environmental footprint.

Project fields:
History of Science; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249202-16

Hilary Wills Becker
University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)

Commerce in color: A Study of the Ancient Roman PigmentIndustry

A book-length study of the economic and technological history of color pigments in the Roman Empire.

Commerce in color presents, for the first time, a study of the Roman pigment industry. Ancient Rome was awash in colors and yet the means by which Rome and its empire were supplied with a wide range of colors has never been studied. This book presents the archaeological and epigraphic evidence for pigment shops and their organization. The varied pigments used by Romans will be considered, using sources such as the natural historian Pliny the Elder, Egyptian papyri, modern chemistry, and pigments found in Roman pigment shops. This industry provides an opportunity to understand Roman trade by focusing on one class of good as it travels from mine to shop, as well as the relative monetary value of goods on the Roman commercial market. Indeed, certain Roman pigments were highly valued, attracting the attention of the Roman state, who controlled part of the industry, and the interest of unscrupulous individuals, who adulterated or faked premium pigments in order to make a profit.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics; Economic History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249217-16

Lori Harrison-Kahan
Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)

Pioneering Jewish Women Writers in the Progressive Era

A book-length study of a group of American women Jewish writers based in San Francisco.

“The Deghettoization of American Jewish Literature: Pioneering Women Writers in the Progressive Era” examines a group of turn-of-the-twentieth-century, San Francisco-based writers whose work provides alternatives to the ghetto tale that has long dominated scholarship on early Jewish American literature. Broadening our understanding of pre-World War I Jewish literary history and American women’s writing, this project tells the stories of forgotten women writers (Emma Wolf, Bettie Lowenberg, Miriam Michelson, Harriet Lane Levy, Anna Strunsky, and Rose Strunsky) who made important contributions to American and transnational literary culture during the Progressive Era. The work of these writers may be over a century old, but their writings and careers offer fresh perspectives on Jewishness and gender and compel us to consider how and why certain voices have been excluded from the American literary and cultural canon and from ethnic literary history.

Project fields:
American Literature; Gender Studies; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249219-16

Nicole Danielle Smith
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

A Christian Mannes Bileeve: A Critical Edition of a Middle English Commentary on the Apostle's Creed

A scholarly edition of A Christian Mannes Bileeve, a 14th-century commentary on the Apostles' Creed written in Middle English.

My project is a critical edition of A Christian Mannes Bileeve (CMB), which Middle English Texts (Heidelberg, Germany) has agreed to publish. CMB is an unpublished and unedited vernacular explanation of the Apostles’ Creed. Its place at the beginning of a long and popular tradition of commentaries on the Creed that extends into the 17th century position it as a seminal text that documents the human condition and its relation to literacy and theology. In particular, CMB presents women as having a licit stake in theological argument. All four surviving manuscripts provide evidence of spiritual prose written for--and perhaps even by--religious women, thus placing them at the center of a complex and nuanced literary playing field informed by vigorous theological debate in late 14th-century England. CMB accordingly stands to influence the way we understand the intersection between women’s literacy and vernacular theology as England found itself on the cusp of intense religious reform.

Project fields:
British Literature; History of Religion; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249220-16

Joseph D. Peschio
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53212-1255)

The St. Petersburg Censorship Committee and the Early Bureaucratization of Russian Censorship

Archival research towards a book-length study on the 19th-century St. Petersburg Censorship Committee.

The state censorship apparatus was the single most significant literary institution in early-nineteenth-century Russia, yet we know very little about how it functioned and how it impacted the development of literary form. The reason for this is simple: Soviet-era scholars were not able to access the necessary archival materials, and publishing on the history of censorship was discouraged. My project seeks to remedy this lacuna through careful and systematic analysis of the archive of the St. Petersburg Censorship Committee, which was charged with regulating most of the nation's literary output in the key period between the Censorship Statutes of 1804 and 1826. The NEH Summer Stipend would support my return to the Petersburg archives and the next stages in my history of literary censorship in Russia. The "deliverables" of this project include journal articles and publications of archival materials in free-access digital venues, and, eventually, a monograph on the subject.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Slavic Languages; Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


FT-249221-16

Rebecca Ann Tuuri
University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001)

The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

A book-length study of the National Council of Negro Women. 

This is the first full-length scholarly monograph on the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), the largest black women’s organization in the United States at the height of the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Era. Whereas recent studies of militant and visible civil rights efforts seek to retrieve and analyze a radical model of social change, this story examines how the middle class black women of the NCNW used their respectability, moderate reputation, and national network to gain access to and money from powerful political and business leaders from the late 1950s through the 1970s. Their private, non-governmental, self-help approach even appealed to conservative leaders. However, NCNW also funneled financial resources and support to projects and individuals deemed too controversial by mainstream America to gain funding on their own, thus challenging clear-cut boundaries between radicals and moderates, leftists and liberals.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249230-16

Jessica L. Ghilani
University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg Campus (Greensburg, PA 15601)

Advertising for US Army Volunteers since 1914

Research and manuscript revisions leading to publication of a book on the history of twentieth-century recruitment advertising by the U.S. Army.

"Selling Soldiering: Advertising for US Army Volunteers since 1914" is a book publication under contract with University of Iowa Press. In it I argue that the origins of volunteer military recruitment strategies and sales pitches can be detected deep into the history of 20th century conscription, before the draft's overturn in 1973. I reveal that recruiting appeals made to women as well as to other targeted demographic groups depended more on the surrounding social and political contexts than the recruitment model used to fill military ranks. Advertisements for army service served significant public relations purposes beyond just that of filling ranks. I examine the cultural influence of army advertisements on the civilian public's perceptions, the recruited soldiers' expectations, and the enlisted soldiers' experiences of military service. Such representations deeply inform public opinions, assumptions, and notions of civic obligation over time.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248619-16

Julia Emilia Rodriguez
University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

Nineteenth Century Anthropology and the Scientific Reconquest of the Americas

A history of the development of Americanist anthropology as a collaboration between scientists in Latin America and Europe.

This book project examines the genesis of Americanist anthropology in the late-19th century, a crucial moment in the centuries-old transatlantic enterprise to unearth new knowledge about the fundamental nature of humankind. It follows Americanists' own evidence trail, from physical artifacts to linguistic and cultural evidence, in the context of comparative study of Latin American civilizations. It identifies prominent figures and debates in anthropology on two continents as scientists grappled anew with existential questions -- what are the measures of civilization? Is there a single model of human social development? Can diverse peoples coexist in the same nation? It also explores how Americanist anthropology shaped key aspects of the transnational political culture of the era and outcomes in law locally, for example, practices of integration or exclusion of Native Americans and mixed race groups, the instruction of Native languages, and the return of human remains.

Project fields:
History of Science; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248633-16

Brian Hochman
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

A History of Wiretapping in the United States

A history of wiretapping in the United States, from the Civil War to the present.

All Ears: A History of Wiretapping in the United States explores one of modern media history’s most inconvenient truths: that technologies for eavesdropping on communications have proliferated as rapidly as communications technologies themselves. Third parties tapped the earliest telegraph wires during the nineteenth century, and America’s communications systems have been bugged ever since. Drawing on a range of primary source materials, All Ears uncovers the history of wiretaps and other eavesdropping technologies in the United States. In the process, the book chronicles debates about eavesdropping that have captured the public’s attention since the mid-nineteenth century. My central argument is that cultural contests over wiretapping constitute contests over what it means to communicate in a networked society--a society in which information needs to travel across vast distances, and a society in which technologies of all sorts enable the human voice to traverse them.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248660-16

Hilary Christine Havens
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37996-0001)

From Manuscript to Print: Revising the Eighteenth-Century Novel

A book-length study of how 18th-century British novelists revised their works, using new digital software that recovers deleted text from manuscripts.

My planned monograph, “From Manuscript to Print: Revising the Eighteenth-Century Novel,” recovers and analyzes material from major novel manuscripts and post-publication revisions in order to construct a new narrative about the eighteenth-century creative mind. Criticism of the eighteenth-century novel and even work in the burgeoning field of print culture has often neglected the importance of the process of revision, which in the eighteenth century often occurs in complex response to family and friends, to readers and editors, and to an author’s own previous texts. Many of my insights arise from my development of new digital paleographical methodologies to recover deleted text.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248663-16

Katherine Unterman
Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)

Law and Imperialism in Guam, 1898-1950

A book-length study of the relationship between law and American empire in Guam, 1898-1950.
 

This project examines the relationship between law and American empire in the U.S. territory of Guam. Until now, Guam has been little more than a footnote in studies of American empire — always mentioned, yet never explored in depth. However, Guam provides an ideal lens for examining the nature of American power around the globe. Bridging legal history and American foreign relations, this project contends that law and legal justifications need to be considered alongside military and economic power as crucial tools of U.S. imperialism. Beginning in 1898, when Guam became an American possession, and continuing through the span of the twentieth century, the United States governed Guam as an exceptional legal space where the Constitution did not fully apply. This project reveals the practical impact of laws and judicial opinions on a colon