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Funded Projects Query Form
215 matches

Program: Summer Stipends*
Date range: 2017-2019
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FT-264458-19

Nicholas D. Smith
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-7879)
Socrates on Knowledge, Virtue, and Happiness

Writing toward the publication of a book that argues for a new interpretation of Socratic virtue, finding happiness through honing a set of practical skills.

A book that articulates the connections Socrates makes (in Plato's early or Socratic dialogues) between knowledge, virtue, and happiness. In this project, I make the case that these connections have been misunderstood in the scholarly literature because scholars have insufficiently understood an important consequence of the Socratic conception of the relevant knowledge as craft or skill. Briefly, the achievement of skill occurs by degrees and with practice. I show how this effects the Socratic view of virtue and happiness, and how these are connected, in a way that is gradable. In the Socratic view, then, our project as human beings is to improve our life skills, our degree of achievement in virtue, and thus the extent to which we can be happy.

Project fields:
Classics; Epistemology; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264461-19

Jason Knirck
Central Washington University (Ellensburg, WA 98926-7500)
Learning Democracy: Political Opposition in the Irish Free State

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of parliamentary opposition in the Irish Free State (1922-1937).

This project studies the development of parliamentary opposition in the Irish Free State. The normalizing of such opposition is a crucial aspect of the success of any democracy and Ireland had no traditions or notions of a loyal parliamentary opposition when the Free State was created. The major Irish pre-revolutionary party sought to leave the Westminster parliament via Home Rule and often used obstructionist tactics to achieve that end. The revolution had placed a premium on unity and the post-revolutionary division of Irish politics into parties was often depicted as a deplorable fall—motivated by base desires such as greed or ambition—from the previous state of revolutionary unity. In addition, those hostile to the revolutionary settlement took up arms against the new Irish parliament and initially abstained from it. The development of notions of opposition in the face of these many obstacles proved a key factor in explaining the ultimate perseverance of democracy in Ireland.

Project fields:
European History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264476-19

Frederick Hal White
Utah Valley University (Orem, UT 84058-0001)
Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union

Research and writing leading to publication of a literary and historical study about the translation, reception and popularity of works by American author Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union, from the 1930s to the 1990s.

Ernest Hemingway’s translated works enjoyed immense popularity in the Soviet Union. In the 1930s, the Soviet government had hoped to co-opt Hemingway as a supporter of the Soviet experiment, but his true impact was realized in the 1960s as a counter-culture figure representing the American ideal of personal liberty. Even so, Hemingway was afforded in 1971 a “Soviet biography” fitting for a Soviet writer. Of particular interest are the ways in which Soviet cultural appropriations of American cultural figures played a role in the ultimate collapse of the Soviet Union. This work explores the Soviet aspects of the translation, interpretation and consecration of Hemingway. The Soviet Union first accepted Hemingway for their own political and social agenda (antifascism), only some thirty years later to find that he represented the ideals of personal freedom that Soviet citizens desired, undermining the official positive pronouncements about the collective.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264551-19

Erik Mueggler
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Literacy, Sovereignty, Bondage: a Native Hereditary Chieftainship in Qing China

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on social and political relations on the frontier of the Chinese Qing empire, based on analysis of an archive in two languages: Nasu and bureaucratic Chinese.

This book project explores a unique archive retained by a lineage of native hereditary chiefs during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912) in southwest China. The archive is in two languages: bureaucratic Chinese and Nasu, one of four closely related Ne (or Yi) written languages. Its documents afford an unparalleled opportunity to work out a description of local relations and forms of subjugation in this periphery of the Qing empire. My inquiry begins with basic questions. What systems of ideas, conventions and practices surrounded each class of administrative, legal, personal, and ritual document in this archive? How did different practices of writing, copying, reading and reciting mediate the subjugation of ancestors, chiefs, wives, concubines, heirs, ministers, bonded tenants, and domestic slaves? Methodologically, how might attention to discrepancies and resonances across forms of writing usually kept separate illuminate social relations otherwise obscured?

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264727-19

Colin Malcolm Keating
Yale-NUS College (Singapore 138527 SINGAPORE)
Metaphor and Analogy in Kumarila Bhatta, Classical Indian Philosopher

Research and writing leading to the publication of a book about Hindu philosopher Kumarila Bhatta (ca. 700 A.D.), which will include an English translation of some of his works.

Human beings use metaphor and analogy in scientific reasoning, literature, philosophy, and in their everyday lives. However, despite being pervasive, metaphors and analogies are still the subject of significant inquiry: what is their structure? how are they related? how are they useful for knowledge? Indian philosophers have been considering these questions for thousands of years, and yet their efforts are largely ignored in contemporary philosophical work on the topic. While it is broadly known that classical Indian thought had sophisticated theories of meaning, much work remains to be done, especially on Kumarila Bhatta's work in this area, which was extremely influential for later Indian philosophy. Metaphor and Analogy in Kumarila Bhatta explores 7th century Mimamsa ("Hermeneutics") philosopher Kumarila Bhatta's theory of linguistic meaning in light of his broader philosophical project, showing that it has implications for thinking about metaphor and analogy.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Non Western Philosophy; Philosophy of Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264762-19

Molly Jeanne Farrell
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
New World Calculation: The Making of Numbers in Colonial America

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the role of numbers and numerical thinking in colonial America.

What new possibilities arise if we embrace mathematics as a form of humanist inquiry? How would we tell stories differently if we came to see data as a means of personal expression? My project, New World Calculation: The Making of Numbers in Colonial America, investigates these questions in the context of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century colonialism. When enslaved, indigenous, and colonizing peoples interacted, they staged an encounter between groups who were each highly technically skilled mathematicians and held distinctive beliefs about what numbers are and what work they did in the world. At the same time, the tremendous accounting work required to support the economies of Atlantic slavery and settler colonialism, cultivated new forms of bookkeeping and ideas about the reliability of numerical facts. All of these developments led to shifting relationships to numbers and turned colonial spaces into testing grounds for forging novel forms of numerical thinking.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/3/2019 – 8/2/2019


FT-264777-19

Rashmi Sadana
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Gender, Urban Space, and Everyday Life in the Age of the Delhi Subway System, 2002-2018

Writing a chapter of a monograph detailing ethnographic fieldwork on how the new Delhi metro system reflects and constructs gendered behavior.

The arrival of the Delhi Metro – an ultra-modern, high-tech, and highly surveilled urban rail system, and South Asia’s first major, multi-line metro – has become a touchstone for discussions of urban development, gendered social mobility, and India’s increasingly aspirational culture. A street-level ethnographic view of the city, this book project captures the contradictions of a capital-intensive mega project that seeks to equalize how people of all social classes and backgrounds get around. Focusing on the stories of everyday riders as well as those who designed and built the system, the book documents the story of the Delhi Metro and its social impact since its arrival in 2002. In so doing, this project offers a fresh and contemporary understanding of Delhi that redefines the urban landscape and goes beyond clichés of "third world cities" in the global south.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/24/2019 – 8/24/2019


FT-264780-19

Rudy P. Guevarra, Jr
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Aloha Compadre: A History of the Latinxs Population in Hawai'i, 1832-2010

A book-length study about the migration of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Central Americans to Hawaii between 1832 and 2010, and the Latino-Hawaiian culture that has developed over time.

Aloha Compadre: Latinxs in Hawai’i, 1832-2010, will be the first study to document the collective history and contemporary experiences of Latinxs in Hawai’i. I focus on Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Central Americans, which make up the majority of the Spanish speaking Latinx population in the state. Historically speaking Latinxs have been voyaging to the Hawaiian Islands for over 180 years. Currently they comprise almost ten percent of the state’s population. Aloha Compadre explores how Latinx migrations to Hawai’i are expanding the borderlands region beyond the western hemisphere and into the Pacific region. Their enduring presence in Hawai’i is also transforming the social, economic and cultural landscape of the state. Documenting their community narratives enables us to understand how the Latinx population seeks to build their communities, form interracial relationships, and find a sense of belonging in Hawai’i.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Latino History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264784-19

Kathryn B. Meyer
Wright State University Main Campus (Dayton, OH 45435-0001)
Air Manchuria - The Army Behind the Mask: Aviation and Nation Building in Wartime Manchuria

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Air Manchuria, the commercial airline established by the Japanese Imperial Army as it occupied China's Northeast provinces in 1932.

“Air Manchuria” is the first English language scholarly study of a commercial airline established by the Japanese Imperial Army as they occupied China’s Northeast provinces in 1932. Presenting itself as a multi-national modern Asian nation based on Confucian values, Manchukuo received international condemnation from the start. A commercial airline would underscore modernity and national pride. As a civil enterprise the company faced the same problems that other civil airlines faced in the early days: high prices, fearful customers, and uncomfortable accommodations. It also served a secret military function: logistics, surveillance, and espionage. As a business serving the puppet state it was touted as a mark of legitimacy. This study goes beyond military history. It discusses the use of commerce, leisure, and tourism in the process of state building, in this case a failed state.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264785-19

Jessica Lynne Pearson
Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)
Traveling to the End of Empire: Tourism and Anti-Racism in the Era of Decolonization

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the role of tourism and decolonization after World War II.

"Traveling to the End of Empire" will be the first global history of tourism and decolonization in the twentieth century. It will explore the way that former colonies and former colonizers have used tourist infrastructure—such as museums, exhibitions, monuments, and guided tours—to come to terms with, or to erase, their colonial past. This book will define decolonization as both the formal end of empire and an ongoing process that aims to dismantle hierarchies of race and civilization. It will look critically at the ways in which sites for tourists support or ignore the broader goals of the post-1945 global anti-racism movement, with a particular emphasis on the role that UNESCO played in shaping the global landscape of tourism in the second half of the twentieth century. This fellowship would support two months of research in the United Kingdom. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
African History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 4/1/2020


FT-264797-19

Birger Vanwesenbeeck
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Fredonia (Fredonia, NY 14063-1127)
Loss in Translation: Mourning Across Language in Plath, Pynchon, and Whitehead

The writing of one chapter of a book on the linguistic challenge of articulating mourning in three American authors:  poet Sylvia Plath (1932-1963) and novelists Thomas Pynchon (1937- ) and Colson Whitehead (1969 - ).

Although psychologists and literary scholars have long held that the ability to verbalize a loss or trauma constitutes a key-component of the coping process, there is, to date, very little research on the actual linguistic aspect of this process. Is there such a thing as a “native” language of mourning? What happens when the native tongue is somehow unavailable (or undesirable) for mourning? Is it possible to mourn “across language"? These are questions that are at the heart of the three American writers analyzed in my in-progress book manuscript “Loss in Translation”: the poet Sylvia Plath and the novelists Thomas Pynchon and Colson Whitehead. Three chapters of “Loss in Translation” currently exist in draft from. I’m asking for NEH funding for the completion of a fourth chapter that will allow me to extend the notion of mourning-across-language to include a discussion of the issues of slavery and race.

Project fields:
American Literature; Comparative Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264815-19

Elisa Camiscioli
SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton (Binghamton, NY 13902-4400)
Trafficking, Travel, and Illicit Migration in Early Twentieth-Century France and the Americas

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of trafficking between France and the Americas in the early 20th century.

This project investigates early 20th-century debates on trafficking through the lens of migration history, and how women’s mobility raised key questions about the distinction between free movement and unauthorized migrations. The “traffic in women” generated copious documentation on such themes as border policing, passport controls, immigration law, deportation, and repatriation. In addition, letters written by ostensibly trafficked women, their families, and members of criminal networks reveal the lived experience of these migrations. Focusing primarily on the transatlantic route between France and the Americas, the project situates both the discourse and experience of trafficking within a longer history of free and unfree labor, sex work, mobility, and globalization.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; Immigration History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/10/2019 – 7/9/2019


FT-264816-19

Alex Gottesman
Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
Freedom of Speech in Ancient Athens

Preparation of a book on the concept of freedom of speech in ancient Greek Athens.

Scholars tend to assume that the Athenians held values very similar to the ones that are enshrined in our own constitution and legal tradition. But what did the concept of free speech consist of in Athens? What were the Athenians’ ideas and intuitions about free speech? Where did they draw the line between permitted and unpermitted speech, and under what circumstances? There is to date no book-length study of this topic. I am requesting an NEH Summer Stipend to support my research into this very old, but also very timely, topic.

Project fields:
Classical History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/30/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-264836-19

Kristin Maria Szylvian
St. John's University, New York (Queens, NY 11439-9000)
Instant Housing: Operation Breakthrough, George Romney, and the Unrealized promise of the Factory Built House

A book-length study of George Romney's tenure as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and the legacy of public housing initiatives started during the Richard Nixon administration.

The lack of equal opportunity housing was widely regarded as a major factor in the uprising and protests that took place in many US cities between 1962 and 1968. In May 1969 George Romney, US President Richard M. Nixon's Secretary Housing and Urban Development, launched Operation Breakthrough (OB) to help the US dramatically increase housing production. Romney was unable to shatter or "break through" barriers preventing or inhibiting the industrialization of house production including building codes and zoning laws that sought to restrict low-income housing development and union work rules that discouraged the use of mass-assembly methods and new materials in housing. The nine prototype communities built in eight states did, however, offer among the first, publicly funded, privately built integrated, mixed income planned residential communities in the US (edited by staff).

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264839-19

Kimberly Jenkins Marshall
University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)
Re-Membering the Boise Valley People: Rethinking Sovereignty in Contemporary Cultural Planning

Research and writing of an article on reconciliation efforts by Boise city officials and Native American groups in order to better understand the meaning and role of sovereignty in such contexts.

Over the past few years, cultural planners from the City of Boise, Idaho and local Native American tribes have developed an innovative working relationship. Built on the principle of interdependent sovereignty, these partners have a plan to remake Boise’s cultural infrastructure. They are commissioning public artwork by Native artists and creating signs to reintroduce traditional place names into Boise’s urban spaces. This collaboration holds the potential for both innovative successes and unexpected challenges. However, the unique attitude toward interdependence guiding this collaboration may allow it to serve as a model for other tribal/settler state partners working toward reconciliation. At the invitation of both parties, I will document this collaboration, contributing a new perspective to our understanding of cultural sovereignty by demonstrating the interdependent way in which sovereignty can be enacted through collaborative cultural partnerships.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/13/2019 – 8/13/2019


FT-264843-19

Yinan He, PhD
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
Domestic Enemies, National Identity Mobilization, and China's Attitudes toward Foreign Others

Writing a book about Chinese approaches to the “foreign other” in domestic and foreign policy in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

To stoke fear and hatred of foreigners for internal needs is a recurring pattern in modern Chinese nationalism. Anchored in interpretive analysis of elites’ political rhetoric, party documents, and propaganda materials, the book is a macro-historical study of Chinese national identity discourse from the 1890s till the 2010s. Rather than being constantly antagonistic toward foreign imperialism, China has undergone cycles of seeking cooperation with foreigners and demonizing them. When facing severe political challenges, Chinese elites often tried to exclude domestic enemies in national identity mobilization. However, if targeting domestic others alone was politically inconvenient or unappealing, they would promote antiforeign identity to reinforce internal battles. By linking China’s domestic politics with attitudes toward perceived foreign adversaries, this study revises dominant views that emphasize historical grievances or external threat in explaining modern China’s antiforeignism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; International Relations

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264870-19

Rebecca Elizabeth Keegan VanDiver
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Politics of Ephemerality in African American Art Practices, 1965-2015

Preparation of a book on 20th-century African American art that addresses the notion of impermanence.

My book confronts the relationship between Blackness and ephemerality (material, temporal, and political) as manifest in African American contemporary art. I query how African American artists reconcile the permanent (their Blackness) with the ephemeral (the changing socio-cultural moment). The central claim of the project is that some African American artists engage the politics of ephemerality and its associated connections to permanence and impermanence as part of their efforts to respond to states of emergency—government-declared and government-perpetrated. Topics include: the production and archiving of 1960s era civil rights march posters, 1970s Black feminist print-making, collaborative site-specific artworks like the Organization of Black American Culture’s 1967 Wall of Respect mural, Mark Bradford’s use of ephemera in his collages, Kara Walker’s 2006 After the Deluge show, and recent artistic responses to the Black Lives Matter movement.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 10/31/2019


FT-264875-19

Esra Akin-Kivanc
University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)
Geometry of Islamic Calligraphy: History, Sources, and Meaning

Research leading to two articles on the geometrical foundations of pre-modern Islamic calligraphy.

In the pre-modern Islamic world, calligraphy was commonly considered to be the most revered branch of art. Despite the art form’s centuries-old history, distinctive idiom, and its popularity from China to Spain, there exists no scholarship that explores the structural principles of Islamic calligraphic compositions. I am requesting a grant to continue research on two articles that I am preparing on a corpus of hitherto unstudied inscriptions designed according to the principles of symmetry identified in geometry, specifically, friezes and medallions. My initial analyses of these textual compositions led me to believe that pre-modern calligraphers were knowledgeable of, and incorporated into their art, contemporary discourses and practices in mathematics. This significant finding, in turn, points to an intersection between art and science, a nuanced understanding of which is essential for a study of the history and meaning of Islamic ornament and its reiterations in non-Islamic art. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264881-19

Dale Kretz
Texas Tech University (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
After the Freedmen's Bureau: Administering Freedom in the Age of Emancipation

Research and writing leading to a book about the Freedmen’s Branch (1872-1878), established by Congress to handle applications for bounties, back pay, and pensions for former slaves and African-American soldiers.

My book project explores how formerly enslaved men and women maintained their wartime foothold in the U.S. federal government from the Civil War until the New Deal. While claiming military benefits in extraordinary numbers, freepeople negotiated issues of slavery, identity, loyalty, dependency, and disability, all within an increasingly complex and rapidly expanding federal administrative state.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/18/2019 – 7/18/2019


FT-264900-19

Jethro Hernandez Berrones
Southwestern University (Georgetown, TX 78626)
A Revolution in Small Doses: Homeopathy, the Medical Profession, and the State in Mexico, 1895-1942

Writing two chapters of a history of homeopathy and the regulation of the medical profession in Mexico, 1895-1942.

A Revolution in Small Doses examines the integration of homeopathic institutions into the Mexican medical profession after the revolution of 1910. It analyzes how Mexicans shaped the boundary between professional and popular medicine in the process of national reconstruction in the 1920s and 30s. The book demonstrates that the boundary was more flexible than regularly assumed for Mexican medicine and that even during a period when science dominated public health and medical education projects, homeopaths negotiated a place within state institutions as very few other countries did in the 20th century. Homeopaths’ case in Mexico constitutes an experiment on medical pluralism in a time of biomedical hegemony. Homeopathy’s success reflects the continuous presence of plural medical beliefs in a stratified society, a society that struggled to reconcile elitist medical science with popular demands for health, its Porfirian past with its revolutionary present.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-264906-19

Catherine Marie Jaffe
Texas State University - San Marcos (San Marcos, TX 78666-4684)
A History of the Women’s Council of the Royal Madrid Economic Society (1787-1823): Women, Enlightenment, and Philanthropy

Research and preparation for a book of on the philanthropic contributions of Spanish women in the 18th-century Enlightenment.

I will produce a collaborative book with U.S. and Spanish historians and literary scholars on the history of the Junta de Damas de Honor y Mérito de la Sociedad Económica Matritense (the Women’s Council of Honor and Merit of the Royal Madrid Economic Society), a philanthropic organization of elite women founded in 1787 to promote enlightened reform of institutions for poor women and children. I will work two months summer 2019 in archives in Madrid to complete my chapter on the women’s writings as a projection of a collective, feminine Enlightened identity. I will edit the chapters and write the introduction with my Spanish co-editor, a historian, and consult with other historians. The book shows that the Junta made a compelling contribution to the Enlightenment, to women’s history, and to the history of feminism. It will expand scholars’ knowledge of Spanish women’s contributions to Enlightenment, especially for readers without access to scholarship published in Spanish.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Spanish Literature; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-264915-19

Phillip Isaac Lieberman
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
The Shifting Fate of World Jewry from Iraq to North Africa in the Early Islamic Period

This project revisits long-held assumptions about the dynamics of Jewish life in the medieval Islamic world. In my book project, tentatively titled From the Rising of the Sun...To Where It Sets, I intend to challenge the received wisdom that the mostly-agrarian Jewish community urbanized under early Islamic regimes, and subsequently migrated to the communities of the southern Mediterranean in the wake of Islamic conquest. In its place, I propose an alternative narrative of historical contingency, suggesting a Jewish population in the East which atrophies amidst local unrest and the decay of irrigational infrastructure and a corresponding flowering of the autochthonous Jewish population as opportunities for long-distance trade came on the rise as the southern Mediterranean fell under a single (Islamic) legal regime.

Project fields:
Economic History; Medieval History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/30/2019 – 9/30/2019


FT-264916-19

Brenda J. Longfellow
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Women in Public in Ancient Pompeii

Preparation of a book on the public life and art patronage of women in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.

I am applying for an NEH summer stipend in order to undertake field research at the ancient Roman city of Pompeii in Italy, where I will study the architectural, decorative, and epigraphic remains of Pompeian tombs built by women as well as the funerary equipment awarded to Pompeian women by the town council. This research will provide the source material for a chapter in my single-author book titled Women in Public in Ancient Pompeii. Women comprise half of the known tomb builders in Pompeii and received more than one third of the tomb plots awarded to individuals by the city council, and so female economic agency and civic connections are more visible in the cemeteries than anywhere else in the city. This research and chapter will further our understanding of the historical nature of female involvement in the larger community and outside of the domestic sphere.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264924-19

Joanna Davidson
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Singing Wives and Silent Widows: An Ethnographic Study of Marriage in West Africa

Ethnographic research on women in rural West Africa to document and analyze the public songs of married women leading to a monograph on marriage and gendered behavior in a non-Western context.

Something is happening to marriage around the world, and although scholars have long been preoccupied with marital institutions and dynamics we are now scrambling to catch up to a plethora of new trends. My project adds novel insights to this flourishing field by focusing on the perplexing unspeakability of Jola widows in West Africa alongside the din of wives who collectively sing about their marital woes. These phenomena provide fertile ethnographic ground for re-thinking enduring humanistic concerns with the relationship between economy and affect, materiality and emotion, and instrumentality and intimacy

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2019 – 8/10/2019


FT-264928-19

Isabel Moreira
University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9049)
A Cultural Biography of Queen Balthild of Neustria, France (c.626-80)

Completion of a biography of Queen Balthild of northern France (c.626-680), who was born an Anglo-Saxon slave, married King Clovis II, was regent to her sons, and after her death was venerated as a saint at the French convent she founded.

By means of a biography of an exceptional woman, this book is an investigation of the life and times of a seventh-century Anglo-Saxon slave who became a queen of Neustria (northern France), and eventually was venerated as a saint. A biography of this exceptionally well documented woman illuminates the power and limitations of female power in the seventh century, the opportunities for social mobility in a slave culture, and the way this woman and her supporters preserved an account of her activity in politics and religion, at a time when the slave trade was a reality for those living in the late Roman Mediterranean world.

Project fields:
European History; History, General; Medieval History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264929-19

Norah Linda Andrews Gharala
Georgian Court College (Lakewood, NJ 08701-2697)
“A Black Man from India”: Between Slavery and Freedom in the Early Modern Iberian World

A book-length study about the complexities of slavery, freedom, and identity in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic worlds through the life of slave Antonio Ximenes. 

This project tells the story of Antonio Ximenes, a young man enslaved in Asia who fought for his freedom in the courts of Mexico City. His life was a microcosm of colonial relationships and a kind of urban servitude that differed markedly from later plantation societies in the Americas. Ximenes lived at a pivotal time for seventeenth-century European empires seeking the wealth of trade in Asia. Before he was thirty, Ximenes had traveled in captivity across the Indian Ocean and the Pacific, visiting the cosmopolitan ports of the Philippines, Peru, and Mexico. Calling himself “a black man from India,” Ximenes claimed that his master had granted him freedom in exchange for his bravery and years of service. The records Ximenes and his associates left help us understand the changing and multifaceted meanings of slavery and freedom, race, gender, and self in the global early modern world.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264939-19

John Ott
Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Scandal, Reform, and the Compilation of Canon Law in Eleventh-Century Reims

Research and preparation for editions and translations of two major documents on church and civil legal history in medieval France, the Apologia of Archbishop Manasses I of Reims (c. 1069-1080) and the legal collection Sinemuriensi produced at Reims in the 10th and 11th centuries.

This project examines the compilation of canon law in and around the episcopal city of Reims in the eleventh century, a time of dramatic change, institutional church reform, and local episcopal resistance. It focuses on two sources of considerable importance for the history of canon law and the medieval church: the Apologia of Archbishop Manasses I of Reims (c.1069-1080) and a widely disseminated legal collection known as Sinemuriensis. The Summer Stipend would support two months' archival research in France to examine and transcribe undigitized manuscripts of these texts, with the goal of better understanding how the law was created and employed in the dispute between Manasses and Pope Gregory VII. These legal sources afford valuable lessons about how local cultures and universalizing discourses intersect and overlap, and how their constituents communicate – or fail to communicate – their values to one another. Research will support a book project and several articles.

Project fields:
Legal History; Medieval History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-264943-19

Robin E. Jensen
University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9049)
Julia Ward Howe, Helene Deutsche, and Sophia Kleegman: 20th-Century Women Shaping the Science and Medicine of Fertility

Research and writing leading to a book on Julia Ward Howe, Helene Deutsch, and Sophia Kleegman, 20th-century doctors of reproductive and fertility medicine.

This rhetorical history project analyzes the scientific, public, and interpersonal communication of three women who were central to the development and implementation of fertility science as it is known today. Reformer Julia Ward Howe, psychoanalyst Helene Deutsch, and gynecologist Sophia Kleegman communicated from different social locations and time periods to push back against—and contribute to—scientific orthodoxy. I contend that the fissures they created in scholarly and mainstream discourses about reproductive health functioned to expand the scope of infertility diagnosis and treatment regimens, and to loosen long-held clinical beliefs about women as the central players in fertility related ills. This analysis identifies the discursive strategies that these actors employed to intervene in fertility studies and demonstrates how interventions in science often unfold not in terms of revolutions but in terms of multimodal, nonlinear, and longitudinal communicative negotiations.

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264952-19

Elizabeth Elaine Tavares
Pacific University (Forest Grove, OR 97116-1797)
The Repertory System before Shakespeare, 1582-1594

A book-length study of four 16th-century British theater companies and their contributions to the history of theater, performance, and the early modern English economy.

The generation of theatre makers before William Shakespeare enjoyed greater marketplace diversity than at any other time in the early modern period. 1580s playgoers were spoiled for choice, with more than fifty professional troupes at hand. If plays weren’t systematically advertised, playhouses were in close proximity, and one could see a different play every night of the week, how did one choose? My book, “Playing the Stock Market: The Repertory System before Shakespeare” (under contract with Palgrave) examines four seasons of four companies to expose the interconnections between thematic concerns and staging techniques—revealing that it was repetition, revision, and collaboration rather than novelty that produced their financial success. Attending to the collective process that was the Elizabethan theatre industry, this is the first book to offer a dramaturgical approach comparing several early troupes, proving an important contribution to theatre history and performance studies.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance History; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264956-19

Douglas Leo Winiarski
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet: A Microhistory of Religious Violence on the Early American Frontier, 1805–1815

Research and writing two chapters of a book on interactions between Shakers and Native Americans on the Ohio frontier before the War of 1812.

I seek NEH funding to research and draft the two central chapters of my current book project, Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet. This braided microhistory chronicles the fascinating, but troubled relationship between the Shakers—the religious sectarians infamous for their ecstatic worship practices, communal social organization, celibacy, and pacifism—and the militant followers of Tenskwatawa, the so-called Shawnee Prophet and brother of the famed war captain Tecumseh. Written for a broad audience of students, scholars, and general readers and drawing upon understudied Shaker manuscript letters and journals, Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet examines the local sources of religious violence on the early American frontier during the years leading up to the War of 1812. I anticipate that the book will resonate with readers attuned to the politics of religious difference and the troubling connections between religion and violence in our own times.

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264958-19

Martin Kalb
Bridgewater College (Bridgewater, VA 22812-1599)
Nature and the Making of German Southwest Africa, 1885-1915

Research and writing leading to publication of an environmental history of German Southwest Africa (1884-1915).

My book project is an environmental history of empires, in this case, of German Southwest Africa (1884-1915). I contend that taking environmental factors into account further complicates existing understandings of German colonial fantasies. Germany dreamed of a model colony, envisioned as a profitable agricultural settler society. Realities on the ground, however, threatened such visions of empire, and repeatedly hindered German efforts in the region. The most important challenges were tied to issues of land accessibility and water scarcity. Massive investments into harbor structures, irrigation, and other imperial infrastructures soon shaped broader policies, especially following the 1904 Herero and Nama Uprising. Unintended consequences and overall failures, combined with the employment of everyday violence of the colonial state to achieve its fantasies, eventually transformed nature and people but also shaped the imperial imaginations of German colonialists. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
African History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-264962-19

Eduardo Ledesma
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Blind Cinema: Visually Impaired Filmmakers and Technologies of Sight

A book-length study and companion website about visually impaired filmmakers and their use of various technologies, which illuminate the experience of blindness through film.

"Blind Cinema," for which I seek an NEH Summer Stipend, has two key aims: first, to raise critical awareness about the existence of blind filmmakers, and second, to establish the contours of a blind cinematic style through theories of the gaze and haptic film. It is the first book to study how visually impaired filmmakers use digital media both to make visible the experience of disability and to destabilize stereotypes about the blind. My analysis of films by blind and visually impaired directors, as well as of collaborations between blind and sighted filmmakers, shows how the aesthetics and content of these works represent the experience of blindness. I combine film and disability studies approaches to consider how new technologies of vision are giving blind filmmakers access to the tools and techniques of filmmaking and how their innovations are transforming our experience of film.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-264966-19

Laura K. McClure
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Reimagining the Chorus: Modern American Poet Hilda Doolittle (known as H.D.) and Greek Tragedy

Preparation of a book on the influence of ancient Greek drama on the 20th-century American poet Hilda Doolittle (known as H.D.).

This project examines the engagement of the modernist American poet Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), known as H.D., with the Greek chorus, from her first experiments with translations of Euripides to her final extended dramatic lyric, Helen in Egypt. It situates this analysis within a broader context of Hellenism at the end of the 19th and early 20th century, a key period for the transmission and reception of Greek tragedy in Britain and the U.S. I argue that H.D. transformed a marginal and obscure literary form into a modernist aesthetic of translation and poetics, what she termed the 'choros-sequence', in order to challenge and reshape the male lyric tradition from a female perspective. As the first comprehensive study of the choral form in H.D.’s literary production, this project contributes to the growing body of scholarship on women as critical agents of classical reception.

Project fields:
American Literature; Classical Languages; Classical Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264970-19

Akiko Tsuchiya
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
Spanish Women of Letters in the Nineteenth-century Antislavery Movement: Transnational Networks and Exchanges

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about Spanish women writers and the transnational antislavery movement of the nineteenth century.

This project examines the social and cultural place of Spanish women of letters in the transnational antislavery movement of the nineteenth century, showing the ways in which abolitionist women reconciled their activism with their traditional gender roles—as mothers, wives, and religious believers—and negotiated their relationship to (masculine) liberal discourse. Drawing on recent developments in gender and post-colonial theories, this study raises questions about women’s shifting role in the liberal public sphere, the crucial function of their transnational networks in achieving their political objectives, and their often ambivalent relationship to the subaltern communities for which they were presumably advocating. My work elucidates the different ways in which these women engaged, negotiated and, at times, contested existing gender and racial paradigms as they participated in the antislavery debate, both nationally and transnationally.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Spanish Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-264971-19

Rebecca May Wilkin
Pacific Lutheran University (Tacoma, WA 98447-0001)
An Edition and Translation of Selections from "Work on Women" by French Enlightenment Philosopher Louise Dupin (1706-1799)

Translation into English and editing for publication "Word on Women," an unpublished manuscript of political theory by Madame Louise Dupin (1706-1799).

A translation and edition of selections from Louise Dupin’s long-neglected "Work on Women" (ca. 1745-1751) brings to 21st-century students and scholars the voice of the most important feminist philosopher of the French Enlightenment. In 48 chapters, Dupin skewers sexist bias in natural philosophy and history written by men and reveals the impoverishment and disenfranchisement of women to be a “modern” phenomenon instituted through the laws of the French nation-state. Though the Work was never published, aspects of it lived on—unacknowledged—in the writings of Dupin’s secretary, Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Selections from the "Work on Women" not only restores Dupin to her rightful place in the history of feminist thought; it moreover challenges her first community of readers to revise a history of philosophy built on the suppressed voices of women. During the tenure of the grant, I propose to complete the translation of 7 of the 20 chapters to be included in Selections from the Work on Women.

Project fields:
French Literature; History of Philosophy; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2019 – 8/9/2019


FT-264973-19

Masha Kirasirova
New York University Abu Dhabi (Abu Dhabi 10276-0903 United Arab Emirates)
The Eastern International: Culture, Power, and Realpolitik in Soviet-Arab Relations

Research and writing leading to a book publication on Soviet foreign policy with the Arab Middle East (1920-1990).

The Eastern International is a study of how Moscow leaders’ embrace of the flexible and vague concept “East” in political and cultural initiatives created a mutually interacting relationship between the Soviet Union’s supposedly decolonized “domestic East” (the predominantly Muslim Soviet republics in Central Asia and the Caucasus) and the colonized “foreign East” (South and East Asia, Africa, and the Middle East). I argue that from the interwar period through the Cold War, this conceptual linkage created an unusual relational space of interactions and exchange that shaped official Soviet Central Asian histories, literatures, and cinemas, facilitated the spread of Marxist-Leninist ideas in the Middle East, and shaped Russia’s foreign relations.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/2/2019 – 8/2/2019


FT-264985-19

Jennifer D. Ortegren
Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
New Neighbors, New Muslims: Gender, Class, and Community in Contemporary India

Research for an article, leading to a book manuscript, on relationships in India between Muslim and Hindu women.

This project examines how upwardly mobile Muslim families in and around Udaipur, Rajasthan, India—and especially Muslim women across generations—are reconfiguring their everyday and religious lives to form new middle class identities for themselves and their communities. In so doing, the project asks, how are they redefining not only understandings of modern Indian Islam, but relationships with their Hindu neighbors? This projects moves beyond narratives of marginalization and conflict that are often the focus of scholarship of Indian Muslims to analyze how definitions of gender, religion, and class are formulated anew in rapidly shifting and diverse—but peaceful—contexts in contemporary India, and to consider the future of Muslim-Hindu relations among the emerging middle classes.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Religion, General; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-264991-19

Kerstin Steitz
Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Holocaust Truth and Justice: Literary and Filmic Criticism of the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial (1963-1965)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about literary and film interpretations of the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial (1963-1965), the first major Holocaust trial in postwar Germany.

Between 1963 and 1965, twenty-two men who participated in mass murder at the Auschwitz concentration camps were prosecuted in what became known as the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial, the first major Holocaust trial in postwar Germany. The proceedings revealed, however, that German criminal law was not equipped to deal adequately with the genocide that occurred at Auschwitz. Instead it treated the Nazi atrocities as ordinary murder and manslaughter cases, which trivialized genocide. The book I will complete with a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend exposes how authors and filmmakers revisit the trial, teaching lessons that it misrepresented with regard to the origins of the Holocaust, the conditions in the camps, the guilt of the perpetrators, and the suffering of the victims. The significance of my work thus reveals how art succeeded where law failed in holding the German public accountable for the Holocaust and in crafting a memory culture of genocide.

Project fields:
German Literature; History, Other; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2019 – 7/15/2019


FT-264994-19

James Thomas Downs
Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)
The Laboring Dead: From Subjugation to Science in Global History

Writing a book about medical advances in epidemiology in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries from the treatment of slaves and war causalities.

The Laboring Dead: From Subjugation to Science in Global History, which is under contract with Harvard University Press, uncovers the untold ways in which slavery, imperialism, and war produced the social arrangements that led to the development of scientific ideas and medical practices.

Project fields:
African American History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264997-19

Danielle A. St. Hilaire
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA 15282-0001)
The Art of Compassion: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Pity in Early Modern English Literature

Completion of a book on the role of compassion in art and literature from ancient writers, Plato and Aristotle, medieval theologians, Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas Aquinas, and writers of the English Renaissance, Philip Sidney, Edmond Spenser, and Shakespeare.

The proposed book project examines the intersection of ethics and aesthetics in early modern England, focusing on how classical and Christian concepts of pity collide in the works of Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and William Shakespeare, in ways that challenge the ethical claims Renaissance defenders of poetry often made for the value of making and experiencing art. In the course of this exploration, the project also considers how ideas about the relationship between art and ethics on the one hand, and between emotion and ethics on the other, have shifted between Plato’s banishment of the poets in Republic and recent studies in the social sciences that link reading literature to empathy. Early modern England, I argue, was a pivot-point in the intellectual history of debates about the worth of art; understanding this moment in time provides us insight into our own currently embattled position in the humanities, and potentially offers us powerful arguments for the worth of creating and studying art.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/22/2019 – 7/21/2019


FT-265014-19

David Berton Emerson
Whitworth University (Spokane, WA 99251-2515)
American Literary Misfits: Vernacular Aesthetics and Imagined Democracies, 1828-1861

Completion of a book on 19th-century regional and non-canonical authors such as J. J. Hooper and J. R. Ride and how they contributed to the development of theories of American democracy. 

American Literary Misfits contends that the 19th century’s most radical theories of democracy emerged from texts long exiled from US literary history. Such texts are united by a shared demonstration of local decision-making as viable alternative to the abstracting tendencies of national politics. All over the USA, from Philadelphia and New York to the rural south and Gold Rush California, works like J.J. Hooper’s Simon Suggs and J.R. Ridge’s Joaquín Murieta offered both ideological and aesthetic alternatives to the national prescriptions embodied in sentimental novels and historical romances. Instead of tying individuals to a national community, as these better-known contemporaries did, literary misfits pushed back against the progressive ends of the nation, its version of liberal democracy, and its characteristic literary forms. While criticism has typically fit these texts into regional categories, these misfits demand a rewriting of the liberal tradition of US literary histories.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265034-19

Sarah Frances Williams
University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Music, Memory, and Alternative Performance Spaces in Seventeenth Century England

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about memory, music, and theatrical performance in seventeenth-century England.

My monograph examines the extant music and descriptions of musical performance contained in forgotten entertainments including rare shows, peep shows, puppet theater or "motion shows," and communal ballad singing in seventeenth century England. Using the early modern ars memoriae, or memory arts, as a framing device, I investigate how music can increase our understanding of alternative performance spaces and their resonances within sanctioned theatrical and musical traditions. The early modern theater functioned as a powerful mnemonic scheme, a real and imagined architectural space, a mirror of the world, a didactic tool, a repository of knowledge, and a communal performative experience. Yet, the spaces I investigate are not necessarily limited to physical venues. Rather, I explore how we can view musical performance as a powerful tool that can uncover marginalized identities, unsanctioned or transient theaters, social classes, political intrigue, and forgotten genres.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature; Music History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265043-19

Michelle Chi Chase
Pace University (New York, NY 10038-1502)
Cuban Anti-Communism in Cold War Latin America, 1960-1990

A book-length study about Cuban anti-communist exiles and the Cold War, 1960-1990.

This project will provide the first comprehensive history of the anti-communist movement that emerged in the wake of Cuba’s 1959 revolution. The project argues that Cuban anti-communism was never restricted to merely opposing Fidel Castro; instead, it was a global political movement with far-reaching consequences. From 1960 to 1990, Cuban anti-communist militants became involved in a series of conflicts throughout Latin America and beyond, applying the military and political experience they developed opposing Castro to help defeat revolutionary and national liberation movements from Puerto Rico to Nicaragua to the Congo. This project will consequently reframe standard assumptions of Cuban counter-revolutionary “failure,” showing that militant exiles’ greatest victories occurred elsewhere in the developing and decolonizing world. This story thus sheds new light on the Cold War in the global south by highlighting widespread Cuban influence on the Right, not only the Left.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265053-19

Kristoffer Whitney
Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
A History of Bird-Banding and Wildlife Conservation in 20th-century North America

Research and writing articles for academic and general audiences on the history of bird-banding and its relationship to environmental science.

I propose to use the NEH Summer Stipend to complete an academic article on the environmental and cultural history of bird-banding and its relationship to 20th-century conservation, as well write a shorter piece on the same subjects targeted toward a broader, popular audience online. The art and science of affixing coded markers to migratory birds (and other animals), banding was at the heart of twentieth-century wildlife management, ecology, ethology, and what could anachronistically be called environmentalism. My primary exemplar will be the biography and work of Margaret Morse Nice. Examining this history sheds light on an understudied part of American scientific, political, and cultural heritage: times in our collective past (stretching into the present) when citizens of all stripes—across divides of gender, class, and education—were an integral part of understanding and protecting nonhuman nature.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265054-19

Luis M. Gonzalez
Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)
Modes of the Tragic in Spanish Cinema

Preparation for publication of a book about Spanish film and theories of tragedy, from 1930 to 2016.

Modes of the Tragic in Spanish Cinema is a groundbreaking study that, through a close reading of eleven films by renowned directors such as Florián Rey, Miguel Picazo, Pedro Almodóvar and Paula Ortiz analyzes filmic responses to the tragic and the enduring presence of forms, themes and motifs that belong to the tragic tradition in Spanish cinema. In this book, I argue that a tragic aura permeates many of the films produced in Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries and constitutes not only an essential element of these films but also a key factor in their aesthetic and ideological efficacy and commercial success. This is achieved by evoking an emotional response in the spectators and stirring up feelings of pity and fear that have defined the tragic art since its birth in Greece twenty-five centuries ago. This approach is original since most of the critical work on Spanish Film has been concerned with issues such as national identity, gender, and immigration.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Spanish Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265066-19

Richard C. Sutter
Indiana University, Purdue University at Fort Wayne (Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1445)
Political, Spatial, and Corporeal Transformations Through Ritualized Violence Among the Ancient Moche (AD 200 – 800) of the North Coast of Peru

A book manuscript looking at the concept of “sovereignty” in a pre-Columbian civilization in northern Peru as a comparative example for discussing non-state sovereignty today.

I seek funding to help complete a book manuscript that examines how the ancient Moche (AD 200 - 800) of northern Peru used the built environment for performative ritual feasts that involved spectacular violence and human sacrifice of captured, foreign elite combatants as a strategy to assert and extend their sovereignty by making political subjects of participant-witnesses of these public spectacles. I will use the stipend to spend time writing and and expanding on relevant social theory as it relates to recent archaeological survey and excavations as well as my own data on biological relatedness among ancient Moche skeletal populations from throughout the north coast region.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Biological Anthropology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-265080-19

Claudia Cabello
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Queer Networks: Latin American and Spanish Writers, Artists and Patrons in the First Half of the XXth Century

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Latin American and Spanish women writers, artists, and patrons who challenged heterosexual norms of family, sexuality, reproduction, and economic dependency in the first half of the twentieth century.

My book project, Queer Networks: Latin American and Spanish Writers, Artists and Patrons in the First Half of the XXth Century, maps--thanks to mostly unpublished archival documents--a network of queer Latin American and Spanish women artists, writers, and patrons (both well-known and forgotten) who traveled widely and challenged heterosexual norms of family, sexuality, reproduction, and economic dependency. Starting from a broader concept of queerness as developed by Halberstam together with sociological concepts of social networks and network visualization software (Palladio), this project seeks to reconstruct and analyze these queer networks and their impact in the cultural field between 1920 and 1950.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 7/1/2019


FT-265099-19

Alisa Ballard Lin
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Theatrical Consciousness: Actor and Self in Russian Modernism, 1898-1934

A book-length study of the impact of philosophy and psychology on acting and theater in early twentieth-century Russia.

I am applying for NEH funds to complete the archival research and the writing of my book manuscript. The book argues that Russian modernism's radical reinvention of methodologies for theater acting drew on contemporaneous developments in philosophy and psychology to reimagine, via the actor, the broader nature of human consciousness and perception. In turn, I show that the Russian modernist theater directly influenced the development of both philosophy and psychology in the early-Soviet period. Through close study of theoretical writings on the actor, rehearsal notes, plays, and performances from the early-twentieth-century Russian theater, the book demonstrates that Russian modernism treated the theatrical experience as one that is sensory and lived by both actor and spectator, therein anticipating American and European interest in the phenomenology of theater by several decades.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Russian Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265120-19

Monique M. Ingalls
Baylor University (Waco, TX 76798-7284)
Creating Convivial Community through British Gospel Choirs

Research and writing leading to publication of an article followed by a monograph about British gospel choirs and interracial relations in the United Kingdom.

Community gospel choirs, often comprised of singers from widely varying backgrounds, have become increasingly widespread in contemporary British society. As such, they provide an important window into interracial and interethnic relations. This project uses oral history interviews and ethnographic participant-observation of British gospel choirs and choir networks to examine the role of gospel choir performance in everyday interracial relations in the United Kingdom. My goal is to determine how shared musical participation in gospel choirs has built interethnic and interracial networks and how participating in gospel choirs influences the way singers understand and navigate racial, ethnic, and cultural difference in their everyday lives. Ultimately, this historical and ethnographic study seeks to elucidate the social roles these gospel choirs perform, and will analyze how this popular, yet previously overlooked, religious choral tradition creates a sense of community across difference.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Ethnomusicology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/10/2019 – 7/9/2019


FT-265139-19

Louis Kaiser Epstein
St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN 55057-1574)
The New Patronage: Funding Modernist Music in France, 1918-1939

A book-length study of patronage and modernist music in France, from 1918 to 1939.

In my book, I trace the substantial shifts in patronage that transformed the sounds and meanings of French modernist music between the world wars. These shifts motivate my redefinition of patronage: far from the court- and church-centered employment that produced most art music before 1800, I explore the “new patronage” of the twentieth century, exemplified by disparate funding practices stretching from the philanthropic to the entrepreneurial. I show how shifts in patronage affected not only music but the composers, critics, theater owners, audiences, and institutions that shaped how it was made and understood, leaving behind legacies that continue to shape international art music composition and music philanthropy through the present day.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-265153-19

Wanjiru Mbure
Stonehill College (North Easton, MA 02357-7800)
The Tenacious Defenders, Offenders, and Inventors of African Beauty 1951-1971

Research leading to a book on The Drum, a pan-African magazine, and the definition and promotion of the idea of feminine beauty in Africa.

How did modern cosmetics triumph over enduring diverse perceptions and practices of beauty in Africa? How did new nations and their citizens make sense of new imaginations of beauty? How did they attempt to regulate this new product? Who were the main actors and what key events shaped the historical trajectory of African beauty? The answers to these questions offer a valuable historical context to understand contemporary challenges regarding easy access to injurious cosmetics, the use of beauty in pursuit of decolonization, and the impact of globalization on localized experiences of beauty. Set in South Africa, Kenya, and the United States, this project uses beauty to investigate how lawmakers, advertisers, media, and citizens created, maintained, and resisted notions of African beauty. The book offers new insights into the drama and passion of a vibrant era of African history and the people who gave us varying answers to the enduring question of the nature of beauty.

Project fields:
African History; Communications; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/14/2019 – 8/13/2019


FT-265158-19

Jason Edward Black
University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)
An Annotated Anthology of the Newspaper Columns of Politician and Activist Harvey Milk (1930-1978)

Preparation of a critical anthology of the journalism of gay politician and activist Harvey Milk (1930-1978).

The goal of this study is to present Milk’s words to the world in a concisely-constructed and publicly-accessible volume. This NEH Summer Stipend would assist in the completion of a critically-annotated anthology of the complete run of late LGBTQ activist Harvey Milk’s serialized biweekly column for the most influential San Francisco LGBTQ paper of the 1970s, the Bay Area Reporter. Milk’s column, “Milk Forum,” appeared in the Bay Area Reporter from May 15, 1974 until November 22, 1978, the week before his assassination (109 columns total).

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265166-19

Rina Verma Williams
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Marginalized, Mobilized, Incorporated: Women and Religious Nationalism in India, 1915-2015

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of women's participation in Hindu nationalist movements in India.

What is the role of women in religious nationalism and other conservative populist movements? I place this urgent contemporary question into historical perspective by examining Hindu nationalism in India. Most studies ask why women participate in such movements; I suggest we must first understand how they participate and how their participation has changed historically. My project compares the role of women in Hindu nationalism in three time periods. In the early 1900s, when the movement was founded, women were marginalized despite the attempts of some to participate; in the 1980s–90s some women mobilized into the streets in support of the movement; and today, women have become routinely incorporated into it. But traditional gender ideologies that confine the role of women to private spheres of home and family remain fundamentally unaltered in the movement. Ultimately, I argue, Hindu nationalism has benefited from women’s participation more than women have benefited from participating.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Politics; South Asian History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265181-19

Katherine Julia Thomson-Jones
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1057)
The Philosophy of Digital Art

Writing two chapters for a book about the aesthetics of the production of art using digital technologies or displayed in digital media.

This project will fund the completion of a monograph, 'The Philosophy of Digital Art,' a philosophical investigation into the impact of digital technology on the visual arts. This investigation uses technical explanations of the production and presentation of digital image-based artworks to support a complex account of the nature of the digital. Such an account supports further arguments concerning the terms set by digital technology for full artistic appreciation. 'The Philosophy of Digital Art' is aimed at a broad scholarly audience in both the sciences and the humanities. It will provide a conceptual framework for ongoing interdisciplinary debate about the digital transformation of the art world.

Project fields:
Aesthetics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265205-19

S. Deborah Kang
California State University, San Marcos (San Marcos, CA 92096-0001)
Undocumented European Immigrants in the United States, 1906-1986

A book-length study about undocumented European immigration to the United States and the laws and policies that were designed to legalize their status, 1906-1986.

Pathways to Citizenship: Undocumented European Immigrants in the United States, 1906-1986 offers one of the first histories of illicit European migration to the United States and the laws and policies that were created to legalize their status. Due to these measures, thousands of European immigrants were spared from deportation and deemed eligible for US citizenship. Through a socio-legal approach, the manuscript follows several undocumented European migrations across the nation’s land and sea borders and five legal remedies that were developed in response to their irregular presence. The book also explains how these policies served as the foundations for the legalization provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, the most prominent adjustment of status measure of the twentieth century, and compare the experiences of undocumented European migrants of the early twentieth century with those of Latino/a immigrants in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/24/2019 – 8/24/2019


FT-265217-19

Kevin Gibbs
Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
The Archaeology of Pottery and Chronology at Jebel Tomat, a 3rd Century BCE Settlement in Modern-Day Sudan

Collections research and preparation of book on the archaeological finds at the site of Jebel Tomat in southern Sudan.

In the early third century BCE the Meroitic kingdom emerged as the most significant and influential state in sub-Saharan Africa. The site of Jebel Tomat (Sudan) sits at the southern margin of the Meroitic world, where little archaeological research has taken place. The site was excavated by the late archaeologist J. Desmond Clark during the early 1970s but much of the recovered material remains unstudied. This project will examine the pottery from the site to understand how it was used by the ancient residents of Jebel Tomat and to investigate potential interaction with other communities, including people living to the south. The project will also generate a detailed chronology of Jebel Tomat by radiocarbon dating unanalyzed charcoal samples that Clark collected during his excavations. The project will result in a chapter of book that examines Jebel Tomat and other sites excavated in the Sudan by Clark in the broader context of African archaeology and the Meroitic kingdom.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-265225-19

Celeste Day Moore
Hamilton College (Clinton, NY 13323-1295)
Soundscapes of Liberation: African-American Music and the Circuits of the Twentieth-Century Atlantic World

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the transatlantic networks of production, distribution, and performance that led to the rise of African-American music as a globally recognized sign of power and protest after World War II.

My proposed project traces the transatlantic networks of musical production, distribution, and performance that converged in the Francophone world to make African-American music a global signifier of power and protest after World War II. In the context of increasing US power and a declining French empire, African-American music simultaneously represented the threat of American hegemony and the powerful dissent of a minority population. These divergent associations, I argue, were made possible by a cohort of Atlantic intermediaries, whose fluency in French and familiarity with African-American culture gave them privileged positions from which to translate, disseminate, and racially encode this musical tradition. By tracing their efforts to promote and politicize African-American music, this manuscript not only offers a new perspective on postwar African-American history but also uncovers the commercial, political, and diasporic infrastructure of the twentieth-century Atlantic World.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 9/30/2019


FT-265259-19

Aaron Benyamin Retish
Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Russia Behind Bars: A History of Prisoners of the Russian Empire and Soviet Union, 1863-1932

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of prisons in Russia and the Soviet Union from 1863-1932.

“Russia Behind Bars” uncovers the experiences of prisoners in local prisons of tsarist Russia and the early Soviet Union. It shows how prisoners lived their lives both in and out of the prison regimen. It also examines how penal reforms that aimed to soften punishment and rehabilitate prisoners shaped prisoners’ experience and how lack of resources and state and prison officials’ visions of prisoners as recidivist criminals undercut these reforms, making punishment harsher. The study goes from the birth of Russia’s modern penitentiary system and follows reforms through the rise of the Soviet state in 1917 and ends with the imposition of a harsh, punitive penal system under Stalin. “Russia Behind Bars” emphasizes the importance of prisons as symbols of state power located in urban areas and as important alternatives to exile to the peripheries. I argue that to understand the modern Russian penitentiary system, we need also to account for convicts’ experiences in prisons close to home.

Project fields:
Legal History; Russian History; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265265-19

Jose Guadalupe Ortega
Whittier College (Whittier, CA 90601-4446)
Freedom, Identity, and the History of Empires in Atlantic Cuba, 1794–1817

A book-length study about a group of West African women who sued for their freedom and the legal evolution of personhood and citizenship for captives in the Atlantic Slave Trade during the era of the Enlightenment, 1794–1817. 

My project examines a maritime case resulting in numerous freedom suits in Havana, linking members of multiple societies from Western Africa, Cuba, Spain, France, and Britain in order to assess the fluid foundations of a system of transatlantic jurisprudence with respect to slavery and freedom during the early 1800s. It analyses a series of freedom suits initiated by a group of illegally enslaved women of African descent who formed a legal strategy based on their ethnic identity and the memory of their slave voyage to Cuba. The study points to the creation of a modern world comprised of diverse but integrated cultures bound by international law and a growing intolerance to slavery. It speaks to the development of modern ideals of legal personhood and citizenship and their application to peoples of African descent as well as the construction of viable community based networks by enslaved peoples to help each other in their struggles to free themselves, their families, and kin.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-265276-19

Britt M. Rusert
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
The "Afric-American Picture Gallery": Imagining Black Art, circa 1859

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the "Afric-American Picture Gallery," an 1859 work of periodical fiction by William J. Wilson that imagines the first museum of black art in the United States.

This project is an intensive study of William J. Wilson's 1859 periodical fiction, the Afric-American Picture Gallery. The Picture Gallery is a stunningly experimental work that imagines the first museum of black art in the United States. Despite its publication without any actual images, Wilson uses ekphrastic description to reflect on the politics of black representation and recognition in the decade preceding the Civil War. This monograph seeks to: historicize the series within black political and aesthetic debates in the 1850s as well as cultures of black cosmopolitanism and bohemianism in antebellum New York; chronicle how the Picture Gallery anticipates later genealogies of black visual art and theory while speaking to current conversations about the role of black museums and institutions in society; reproduce the Picture Gallery as an appendix in order to make Wilson's text widely available to scholars and teachers for the first time since its initial publication in 1859.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265301-19

Kristina Lynn Richardson
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Race, Language, and Roma Culture in the Islamic Middle Ages

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Roma culture and language in the Islamic Middle Ages.

Historians of the Roma (Gypsies) work under the assumption that the earliest written records about their subject were produced in fifteenth-century Europe. My recent work identifying the classical Arabic term for Roma and Roma-affiliated groups (ghuraba’), along with reconstructing their medieval sin dialect and translating sin prose and poetry, will add complexity to the constructions of medieval racial categories, demographic studies, historical linguistics, and the social history of nomads. Sin is still spoken in Egypt and Sudan today. My proposed project of translating the minority Gypsy community’s language and culture into broader historical contexts will fundamentally transform histories of the Roma and conceptions of minorities and race in the broader premodern Middle East.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265307-19

Paula Halperin
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Purchase (Purchase, NY 10577-1402)
Dancing Days: Nationalism, Soap Operas, and Dreams of Modernization in Authoritarian Brazil. 1970 - 1988"

A book-length study about the development of Brazilian national identity and the rise of the television industry during the military dictatorship between 1970 and 1988.

In this project, I analyze the complex relations between the Brazilian military regime (1964 – 1985), the emergence of the television network Rede Globo in 1965, and its growing influence during the 1970s and 1980s. In addition to mapping the political and institutional dimensions of government cultural policies, I closely analyze the emergence of a new kind of aesthetics and teledramaturgy present in popular soap operas that channeled the aspirations and anxieties surrounding the project of conservative modernization promoted by the regime.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-265336-19

Bryan Alan Smyth
University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)
On the Literary Use of Language: Translation of French Philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s Lecture Notes, 1953

Research and writing toward completion of an English translation of French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s (1908-1961) 1953 lectures notes.

This project is an annotated English translation of Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s lecture notes from one of the two courses he gave during his inaugural year at the Collège de France. Merleau-Ponty is widely regarded as one of the most significant philosophers of the twentieth century, and themes from his work have been taken up into innumerable disciplines and subfields across the humanities. Studying the philosophical development of Merleau-Ponty’s work has been difficult, however, until the publication in recent years of notes from some of his Collège de France courses. These notes have proven to be invaluable resources for understanding the trajectory of Merleau-Ponty’s thought. I have recently completed an English translation for one of the courses from 1953, and I am seeking NEH support for final work on the second. Given the significance of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and its wide uptake across the humanities, the resulting volume will be a very significant contribution.

Project fields:
Aesthetics; Phenomenology Existentialism; Philosophy of Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265340-19

Jennifer Phegley
University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
Magazine Mavericks: Marital Collaborations and the Invention of New Reading Audiences in Mid-Victorian England

Completion of a book-length study on the history of periodical publishing and its readership in 19th-century England.

This project examines eight mass-market magazines launched by John Maxwell and Samuel Beeton in mid-nineteenth-century London. In collaboration with their domestic partners Mary Braddon, Isabella Beeton, and later Beeton’s neighbor Matilda Browne, these entrepreneurial couples built small but mighty publishing empires using innovative niche-marketing techniques to reach new groups of readers. Defying the conventional wisdom of aiming for the broadest audience to generate the greatest profit, these publisher-author teams appealed to more specific interests and identities than the widely accepted categories of class and sex. With magazines for struggling Bohemians, adventurous boys, style-conscious housewives, and independence-seeking teenage girls they transformed notions of what constituted a viable audience. These popular but neglected magazines are emblematic of a publishing revolution that by the end of the century catered to everyone from bicyclists to anarchists.

Project fields:
British Literature; Gender Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-265344-19

Jacqueline Emery
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Old Westbury (Old Westbury, NY 11568-1717)
A Selected Edition of the Journalism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), American Writer and Intellectual

Preparation of a selected critical edition of the journalism written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935), American feminist author and intellectual. 

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) is considered one of the most well-known and influential feminist intellectuals of the early twentieth century. Best known for her short story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" (1892), Gilman was a prolific author who wrote more than a dozen books, several plays, and hundreds of short stories and poems. From the early 1880s through the early 1930s, she was also a journalist, contributing nearly fifteen hundred articles to newspapers and magazines. Despite her prodigious journalistic output and recent efforts among scholars to bring her lesser-known writings into view, her journalism remains largely understudied. No collection of her journalism currently exists. My edited volume would not only make her journalism accessible to scholars and students but also provide a new critical framework for considering her legacy and contribute to ongoing efforts among feminist scholars to recover and advance the study of women's writing through the periodical archive.

Project fields:
American Literature; Journalism; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265358-19

Abigail Firey
University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Lady Justice's Schoolrooms: Learning Law in the Holy Roman Empire (Germany and Italy, ca. 800-1000)

Preparation of a three-volume history of law in medieval western Europe.

The concept of the rule of law evolved over centuries, yet its narrative has often neglected social context or cultural change. This project studies the impact of law on particular historical communities and, reciprocally, the influence of communities in shaping legal norms. It suggests that the meaning of law can be affected by the interpretative mediation of teachers and administrators, even when they are not directly delivering justice. The project is part of a book-chapter treating the spread of legal knowledge in Germany and Italy in the ninth, tenth, and eleventh centuries. Using unpublished manuscripts annotated by medieval teachers, it explores legal knowledge at the regional level, to reveal tensions and reciprocity between regional interpretations and legal universalism. It explores how judicial practices and principles, framed as commonly-held standards of equity and ethics, can be shaped by those who know law’s history, rationales, technical framework, and rhetoric.

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence; Legal History; Medieval History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265388-19

Katherine B. Gustafson
Indiana University Northwest (Gary, IN 46408-1101)
Novel Marketing, Novel Writing, and the Development of the Adolescent, 1740-1815

Completion of the first book-length study of adolescence as a modern social category in 18th-century British novels and its affiliated marketing industry.

I seek support from the NEH to complete the last chapter of a scholarly monograph. My book, "Novel Marketing, Novel Writing, and the Development of the Adolescent, 1740-1815," argues that the evolution of the novel in eighteenth-century England occurred in dynamic response to the development of adolescence as a modern social category. It contributes to humanistic study both by rewriting the history of the novel and by providing a history of eighteenth-century adolescence. By historicizing the conditions under which canonical eighteenth-century novels were written, published, and marketed, my work restores adolescence to its rightful place within the novel’s evolution, and demonstrates that many of the novel’s formal developments responded to cultural anxieties about adolescent readers. My last chapter will examine works by Sir Walter Scott and Maria Edgeworth to demonstrate the increased stratification of the novel market for adolescents in the early nineteenth century.

Project fields:
British Literature; Cultural History; Literature, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265390-19

Audrey C. Cooper
Gallaudet University (Washington, DC 20002-3600)
Critical Ethnography of Disaster Mitigation, Deaf Leadership, Adaptation and Resilience in Viet Nam

An academic article (in English) and summary reports (in Vietnamese) on crisis management for deaf people in Vietnam based on summer fieldwork.

Conducting multi-sited ethnographic research into Deaf organizational decision-making processes in disaster impacted areas of Viet Nam, this project aims to generate analytic insights into Deaf people’s adaptation and resilience practices with respect to leadership in disaster preparedness and mitigation. Viet Nam demonstrates increasing incidence of weather- and climate change-related disasters and a high rate of disability per capita. Accordingly, Viet Nam is confronting the urgent need to prepare and protect its people from disaster. However, despite widespread marginalization of people with disabilities from most socioeconomic sectors in Viet Nam, preliminary evidence indicates that Deaf organizations are at the forefront of disaster preparedness and mitigation responses. Publication of research results aims to expand the ethnography of climate change and to challenge existing scholarly and mainstream characterizations of people with disabilities as vulnerable populations.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Linguistic Anthropology; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265395-19

Seth Mnookin
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
The Mortal Truth: A Cultural, Historical, and Scientific Examination of the Past, Present, and Future of Aging

Writing a historical and contemporary narrative of aging and longevity research, reviewing the scientific and cultural implications of extending the human lifespan.

"The Mortal Truth" is a book about aging for a general audience. It will examine both cutting edge research into aging and the treatments and supposed cures that research is engendering, and cover the way humans have conceived of and approached aging for the last 3,000 years. By 2035, the U.S. Census Bureau projects that the United States will have more citizens over the age of 65 than under 18. Given this demographic shift, "The Mortal Truth" will provide much-needed information on preparing for a future in which the elderly, and issues surrounding aging, will play an increasing important role. This project will also fill a hole in the current literature: There is not an up-to-date broad narrative on aging for a non-specialist readership. At a time when the public often gets confusing or contradictory information about scientific advances, this type of humanities-based research project can play a crucial part in informing our country's citizens.

Project fields:
History of Science; Journalism; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2019 – 8/14/2019


FT-265407-19

Michael Benjamin Silvers
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
The Circulation and Aesthetics of Materials for Classical Bows and Brazilian Rabecas (Fiddles) in an Age of Ecological Change

Research and writing leading to a book-length study about the history, aesthetics, and cultural uses of musical instruments made from brazilwood, with a focus on Brazilian handmade fiddles (rabecas) and bows for Western string instruments.

Histories of musical instruments, the materials from which they are made, and the timbral aesthetics associated with them are entangled with colonial, capitalist, and environmental histories. My two case studies--pernambuco wood in bows for string instruments and Brazilian handmade fiddles (rabecas)--will uncover relationships between musical aesthetics and natural resources via multi-sited ethnographic and archival research in Brazil and the US. With this grant, I hope to spend two months in Juazeiro do Norte to study with luthiers as they select, obtain, and use materials (wood, gourds, and garbage) for creating new instruments, and to study their aesthetic and practical choices. I will also begin writing up the related chapter for my book project Timber and Timbre: From Brazil’s Atlantic Forest to the Concert Hall.

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; Latin American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265418-19

Jennifer Forestal
Stockton University (Galloway, NJ 08205-9441)
The Shape of Democracy: Building Political Spaces in a Digital Age

Writing and revising a book for publication about the challenges that digital technologies such as social media pose for fostering democratic practice.

The Shape of Democracy is a book that deals directly with a pressing contemporary problem: how have digital technologies changed, or challenged, the traditional practices of democracy? Using examples from Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter, I show how the problems often associated with digital technologies exemplify three enduring challenges of democratic politics--the problems of 1) an expanding population, 2) self-segregation, and 3) instability. Ultimately, I argue that these three problems can be overcome, in whole or in part, by building digital spaces that meet three criteria: 1) they must have clearly marked and relatively limited boundaries, 2) those boundaries must be flexible, and 3) the resulting spaces must be stable over time.

Project fields:
Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265424-19

Heather Lynn Ferguson
Claremont McKenna College (Claremont, CA 91711-5929)
Sovereign Valedictions: "Last Acts" in Early Modern Habsburg and Ottoman Courts

Research and writing leading to publication of a monograph on last sovereign acts during 16th century Habsburg and Ottoman Empires.

Scholars attentive to early modern rivalries address the competitive dynamics of the Ottoman and Habsburg dynasties with increasingly sophisticated projects. "Sovereign Valedictions" explores the often-mimetic nature of early modern courts from a rare vantage point: the undertakings, directives, and landmarks that define—even if retrospectively—the last acts of a sovereign. These “last acts” reveal moments of potential fragility and vulnerability for both the individual ruler and the empire embodied in his personhood. I turn to the “last acts” of dynastic representatives not as an academic conceit, but rather as a new kind of historical index that serves as a repository of early modern forces at work. Tactics pursued to preserve the pretense of control, bend political turmoil toward dynastic endurance, commemorate triumphs, forfend disaster, and shape posterity also unmask the structures, concepts and tropes deployed to render Ottoman and Habsburg rule integral if not invulnerable.

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 4/1/2020


FT-265433-19

Laura E. Helton
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
The Making of African American Archives, 1910-1950

Writing two chapters of a history of African-American archives in the early 20th century.

"Black Archival Publics" charts the making of early-twentieth-century African American archives in order to understand the relationship between historical recuperation, forms of racial imagination, and black social movements. It traces a generation of black bibliophiles, librarians, and scrapbook makers in New York, Chicago, Raleigh, Detroit, and Washington, DC, who created repositories of African diasporic material between 1910 and 1950. At a moment when most scholarly and popular accounts rendered blackness as unlettered and absent from history, these collectors assembled books and manuscripts, organized “Negro collections” in local and university libraries, and made such collections active sites of black public life. In so doing, they did more than simply bequeath to the future a storehouse of research materials. They also activated the urgent declaration of Afro-Puerto Rican bibliophile Arturo Schomburg that “the American Negro must remake his past in order to make the future.”

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265453-19

Nicole Svobodny
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
The Feeling Mind: A Study of Russian Dancer Vaslav Nijinsky's St. Moritz Notebooks (1917-1919)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about the personal notebooks of Polish-Russian dancer Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950).

What happens when “the greatest male dancer of all time” stops dancing and sits down to write? What are the physical and cognitive processes involved? My project addresses these questions through an examination of the personal notebooks kept by Vaslav Nijinsky when he was cut off from the Ballets Russes, right before his catastrophic breakdown in 1919. These notebooks contain handwritten words in Russian (the diary), ink and pencil drawings, and drafts for a dance notation system. My book is the first in-depth study of the original Russian manuscript. Drawing on extensive archival research, I consider the writing in the post-war context and in relation to Nijinsky’s isolation and diagnosis of schizophrenia, his engagement with past literary masters, his live performances, and his other attempts to explore and “to fix" movement through the creation of visual art and dance notation. My study concludes with an investigation into the transnational migration of Nijinsky’s notebooks.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Dance History and Criticism; Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/17/2019 – 8/17/2019


FT-265455-19

Faith Barrett
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA 15282-0001)
Let Music Rise from Every Tongue: Reading and Writing Poetry in Antebellum African American Communities

Research leading a book on African-American poets in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Chapel Hill before the Civil War.

Let Music Rise from Every Tongue examines how African Americans used poetry to constitute community in the antebellum US. Focusing on literary circles in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Chapel Hill, I argue that African Americans found in poetry a means of articulating not only their political commitments, but also their affective experience: poetry thus plays a crucial role in establishing communities that are both political and social. With chapters focused on the poetry in friendship albums, the Black press, an anthology of New Orleans writers, and single-author collections by Frances Harper and Georges Moses Horton, my book contends that poetry was a central genre for African Americans because of the ways it brings together solitary and collective voices.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265463-19

Marguerite Hailey Rippy
Marymount University (Arlington, VA 22207-4299)
Orson Welles, Macbeth, and Africa: Collective Genius and the Diaspora

Research leading to publication of a book about the contributions made by African and African American artists to Orson Welles’ 1936 Federal Theater Project production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

This project seeks to produce a book-length monograph that would reposition scholarly and general understanding of the production that came to be known as the 1936 “Voodoo” Macbeth. Directed by a youthful Orson Welles, the 1936 "Macbeth" has been widely recounted in theater history as a work of Welles’ budding genius, a product of his collaboration with producer John Houseman and Federal Theatre director Hallie Flanagan. Many of the materials regarding the contributions of the over 100 African and African American participants, however, have yet to be studied alongside the conventional history of this production. This project brings together archival materials from multiple collections to illuminate the contributions of African and African American actors, artists and musicians in the 1936 Federal Theatre Project production of "Macbeth."

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265484-19

Naomi Macalalad Bragin
University of Washington, Bothell (Bothell, WA 98011-8246)
An Ethnographic Cultural History of Streetdance since 1970

A book-length historical and ethnographic study of hip hop dance in California, from the 1970s to the present.

Black Power of Hip Hop Dance is an ethnographic cultural history of Streetdance in 1970s California—an archive of African American dance under-researched in dance studies. I show New York hip hop culture’s aesthetic foundations in West Coast dances of Popping, Locking, Robot and Waacking. At first prohibited in dance studios, Streetdance is now a global culture spanning international classes, competitions, viral videos, reality TV and popular film. I bridge dance analysis, cultural theory, American and black studies, to assert that Streetdancers create nuanced forms of political engagement by moving their bodies in public spaces. I center the role of motion in the production and transmission of culture and formation of community. Streetdance contributes to conversations on race, power and difference, using movement as a non-verbal, embodied way of knowing. Black Power of Hip Hop Dance emphasizes the value of community history in motion—dance studies key lens of inquiry.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Dance History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/15/2019 – 9/14/2019


FT-265503-19

Theresa Sims
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Zulu Figurative Art and Colonial Engagement, 1860–1920

Preparation of a book that analyzes the emergence of figural art made by the Zulu people of Southern Africa between 1860 and 1920.

Research and writing leading to the publication of a book-length study of Zulu figurative sculpture from colonial South Africa. The sudden appearance of figural elements in artistic production by the Zulu in the second half of the 19th century was due to the exposure to prints and photographs brought to the people by missionaries, traders, and colonizers. A close analysis of different sculptural forms and their meanings will illuminate the circumstances of their production from an African perspective and attempt to explain why the figural elements are fragmentary in nature, rather than representing a complete body. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265510-19

Monica Lynn Mercado
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911

Research and writing a book on the experiences of young Catholic women in the United States during the 19th century.

Breaking from histories of 19th-century U.S. Catholicism that center anti-Catholic narratives about women and girls, my book project The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911, refocuses on Catholics’ own understandings of themselves. Using a rich but overlooked set of print and manuscript sources (the vast output of a vibrant U.S. Catholic publishing industry and the convent school pedagogies, book clubs, and reading retreats that grew up around it) I illustrate the formation of a Catholic cultural identity and argue for the special role of young women as makers of class and status for their upwardly mobile, second- and third-generation Catholic families. Given a recent resurgence of interest in the world of the convent school, and contributing to the rich historiography of U.S. Catholic laywomen, this project gives voice to the girls shaped in religious institutions, whose futures were expected to shape the Roman Catholic Church in America.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2019 – 8/9/2019


FT-265547-19

Jessica Starling, PhD
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-7879)
Leprosy, Social Work, and Ethical Praxis in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism

Research for a scholarly article and book on contemporary Japanese Buddhist care for leprosy patients.

This research focuses on Buddhist social work at leprosaria across Japan and its former colonies. Leprosy, or Hansen’s Disease, has long been seen as a morally culpable condition in Japan. Premodern Buddhists understood the illness as a form of karmic retribution for one’s past immorality. In modern Japan, Western medicine added the discourse of germs and contagion to earlier stigmas, and the government forced those infected with the bacteria to relocate to national leprosaria. After the war, however, many Japanese came to see leprosy and its stigmatization as the central human rights issue of their time. Stirred by these stories of discrimination and dehumanization, my True Pure Land Buddhist informants now regularly visit residents of Japan’s former leprosaria. Employing ethnographic and historical methods, this project illuminates contemporary Buddhist ethics as they are expressed through encounters between priests, laypeople and leprosy survivors at these leprosaria.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; History of Religion; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265568-19

Zeynep Esra Santesso
University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Representations of Islam and Muslims in Contemporary Graphic Narratives

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the representation of Islam and Muslims in contemporary graphic novels, cartoons, and web-comics.

This is a book project focused on the representations of Islam and Muslims in contemporary graphic narratives (graphic novels, cartoons, web-comics). Adopting a transnational approach, my project brings literary studies together with the visual arts in order to trace the aesthetic and political transformation of the Muslim within the graphic narrative tradition—from the vilified Other to relatable comics commodity. The book essentially demonstrates that these narratives are increasingly concerned not only with pluralizing and humanizing the Muslim figure but also with exploring new and innovative visual representations of this faith group to validate unofficial accounts of history written from the margins. As I argue, multifaceted representation of Islam, with an eye toward gender equality, civil liberties, self-determination, and democratic participation, illustrates a desire to address the shallow representations of Islam, and usher into a new era of activism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Literary Criticism; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-259422-18

Olivia Alton Weisser, PhD
University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
A Cultural History of Venereal Disease and its Treatment in Early Modern England

Research for a book-length history of venereal disease in 18th-century England.

I aim to write a lively, accessible history of venereal disease at the turn of the eighteenth century. The project takes an innovative approach by situating the disease within the texture of pre-modern London life. Rather than focus on institutional records or writing by elite men, the book grounds disease in the gardens, streets, and taverns where patients and healers discussed the disease, swapped remedies, and negotiated cures. In focusing on the words and lives of sufferers, as well as a particularly vocal group of clap-curers who lived and worked in the crowded streets of London, the book is intended to appeal to a broad audience. I use accessible prose and human stories, but without sacrificing the rigor of thoughtful scholarship. More broadly, the project aims to create an interdisciplinary model for studying the history of disease by drawing on the methods of cultural history, as well as the history of the book, gender history, and literary studies.

Project fields:
British History; Gender Studies; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-259448-18

Margaret Elizabeth Clinton
Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Power and Petroleum in China and the Western Pacific, 1870-Present

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of petroleum in China and the Western Pacific from 1870.

China’s petroleum history has yet to be written, despite its protracted duration and vast geographical reach. China and the Western Pacific region stretching from Russia’s Far East and Japan through Singapore, the Malacca Straits, and Indonesia, have been no less vital to the global history of oil than the better-known entanglements of Euro-America and the Middle East. My book-length environmental history project analyzes China’s long participation in shifting global networks of oil production alongside the changing meanings of oil consumption in daily life. A Summer Stipend will allow me to research and write the book’s third chapter, addressing the years 1949-1976. This chapter focuses on the everyday life of oil production under Maoism, particularly as lived and debated in the Daqing oil fields discovered in the northeastern region of Manchuria in 1959, and what this now-eclipsed period tells us about the possibilities and limits of fossil fuel-based energy sovereignty.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259487-18

Benjamin Lee White
Clemson University (Clemson, SC 29634-0001)
The Authorship of the Pauline Epistles: The Promise and Limitations of Computational Methods

Research and preparation of two scholarly articles on the forensic stylometry and authorship of the Epistles of Saint Paul.

This project explores the limitations of forensic stylometry – the detection of an author’s literary fingerprint in the service of exposing forgery. The development of tests, tools, and protocols within computational stylistics has increased confidence in conclusions about authorship, yet tests on the Pauline Epistles in the New Testament over the past 50 years have resulted in divergent findings about which of the 13 texts are authentic. This project seeks to discern why some ancient corpora like the Pauline Epistles have been resistant to consistent authorial categorization. The results will not only help scholars of Christian origins to reassess the relative value of forensic stylometry for their work, but will also serve as a caution for scholars of antiquity more generally who work with short texts in small corpora. Moreover, the project will help forensic stylometrists identify the limitations of their tools in relation to some corpora of great historical interest.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Computational Linguistics; History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259489-18

Emily Suzanne Clark
Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA 99258-1774)
Jesuit Missions and Native Communities in the Northwest, 1840–1940

Research and writing of a chapter in a history of Jesuit missions to Native Americans in the American Northwest and Alaska, 1840-1940.

Using the rich and understudied archive of the Jesuits of the Oregon Province, this book project focuses on the interactions between Jesuit priests and Native communities in the Northwest region of the United States. While many scholars of American religion have studied Christian missions to Native communities in early America and the eastern states, this project shifts the focus westward and later in American history. It also expands our understanding of conversion and colonialism. Even as the Jesuit priests emphasized their dedication to serving native communities, their actions aided the expansion of the U. S. nation-state through processes of Christianizing and "civilizing." Thus, the book continues a turn in the scholarship on missions and Native Christians to think of conversion as a complicated process with no universal definition. The native communities who hosted them accepted, resisted, and adapted the Catholicism and culture brought by the Jesuits.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259499-18

Cecile Whiting
University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
Global War and the New American Landscape, 1939–48

Research and preparation of a book on U.S. landscape painting during and after World War II.

During World War II, photographs and newsreels documenting death and destruction in theaters of war around the world prompted a change in painted representations of landscape in the United States. As a well-established genre in American art, landscape painting had a long tradition of celebrating the local, both bucolic settings and topographical wonders. The wider geographic scope of World War II challenged the regional focus of American landscape painting, especially as it had been practiced in the 1930s. My book examines the ways in which artists struggled to acknowledge an environment now understood to be global and interconnected, and also felt compelled to address the sheer scale of carnage caused by the war. Together these artists recast the terms of landscape painting, broadening its scope from the local to the international, and from the pastoral to the anti-pastoral.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259521-18

Willeke Sandler, PhD
Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)
Unofficial Empire: Germans Between Germany and Tanganyika, 1925–1945

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Germany's former African colony Tanganyika (1925-1945).

Although Germany was stripped of its overseas empire in 1919, from the mid-1920s through the mid-1940s hundreds of Germans immigrated to the former colony of German East Africa (now the British Mandate of Tanganyika). They established tightly-knit communities in the Mandate that received support from the German Foreign Office as well as Nazi organizations. I use the case study of Tanganyika to explore the (re)creation of an expatriate community within the context of a territory that had once been German. This obstinate form of “colonialism without colonies” ignored the reality of Germany’s official position in Africa and helped to establish an unofficial German colony in Tanganyika. A space of overlapping imperial claims, of German pasts and hoped-for futures, and of individual Germans’ economic goals, Tanganyika in the interwar period demonstrates the continued importance of the African continent to the German nation and state after the end of formal empire.

Project fields:
African History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259563-18

Emily Callaci
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Planning the African Family in the 1960s and 1970s

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on family planning in Africa during the 1960s and 1970s.

The history of contraception, population control and family planning is a story of global unevenness. Historians have characterized this global history as a story of extremes: of reproductive freedom, upward mobility and empowerment in some parts of the world, and of racism, vulnerability, population control or coercive sterilization in others. Yet neither narrative of feminist liberation nor of coercive population control captures the history of Africa’s encounter with the global family planning movement. My book, Planning the African Family, tells the story of how African doctors, nurses, social workers, politicians, and patients in the 1960s and 1970s used the resources of family planning in creative and often unintended ways, improvising in the context of scarcity to deliver health and to build health systems.

Project fields:
African History; Gender Studies; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259564-18

Nicole Etcheson
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Suffrage in the Post-Civil War United States

A book on disputes over suffrage for women, African Americans, and ex-Confederates in the post-Civil War era.

Before the Civil War, there was no right to vote. Voting was a privilege with each state deciding whether to set racial, gender, education, property, or naturalization requirements for its electorate. The Civil War destabilized this norm. Native-born white men lost the vote in some states because of service or aid to the Confederacy. African American men claimed suffrage based on loyalty, military service, and the need to protect their newly acquired freedom. Woman suffrage advocates hoped to advance their rights by exploiting the re-opened debate over suffrage. In ways previously unrecognized, these movements intersected and played off each other even as the federal government supplanted the states as arbiter of qualifications for what was increasingly defined not as a "privilege" but a "right." Moreover the effects of these Civil War suffrage disputes would linger well into the twentieth century, having ramifications for African American voting rights and women's rights.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259565-18

Stephen Hong Sohn
University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
The Korean War (1950–53) in Poetry by Korean Americans

Research leading to an article and book on the impact of the Korean War on the literature of Korean-American poets such as Myung Mi Kim, Don Mee Choi, and Sun Young Shin.

Though publications by American writers of Korean descent now number easily in the hundreds, no monograph exists that considers this extensive and critical body of work. My aim is to address this oversight at least in part by engaging in the production of a chapter length work over the NEH Summer Stipend period. The chapter will explore discourses of technology and militarism, as they arise in Korean American war poetry, especially focusing on the work of Myung Mi Kim and how her collections—including Under Flag, The Bounty, Dura, and Commons—can be placed in comparison to others such as Don Mee Choi’s Hardly War and Sun Yung Shin’s Rough, and Savage. Juxtaposing these poetry collections reveals an intriguing connection between the Korean civilian and American serviceman in the terrain of war: the desire to find legibility and recognition beyond the weapons, bombs, and gunfire that mark their lives as expendable.

Project fields:
American Literature; Military History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259568-18

Elizabeth Bond
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Experiencing the Enlightenment: an Eighteenth-Century Information Network

Preparation for publication of a book-length study of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and French newspapers from 1770 to 1791.

My book project, 'Experiencing the Enlightenment: an Eighteenth-Century Information Network,' offers new insight into the cardinal question in my field: the link between the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Drawing upon letters to the editor written by men and women throughout France between 1770 and 1791, I explore how thousands of readers consumed and interpreted the intellectual movements of their day. Representing a wide range of readers, such letters articulated solutions to everyday problems, honing habits of mind focused on knowing the world and changing society. Bringing previously unexamined sources and digital humanities approaches to bear on an enduring question, my work renders a more nuanced understanding of popular cultural responses to intellectual movements.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259578-18

Sarah E. Gardner
Mercer University (Macon, GA 31207-0001)
Reading During the American Civil War, 1861–1865

Research and writing of a book on reading practices and literary interpretation during the American Civil War, 1861-1865.

This project examines the reading habits, practices, and choices of various interpretive communities during the American Civil War. It demonstrates that wartime readers did not merely respond to the circumstances of the war, occupation, and Union victory. Rather, reading--how and what they read, the meanings they ascribed to what they had read, and the conditions that influenced their reading--shaped their understanding of the world around them. The war's unprecedented carnage, its contingencies, and its destruction shattered romantic modes of understanding. If America's bloodiest conflict profoundly transformed American literary culture, then it surely changed how readers encountered the printed word. Wartime readers were active participants in the process of coming to terms with the nation's defining event. Ultimately, then, this project explores the relationship between lived experiences and the intellectual and imaginative lives of wartime readers.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259602-18

Kathleen Elizabeth Newman
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Argentine Early Sound Film (1933–1935)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about Argentinian film (1910-1935).

"Argentine Early Sound Film (1933-1935)" is part of the book project, Transnational Modernity: Argentine Cinema and Society, 1910-1935, a study of the relation between silent and early sound film, early feminist movements, and democratization in Argentina. The book examines the competitive roles of (a) Argentine fiction feature films and newsreels and (b) imported, international cinema, mainly from the United States, in shaping a new political imaginary in Argentina in the early twentieth century, first, from the centenary of national independence in 1910 through 1930, the year of the nation's first military coup of the twentieth century, and, second, the dictatorship (1930-1932) and its aftermath (1932-1935). The central research question of this historical and theoretical book project concerns the role of cinema in social transformations of modernity in Argentina, which included a transformation of gender roles and a redefinition of citizenship.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Latin American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259619-18

Zachary Brittsan
Texas Tech University (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Murder and Justice in Mexico’s Age of Conflict, 1847-1871

Research leading to a book-length study criminal courts in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, 1847-1871.

By examining hundreds of wrongful death investigations and death sentence appeals in nineteenth-century Mexico, Trying Modernity captures how alleged criminals drew from their life experiences, cultural foundations, and legal understandings to defend themselves in the courtroom. Such testimonies give voice to the voiceless and tell us something about how everyday members of civil society understood and asserted their rights. Plotting the trajectory of individual voices across gender, racial, and social lines also reveals the meaning behind the contentious language deployed by judges, investigators, and witnesses. The quiet battle of words in the courtroom, too often overshadowed by the overt violence of military uprisings and civil war playing out at the same time, ultimately shaped a cultural consensus in 1871 that would be foundational for both the authoritarian peace of the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship and notions of citizenship and criminality that extend into the present.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259620-18

Jose Luis Bermudez
Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
The Power of Frames: Rethinking Models of Rational Decision-Making

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on philosophical models of decision-making.

Should values and decisions be influenced by how we frame the outcomes we confront and the choices we have to make? The orthodox view (as found, for example, in psychology and behavioral economics) is that any such influence is fundamentally irrational. The goal of this project is a book, The Power of Frames (under contract to Cambridge University Press) in which I will argue against this orthodox view. Problems with standard ways of thinking about framing emerge when we apply insights from philosophy and related areas of the humanities. The book explores a range of cases illustrating how frame-sensitivity is an integral part of rational decision-making. I draw on examples from Greek and Shakespearean tragedy, ethical dilemmas, group identification, social coordination, and practical psychological problems such as exercising self-control in the face of temptation.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General; Psychology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259640-18

Lauren Meeker
SUNY Research Foundation, College at New Paltz (New Paltz, NY 12561-2407)
Moral Responsibility, Gender, and Social Change in Lineage Ritual in Northern Vietnam

Ethnographic research and completion of a paper on the adaptations to modern social changes in the ritual practices of North Vietnamese rural villages.

This project is an ethnographic study of the gendered dimensions of moral responsibility in northern rural Vietnam, with a focus on lineage ritual. The research examines how village women, who are structural outsiders in their lineages, negotiate what are often overlapping and conflicting moral positions in order to establish themselves as moral persons in the community. In particular, the study considers how this process is affected by changing cultural values and customs. More generally, the study demonstrates how individuals construct moral and social personhood in concert with broader authoritative discourses in times of rapid societal change. It also highlights the diverse ways that local communities address a core humanistic problem: how individuals, each embodying a singular way-of-being in the world, come to live together in a moral community.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259641-18

Waitman Wade Beorn, PhD
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Between the Wires: The Janowska Camp and the Holocaust in Lviv

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Janowska camp in Poland during World War II.

This project seeks support to finish research and begin writing a manuscript on the Janowska camp in Lviv, Ukraine. This concentration camp has received little scholarly study despite the fact that the Nazis murdered at least 80,000 Jews in there. Relying on extensive and varied sources including maps, photographs, artwork, perpetrator and survivor testimony, site surveys, and archival documents, I am writing the first comprehensive history of this important place which served as a “hybrid” camp, functioning as a concentration camp, a transit camp to the extermination camp of Belzec, and a dedicated killing site in its own right. In addition, I am applying an interdisciplinary approach to the project that recognizes spatial aspects of the camp’s history that enrich our understanding of it at the micro, local, and regional scale. This includes the microspaces of the camp and its role as the hub of a network of perpetrators in the region.

Project fields:
European History; History, Other; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 8/31/2019


FT-259642-18

Martine Jean
University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in 19th Century Brazil, 1830–1890

A book length study on the development of prisons in Brazil between 1830 and 1890.

My monograph, "Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, 1830-1890," investigates the birth of the prison in Brazil with a focus on Rio de Janeiro’s Casa de Correção, the city’s penitentiary, and the Casa de Detenção, a remand prison, from 1830 to 1890. This era spans the post-independence period, the termination of the slave trade in 1850, and the protracted emancipation process that culminated in the abolition of slavery in 1888 and the fall of the Empire (1822-1889). The research highlights the seeming paradox that Brazil’s construction of the Casa de Correção represents in the global history of the penitentiary which is associated with industrializing societies and free wage labor whereas slavery was the basis of the Brazilian economy until 1888.

Project fields:
History, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259659-18

Cassio Ferreira de Oliveira
Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Collective and Individual Identity Formation in the Soviet Picaresque Novel, 1921-1938

Research and writing leading to a book on the genre of the picaresque novel under the Soviet regime in the years 1921-1938.

Archival research and completion of book chapter on Soviet picaresque narratives. In my book manuscript, I analyze the role of the picaresque as a locus of individual resistance, ambivalence, and apparent reconciliation vis-à-vis the Soviet regime. The picaresque narrates the adventures of a character in the margins of society and his attempts at social ascension and rehabilitation across the territory of a rapidly changing USSR. As a mode of writing and of literary representation of the Soviet Union’s breakneck development, the picaresque suited writers as a means to come to terms with disparate aspects of life in communism. Much as the classical picaresque at once depicted and undermined the Spanish colonial enterprise in the Age of Discoveries, the Soviet picaresque narratives participated in an empire-building project while questioning the basic tenets of the communist experiment.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Media Studies; Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259686-18

Jason H. Pearl
Florida International University (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Balloon Flight and British Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries

Research and writing for a book on the emerging technology of ballooning in 18th-century England and its impact on literature and the techniques of omniscient narration.

This book project shows how the advent of flight enabled nothing less than new ways of seeing the world. The first hot air balloons, beginning in 1783, gave the bird’s-eye view to human eyes, and writers in various genres, factual and fictional, adopted the perspective of an observer in a balloon basket. These writers described natural and human-built environments from extraordinary angles and distances, portraying the geographies of Britain and beyond at unprecedented scales. They thus put into practice, more literally than ever before, scientific methods such as detached observation and far-reaching empirical induction, as well as the literary technique of omniscient narration.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259697-18

Sarah A. Curtis
San Francisco State University Foundation Inc. (San Francisco, CA 94132-1722)
The Culture of Childhood in Nineteenth-Century France

Research for a book-length study on the history and culture of childhood in 19th-century France.

This book-length project examines the culture of childhood in France from approximately 1850 until the eve of World War I. In mid- to late-19th-century France, changing attitudes towards children as well as the rise of consumer culture both reflected and shaped a new focus on children as economic actors, social beings, and cultural icons. Through an examination of children's literature, material objects, publicity materials, memoirs, and contemporary criticism, this project will show how a new culture of childhood developed in a society undergoing social, economic, and demographic transformation, political democratization, imperial expansion, and Catholic-anticlerical conflict. It argues that both consumerism and anxiety about the future of the nation shaped children’s cultural experiences as well as adult expectations for them during a period when children were critical to the future of the French nation and republic.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259718-18

Sascha Thyme Scott
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
Interpreting Early 20th-Century Paintings by Pueblo Artists of the American Southwest

Research and preparation of a book on paintings by 20th-century Pueblo artists of the southwestern United States.

My book explores how early 20th-century Pueblo painters navigated the simultaneously generative and perilous confluence of modernity and tradition. I build on while challenging scholarship on American Indian art produced in colonial contexts, which is largely focused on the support and interventions of white patrons and on market forces. Instead, my book foregrounds individual Pueblo artists, highlighting their “aesthetic agency,” or how they creatively adopted, resisted, confronted, transformed, and subverted colonial political, economic, and cultural forces. Each chapter is focused on one Pueblo artist, seeking to understand the aesthetics and politics at play in his or her art. The method for doing so is through careful archival research, through dialogue with the artists’ home communities, and by attending to a rich body of theoretical work produced by indigenous thinkers. As such, the book aims to provide a productive model for writing about transcultural indigenous arts.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Native American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259722-18

Mitra J. Sharafi
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Fear of the False: Forensic Science in Colonial India, 1856–1947

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of forensic science in colonial India, covering 1856-1947.

Between 1856 and 1947, a web of institutions tailored to the scientific detection of crime in South Asia was created. India’s new experts in toxicology, blood stains, handwriting analysis, and explosives were supposed to cut through the confusion produced by the perjury and forgery of “mendacious natives” to extract objective scientific truth in the service of a neutral vision of justice. In practice, however, the use of the new forensic science in the courtroom invited increasingly complicated and conflicting answers to the questions, "what is truth?" and "what is justice?" This study, which will be the first book-length history of forensic science in colonial India, reveals that a system initially structured along fault lines of racial mistrust expanded into a site for competing conceptions of truth and justice among legal, scientific, and medical professionals, both South Asian and European.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Science; Legal History; South Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259723-18

Victoria Fortuna
Reed College (Portland, OR 97202-8199)
Concert Dance, Race, and Identity in Argentina

Research leading to a book-length study on race and modern dance in Argentina since during the 20th century.

This project examines the role that concert dance forms—classical ballet, modern dance, and contemporary dance—historically have played in the construction and/or critique of Argentine racial exceptionalism. Racial exceptionalism names the pervasive academic and public discourses that have situated Argentina as exceptionally white and European among Latin American nations. Because of its relationship to Euro-American culture, concert dance offers a privileged site for examining the construction of Argentine whiteness. Argentina’s Centennial (1910) and Bicentennial (2010) celebrations, both critical crossroads in the imagination of national identity, bracket this study. My project joins a growing body of scholarship that centers racial politics in Argentina. Within the dance studies field, it aims to bring Argentine concert dance into dialogue with scholarship that documents how dance articulates histories of race and nation.

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 11/30/2018


FT-259726-18

Margarete Myers Feinstein
Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, CA 90045-2650)
Holocaust Survivors and Retribution at the End of World War II

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Jewish revenge after the Holocaust.

This book chapter on Jewish revenge after the Holocaust shines a new light on the myth of Jewish passivity in response to Nazi persecution. It challenges popular perceptions of Holocaust survivors as spontaneous paragons of reconciliation and tolerance, suggesting instead that attitudes of reconciliation came later and with effort. By acknowledging the role of revenge in survivors' transition to post-genocide life, we can gain insights into their gendered responses to trauma and into the processes by which they sought to reclaim control over their lives. The influence of religious traditions and Zionist politics on survivors' decisions about revenge acts is also explored. This study suggests that Jewish responses may not have been so very different from that of other victims of Nazism. Scholars of other genocides can find it useful for comparison to teach us more about what promotes reconciliation and what fosters the desire for vengeance.

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259751-18

Denise Eileen McCoskey
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Eugenics and Classical Scholarship in Early 20th-Century America

Research and writing of a scholarly article about the role of eugenics in American classical scholarship prior to World War II.

In this project, I propose to carry out a critical study of the role of eugenic theories in early twentieth-century American classical scholarship. Building on research I conducted for an earlier project, my hypothesis is that the reliance on eugenics was widespread in classical scholarship during the first half of the twentieth century, and I would like to use the NEH Summer Stipend to document and evaluate classicists’ employment of such theories in their interpretations of ancient history, while also weighing the legacy such scholarship continues to have in the field of classics today. The penchant for using Greek and Roman history as a mirror for American life is as old as America itself, and I believe interrogation of the intersections of classical scholarship and eugenics can also provide insight into some of the ways contemporary American debates about race and eugenics were, in turn, bolstered by these interpretations of the ancient world.

Project fields:
Classical History; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259759-18

Erin Claire Cage
University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL 36688-3053)
The Science of Proof: Forensic Medicine in Nineteenth-Century France

Research for a book-length study on the relationship between forensic science and law in 19th-century France.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259760-18

Virginia Blanton
University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
Shaping Monastic Devotional Culture in 14th-Century England

Research for a book-length study of a work by 14th-century chronicler, John of Tynemouth, on the lives of saints in medieval England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.

I seek funding to support the writing of a formative section of a book project, titled Shaping Monastic Devotional Culture in England. This monograph offers the first sustained investigation of a neglected collection of 156 saints’ lives, some of which constitute the only historical evidence of religious women during the Christian conversion of England. John of Tynemouth's legendary became the definitive register of English holiness, one that was read and recopied from c. 1350-1550. Shaping Monastic Devotional Culture in England investigates the scope of John’s legendary, documents the sources for the saints' lives, examines the collective narrative about localized sanctity, and illustrates the centrality of this register in English monastic reading.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History of Religion; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259830-18

Sean Michael Farrell
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
The Trillick Railway Outrage: Making Sectarianism in Victorian Ireland

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on religious conflict in 19th century Ireland.

This book examines an 1854 assassination attempt in northwestern Ireland. One of the world’s first “train wreckings,” Trillick received widespread newspaper coverage. Commentators assumed this was a sectarian crime, and seven Catholic railway workers were arrested soon after the crash. Despite their best efforts, officials determined there was insufficient evidence to go to trial and released the men, who quickly left the region, disappearing into Ireland’s global diaspora. The first book-length study of this dramatic event, my work highlights the constructed nature of Catholic-Protestant division in nineteenth-century Ireland. I do this by focusing on the ways that Trillick impacted four individuals linked to the crash. This microhistorical approach is designed to detail the ways that sectarian narratives conceal the complexity of human experience. This Irish story has obvious contemporary relevance, given the prevalence of religious violence in divided societies around the world.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 9/30/2018


FT-259832-18

Rebecca Scharbach Wollenberg
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Beyond the Book: Reimagining the Early Reception History of the Bible

Completion of a book on the use of the Hebrew Bible in Judaism during late antiquity and the early middle ages.

The study of early Jewish religious reading proposed here documents practices in which a cultural elite that is widely acknowledged to sit at the heart of the biblical project seldom opened a Bible and even great religious thinkers maintained an indistinct notion of the contents of the biblical text. This study argues, moreover, that many early rabbinic authorities found that their central canonical text inspired doubts very similar to those expressed by modern skeptics—a form of intellectual dissonance that was tolerable to these late antique thinkers because many early rabbinic authorities cultivated a form of scriptural religiosity that defused doubts regarding the biblical text by embracing the idea of the Bible while simultaneously neglecting the book itself.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Jewish Studies; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 6/30/2018


FT-259833-18

Elizabeth Rebecca Wright
University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Theater and the Slave Trade in 15th- and 16th-Century Spain and Portugal

Research for a book-length study of relationships between the Atlantic Slave Trade and the emergence of professional theater in early modern Spain and Portugal.

“Stages of Servitude in Early Modern Iberia” examines an enduring question about the Atlantic slave trade that first comes into view in Portugal and Spain in the late fifteenth century: why did early awareness of its cruelty and illegality not foment abolitionism? I ask how the thriving theater cultures of Spain and Portugal contributed to the naturalization of demeaning images of sub-Saharan Africans and the institutionalization of the Atlantic slave trade. Yet my book also considers a paradox: black Africans and Afro-descendant Iberians found rare chances for artistic validation and economic advancement in the theater business, working as musicians, actors, stagehands, and writers. My study is organized in five chapters (stages), understood in spatial-temporal terms as the cultural contexts where slave-holding was displayed. The completed book will enhance our understanding of Renaissance theater and empire building.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 6/30/2018


FT-259846-18

Rachel Gabara
University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Realism and African Documentary Film, 1905 to the Present

Research and writing leading to publication of a book-length study of documentary films in sub-Saharan Africa, from 1905 to the present.

In my current book project, “Reclaiming Realism: From Documentary Film in Africa to African Documentary Film,” I analyze postcolonial African documentary film in its aesthetic, social, and historical contexts. For over half a century, French colonial documentary claimed to capture the truth about Africa and Africans. In the postcolonial era, African filmmakers have reclaimed the cinema and their cinematic image by experimenting with documentary content, voice, and style. I argue that documentary was of vital importance to French colonialism as well as to a postcolonial reframing of African identities and modes of filmic discourse. My study of documentary, moreover, demonstrates how the inclusion of African films enriches our understanding of global cinema. The NEH Summer Stipend will support a final trip to Paris, France, to update the research for the postcolonial portion of my manuscript.

Project fields:
African Studies; Film History and Criticism; French Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259849-18

Patrick M. Erben
University of West Georgia (Carrollton, GA 30118-0001)
German Pietism and American Literature of the Late 18th and 19th Centuries

Research leading to an article and book on the influence of German Pietism on late 18th- and 19th-century American literature.

My current book project investigates the profound yet neglected role of German Pietism in the development of English-language American literature. A 17th and 18th century religious reform movement, Pietism emphasized a personal and emotional relationship between individuals and the Christian redeemer. The transatlantic spread of Pietism by German immigrants such as the Moravians shaped the occupation with sensibility, feeling, and inwardness in the movement from Enlightenment to Romanticism. My project thus endeavors a major scholarly reassessment of canonical and non-canonical authors of late 18th and 19th-century American literature and upends longstanding origin narratives grounded in what Sacvan Bercovitch called The Puritan Origins of the American Self (1975). During the funding period, I would research and write an article titled “The Cult of Zinzendorf in 19th-Century American Literature and Culture,” examining the American popularity of the founder of the Moravian Church.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; History of Religion; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259859-18

Kevin John Adams
Kent State University (Kent, OH 44242-0001)
Civil Rights and Anti-Chinese Violence in Seattle During the 1880s

Work on a book-length examination of anti-Chinese violence in late-nineteenth-century Seattle and its implications for post-Reconstruction federal civil rights policy.

“American Pogrom: Anti-Chinese Violence and the Challenges of the Long Reconstruction” uses the assertive federal response to 1880’s mob violence against Chinese in the Pacific Northwest to understand federal power after Reconstruction. Two discrete questions guide my inquiry: what tools did the federal government have at its disposal to protect the civil rights of marginalized groups and how effectively did it do so? Relying on both the architecture of civil rights protections enshrined during Reconstruction and the U.S. Army, which effectively projected federal power, the Cleveland administration illustrated the federal government’s continuing ability to protect civil rights, even after Reconstruction, but also the structural impediments to complete success in that endeavor. In the end, fervid support for Chinese exclusion by locals trumped the federal prerogative, but events there set a precedent for civil rights enforcement that would later be expanded upon in the 1950s and 60s.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259870-18

Julia Quinn Bryan-Wilson
Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
The Works of American Sculptor Louise Nevelson (1899–1988)

Preparation of a book about the American sculptor Louise Nevelson (1899-1988).

Louise Nevelson’s Modernisms will be the first scholarly monograph to closely examine the monochromatic sculptures of a well-known but little studied figure within 20th-century American art. Though Nevelson frequently showed alongside Abstract Expressionist artists in her lifetime (1899-1988), I claim that her scavenged wood wall-based grids, which hover between painting and sculpture, continue to resist easy categorization. The book asserts that Nevelson's work challenges and complicates what modernism looks like, and argues that her color choices (in particular her stated allegiance to blackness) as well as her formal interest in carpentry propose political identifications, ones that offer novel ways of conceiving how sculpture constructs multiple selves in relation to race and gender. I define her modernisms as multiple, related to her art’s aesthetic of embellishment and to her understanding of herself as an atypical modern woman.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259893-18

Melinda Latour O'Brien
Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Moral Song in Late Renaissance France, 1550-1650

Preparation for publication of a book-length study of moral songs and ethics during the Wars of Religion in late sixteenth-century France.

The Voice of Virtue offers the first book-length study of moral song, a fascinating domain of musical activity that gained traction during the Wars of Religion in late sixteenth-century France. Setting pithy and sometimes profound morsels of vernacular wisdom to simple tunes or elaborate polyphonic compositions, moral song offered a multi-sensory engagement with contemporary ethical thought. Whereas Medieval ethics developed within the boundaries of professional philosophy, the Renaissance saw an explosion of informal expressions of moral philosophy created by and for non-specialists. This will be the first book to illuminate song as one such expression of informal ethics, animating diverse moral principles drawn from ancient sources for a broad community of amateur musicians. Positioned at a rich intersection between cultural and intellectual history, The Voice of Virtue stands to make a significant contribution to music scholarship, ethics, and the reparative turn in the humanities.

Project fields:
Ethics; French Literature; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259916-18

Renata Nicole Keller
University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)
Ground Zero: The Cuban Missile Crisis in Latin America

A book-length study of Latin American reactions to the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962.

Ground Zero is a hemispheric history of the Cuban Missile Crisis. It argues that this event was critical to shaping Latin American history and that, in turn, Latin America was critical to the global history of the crisis. Faced with the threat of nuclear war, Latin American politicians, military officers, and citizens seized active roles in the crisis, and their responses had important results. Few histories of the missile crisis look beyond the United States, the Soviet Union, and Cuba, and no histories of Latin America analyze the wider impact of the crisis. This project draws on archival sources from across the Americas, the records of international organizations like the United Nations and the Organization of American States, and the cultural productions of diverse Latin Americans to determine the impact of the Cuban Missile Crisis on Latin America and uncover the ways that Latin American governments and individuals shaped the outcome of the crisis.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Latin American History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259941-18

J. Cameron Monroe
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Archaeology at Cana: A West African City of the Atlantic Era, 1600–1894

Completion of an archaeological study and publication of a two-volume monograph on the West African kingdom of Dahomey (1600-1894).

Western perspectives on African cities have long privileged external factors in the rise of cities across the continent. In recent decades, however, archaeologists have revealed the local origins of cities, countering such arguments for the exogenous origins of African civilizations. Yet the global trading networks that engulfed Africa in the second millennium AD had wide-reaching impacts on African urban systems, and we are only beginning to explore how local and global forces articulated. Since 2000, I have explored this question in reference to the kingdom of Dahomey in West Africa, which thrived in the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In the coming year I plan to complete a two-volume monograph summarizing archaeological, documentary, and oral evidence from this research. The monograph will represent one of only a few detailed archaeological studies of a West Africa urban community in this period, providing comparative data for scholars working across the region.

Project fields:
African History; Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-259950-18

Jolene Zigarovich
University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0001)
Death and Corpses in the 18th-Century British Novel

Research leading to a book on the changing attitudes toward death, funeral practices, and mortality as reflected in 18th-century British novels.

Without a book-length study of death in eighteenth-century Britain, historical facts concerning funerary practices and the culture’s overall relationship with mortality are only beginning to be understood. By incorporating a variety of historical discourses–wills, undertaking histories, medical studies, philosophical treatises and religious tracts–my project illuminates a shift in control over death and the body from religious institutions to the individual, which resulted in secular, aesthetic approaches to death and dying. Preserving Clarissa, and other Morbid Curiosities in the Eighteenth-Century Novel reveals that the body itself—its parts, and its preserved, visual representation—functioned as erotic memento, and it suggests that preserved remains became symbols of individuality and subjectivity. This project thereby forces us to reassess the eighteenth-century response to and representation of the dead and dead-like body, and its fetishized purpose and use in fiction.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259957-18

Michael David Dwyer, PhD
Arcadia University (Glenside, PA 19038-3215)
Tinsel and Rust: Hollywood Film and Postindustrial Cities in the United States

Preparation for publication of a book-length study of the relationship between postindustrial cities and film in the United States, from the 1970s to the present.

Since the term entered popular usage in the early 1980s, the “Rust Belt” has gained considerable cultural and political pull in the United States. Not merely a descriptor for a geographical region surrounding the Great Lakes and Ohio River Valley, “the Rust Belt” serves as a potent symbol for America’s past, present, and impending future. Much of the social construction of the idea of the Rust Belt—both then and now–has occurred in popular film. Filmic representations of shuttered auto plants, unemployed laborers, and decaying downtowns have all contributed to narratives of American decline. At the same time, cities like Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh have actively attempted to court film and television production in an effort to craft their own stories of American renewal. In my manuscript Tinsel and Rust: Hollywood Film and Postindustrial America, I examine the complicated relationship between postindustrial cities and the creative industries in the United States.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259958-18

Suzanne Sutherland Duchacek
Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
War, Diplomacy, and Knowledge in Habsburg Europe (18th and 19th Centuries)

Preparation for publication of a book-length study of 17th-century European military entrepreneurs, warfare, and diplomacy.

This study examines the social, cultural, and political impact of military contracting in the last great age of contracting prior to the modern era. In the seventeenth century, military entrepreneurs used private wealth, credit, and connections to raise and command regiments since war had become pervasive but rulers lacked large-scale standing forces. What forms of power emerge when contractors monopolize violence? How do their activities redefine the state and political allegiances? How did new forms of power influence other dynamic elements of early modern life, including the growth of science? Focusing on Italian military entrepreneurs in Austrian Habsburg service, this book argues that contractors innovated a new kind of expertise, military science. They undermined political allegiances and built new ties across regions. Military men contributed to a dizzying new mobility in Europe that destabilized traditional boundaries and opened up spaces for new ideas and practices.

Project fields:
Military History; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259974-18

Corinna Zeltsman
Georgia Southern University (Statesboro, GA 30458)
Printers and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Mexico

A book-length study of political printers in Mexico between 1821 and 1910.

My book project examines the political and social struggles surrounding the making and consuming of print in Mexico to offer a new analysis of the emergence of liberalism across the long nineteenth century. It argues that Mexico City printers galvanized and shaped post-independence political discussion and conflict by giving material form to competing ideas and reform projects. The book also demonstrates how Mexico City printers and collaborators from across the social spectrum ushered in a new political culture in which print served as an incendiary element in rollicking and ruthless struggles over the fledgling nation’s future. The project significantly revises our understanding of the role of print in the formation of Mexico’s public sphere, and offers insight into how imprints functioned as key objects that linked intimate urban communities, larger patronage networks, and spurred political action in a post-colonial society with low literacy rates.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-259994-18

Paula C. Park
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Latin America in the Philippines: Rethinking Intercoloniality Across the Hispanic Pacific (1898–1964)

No project description available

Project fields:
Latin American Literature; Latin American Studies; Spanish Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-260009-18

Nathan John Martin
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
The Philosophers' Rameau: Music Theory in the Encyclopédie

Research and writing of a book-length study of the music theory of Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) and French Enlightenment debates about human knowledge.

The Philosophers' Rameau investigates how and why the music-theoretical writings of Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) came to be prominently featured in the main publishing organ of the French Enlightenment: Diderot and d'Alembert's Encyclopédie. The answer is that the philosophes' found in Rameau's theory of harmony a succinct illustration of their own scientific epistemology. For this reason, the structure of the Encyclopédie's exposition of Rameau comes to mirror that of its account of human knowledge as a whole. The initially veiled and the progressively more overt critique of Rameau that Rousseau developed across his articles on music, and which d'Alembert subsequently appropriated, thus redounded on the Encyclopédie itself and in the end threatened its editors' global project. My book's chief methodological novelty lies in its emphasis on the interpenetration between technical questions of music theory and broader issues of scientific method and philosophical psychology.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Intellectual History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260035-18

Phillip Troutman
George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
The Radical Visual Rhetoric of American Abolition in the 1830s

The completion of two chapters of a book on images in abolitionist publications during the 1830s.

My book project, ‘Incendiary Pictures,’ is the first to analyze American abolitionist image-making in the full context of its formative decade, the 1830s, arguing that its visual rhetoric was creative and its ideology radically interracial, with image-makers attending self-consciously to their own motives, methods, messages, and audiences. Scholars focusing on 1840s-1850s images interpret them as patronizing, objectifying, sentimentalizing, and exploitative. By contrast, I show that in the 1830s, abolitionist visual rhetoric asserted African American agency and subjectivity, interracial collaboration and action, and civil rights. By attending closely to each creator’s ideology and by taking cues from W. T. J. Mitchell’s question, “what do pictures want?”—in the double sense of demanding and lacking—I show how abolitionists creatively exploited images’ power to persuade but also self-consciously acknowledged the limits of any image to convey slavery’s full brutality.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260081-18

Nathan Edward Suhr-Sytsma
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
The Role of Poetry in Contemporary African Literary Communities

Research and preparation of an article on the role of poetry in African literary communities.

What is the future of literature? While the Internet revolution is often thought to call into question the future of literary reading in North America, African writing today suggests that the rise of digital media should not be confused with the decline of the literary. This project examines contemporary African poetry in English and the communities through which it circulates in order to ask in what sense this new poetry serves as a paradigm of the literary and its fortunes in the twenty-first century. In pursuit of a better grasp on literature’s cultural, ethical, and subjective work, the project probes the extent to which a writer’s location still matters in an era of digital publication. Drawing on fieldwork as well as theoretical discussions of lyric poetry and original textual interpretation, it foregrounds diverse African actors’ understanding of why the literary still matters for their current situation and possible futures.

Project fields:
African Literature; African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260082-18

Zena Hitz
St. John's College, Main Campus (Annapolis, MD 21401-1687)
Intellectual Life: What It Is and Why It Matters

No project description available

Project fields:
Ethics; Philosophy, General; Western Civilization

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 6/30/2018


FT-260113-18

Aaron Paul Johnson
Lee University (Cleveland, TN 37311-4475)
Philosophy and Tradition in the Contra Julianumby Cyril of Alexandria (c. 375–444)

Research and preparation of a book on the 5th-century literary attack by Bishop Cyril of Alexandria against the Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate (332-363).

This book project is the first monograph in any language to investigate one of the most significant works of Cyril of Alexandria (5th century) since the very recent publication of its extant ten books in a critical edition. The book will focus upon the ways in which the Contra Julianum (a literary attack against a religious polemical work of the emperor Julian over sixty years following his death) participated in key literary and philosophical discourses. The Contra Julianum not only extended earlier Christian apologetic traditions but also appropriated Greek poetic and philosophical texts in unique ways within a late Roman imperial context. Cyril furthermore crafted unique formulations of epistemological, theological-demonological, and legal-philosophical positions that show a creative and incisive engagement with ongoing philosophical discourses in these areas.

Project fields:
Classical Literature; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260114-18

Laura Moure Cecchini
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
The Lure of the Baroque in Italian Visual Culture, 1898–1945

Preparation of a study on the revival of the 17th-century Baroque style in Italian art and architecture from 1898-1945.

Against dominant narratives about the chief role of the classical tradition in modern Italy, Baroquemania argues that between the country’s unification and the cataclysmic fall of fascism, Italian cultural conversations mostly revolved around the Baroque and its legacy. The Baroque was seen as a period of decline but also as one of the few experiences common to the entire peninsula. Baroquemania combines archival research and close readings of visual and material culture, with critical analyses of the Italian discourse on Baroque aesthetics. The book explores imaginative responses to the style in a variety of artistic mediums, with an eye to the debates in the academy and another to those outside of it: artists, architects, critics, and political ideologues. Intervening in the study of Italian visual culture and of the Baroque revival, Baroquemania re-appraises Italian modern art and sheds new light on the role of style in the cultural politics of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History; Italian Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260120-18

Traci Lynnea Parker
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s

Research and writing of a monograph on the economic consequences of the integration of American department stores, from the 1950s to the 1980s.

I am seeking the assistance of a NEH Summer Stipend, so that I can complete my first book, Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights (under contract at the University of North Carolina Press). During the summer of 2018, I will conduct archival research at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Maryland. Here, I will review the records of the Sears, Roebuck, and Company affirmative action cases, the subject of my book’s sixth and final chapter. These cases expose the retail industry’s discriminatory practices against African Americans and women, the industry's ongoing transformations, ones that revolutionized, or rather diminished the status of retail work and consumption, and the challenges and limitations of neoliberalism in the 1970s and 1980s.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; Labor History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-260121-18

Daniel Bernardo Hershenzon
University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)
Jewish Manuscripts in the Early Modern Mediterranean: Between Piracy, Redemption, and the Spanish Inquisition

Research leading to publication of a book-length study of religious artifacts and piracy in the early modern western Mediterranean.

I am requesting the NEH Summer Stipend to conduct two months of research in the Bodleian Library (GB) and in the AHN and AGS (Spain) on the negotiations over the restitution of 3,000 Hebrew manuscripts, sent from Livorno to Algiers in the 1630’s, intercepted by Spanish pirates, and sent to the Inquisition’s dungeons. The story forms the 3rd chapter of a book project on religious artifacts—Korans, Bibles, prayer shawls, pictures of Christ and the Virgin, and relics—that as a byproduct of piracy and human trafficking circulated in the thousands in the early modern western Mediterranean, crossing religious boundaries. The project argues that during the 17th century such objects—captured, humiliated, redeemed—helped shape relations between Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the context of maritime piracy. Reconstructing their trajectories sheds new light on the experience of captivity and the practice of redemption, of people and objects.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 10/31/2018


FT-260154-18

Constance Kassor
Seeley G. Mudd Library, Lawrence University (Appleton, WI 54911-5690)
Translation of "Synopsis of the Middle Way," a Treatise by the 15th-Century Buddhist Philosopher Gorampa Sonam Senge

Research leading to publication of an English translation of the 15th-century Tibetan philosophical text Synopsis of the Middle Way by Gorampa Sonam Senge (1429-89).

I am applying for an NEH Summer Stipend to travel to Kathmandu, Nepal, where I will complete and prepare for publication an English translation of the highly influential and encyclopedic fifteenth-century Tibetan philosophical text, Synopsis of the Middle Way (Dbu ma’i spyi don), by Gorampa Sonam Senge. At the heart of the Synopsis is a question central to the humanities: What constitutes knowledge, and how should a person go about cultivating the right kinds of knowledge? Specifically, this text argues that the highest forms of wisdom build on intellectual, analytical knowledge and develop into embodied and enacted kinds of understanding. By cultivating these higher states of wisdom, one learns how to act ethically in the world. The rigor with which Gorampa addresses these issues and the number of interlocutors that he brings into conversation with his own view have the potential to expand current conversations around these issues in the humanities more broadly.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-260155-18

Jason D. BeDuhn
Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, AZ 86011-0001)
The Influence of the Religion of Manichaeism from about 400 to 430 on Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430)

Research and preparation of a book on the influence of Manichaeism, an important religion in the Middle East in the third century CE, on the thought and writings of Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430).

This book project completes a trilogy contracted by the University of Pennsylvania Press on Augustine of Hippo (d. 430 CE) and his intellectual engagement with Manichaeism. This third book covers the last thirty years of his life, when his views underwent a "darkening" regarding the depravity of human nature. Some of his contemporaries and modern interpreters have attributed these views to Manichaean influence. Through a chronological account of Augustine's encounters with Manichaeans and critics within the Catholic Church, this book explores (1) the problem of evil, (2) the source of human motivation to sin, (3) free will, predestination, and fatalism, and (4) divine and human justice. Through these major issues of the Western intellectual tradition, the reader will be shown how much the Western thought on them owes to a forgotten episode of inter-religious dialogue and debate with a now extinct religion that nonetheless has left its lasting traces.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 9/30/2018


FT-260211-18

Sarah Elizabeth Igo
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Nine Digits: a Biography of a Number and a Nation

Research toward writing a history of the Social Security number, examining modern U.S. attitudes toward citizenship, governance, and civic feeling.

This project examines modern U.S. attitudes toward citizenship, governance, and civic feeling from a new and perhaps surprising angle: the history of the Social Security number (SSN). The now-familiar nine digits came to be annexed to most Americans’ lives over the course of the twentieth century. SSNs are generally understood as an incidental part of the larger story of modern state-building and social provision—or today, often as a risk. But I focus squarely on the number in order to offer a material and affective history of how Americans have envisioned the modern federal government and their shifting relationship to it. By considering what has often been seen as a regulatory, administrative, or policy matter as a humanistic one deeply entwined with questions of civic belonging, state obligation, and individual responsibility, a history of the Social Security number gives us new purchase on the dilemmas of American citizenship, past and present.

Project fields:
American Studies; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


FT-260214-18

Elaine Y. Yau
Unknown institution
The Paintings of Clementine Hunter (1887–1988), a Folk Artist of Rural Louisiana

Research and preparation for an article on the self-taught Louisiana painter Clementine Hunter (1887-1988).

Clementine Hunter (1887-1988) is celebrated for her paintings of everyday life in rural Louisiana, where she was a sharecropper and domestic servant throughout the early 20th century. In their relationship to the past, these artworks have bolstered Hunter’s reputation as one of America’s great folk artists. In this model, her racial blackness functions as a defining aspect of her marginality that her art overcomes. This project offers a more dynamic history opened up by Hunter’s explorations of African and creole subjects. Neither obvious memory paintings nor simple representations, these abstracted renditions of French creoles of color and Caribbean rituals illuminate Hunter’s engagement with legacies of slavery and racial and cultural mixture. I turn to theories of creolization and diasporic imaginations forged by cultural critics, folklorists, and art historians to examine these paintings; Hunter’s evolving sense of her French, Creole, and African ancestry; and her modernity.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 9/30/2018


FT-260244-18

Matthew Crain
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
The Rise of Surveillance Advertising in America, from the 1990s to the 2000s

Research and writing of a book on the history of advertising and the surveillance of consumer activity on the Internet.

Surveillance has become the internet’s de facto business model. Everyday users have a sense that the web is watching, but the details and implications of these practices remain opaque. In particular we lack historical accounts of how and why this seemingly unintelligible system of digital surveillance was constructed. My book project, First Watch: The Rise of Surveillance Advertising, gives internet surveillance a much needed origin story by chronicling the development of its most important historical catalyst: web advertising. Set in the 1990s, the project offers an institutional history of the online advertising system and considers the political-economic and social consequences of the web’s rapid embrace of consumer monitoring. As one of the first book-length historical treatments of web surveillance, this project has the potential to make significant contributions to the field of media studies and to broader public debates about big data, privacy, and politics in the digital age.

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; History, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260249-18

Andrey Vyacheslavovich Ivanov
University of Wisconsin, Platteville (Platteville, WI 53818-3001)
A Spiritual Revolution: the Reformation and Enlightenment in Orthodox Russia 1700–1825

Research and preparation of a book on religious reforms in the Russian Orthodox church (1700-1825).

The Reformation and Enlightenment undoubtedly stand out among the most formative events in the emergence of modern civilization. While much is known about the significance of these events in the history of Western societies, there is very little literature about their influences in Eastern Europe, and especially Russia. Among the existing body of knowledge, my monograph will be the first book to place Russia and its Orthodox Church in the context of the European Reformation and the subsequent European Enlightenment. The book will examine how Russia’s liberalizing church hierarchy and monarchs adopted Protestant and later, Enlightenment ideas to engineer radical religious and political reforms that played a fundamental role in the origins of Russia’s empire during the eighteenth century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; Intellectual History; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260283-18

Christopher J. Lee
Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)
A History of the Nighttime in 19th- and 20th- Century South Africa

Research and preparation of a book on the history of the nighttime in South Africa.

This research project addresses the history of the nighttime in South Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Its significance is that it promises to be the first such study. It aims to advance how we understand the time and place of historical change: how the night as a specific context was (and still is) a complex period of criminal danger and cultural freedom, state control and political activism, modern technology and celestial knowledge in the longue durée. Key questions that motivate this study include: what happens at night, and how have these activities changed over time; what are the uses of the nighttime, and how have perspectives on the nighttime evolved during the past two centuries; and, third, how has the nighttime itself influenced historical change, and how might it reshape South Africa’s historiography. This project argues that the nighttime has been an under-examined, yet vital, factor in the making of South African history.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260307-18

Heidi Morse
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Black Women and the Classical Traditions of Greece and Rome in 19th-Century America

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on how African American women used classical Greco-Roman traditions of rhetoric and art to promote racial equality in 19th-century America.

Teaching and Testifying asks what the thriving culture of classical Greco-Roman adaptations in nineteenth-century America meant to African Americans, and to popular conceptualizations of race, gender, and citizenship, before and after Emancipation. From schoolrooms to public lectures to art galleries, the classics were omnipresent in early Americans’ everyday lives—even as classical education operated as a social machinery of exclusion that denied access to many African Americans, especially women. This book narrates the hidden history of black classicism as a popular cultural phenomenon. I show how black women speaking in public performed embodied hybridizations of classical rhetoric and black cultural expressions that promoted racial equality and shattered the myth of white classical inheritance.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260311-18

Anne Elizabeth Dwyer
Pomona College (Claremont, CA 91711-4434)
Literary Theorist Viktor Shklovsky (1893–1984) and the Arts Policies of the Soviet Union

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Russian literary theorist Victor Shklovsky (1893-1984).

Viktor Shklovsky (1893-1984) is known as the father of Russian formalism, an intellectual movement associated with the beginnings of modern literary theory. Shklovsky wrote his main theoretical texts in the 1910s and early 1920s; formalism as such ended by the mid 1920s. But Shklovsky kept on writing and publishing prolifically. That he “accommodated himself” to the Soviet regime is a truism. But what insights might this very accommodation give us into larger cultural processes? Arts of Accommodation delves into the specific textual strategies that Shklovsky employed to become—and stay—a Soviet cultural worker who still espoused certain key tenets of his original theory, chief among them ostranenie (defamilarization). Shklovsky’s later work adds up to a latent post-formalist cultural theory, in which ideological and institutional constraints are recast as formal ones, directing attention to the mechanisms of accommodation as a structural phenomenon of Soviet culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260316-18

Amy K. Anderson
West Chester University (West Chester, PA 19383-0001)
Windows to Heaven: The Rhetorical Legacy of Byzantine Icons

Research and writing of a book on visual rhetoric and the status of icons in the 8th- and 9th-century Eastern Orthodox Church.

During the eighth and ninth centuries, the Byzantine Empire was rocked by an economic, religious, and political conflict known as Byzantine Iconoclasm. At the center of the conflict was the question of whether or not images could convey spiritual teachings in the Eastern Orthodox Christian church. The debate was settled in 843 when images were decreed equal to texts in their ability to convey religious ideas. Byzantine Iconoclasm is unique because, unlike Western Protestant-motivated iconoclasms, iconophile theology went beyond religious arguments and instead theorized the properties of texts and images. Despite Byzantine Iconoclasm’s rich insights into modality, the debate has gone largely unstudied by Western rhetoric scholars. The monograph Windows to Heaven: The Rhetorical Legacy of Byzantine Icons corrects this oversight by reframing the Iconoclasm debate as a discussion about multimodality and asking what Byzantine religious icons reveal about contemporary ways of seeing.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260324-18

Leandro Benmergui
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Purchase (Purchase, NY 10577-1402)
Vila Kennedy: The Social and Political Organization of Public Housing Residents in Argentina and Brazil, 1960-1973

No project description available

Project fields:
Area Studies; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 11/30/2018


FT-260341-18

Peter Thomas L'Official
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Urban Legends: The South Bronx in Representation and Ruin

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on post-1960 photographic, literary, and cinematic representations of urban ruin in the South Bronx, New York.

Urban Legends examines how a single place—the New York borough of the Bronx—came to define the concept of urban ruin to Americans and to the global imagination from the 1960s until the present day. For years, the words “South Bronx” were synonymous with civic neglect, urban destruction, and crime, and images of the borough’s ruins were used to proclaim the failures of urbanism. Yet, the same South Bronx also produced one of the most powerful artistic innovations of the past 50 years: hip-hop. Urban Legends excavates the broader cultural history of the Bronx—at once more intertwined, and more outwardly influential, than these two narratives have allowed. My central argument is that cultural representations of urban ruin have shaped not only how modern ideas about race and American built space are constructed, but also how these ideas continue to proliferate. These representations reveal deeper anxieties about the realities of what it means to live—and share—in any urban space.

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260355-18

James Warren Heinzen
Rowan University (Glassboro, NJ 08028-1702)
Underground Entrepreneurs and the Soviet Shadow Economy under Late Socialism, 1950s–1980s

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Soviet shadow economy during the Krushchev and Brezhnev eras (1953-1985).

Supported by new archival material and newly located interviews, this book project exploring the social and cultural history of the Soviet black market advances three important and promising fields: everyday life under “mature” Soviet socialism; the vibrant history of crime and corruption (including ethnic networks); and the interplay of ideology and the hyper-centralized planned economy. The project makes connections between four levels of analysis: law and legal history; the social dynamics of entrepreneurial activity under an authoritarian socialist regime; the complexity of ethnic networks in a modern multinational empire; and the peculiar politics of anti-corruption in a corrupt party-state. This project thus lies at the intersection of the political, the criminal, and everyday life in the final decades of the Soviet empire. The aim of this project is to conduct deep archival research to shed light on major themes in Soviet history.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260379-18

John Patrick Leary
Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
A Cultural History of the Concept of Innovation, from the 17th Century to the Present

Research and writing leading to publication of a book exploring the cultural history of the concept of innovation.

This project’s primary aim is to unearth the intellectual history of a ubiquitous concept that, in its zeal for the new, seems to have no history at all. When “innovation” was first used as a synonym for false prophecy and radical dissent in the seventeenth century, the salvation it offered was a ruse amplified by the innovator’s art of persuasion. It was not until the turn of the twentieth century that “innovation” began to shed its ties to deceit and conspiracy to become a byword for business dynamism. What was once an act of political and religious heresy became a process of material transformation. As I argue, however, innovation's enduring associations with moral and aesthetic traits like creativity and "vision" are a complex legacy, rather than a simple departure, from its long political history. Ranging from economics to literary and religious history, this project will provide this important concept with the interdisciplinary intellectual history it has thus far lacked.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 6/30/2018


FT-260387-18

Jennifer Laura Ferriss-Hill
University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2503)
The Ancient Roman Poet Horace's "Art of Poetry" and the Art of Living

Research and preparation for a book on the Ars Poetica (Art of Poetry), poem by the ancient Roman poet Horace (65-8 BCE).

Horace’s Art of Poetry and the Art of Living approaches Horace’s Ars Poetica (Art of Poetry) as a work of literature in its own right, and one that occupies a key place in the poet’s oeuvre. This 476-line poem has stood for two millennia alongside Aristotle’s Poetics as a canonical work of literary theory, taken largely as what it professes itself to be: a handbook, written under commission, for how to write drama. I argue that it should rather be read in the context of Horace’s other hexameter writings, and in particular as a companion and counterpart to his Satires. Just as throughout the Satires, his earliest poems, Horace encodes literary prescriptions into his advice on how to live well, so I contend that the Ars Poetica, thought to be his final work, may be read as a manual for how to live that masquerades as a treatise on poetics.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classical Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018