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254 matches

Program: Summer Stipends*
Date range: 2018-2020
Sort order: Award year, descending

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FT-269994-20

Hannah Weiss Muller
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Alien Invasions and Revolutionary Contagion: : The Aliens Acts, the 1790s, and the Changing Contours of Citizenship

Research for a book on British, Canadian, Caribbean, and American immigration legislation during the 1790s in response to the French Revolution.

An NEH Summer Stipend will make possible two months of archival research in London focused on reconstructing legislation passed in the British Caribbean against aliens between 1793 and 1794. This research is part of my next book project, Alien Invasions and Revolutionary Contagion, which provides the first comparative study of British, Canadian, Caribbean, and American aliens acts passed during the 1790s in response to the movements of individuals fleeing revolutionary France. The book places aliens acts in their broader context and also elucidates how international rivalries and fear of French-inspired radicalism shaped security policies, early immigration law, and citizenship practices throughout the Anglo-Atlantic world. At its broadest level, it documents a critical shift in how “aliens” and "enemies" were defined during the Age of Revolution, where political principles, rather than religious affiliation, came to distinguish “insider" from "outsider."

Project fields:
British History; History, Other; Immigration History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270008-20

Bobby J. Smith II
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Food Power Politics: Race, Civil Rights, and Food Access in the Mississippi Delta

Research and writing two chapters of a book on food politics in the Mississippi Delta during and after the civil rights movement.

Food Power Politics is the first book to analyze the interaction between oppressive and emancipatory practices of food power as exercised in the Mississippi Delta from the civil rights era to today. By documenting this dynamic, my book shifts the way we understand civil rights history and current struggles against food disparities in black communities. It offers a new line of inquiry that uncovers a neglected period of the movement when activists expanded the meaning of civil rights to address food as integral to social and economic conditions. This meaning-making process is used as a model by black communities today that mobilize around the food justice movement. By making these connections, my book shows how current concerns for food disparities in black communities are rooted in the civil rights struggle and how black communities work to create solutions to those disparities locally and nationally.

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270021-20

Peter Der Manuelian
Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
The Man who Dug the Pyramids: A Biography of American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942)

Research and writing leading to a biography of the influential American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942).

Most archaeological biography projects do not reflect the broad brushstrokes of international relations and global change. But the individual currently under study—George A. Reisner (1867–1942, Harvard AB 1889)—is exceptional in several ways. Not only did Reisner pioneer crucial aspects of modern archaeological method as we understand them today, but he did so on an international stage, as an American expatriate working primarily in Arab countries (Egypt, Sudan) dominated by British political control and a French antiquities service. His story covers nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, the birth of scientific archaeology, the history of Harvard and of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the discovery of ancient art masterpieces and their ultimate museum destinations (under the partage system), and the issues of repatriation and cultural patrimony before they became the “hot topics” they are today. It is time that Reisner’s story, and his impact on the archaeological world, was told.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270061-20

Peter Filkins
Bard College at Simon's Rock (Great Barrington, MA 01230-1978)
Translation of Das Buch gegen den Tod (The Book Against Death) by Bulgarian Novel Prize-winning Author Elias Canetti (1905-1994)

Preparation for publication of a translation with introduction and annotations of Das Buch gegen den Tod (The Book Against Death), by the Bulgarian Nobel Prize-winning author Elias Canetti (1905-1994).

Elias Canetti's Das Buch gegen den Tod (The Book Against Death) collects 47 years of his aphorisms on the meaning, nature, and consequence of death for himself and a wide variety of writers, cultures, and eras, and was first published in German in 2014. Based on the German publication, my translation will be the first in English and will be accompanied by an introduction and notes providing background on historical events, allusions to other writers, and Canetti's life and work. The result will be a volume of ca. 350 pages recording Canetti's most intimate thinking on death and life itself.

Project fields:
German Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270065-20

Scott M. Kenworthy
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Patriarch Tikhon Bellavin and the Orthodox Church in Revolutionary Russia

A biography of Patriarch Tikhon Bellavin (1865-1925), head of the Orthodox Church during the Russian Revolution.

This project will be the first complete biography of Patriarch Tikhon Bellavin (1865-1925), who became head of the Orthodox Church in the midst of the Russian Revolution and played a decisive role in guiding the Church in the face of a militantly hostile atheist regime. Based on extensive new primary sources, it follows his career in the Russian Empire and in North America before 1917, which played a formative role on Tikhon as a leader, as well as his role as head of the church from 1917 onward. Although the Soviet authorities labeled him a counter-revolutionary and repeatedly arrested him, Tikhon sought to defend the Church against the Bolsheviks’ assaults against it while at the same time was open to negotiation in a way that prepared the church for surviving in the hostile environment.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/20/2020 – 7/19/2020


FT-270094-20

Joshua Salzmann, PhD
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
The History of Gun Control in Chicago, 1968-2010

Writing an article on the history of gun control in Chicago from 1968 to 2010 for an academic journal.

My project is an article entitled, “The History of Gun Control in Chicago, 1968-2010.” Since the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Americans have been locked in a debate over gun control and the meaning of the 2nd Amendment. Perhaps no city occupies as significant a place in that debate as Chicago, which has a history of terrible violence and stringent gun laws. In 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court solidified the city’s crucial place in that debate when it issued a landmark ruling in McDonald v. Chicago, which limited American cities’ power to regulate guns. There is no academic, historical study of Chicago’s firearm laws. My article addresses this lacuna. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/15/2020


FT-270119-20

Sabrina Fuchs Abrams
SUNY Research Foundation, Empire State College (Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-4309)
The Politics of Humor during the Interwar Period: New York Women of Wit

Research and writing one chapter of a book on women’s humor in New York City, 1920–1950.

Women’s humor has been largely overlooked and undervalued, yet it offers a unique perspective in critiquing existing social structures and rethinking gender roles in American society. While there has been a recent resurgence in the role of women in comedy, this book looks back at the innovators and ground-breaking female humorists of the twentieth century. In particular, I will focus on the women of wit of the interwar period: Edna St. Vincent Millay among the Greenwich Village bohemians, Dorothy Parker among the Algonquin wits, Tess Slesinger of the Menorah Journal, Jessie Fauset and Nella Larsen among the Harlem Renaissance writers, Dawn Powell of the Lafayette circle, and Mary McCarthy among the Partisan Review crowd. Through the use of satire, irony and wit, these women were able to mask their social critique through the palliative form of laughter, and to set the stage for future generations of smart, sassy women.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/13/2020 – 9/11/2020


FT-269538-20

Roslyn E. Weiss
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
Justice in Plato's Republic: The Lessons of Book 1

Research and writing two chapters for a book about a new interpretation of Plato’s definition of justice in The Republic.

Although Socrates offers a novel definition of justice in Book 4 of Plato's Republic, it is argued that the place to learn what justice really means for Socrates in The Republic is Book 1. It is here that, through a series of conversations, Socrates teaches that conventional rules of justice, though important, are to be set aside if they lead to harmful consequences; that justice harms no one, neither friend nor foe; that justice cares for others and, in particular, for the weaker; and that the function of just government is first and foremost to encourage virtue in its citizens.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics; History of Philosophy; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269830-20

Leyla Ozgur Alhassen
Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Qur’anic Stories: God, Revelation and the Audience

Completing a book analyzing the narrative and rhetoric of the Qur’an to understand the text and its worldview.

Despite excellent comparative work on biblical and qur’anic stories and research on historical aspects of the Qur’an, there are few books that exclusively explore qur’anic narrative technique. Yet, without such an understanding, we are left with an incomplete understanding of how qur’anic stories function as narrative. My book, Qur’anic Stories: God, Revelation and the Audience, remedies this gap by developing a methodology to analyze qur’anic stories, given their dual status as narratives that are religious, and analyzes a few qur’anic stories in order to explore the Qur’an’s use of narrative technique to reinforce theological beliefs. I am applying for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer fellowship to support the revision of my book. Edinburgh University Press is considering this book for publication in the Edinburgh Studies in Classical Arabic Literature series. I am planning to revise the final manuscript, after it is sent out for peer review.

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Near and Middle Eastern Literature; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


FT-269846-20

Kevin Kenny
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Slavery and immigration, an American history (1789-1889)

Research and writing leading to a book on the interrelationship of immigration standards and slavery in federal policy, constitutional reform, and political action after the Civil War.

Immigration and slavery are separate subjects but their histories are tightly entangled. Before the Civil War, the federal government played almost no role in immigration. National laws regulating the movement of one kind of people (immigrants) would have affected the movement of others (free black and slaves). The states set their own terms for the admission, exclusion, and expulsion of foreigners, and for the movement of free blacks and enslaved persons. Only after slavery was abolished did the Supreme Court rule unequivocally that immigration was a federal matter. By this time, the Chinese were subject to the kinds of racial practices that had been used against free blacks in the antebellum era. To justify Chinese exclusion, the Supreme Court ruled in 1889 that federal authority over immigration resided in the inherent sovereignty of the nation, rather than any particular part of the Constitution. This doctrine has been the basis of U.S. immigration policy ever since.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-269853-20

Julie Walsh
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Women and Freedom in the Works of French Philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632-1705)

Writing of two chapters of a book on the metaphysical account of human freedom developed by the French philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632–1703).

My project is a book-length analysis of the view of human freedom elaborated by French philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632–1703). Largely ignored by historians of philosophy, Suchon is nevertheless one of the first Western thinkers to leave a substantial body of work devoted to developing a metaphysical account of freedom that is tied to women’s social, political and moral lives. Her key philosophical innovation was to argue that freedom for women requires that they choose what she calls “the neutral life,” foreswearing personal and professional relationships. I offer the first systematic treatment of Suchon’s philosophical system, showing how it offers new, feminist perspective on early modern treatments of human freedom. By placing Suchon in the context of feminist thought, I join the larger scholarly tradition, led by feminist historians, of giving women their proper place in intellectual history.

Project fields:
European History; Gender Studies; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-269856-20

Jon David Schaff
Northern State University (Aberdeen, SD 57401-7198)
A More Perfect Union: The Political Philosophies of Jefferson, Hamilton, and Lincoln

Writing a historical study comparing the political philosophies of Thomas Jefferson (president, 1743-1826), Alexander Hamilton (secretary of the treasury, 1757-1804), and Abraham Lincoln (president, 1809-1865).

Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton are rightly depicted as adversaries in the American founding era. Jefferson was the tribune of people and a believer in small government based in the yeoman farmer. Hamilton promoted government support for banking and industry and showed deep skepticism toward democracy. This project argues that Lincoln serves as a synthesis of Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian ideas. Lincoln's thought marries Jefferson's preference for self-sufficient labor and natural rights to Hamilton's belief in a national economic policy and skepticism of Jeffersonian populism. Looking at each statesman's views on economics, presidential power, war, the Constitution, natural rights, and populism we see that Lincoln was able to blend ideas of both founders to build better than either intended. As the nature of the founding-era conflicts still inhabit contemporary politics, we can prosper from appreciating Lincoln's fusion of the best of Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian ideas.

Project fields:
American Government; Political Theory; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2020 – 7/15/2020


FT-270170-20

Elizabeth Jane Rivlin
Clemson University (Clemson, SC 29634-0001)
Shakespeare and the American Middlebrow: Reading Publics, 1878-Present

Research and writing a history of how American individuals and organizations have engaged the plays of William Shakespeare since the late 19th century.

The premise of this book is that middlebrow institutions have led the way in disseminating Shakespeare to an expanding American reading public. Gaining momentum after the Civil War and continuing to the present day, reading programs and publishing initiatives have presented Shakespeare to American readerships, operating on the principle that reading Shakespeare can both catalyze and confirm self-improvement and cultural privilege. My thesis is that such middlebrow institutions have served as sites where the boundaries of the American public have been contested and where demands for fuller public participation by marginalized groups have repeatedly been tested. The first three chapters focus on programs that shaped the reading public around Shakespeare. The last two chapters suggest that Shakespeare’s reading public now emphasizes some of the same constituents it once excluded, demonstrating that Shakespeare’s uses are changing even as he remains a vehicle for American aspirations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies; British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


FT-270182-20

Timothy Linwood Stinson
North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
Jerusalem’s Fall and England’s Rise: Josephan History, the Prose Brut, and the Framing of a Medieval English Nation

Research and revision of an article of transcription of a medieval manuscript housed at the Cleveland Public Library.

The focus of this project is a detailed study of a medieval manuscript held in the Cleveland Public Library, MS W q091.92-C468, which is one of the most unusual medieval English manuscripts in North America, and also one that holds tremendous promise for researchers. The final goal of this project is an article that will identify and analyze the texts contained in this manuscript and argue that their careful combination was intended to frame and interpret English national history in the context of Josephan history, particularly the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD. In preserving and carefully curating unique versions of popular texts, the compiler of this book constructed a national history that posits England’s rise as a direct counterpoint to Jerusalem’s fall and deploys the destruction of Jews and Judaism as a lens through which to comprehend England’s birth and ascent as a nation.

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/8/2020 – 8/7/2020


FT-270243-20

Dana Velasco Murillo
University of California, San Diego (La Jolla, CA 92093-0013)
The Chichimeca Arc: War, Peace, and Resettlement in America’s First Borderlands, 1546-1616

Writing one chapter of a book on war and indigenous peoples in central Mexico, 1546-1616.

The war against stateless peoples (1550-1590) in America’s first borderlands—New Spain’s emerging near northern silver mining district—devastated nomadic indigenous populations (generically called Chichimecas). Traditional native hunting and foraging lands experienced intense ecological change and native men and women were killed or sold into long-term enslavement. Worn down by years of violence and deprivation, native peoples gradually submitted to Spanish rule in the late 1580s, agreeing to resettlement in reducciones (reservations) near Spanish towns. The focus on state peoples and events casts Iberians and sedentary indigenous migrants from central Mexico as the main subjects of this foundational borderlands history. This book recovers and repositions Chichimecas as central protagonists. It considers how they experienced the war, took an active role in peacemaking, responded to social reorganization in reducciones, and navigated the state’s attempts to transform their lifeways.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Latin American History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270254-20

Ingrid Nelson
Trustees of Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Ambient Media in Chaucer’s House of Fame

Research leading to a book on the way that Chaucer discusses aural and textual media such as spoken word and manuscripts in his literary texts, and the ways in which he conceptualized the circulation of media and culture.

This project is a chapter of a book-in-progress titled “Chaucer’s Premodern Media.” While medieval culture lacked the machine technologies that we associate with the term “media,” this book demonstrates that it had extensive philosophical, political, and spiritual discourses of media and mediation. The project counters a common assertion among media theorists that no media exists before the arrival of the printing press in the West. The chapter I plan to complete during the summer, “Ambient Media in Chaucer’s House of Fame,” brings together the scientific and communicative senses of “media.” Following thirteenth-century Latin translations, Aristotle’s theory of sense perception through natural media, including air, was newly available to medieval audiences. Chaucer’s poem uses Aristotle’s theories to examine how bodies and their environments generate what we now call communicative media: written words and images, but also the physical milieux that transmit texts and content.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269862-20

Grant Bollmer
North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
Measurement and Technological Inscription in the Psychology of Emotions, 1850 to the Present

Completion of a book on the history of technologies used to measure human emotions.

This project examines the history of emotions in American psychology through particular technologies used in empirical, laboratory research. It argues that psychological definitions of emotion have long been directly modified by the physical qualities of these laboratory technologies, following how, from 1850 to the present, psychological research on the emotions has confused the biology of an emotion with the physical qualities of tools psychologists use to measure emotion. The implications of this project demonstrate how “emotion” and “affect” have long been linked with how various technologies inscribe physiological signs of the human body, converting the body into data, with implications for contemporary technologies used in digital media--such as machine vision used in social media, surveillance, and security technologies--to identify internal emotions.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269883-20

Katie Johnson
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Racing the Great White Way: A Counter History of Early 20th-Century Broadway

Research and writing leading to a book about interracial collaboration in theater in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s, with analysis of performances staged on Broadway, in Harlem, in Greenwich, and in films.

I seek an NEH Summer Stipend to complete my third book, a monograph that charts a fresh account of one of the most vital moments of U.S. culture. Racing the Great White Way: a Counter History of 20th-Century Broadway shows that during a time when U.S. culture was profoundly segregated, the theatre was a site of interracial collaboration. Diverse theatre artists were integrating not only theatrical spaces, but also shaping aesthetics and cultural discourse. The project steers the reader away from the glistening lights of Broadway toward sparse performance spaces in the Village or the basement of the Public Library on 135th Street. Broadway and its adjacent spaces were not only major producers of theatre but also crucial architects of cultural work during the 1920s and 1930s. The central claim of the book is that by racing beyond Broadway, we discover not only a rich history of diverse theatrical performances, but also a powerful archive of U.S. culture transitioning to modernity.

Project fields:
African American History; American Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/26/2020 – 8/24/2020


FT-269886-20

Kimberlee Sue Moran
Rutgers University, Camden (Camden, NJ 08102-1405)
The Arch Street Project: Visualizing the Historical, Archaeological, and Bioanthropological Evidence from the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia’s Burial Ground

Development of a digital map to present the results of salvage excavations of a historic cemetery in Old City, Philadelphia.

The “Arch Street Project” is a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional effort centered around the disturbance of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia’s cemetery, also known as LaGrange Place. The aim of the Arch Street Project is two-fold: 1) to maximize the research potential of this assemblage prior to its reinterment in 2023, and 2) to set a new collaborative model of bioanthropological research through full inclusivity, meaning all disciplines are welcome and able to contribute to and inform data gathering and interpretation. This proposal aims to produce a web-based, interactive archaeological site map depicting each individual burial and all its associated data. The map will allow users to filter and query data, view spatial distributions, and generate graphs and charts. Such a tool will greatly aid in the historical, archaeological, and bioanthropological interpretation of the cemetery and its integration into the larger historical narrative of early Philadelphia.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269888-20

Kacy Kim Tillman
University of Tampa (Tampa, FL 33606-1490)
The Liberty of Loyalty during the American Revolution: Black Loyalism in the Book of Negroes

Research and writing of an article on “The Book of Negroes,” a Revolutionary War manuscript that documents Black loyalists to the British cause held at the British National Archives as part of the British Headquarters Papers, 1774–1783.

For Black loyalists during the American Revolution, loyalty meant liberty. Responding to British Proclamations that promised freedom in exchange for fealty to the Crown, three thousand Black loyalists left New York in 1783 to start new lives elsewhere at the end of the American Revolution. Their long-overlooked stories are preserved in a little-known text called “The Book of Negroes.” The few historians who have discussed this book have treated it as little more than a ledger, but I argue that it is one of the earliest and largest collections of circumatlantic Black authorship, if we just know how to interpret it. This NEH grant would support the development of a peer-reviewed article concerning Black loyalist writing as it is represented in “The Book of Negroes.” Specifically, it would fund archival research at the National Archives in Kew (UK) to access the British Headquarters Papers, 1774–1783, a collection that contains “The Book of Negroes” and its ancillary documents.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270255-20

Seth C. Bruggeman
Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
Lost on the Freedom Trail: The National Park Service and Urban Renewal in Postwar Boston

Research and writing of a book on the establishment of history parks on the model of Boston’s National Historical Park after World War II.

"Lost on the Freedom Trail" is a book project that examines the National Park Service's efforts after World War II to create history parks in American cities. At its core is the institutional history of Boston National Historic Park. Congress established this park in 1974. The NPS conceived of it as a template for all urban parks. This posed a problem, I argue, in that the template internalized the logic of Boston’s postwar urban renewal campaign, which mingled cultural heritage with profit, private investment, and racial erasure. My work demonstrates that, despite resistance from within the agency and among its stakeholders, decisions made over a half century ago in Boston about the role and purpose of history account in part for the unfortunate state of public history in the NPS today.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270257-20

Erika Marie Vause
St. John's University, New York (Queens, NY 11439-9000)
Imagining Disaster: Insurance, Citizenship, and Financial Futures in Modern France

Research for a book on the history of insurance in modern France.

I will use my funding to perform two months of research in France on a book about the social and cultural role of insurance in creating French notions of economic citizenship from the Enlightenment through the early twentieth century. The development of insurance from a little-known and frequently condemned financial tool used largely by mariners to a possible answer to France’s “social question” representing a “third way” between liberal individualism and state-dominated socialism is a story that has yet to be told. This book, which draws on previously untapped archival sources, traces the history of a broad array of financial instruments designed to mitigate risk and precarity– including agricultural, health and life insurance, retirement annuities, and savings plans – and  shows how the logic of insurance not only transformed discussions of social welfare by displacing prior ideas of fault and responsibility, but also explores the growing conceptualization of the welfare state as insurer.

Project fields:
Economic History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270269-20

Dana Tulodziecki
Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Scientific Progress without Truth: Expanding the Notion of Epistemic Success in Science

Writing one chapter of a book that will argue for a new way of thinking about scientific progress.

I seek funding to write a formative section of a book-length original research monograph, tentatively titled 'Scientific Progress without Truth', to be submitted to a major university press by the end of 2020. This book addresses the question of what makes our scientific theories so successful, despite the fact that virtually all of them turn out to be false, as is shown by the historical record. I develop a new notion of scientific progress – divorced from the traditional notion of truth – that is based on non-evidential features of actual scientific practice which, I argue, play a central role in contributing to our theories’ epistemic value.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Philosophy of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-270276-20

Thomas Ort
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Heydrich's Shadow: The History, Memory, and Meaning of an Assassination

Archival research for a book on the Czech reception history of the 1942 assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, Nazi Germany’s governor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.

The May 1942 assassination in Prague of Reinhard Heydrich—the second highest ranking official of the Nazi SS, one of the principal architects of the Final Solution, and the governor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia—was one of the boldest acts of anti-Nazi resistance in World War II. It was also one of the most controversial in that it precipitated horrific mass reprisals that led to the deaths of approximately 5,000 people. “Heydrich’s Shadow” explores the curious transformation in the Czech lands of the memory of the killing of Heydrich. Whereas in 1942 and for years thereafter the assassination was widely understood as a reckless and ill-conceived endeavor, by the 1990s it came to be celebrated as the single most important act of Czech resistance. This book project traces the surprising shifts in the interpretation of the assassination under Nazi, Communist, and liberal democratic rule, suggesting that “memory” is best understood as an unstable framework of meaning.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270278-20

Katherine Elizabeth Sorrels, PhD
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Disability, Jewishness, and Belonging: A History of the Camphill Special School Movement in Postwar Britain and America

Research for a book on the history of the Camphill Special Schools movement and its role in the international disability rights movement, including a digital, open-access social network analysis of its founder’s body of work.

My proposal is for a book manuscript and open-access digital project that address the NEH area of interest, Protecting our Cultural Heritage. I trace Jewish pediatricians and disabled children who fled Nazi Vienna for northern Scotland, where they founded an intentional community called Camphill Special School. Camphill soon grew into an international movement for disabled children and adults. Today, there are over 130 Camphill Villages around the world. Camphill’s success is due in part to the way its founders subverted medical norms in disability care: people with disabilities live with their caretakers in family-style households that stress communal learning, work and social life. I argue that Camphill conceived of a new idea of home, one that met a pressing need that neither individual households nor state institutions could meet. Based on oral history interviews and extensive archival research, I reconstruct and contextualize the moment’s history and culture.

Project fields:
European History; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2020 – 7/15/2020


FT-269893-20

John Eicher
Pennsylvania State University, The (Altoona, PA 16601-3777)
Influenza, War, and Religion in Rural Europe, 1918-1920

Researching a history of the 1918 influenza epidemic in rural Europe, investigating the social, political, and religious factors shaping responses to the medical crisis.

This book project compares the 1918 influenza pandemic’s cultural effects on rural communities in the British isles (Great Britain and Ireland) and Central Europe (Germany and Switzerland) in order to understand popular perceptions of science and religion at the end of Europe’s first total war and the beginning of western medicine’s “golden age.” My transnational and comparative framework helps us understand the pandemic through multiple lenses including (1) wartime solidarities, (2) rurality, (3) religion, and, (4) empire. I hypothesize that: 1) Interpretations of the flu varied between urban/rural contexts and across national/confessional lines. 2) Rural communities placed greater trust in local leaders than in overburdened national authorities. 3) In contrast to modern Europeans’ dependency on a welfare state, rural Europeans in 1918 had fewer expectations that governments were responsible for citizens’ health, which enhanced social stability during the crisis.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 11/30/2020


FT-269903-20

Jeehyun Lim
SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Amherst, NY 14228-2577)
Unforgetting the Korean War: Cultural Representation and Memory, 1950-2017

Writing of a chapter and related article for a book examining cultural representations of the Korean War.

The Korean War is commonly known as the “forgotten war.” Curiously, however, it was first named as such in a US News and World Report in 1951 when the war was still active. While the moniker has come to generally mean that there is scant cultural memory of the Korean War, memory is an ironic pathway to understanding the forgetting which first concurred with the unfolding of the events of war. My current book project, purposefully entitled “Unforgetting the Korean War,” comparatively examines representations of the Korean War in American literature and culture during the 1950s and the post-Cold War era to elucidate the cultural politics of memory on this war. It attempts to locate the cultural politics of the war in the very trope of forgetting by analyzing assemblies of Korean War representations—which are surprisingly numerous, varied, and noteworthy—at two high points of literary and cultural engagement with the war.

Project fields:
American Studies; East Asian Studies; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269909-20

Monica Dominguez Torres
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Pearls for the Crown: European Courtly Art and the Atlantic Pearl Trade, 1498-1728

Research and writing for a book on the history and influence of the Atlantic pearl industry on 15th-18th-century European art.

At times called the “Pearl Age,” the early modern period saw a sharp increase in the number of pearls that were fished, traded, and consumed around the globe. The discovery of rich pearling beds in the Americas, in particular, prompted the emergence in Europe of exquisite artworks featuring pearls and pearl-fishing scenes. Yet, such pieces have often been regarded as innocuous luxury items of interest only to art connoisseurs. "Pearls for the Crown" focuses on five under-studied artworks hailing from the Atlantic pearl industry in order to unveil the messages they conveyed within their geo-political contexts. Specifically, it looks at the discourses they articulated about imperial expansion and human mastery over nature, notions of great importance in courtly circles linked to the Spanish Crown. Such notions, moreover, helped legitimize the indiscriminate exploitation of natural and human resources that eventually laid out the foundations for the Anthropocene.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Hispanic American Studies; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-269921-20

Timothy J. Lombardo
University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL 36688-3053)
Beer Cities: How Craft Brewing Remade Urban America

Research for a book on the craft brewing industry’s impact on urban renewal.

This project examines the craft brewing industry's structural, cultural, and political effect on American cities. Since the 1980s, small scale, independently-owned brewing operations have acted as a catalyst for urban revitalization and cultural change. Architects and city planners have begun calling the process of craft breweries acting as beachheads for urban revival “beer urbanism.” This project seeks to historicize this process through an in-depth and comparative examination of the craft brewing industry in various U.S. cities. More than an exploration of craft brewing, this project is about cities, how they change, and for whom. In addition to situating beer urbanism in the context of recent American urban, cultural, and political history, this project also addresses broader questions about capitalism, gentrification, and unequal urban renewal.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270308-20

Katrina Daly Thompson
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
A Multi-sited Ethnography of Non-Conforming North American Muslims

Research and writing leading to an ethnographic monograph on the use of language (both Arabic and English) to create communities of nonconforming Muslims in North America.

Muslims on the Margins tells the ethnographic story of a multi-sited community coalescing around creative (re)interpretations of the Qur’an, critical questioning of taken-for-granted Muslim norms, and radical inclusion of those who are ‘queer’ in various ways. The book's humanizing, ethnographic, and sociolinguistic approach centers on the voices and interpretations of LGBT and gender-nonconforming Muslims and their allies collected over a 45-month period in North American face-to-face and international online groups that label themselves “progressive” or “inclusive.” By examining how eclectic participants form small and large-scale communities, learn and teach one another the norms of these communities, and find meaning in their practices, the book will lead to deeper understanding of Muslim diversity, overturn stereotypes that Islam and queerness are incompatible, and encourage appreciation for both similarities and differences across religious beliefs.

Project fields:
Linguistic Anthropology; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/15/2020


FT-270335-20

Amy Paris Langenberg
Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, FL 33711-4700)
The Classical Roots of Authority, Secrecy, and Violation in American Buddhism

Writing two chapters of historical context in a book about official misconduct within American Buddhism.

American Buddhists are signaling #MeToo. Numerous American Buddhist communities, including Shambhala and Against the Stream, have recently faced revelations of abuse. Grounded in the humanistic methodologies of Buddhist Studies, and informed by postcolonial feminist theory, this project critically assesses romanticized or selective readings of the Buddhist past that surface as responses to abuse. It does so not for the sake of correction but in order to understand the interpretative processes at work in American Buddhism’s #MeToo moment and to map the generative effects of scandal on American Buddhism.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Nonwestern Religion; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-270336-20

Kristen Alff
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
The Business of Property: Levantine Joint-stock Companies, Land, Law, and Capitalist Development Around the Mediterranean, 1850-1925

Writing of a book on Levantine Joint-stock Companies and the origins of capitalist development in the Middle East (1850-1925).

The Business of Property is framed by two questions: First, how did land in the Levant become commodified? Second, how was this process of commodification – with its related impetuses and impacts – related to the development of capitalism around the Mediterranean basin? I argue that prominent Beiruti families who formed joint-stock companies in the mid-nineteenth century relied on forms of sharecropping rooted in the Ottoman social formation as the most efficient techniques for local capital accumulation in the Levant. Only during the First World War did the firms’ land tenure arrangements in parts of Greater Syria and Palestine begin to take on a commodified form, making them acceptable to European buyers. Indeed, the crisis of World War I concretized processes that were already underway in the Levant from the mid-nineteenth century and transformed the shape of capitalism globally.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2020 – 8/9/2020


FT-270341-20

Sarah Louise Cowan
DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Mending Abstraction: The Work of African-American Artist Howardena Pindell (1943- )

Writing of the first book-length study of African-American curator and artist Howardena Pindell (b. 1943).

“Mending Abstraction,” examines how visual artist, activist, curator, and writer Howardena Pindell (b. 1943) confronted expectations of the 1960s and 1970s that African American artists represent themselves in their art in a literal way. I argue that Pindell investigated how questions about racial and gender difference have haunted American modernist visual art in her largely abstract practice. Through her use of handicraft and metaphors drawn from black feminist theory, she sought to “mend” abstraction, making it useful to her as an artist who had experienced de facto exclusion from the category “modernist.” The first scholarly monograph on Pindell’s groundbreaking career, this project enriches humanistic understanding of twentieth-century American culture, especially process-oriented art, by showing how artists of color have been active agents in remaking its terms.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/18/2020 – 7/17/2020


FT-270342-20

Douglas Rogers Egerton
Le Moyne College (Syracuse, NY 13214-1301)
The Ally: Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Boston Brahmin, Radical Minister, Labor Agitator, Vigilance Committee Activist, Kansas Jayhawker, Secret Six Conspirator, Feminist Essayist, Warrior, Socialist

Research for a biography of Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823-1911), artist and public intellectual of the 19th Century.

Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823-1911) has been remembered as a soldier, poet, scholar, historian, feminist, and radical. Although Higginson enjoys cameos in virtually every book written on antebellum reform, women’s rights, or the Civil War, the only complete biography was published fifty-two years ago and did not offer rigorous documentation. Drawing on archival materials housed in the Boston area, the proposed biography of Higginson will offer lay readers, students, and specialists in American literature an opportunity to appreciate this fascinating, multi-faceted man’s life. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


FT-270343-20

Yakov Klots
CUNY Research Foundation, Hunter College (New York, NY 10065-5024)
Contraband Russian Literature and the Cold War (1956-1991)

Research and writing of a book chapter on Soviet authors Andre Sinyavsky (1925-1997) and Yuli Daniel (1925-1988) and their reception within and outside of the Soviet Union in the 1960s.

As a literary practice and political institution, Russian literature published extraterritorially was as integral to the late Soviet era as official state publishing and underground circulation of manuscripts inside the country. The project is devoted to first publications and reception of twentieth-century Russian literary classics banned, censored or never submitted for publication at home but smuggled through various channels abroad and printed elsewhere, with or without their authors’ knowledge or consent. It is a pioneering study of how clandestine texts, which have since shaped the Russian literary canon, first emerged from the drawer, transgressed geographical and political borders, went into print, and were read by interpretive communities on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Political Science, Other; Russian History; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270345-20

Leigh Katherine Fought
Le Moyne College (Syracuse, NY 13214-1301)
A Biography of Sally Hemings (1773-1835): Given Her Time

On-site research at Monticello for a short biography of Sally Hemings, one of Thomas Jefferson’s most historically notable slaves.

This biography will tell the life story of Sally Hemings, the Anglo-African woman claimed by Thomas Jefferson as a slave, who was half-sister to his dead wife, mother to his five youngest children, and a member of an extensive kinship network of African Americans centered on his Monticello plantation. As such, the book will also be an introduction to race, gender, slavery, and freedom in the first fifty years of the American republic. The chapters will follow the chronology of Hemings’s life from her birth in 1773 until her death around 1835, with each focusing on a key question that has perplexed historians who have written about her. The final chapter will look at the ways she has been interpreted at the Monticello historical site and in popular culture.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 5/31/2021


FT-270353-20

Anne Boyd Rioux
University of New Orleans (New Orleans, LA 70148-0001)
A Writer's War on Fascism: Kay Boyle in Europe and America, 1933-1953

Research and writing leading to a book on the life and work of American fiction writer Kay Boyle (1902–1992).

This book will tell the story of how the American writer Kay Boyle (1902-1992) left behind modernism’s “art for art’s sake” to embrace a responsibility to document the injustices of her time. Although now largely forgotten, Boyle was among the foremost chroniclers of the twentieth century's darkest days, documenting and analyzing in her fiction the rise of Nazism in Austria in the mid-1930s, the fall of France and the internment of innocent refugees during WWII, and America's occupation of post-war Germany, which still struggled to free itself from fascism. Boyle’s fiction in the 1930s-1940s won her two O. Henry Awards for best story of the year and a contract with The New Yorker that was severed in 1953 when she was erroneously accused of being a Communist. This book will illuminate Boyle’s considerable contributions to international modernism and anti-fascist literature. Most importantly, Kay Boyle’s life and work can help us look more closely at the troubling times we now confront.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270357-20

Jordan A. Stein
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
Pequod on the Seine: Translating Melville in War and Peace

Research leading to a book on the translation and reception of the works of Herman Melville, American novelist, in France and Belgium.

Pequod on the Seine identifies and explores the networks and exchanges that made Melville’s works visible and significant to the French and European literary worlds engaged in the national conflicts of the Second World War. My study contravenes the dominant scholarly narrative of the “Melville revival” of the 1920s—the discovery and republication events thirty years after Melville’s death that rescued his novels from oblivion—showing that this story about American literature typically, and incorrectly, confines itself to the boundaries of the United States. My research corrects for the US-national focus, locating the uptake of Melville’s writings between the United States, France, and Belgium. Focusing on Melville, my study takes as its premise that even the most canonical objects for the study of US culture have both existence and afterlives beyond that culture.

Project fields:
American Literature; Comparative Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 8/15/2021


FT-270371-20

Kathleen Mary McIntyre
University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI 02881-1967)
Protestant Women and Political Activism in Mexico, 1900-1955

Research leading to a book on the political life of Protestant women in Mexico during and after the Mexican Revolution, 1900-1955.

My project examines how Protestant women conceptualized citizenship after the 1910 Mexican Revolution. I explore the interrelated themes of educational reform, sports culture, temperance, suffrage, and transnational women’s rights, as well as relations between Protestant and Catholic women. Through suffrage clubs, civic education, pan-Americanism, and temperance organizations, women contested the view that political activism was inappropriate to their sex or religion. Protestants tapped into ideas about revolutionary citizenship as they ran schools, planned evangelization events, and influenced government policy. Using their shifting relationship with the state to drive feminist issues, they carved out new roles within their families, churches, political parties and transnational organizations. Bridging the fields of women’s studies, religious studies, and history, this is the first historical work to focus on Protestant women and state formation in post-revolutionary Mexico.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-270374-20

Benjamin Gatling
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Afghan Stories of War, Migration, and Home

Research and writing two chapters of a book about the stories of displacement and migration told by Afghans living in the Washington, D.C. area.

Afghans have experienced an almost unparalleled level of social trauma in recent decades, suffering through invasions by foreign powers, years of civil war, and ongoing military efforts to create a sustainable political future. I have partnered with members of the Afghan diaspora in the greater Washington, D.C. area to collect their stories about displacement from Afghanistan, movement abroad, and emplacement in the U.S. This NEH summer stipend is to support writing a book manuscript with the data collected. Using ethnographic methodologies, the book explores how individuals who have fled Afghanistan and now live in the U.S. narrate their experiences.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/6/2020 – 7/5/2020


FT-270384-20

Michael Gibbs Hill
College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
Reading Distance: Chinese and Arabic Literatures at the End of Empire, 1850–1950

Research and writing leading to a book on intellectual and literary exchanges between Egypt and China in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

This project breaks new ground in comparative literary and cultural studies, connecting the intellectual “enlightenment” in China in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century with the “enlightenment” or “awakening” (Nahda) in Arabic-language cultural and intellectual history of the mid-nineteenth through the early twentieth century. Using materials in Chinese and Arabic—often in translation or dialogue with writings in English, French, and German—my project begins in the mid-nineteenth century, when these two intellectual and literary traditions were relatively isolated from one another, and extends to a moment in the 1940s that saw substantial exchanges among intellectuals from the Republic of China and Egypt. Through a historically and linguistically rigorous account of these developments, my project pushes the limits of the methods of global intellectual and cultural history and comparative literature.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; East Asian Literature; Near and Middle Eastern Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270390-20

Justine Howe
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)
Muslim Students and the Making of American Islam, 1963-present

Research and writing two chapters of a history of the Muslim Student Association and its role in shaping modern American Islam.

Founded in 1963, the Muslim Students’ Association has played a crucial role in shaping American Islam on a national scale. This book-length project demonstrates how the ostensibly secular American university has served as an indispensable site for the coalescence of American Muslim community and identity from the mid-twentieth century onwards. Muslim Students and the Making of American Islam closely analyzes six case studies to explore the imaginaries and strategies through which Muslim students have enacted their visions for Islam, as they negotiated their relationship to other activist projects in the U.S. and to global Muslim revivalist movements. Through these processes, I argue, the MSA made the ideal of a unified American umma (community) into a key and contested project for American Muslims writ large.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270391-20

Gregory Hamilton Williams
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Practical Aesthetics: The Object of Postwar Art and Design in West Germany

Research for a book on the impact of training in the practical arts on the development of the work of artists in post-World War II Germany.

My current book project explores the changing relationship between art and design in West Germany during the 1950s and 1960s. Previous scholarship has not sufficiently acknowledged the extent to which practical training had a visible impact on the work of West German sculptors, painters, and printmakers, including Thomas Bayrle, KP Brehmer, Imi Knoebel, Charlotte Posenenske, Peter Roehr, and Franz Erhard Walther. Vocational programs offered a starting point for a surprisingly large number of influential artists, who are recognized today for pursuing material experimentation, formal innovation, and technological exploration. The widespread postwar pedagogical transformations simultaneously looked back to the Bauhaus and projected forward as West Germany entered a period of rapid economic recovery and growth.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2021


FT-270400-20

Reiko Margarita Hillyer, PhD
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-8091)
Windows in the Walls: The Permeability of the Prison in the Twentieth Century United States

Research for a book on the permeability of the prison from the postwar period to the end of the 20th century.

The prison has become an urgent site of inquiry for scholars of the humanities, but historians of U.S. prisons have only begun to analyze the relationship of prisons to the outside world. My research demonstrates that, until recently, practices such as furlough, conjugal visits, clemency, and religious outreach rendered prisons surprisingly porous. This project is about the "thickening" of prison walls in the late 20th century U.S. and examines the invention and decline of practices that had connected people to free society. By historicizing the impermeability of the prison, I trace the increasing social isolation of prisoners as cause and consequence of punitive policies. In a moment characterized by presentism and the rapid-fire spread of information, my work provides much-needed context for a national conversation about prisons and thus contributes to the NEH’s goal of advancing civic education and embracing the humanities as a means of building “A More Perfect Union.”

Project fields:
American Government; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270410-20

Elizabeth Palmer Baltes
Coastal Carolina University (Conway, SC 29526-8428)
Portrait Statuary from the Athenian Agora Excavations

Research and writing one chapter and a catalogue of female statuary found in the ancient Athenian Agora, the city’s central meeting place.

The aim of this project is to study and publish in monograph form the full range of material remains of portrait statuary found in the Athenian Agora. A careful analysis of all identifiable fragments of portrait statue bodies and inscribed bases, together with portrait heads, busts, and herms, will generate a better understanding of the local customs and concerns that influenced Athenian portrait production from the late Classical through the Roman period. In order to reconstruct the history of portrait dedication and display in and around the Agora, this project will examine not only the artifacts themselves, but also the full range of contexts in which portrait statuary has been found. This contextual approach, which will include the use of digital technologies such as GIS and 3D modeling, will enable a fuller understanding of how the production and display of portrait statues was shaped by local Athenian history from the fourth century BC to the third century AD.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2022


FT-270411-20

Rebecca Leigh Rossen Pavkovic
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Holocaust Dances: Holocaust Representation in Contemporary Dance

Research and writing leading to a book about dances depicting the Holocaust and its history, memory and trauma, from 1960 to the present.

The Holocaust has been a major focus of film, theater, literature, and visual art. Dance has also served as a powerful forum to address the Holocaust; there have been many such works, yet there are no books on this topic. Holocaust Dances addresses this gap by examining depictions of the Shoah, history, memory, and trauma in select dances created between 1960 and the present. I will argue that dance has served as a fertile platform for making an embodied intervention into an immensely complex history of trauma and loss, intolerance and bigotry. Holocaust dances have the potential to make manifest traces of the past, nudge memorials and archives out of stasis, and involve viewers and participants in collective and performative acts of witnessing and commemoration.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; Jewish Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/20/2020 – 7/20/2020


FT-270439-20

Ryan Jeffrey Johnson
Elon University (Elon, NC 27244-9423)
Hegel’s Influence on Three Early American Philosophers

Research and writing two sections of a book on the influence of German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) on three prominent American scholars.

My book project, Three American Hegels, explores the influence of German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) on three seminal yet overlooked American philosophers: Henry C. Brokmeyer (1828-1906), Horace Williams (1858-1940), and John William Miller (1895-1978). Each of them was, in his own way, both an apprentice of Hegel and a true American original. Yet until now, their stories have been almost completely overlooked. When scholars mention their name, they are merely footnotes. It is time to change that. I will unearth this formative yet forgotten narrative of American philosophy and thus enhance the understanding of our national intellectual identity as we approach the 250th anniversary of American independence.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270444-20

Ikuko Asaka, PhD
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
The Evolution of US Imperial Engagements with Overseas Islands, from the Antebellum Era to Spanish-American War

Research for a book about United States policy and practice on the use of overseas resources during the nineteenth century.

This book project seeks to demonstrate how the United States pursued extraction of natural and human resources off of foreign islands in East Asia, the Caribbean, and South Pacific, through annexation, unequal treaties, and surveys, in the decades before the Spanish American War. Scholars have long illuminated the ways in which the United States has exploited insular land, labor, and raw materials in the forms of military bases and nuclear testing grounds as well as commercial waystations. Throughout this literature, the 1898-99 acquisition of island colonies precipitated by the Spanish American War marks the beginning of the United States’ systematic exploitation of overseas islands. By contrast, my project traces the origins of such insular imperialism back to the antebellum era and charts how US insular engagements evolved over time up to 1898-99, with an attention to the changing historical contexts that informed policy decisions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2021


FT-270445-20

Anne C. Fleming
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Household Borrowing and Bankruptcy in Jim Crow America, 1920-1960

Research for a book on household borrowing, bankruptcy, and credit relief during the Jim Crow era.

Although an extensive literature documents the history of racial disparities in home mortgage lending, we know very little about how race shaped household access to everyday forms of credit and debt relief in the first half of the twentieth century. This book project will describe and compare the experiences of black and white workers who took out personal loans or bought goods on credit in the United States during the Jim Crow era. Using previously unexamined bankruptcy court records, it will examine how urban working-class households organized their financial lives and navigated the shifting matrix of legal rules and institutions that governed credit relationships and debt forgiveness. More broadly, it seeks to explain what the practices of incurring debt and seeking debt relief revealed to these wage workers, only one or two generations removed from slavery, about the meaning of freedom and self-ownership in a modern capitalist society.

Project fields:
African American History; Economic History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270454-20

Nathan Vedal
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
The Category of Everything: Ordering and Circulating Knowledge in Early Modern China

Research leading to a book on the organization of knowledge in sixteenth- to eighteenth-century China, based on the digital analysis of reference works such as encyclopedias and dictionaries.

Research for a book on the circulation of information in 16th through 18th-century China. This study examines how early modern Chinese readers coped with an overabundance of texts and information following the 16th-century publishing boom. Drawing on a wide body of extant reference works, from encyclopedias to dictionaries, I trace the emergence of new scholarly working methods and analyze how such texts were put to use by readers. I argue that these reference works played a central role in the formation of a new relationship between author and reader that underpinned the period’s intellectual and literary activity. By shifting my analysis from the better-documented role of such works in the early modern West, I highlight practices of knowledge production that can be more broadly generalized to the early modern world. In addition this project incorporates innovative digital methods to analyze citation practices in massive encyclopedic compilations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/30/2020 – 8/29/2020


FT-270464-20

Costanza Gislon Dopfel
Saint Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA 94575-2715)
Fertile Florence: How a Demographic Disaster shaped the Italian Renaissance

Research for a book on the connection between the Black Death and the origins of the Italian Renaissance.

Fifteenth-century Florence faced an unprecedented demographic crisis, as recurrent plague epidemics shrunk the urban population from the original 110,000 citizens in 1300 to just 37,000 in 1427. Yet, as the race for repopulation seemed to intensify, so did creativity and artistic production. This project provides an alternative understanding of the early Renaissance, identifying ties between the demographic situation and the literary and artistic production of the time. Two ongoing concerns underscore the research: changes in female agency and modifications of social behavior in response to anxieties about fertility and population decline. By identifying the historical events that connect the concepts of human and intellectual fertility, it unveils the link between female reproductive duties and the iconography of childbirth, between family books and the anxiety of perpetuating the family name; between monumental state commissions and the public trauma of depopulation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Renaissance Studies; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270474-20

Patrick James Connolly
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
The Critical Edition of John Locke’s A Discourse on Miracles and Other Theological Texts

Research and writing toward a critical edition of John Locke’s (1632-1704) Discourse on Miracles and twenty short essays and notes on theological topics.

This project will complete a key volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke. Locke's writings on miracles are central to his influential philosophical and theological thought. But there is, as yet, no accurate and accessible edition of these writings. This grant will enable travel to archives to transcribe relevant Locke manuscripts, further work on the detailed General Introduction to Locke's texts, and the final organization and presentation of material in the volume.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; History of Religion; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270478-20

Lindsey Green-Simms
American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
The Art of Resistance: LGBT Cinema in Sub-Saharan Africa

Research and writing of a book on the role of LGBT cinema in Sub-Saharan Africa.

This book manuscript examines the history of LGBT cinema in sub-Saharan Africa and discusses the multi-layered forms of resistance present in the films. The project examines how films track the psychological effects of homophobic violence as well as modes of survival and loving that persist despite that violence and that are, in fact, often forged as a resistance to it.

Project fields:
African Studies; Film History and Criticism; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270511-20

Amy J. Lyford
Occidental College (Los Angeles, CA 90041-3314)
The Photography of French Surrealist Dora Maar (1907-1997)

Research and writing leading to a book on the French photographer Dora Maar (1907-1997).

I propose to conduct research on the surrealist photographer Dora Maar, a figure best known as an infrequent participant in surrealist publications of the 1930s, and as a partner of Pablo Picasso who also documented his painting Guernica. Maar’s photographic practice has been little studied to date, and I plan to write a book on her diverse photographic work: inventive portraiture and fashion photography; unsettling collage work; and politically nuanced "street" photography. Her photographs intersect with surrealist forms and methods of production but take on the power and ubiquity of commercial and documentary work; her pictures smuggle surrealism inside those conventional photographic typologies. Maar’s expressive, unflinching approach enabled her to invent a powerful visual critique of how bodies and social spaces might express alternative gender, class, and identity positions in the 1930s.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 10/31/2021


FT-270519-20

Vladimirs Trojanskis
Furman University (Greenville, SC 29613-0002)
An Empire of Refugees: Muslim Migration and the Late Ottoman State

Research and writing two chapters for a book on Muslim Refugee Resettlement in the Late Ottoman Empire (1860-1914).

Completion of research and writing for a book on Muslim refugee resettlement in the Ottoman Empire between 1860 and 1914. In the half century before World War I, over a million Muslims from Russia arrived as refugees in the Ottoman Empire. The Ottoman government resettled them throughout the empire: from the Balkans in the west, through Anatolia, to Iraq and Transjordan in the east. This book project is a social history of migration that shows how Muslim refugees transformed the late Ottoman Empire and how the Ottomans constructed a massive infrastructure to manage refugee flows. Using documents in Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and Russian, I argue that imperial support, in the form of financial aid and infrastructure, was critical for the economic success of refugee villages, which in turn proved fundamental to Ottoman political stability. By asserting the notion of an Ottoman refugee regime, the book marries Ottoman and Islamic history with global refugee and migration studies.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Near and Middle Eastern History; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-270527-20

Andrew Konove
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Making Change: Money, Wealth, and Sovereignty in Hispanic America, 1750-1850

Research leading to a book on the history of money in Spanish America during the Age of Revolutions, 1750-1850.

This project offers a new interpretation of the Age of Revolutions in Hispanic America by examining the role of money and monetary reform in the era of Spanish American independence. It follows eighteenth-century reformers’ attempts to introduce fractional currency, or small change, in colonial Spanish America in order to promote commerce and alleviate poverty. It traces those efforts through the wars for independence, when patriot and royalist armies and the new American nation-states experimented with different forms of money in order to build popular support and raise revenue for their regimes. Using published treatises of political economy, archival petitions to royal and national authorities, judicial records, and newspapers, my book project shows that Hispanic Americans saw money and monetary policy as drivers of economic development and nation building. Making Change thus reinserts the history of economic ideas into the historiography of Latin America’s independence era.

Project fields:
Economic History; Latin American History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270531-20

Kirk Melnikoff
University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)
Bookselling in Early Modern England

Archival research leading to a monograph on bookselling in early modern England.

Bringing a wide variety of print and manuscript evidence to bear, Bookselling in Early Modern England will provide the first systematic, book-length study of the shape, venues, practices, and sway of the retail side of the book trade between 1557 and 1666, from the incorporation of the Stationers’ Company to the Great Fire of London. These years featured not just the close of the Renaissance in England, an extraordinary time of social, economic, and cultural change, but also the expanding influence of the printing press as a communications technology. This project will attend to bookselling across England (not just in London but in places such as York, Oxford, Cambridge, and Norwich), and it will acknowledge agents involved in the trade that too often have been ignored such as wives, widows, itinerant sellers (e.g. chapmen and chapwomen), and merchants from a variety of different guilds.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-270538-20

Patrick Joseph Huber
University of Missouri (Rolla, MO 65409-0001)
Fiddlin’ Doc Roberts (1897-1978) and the Business of Hillbilly Music

Research and writing of a book on Doc Phillip Roberts, aka “Fiddlin’ Doc Roberts,” (1897–1978) and the history of “hillbilly music” in America.

My book chronicles the life of Doc Roberts (1897–1978), whom scholars have hailed as “the most famous and widely recorded of all Kentucky fiddlers” and as “one of the most widely heard southern fiddlers of the 1920s and early ’30s.” Far more than simply a biography, this project interrogates many of the commercial dimensions of the hillbilly music industry during its formative years using Roberts’s career as the central lens. Roberts’s remarkable collection of correspondence illuminates seldom-examined aspects of the industry’s business practices and policies, especially musicians’ relations with record company officials and music retailers. My book challenges the persistent notion of hillbilly music being essentially a rural southern folk music separate from the commercial world of capitalist imperatives and profit-driven motives. Focusing on Roberts and the financial and logistical dimensions of his career helps reveal the long-neglected business history of hillbilly music.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 10/31/2022


FT-270541-20

Xia Shi
New College of Florida (Sarasota, FL 34243-2146)
Concubines, Gender, and the Politics of the Private in Republican China, 1912-1949

Research and writing leading to a book on the status of concubines in Republican China (1912-1949) and their role in public debates about China’s past and future.

In Republican China (1912-49), the degree of public visibility that was given to concubines, a low-status category of women, was unmatched in history. Meanwhile, concubines became stigmatized as glaring symbols of the degenerate Chinese nation. This book explores this paradox by examining the controversial public presence of concubines and its multifaceted social and cultural consequences in an age when reformists had launched vehement attacks on concubinage. It argues that these women should not be evaluated as merely members of an outdated social category waiting to be eliminated but were a key group of controversial women who were often at the center of intense public debates about China’s imperial past and its Republican future. By showing how concubines’ public visibility intricately connected elite men’s private lives to national politics, the book provides new insights on how gender functioned in important yet overlooked ways in the progressive politics of the Republic.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/21/2021 – 7/20/2021


FT-270555-20

Joaquin Villanueva
Gustavus Adolphus College (St. Peter, MN 56082-1498)
Ambassadors of Empire: The Puerto Rico Planning Board and the Geography of American Capital, 1942-1960

Research for a history of the Puerto Rico Planning Board, focusing on how the program transformed the island’s landscape after World War II to attract American investment.

The project is a historical geography of Puerto Rico's postwar urban planning program. The project documents the extent to which the Puerto Rico Planning Board helped transform the island's physical landscape in order to attract American investment capital in the 1940s and 1950s. Similarly, the project tracks the PR Planning Board's international engagement across Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, a role that facilitated the entrance of American capital in those regions.

Project fields:
American Studies; Geography; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270576-20

Emily Katherine Hyde
Rowan University (Glassboro, NJ 08028-1702)
Postcolonial Modernism and the Visual Book, 1947-1968

Research and writing leading to a book on the modernist illustrations and visual imagery of postcolonial novels in English.

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the modernist visuality of postcolonial novels in English The British Empire broke apart between 1947 and 1968, and writers from newly independent countries produced a wave of fiction that wrote new nations, subjects, settings, and plots, even new kinds of English into literary history. Previous studies have overlooked the intense visuality of these works—they are packed with illustrations, rhetorical allusions to the visual arts, and descriptions of visual images. “Postcolonial Modernism and the Visual Book” examines the early years of decolonization to show that postcolonial writers in this period transformed modernism in the visual arts and used it to decolonize English literature. I study the collaboration of African, Caribbean, and British writers and artists and show how crossing disciplinary boundaries was crucial to undoing the colonial systems of knowledge and representation that underpin literary history and form.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


FT-270594-20

Bryan Sinche
University of Hartford (West Hartford, CT 06117-1599)
Published by Himself: Self Publication and Nineteenth-Century African American Literature

Research and writing of one chapter of a book on self-published writings by African Americans in the nineteenth century.

PUBLISHED BY HIMSELF blends book historical and literary critical methods to examine the extensive and significant corpus of self-published African American writing of the long nineteenth century. In PUBLISHED BY HIMSELF, I focus on the material facts of publication and underscore the significance of publication as a tool for negotiating the challenging economic world in which so many African Americans lived. Additionally, because PUBLISHED BY HIMSELF recovers and evaluates a set of writings that has escaped critical attention, it invites a new set of authors into discussions of nineteenth-century African American writing, and forces us to reconsider the economic value and signifying power of printed books, and the meanings of publication and authorship.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 7/14/2021


FT-270602-20

Sophie Esch
Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Animals and Armed Conflict in Contemporary Literature from Latin America and Africa

Writing one chapter of a book on animals and the experience of war in African and Latin American literature.

This book-length study analyzes the presence of animals in recent war and postwar narratives from Latin America and Africa, be it as companions of humans or as victims of the armed conflict, killed, wounded, displaced, or trafficked alive or as parts. My work takes up recent debates within ecocriticism, animal-human studies, and posthumanism and further expands them by discussing the presence of the non-human animal in war and postwar literature. I posit that the animal appears as both a symbol and an anchor point to reflect upon humanity and war in relation to topics such as trauma, innocence, redemption, domesticity, and agency; but I also push these questions further by asking whether the non-human animal can figure as a subject (not just an allegory) within literature and history. Reading Latin American and African literature together, my work uses a rare South-South comparative framework that adds to recently revived debates about world literature.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African Literature; Comparative Literature; Latin American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270604-20

Scott Max Edelson
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Among Towns/Along Paths: How Native Americans Imagined the Colonial South

Digital analysis of maps of the American Southeast created by Native American communities during the colonial era.

My research examines how Native Americans envisioned the American South and how this vision shaped war, trade, and diplomacy in the volatile eighteenth century. It privileges Native representations of the contested North American interior, focusing on the meanings of two indigenous maps created in the 1720s and analyzing Native diplomatic speeches transcribed by colonial officials. Through analyzing original images and texts for evidence of geographic thought and experience, visualizing research findings with geospatial digital tools, and applying insights from the cognitive sciences to understanding spatial behavior, this new study will describe how Native Americans proposed the first coherent vision of “the South” and demonstrate the significance of this vision to the formation of the United States.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270635-20

Evan Glenn Rodriguez
Idaho State University (Pocatello, ID 83201-5377)
Rivals or Relatives? Tracking Truth and Ways of Knowing among Plato and the Sophists in Classical Greece

Research leading to a book on the relationship between Plato his philosophical rivals, the Sophists (5th to 4th century BC).

My book project challenges the dominant narratives about Plato's rivalry with his sophistic contemporaries in classical Greece (5th–4th century BCE) and highlights the broader conversation on both sides that fostered new modes of inquiry in the Western tradition. It tells a more realistic story of philosophy proceeding as a structured conversation, one that is much more dialogical and inclusive than those dominant narratives suggest.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/8/2020 – 8/7/2020


FT-270660-20

Courtney Chatellier
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
American Literature and the Politics of Translation in the Age of Revolutions, 1789-1815

Revision of two chapters of a book on the influence of French texts and ideas in the early American republic.

The first book-length study of the French and Haitian revolutions’ influence on early U.S. writers, this book examines American translations and adaptations of French literature, as well as American authors’ engagements with revolutionary ideology in the form of political commentary, literary criticism, and original novels during the period 1789-1815. Whereas many studies of early American literature have examined transatlantic exchanges between Britain and the U.S., the extensive influence of French literature through translation and other literary modes has received scant attention. I argue that to form a more complete picture of early U.S. intellectual and literary history, we must consider how the American tradition defined itself in relation to the French, particularly as the French and Haitian revolutions stirred Americans’ deepest aspirations and fears for the project of democracy and the role of literature in shaping the nation’s future.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270669-20

Jeremy Fortier
City College of New York (New York, NY 10016-4309)
How Rational Does Democracy Need to Be?

Writing two to three chapters of a book about the kind of reasoning necessary for citizens in a liberal democracy.

This book manuscript deals with the following puzzle: Enlightenment and contemporary liberal thought generally share in common the notion that liberal democracy is a “rational” regime, where political decision-making is shaped by processes of reasoning and reason-giving. However, the rationalist justification of democracy is questioned by two major sources: first, by influential voices in late modern Continental political philosophy; second, by recent research in the field of American political science. On both fronts, a similar claim is made: namely, that liberal democratic political theory has failed to recognize that human beings are primarily “rationalizing” beings, rather than “reasoning” beings. I believe that political theorists need to take this claim seriously, so that we can consider with fresh eyes the question: to what extent are genuinely “rational” citizens required in order to have a properly functioning liberal democracy?

Project fields:
American Government; History of Philosophy; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270761-20

Nicholas Abbott
Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Sarkars into State: Language, Family and Politics in Early Colonial India

Research and writing leading to a book on how dynastic conflict in India fueled British colonial expansion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

My book project examines how new ideas of statehood and sovereignty emerged in eighteenth-century India; how they became critical tools for contesting gendered claims to power and property in Indian ruling families; and how they laid conceptual foundations for the British colonial state. Using understudied Persian chronicles and archival documents, my research shows how changing conceptions of statehood not only allowed male rulers to assert greater control over rival households (sarkars) and to divest female relatives of property and authority, but also helped naturalize the increasingly hegemonic British East India Company as a paramount Indian state. In so doing, the book reveals how dynastic conflict fueled colonial expansion in India and how modern notions of statehood and sovereignty abetted a global masculinization of public politics in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Project fields:
South Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270771-20

Ryan Fong
Kalamazoo College (Kalamazoo, MI 49006-3295)
Indigenous Communities, Empire, and Victorian Literature in Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, and Australia

Research and writing of a book chapter examining literary representations of early contact between Aboriginal Noongar communities and white settlers in Australia.

This book project develops an account of the wide range of Indigenous literatures that were produced across the British empire during the nineteenth century. Working across multiple colonial sites—including Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, and Australia—the book not only shows how Indigenous communities survived and persisted within the violent systems of colonial settlement, but also how they produced forms of writing and expression that resisted and rejected those oppressive structures. Throughout the book’s analyses, I center frameworks that developed within these Indigenous communities to inform a method of reading that decolonizes the approaches typically used within Victorian literary studies, which tend to prioritize Britain and works by white British and emigrant writers. In so doing, the book develops an understanding of literature and empire within the Victorian period that attends to those voices and perspectives most affected and marginalized by British colonialism.

Project fields:
British Literature; Literary Criticism; Literature, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-270775-20

Brian Michael Murphy
Bennington College (Bennington, VT 05201-6004)
Preserving Data in America, from the Depression to the Digital Age

Completion of a cultural history of America’s obsession with permanent data preservation.

"Preserving Data in America, from the Depression to the Digital Age" is a book-length project that traces the emergence and growth of Americans' obsession with preserving data over the past century. From the first "permanent" time capsules in the 1930s, to the three million data centers located in the United States today, an ever-expanding "data complex" preserves data on paper documents, microfilm reels, hard drives, magnetic tape, and even digital code written in DNA. The data complex has intensified in response to three major national crises: the economic instability of the Depression, the threat of nuclear attack during the Cold War, and the rise of environmentally unsustainable digital media in the time of climate change. This project marshals extensive archival research, and draws upon recent work in both Media Studies and American Studies to explain why efforts to preserve data do not produce the relief from anxiety they promise, but instead provoke more preservation.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270779-20

Jennifer Anne Fraser
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1057)
A Digital Humanities Project: Song in the Sumatran Highlands

Preparation for digital publication of a multi-media resource about the music and culture of saluang, a song tradition from West Sumatra, Indonesia.

Song in the Sumatran Highlands is a digital humanities project that reimagines the ways ethnomusicologists share research and moves us closer to the sensorial worlds of performance. I will build an interactive website that is rich in multimedia, explanatory and interpretive text, annotated song texts, visualizations, and maps in order to model the sonic, visual, and spatial epistemologies of saluang, a West Sumatran vocal genre. It will map, for example, the sonic manifestations of place through tagging song titles, landmarks referenced in song texts, performers, and performances with geospatial metadata. Key to the design of the project is representing ethnomusicological knowledge in formats more accessible to the public, including the later creation of a parallel site in Indonesian. This grant will allow me to construct the structural and technical scaffolding of the site, including creating pages for each song, performer, and place.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270783-20

Abigail Santamaria
CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
I Am Meg: The Life of American Author Madeleine L'Engle (1918-2007)

Research and writing leading to a literary biography of the American writer Madeleine L’Engle (1918–2007).

My narrative literary biography of Madeleine L’Engle (1918–2007) is the first fully-sourced adult life of one of the most beloved, prolific, and honored writers of twentieth century American letters. Author of nearly 60 books across genres, L’Engle received a National Book Award, the National Humanities Medal, and 17 honorary doctorates, among other recognitions. She will always be best known, however, for her 1963 Newbery Medal-winning classic, A Wrinkle in Time—the iconic novel that changed the lives of generations of readers and transformed the landscape of possibility for women writers and female protagonists. With that book and its sequels, L’Engle shattered the science fiction glass ceiling, influencing and making way for major women authors to come: Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, and J.K. Rowling, to name just a few. Under contract with Farrar, Straus & Giroux, my biography benefits from exclusive access to private correspondence, journals, and unpublished manuscripts.

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/30/2020


FT-270789-20

Adriana Mariel Brodsky
St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001)
Jewish Argentine Youth, 1940-1976

Writing leading to the completion of a book on the history of Jewish youth in Argentina between 1940 and 1976.

My book project seeks to respond to these simple questions: Why did young Jewish men and women who spoke of the nation in which they lived as the land of freedom and opportunity begin to prepare for a new life in Israel after its creation? How did young people’s commitment to the existence of Israel, even when deciding not to live there, bring about concrete changes to Jewish life in the Americas? In particular, my book focuses on young Jewish Argentines as they responded to calls made by community leaders to ensure the survival of the Jewish people in the face of the Holocaust; their involvement in Zionist institutions, however, did not preclude them from also addressing Jewish life in the diaspora and the need to introduce changes in communal organizations to avoid assimilation. Through their activism, then, they helped shape an understanding of Zionism that focused not only on moving to Israel after its creation, but on rooting themselves to their nations as well.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/10/2020 – 7/9/2020


FT-270791-20

John Hay
Board of Regents Nevada System of Higher Education (Las Vegas, NV 89154-9900)
The First Person in America: The Identity of the Narrator in the Nineteenth-Century U.S. Novel

Writing four chapters of a book on the evolution of the narrator in nineteenth-century American fiction.

This is a book-length project in American literary history that examines narrative strategies in nineteenth-century U.S. novels. Throughout the 1800s, virtually all long works of fiction by American writers featured first-person narration—an “I” or a “we” telling the tale to the reader. But by the early years of the twentieth century, an impersonal or “third-person” style of narration had become the norm, and the appearance of the first-person “I” was deemed an offensive authorial intrusion. Reading nineteenth-century American novelists as members of a single family allows me to portray these narrative techniques as a social project, developed among a community of readers and writers, rather than as a series of isolated individual discoveries. “The First Person in America” presents a literary history that connects the early preoccupation with a democratic or private interiority, with the later development of an imperial or corporate self. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/11/2020 – 7/10/2020


FT-270794-20

Jonathan Den Hartog
Samford University (Birmingham, AL 35229-0001)
John Jay's Statesmanship: Diplomacy, the Law, and Education

Writing three chapters of a political and intellectual biography of John Jay (1745-1829), Secretary of State and first Chief Justice of the United States.

John Jay (1745-1829) of New York is one of the most consequential, yet under-appreciated members of the American founding generation. His greatest contribution lay in his demonstration of statesmanship at critical moments for the new nation—when it was trying to secure independence, when it was considering the proposed 1787 Constitution, when it needed a framework for a judiciary, and when it demanded strategic diplomacy for world affairs. A 2020 NEH Summer Stipend will enable me to make significant progress on my in-progress book manuscript, titled John Jay: Founding Statesman. The drafting of three chapters (on Jay’s diplomacy, the significance of the law for him, and his formative education) during the summer of 2020 will enable me to complete the entire manuscript by the following year. This project uniquely meets the NEH’s call for projects related to American independence and contributing to civic understanding and education.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-270797-20

Dov Yehuda Weiss
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Rabbinic Inferno: Hell and Salvation in Classical Judaism

Writing a chapter of a book on Jewish understandings of hell and the afterlife in the classical rabbinic era (70-700 CE).

In 1885, the leading Rabbis of American Reform Judaism declared that “we reject as ideas not rooted in Judaism, the belief … [in] Gehenna (hell).” As a Google search of the words “Judaism” and “hell” reveal, there is a widespread assumption today that traditional Judaism rejects the existence of fiery torments in the afterlife. Arguing that these attitudes misrepresent the history of Judaism, Rabbinic Inferno: Hell in Classical Judaism produces the first scholarly book on afterlife retribution in the rabbinic era (70-700 CE). Rather than absent in classical Jewish discourse, or occupying its periphery, hell played a central role in classical Jewish literature and culture. Rabbinic Inferno uses ancient Jewish discourse about hell -- as it emerges in rabbinic biblical interpretation -- to unearth the distinctive anxieties, values, aesthetics, fantasies, and hopes within classical Jewish culture. Without such analysis, our understanding of Judaism remains incomplete.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-270803-20

Mary Elizabeth Walters
Kansas State University (Manhattan, KS 66506-0100)
Hospitality is the Law of the Mountains: The 1999 Kosovo Refugee Crisis in Albania

Research and writing for completion of a book on the 1999 Kosovo Refugee Crisis in Albania

This project is the first historical account of the 1999 Kosovo Refugee Crisis. It focuses on the actions of the U.S. military and Albanians and how their efforts combined to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe. The U.S. military’s approach was utilitarian and centered on logistics. Over the period of the crisis, however, military personnel came to know both Kosovar refugees and surrounding Albanian communities and adjusted their approach to better fit the needs of refugees and communities. Albanian communities and local governments, meanwhile, turned to the historic concept of mikpritja (hospitality) to understand why and how to help the Kosovar refugees, ultimately motivating Albanian families to shelter sixty-six percent of all refugees. This study provides insight into two very different approaches to mass migration and, as a result, gestures towards the rich potential of looking beyond the standard narratives of humanitarian aid and refugee assistance.

Project fields:
European History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/17/2021 – 4/30/2021


FT-270804-20

Sonja G. Anderson, PhD
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)
Idolatry and the Invention of Biblical Religion

Research and writing two chapters of a book on conceptions of and discussions about idolatry in the early Christian era (to 500 AD).

When early Christians railed against “idolatry,” what did they mean? What did they think idolaters believed, why did they think idolaters did what they supposedly did, and how did they think idolaters differed from Christians? I argue that ancient idolatry polemic produced both the idols spoken of and several assumptions that still govern modern Biblical Studies: that something called “biblical religion” existed; that the Bible contains a single, clear concept of idolatry; that idolatry is only about the erroneous treatment of images; and that ancient Jewish and Christian worship was scrupulously observant of the second commandment. A close reading of ancient Jewish, Christian, and “pagan” texts, however, shows that these assumptions are as misleading as they are intuitive. The project I propose here is to draft two new chapters (on “biblical religion” and early Christian worship) to orient what will become my first book, "Idol Talk: False Worship in the Early Christian World."

Project fields:
Ancient Literature; Comparative Religion; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270820-20

Ruth Elizabeth Toulson
Maryland Institute College of Art (Baltimore, MD 21217-4191)
Design for Death: Sustainable Disposition in the 21st Century Metropolis

Research for a book on urban planning and burial practices in five cities around the world.

The corpse has an afterlife: dead bodies live on, not merely as souls, ancestors, or memories, but in their materiality. They take up space in graves set aside in perpetuity, seep formaldehyde into the water supply, and release carbon monoxide into the air. The problem of what to do with corpses is pressing: in the next decade, multiple world cities will run out of room for the dead. This project, Design for Death: Sustainable Disposition in the 21st Century Metropolis, examines solutions to the problem of the dead body’s afterlife in five major world cities: New York, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Jerusalem, and Istanbul. Existing scholarship on sustainable disposition has focused largely on Christian and Euro-American contexts; in contrast the project takes a comparative, cross-cultural approach, articulating that spaces for the dead present not only planning challenges but spaces for ritual and remembrance.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Social Sciences, General; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270822-20

Michael Everett Brumbaugh
Tulane University (New Orleans, LA 70118-5698)
Plato and the Guaraní Republics of Colonial Paraguay

Writing a chapter of a book on an 18th-century Latin treatise comparing indigenous societies of colonial Paraguay to Plato’s Republic.

Completion of a monograph on the indigenous communities of colonial Paraguay widely seen to have been modeled on Plato’s ideal state. My project offers a study of an eighteenth-century Latin treatise by José Manuel Peramás comparing the Guaraní communities in the Jesuit Province of Paraguay with the ideal state described by Plato in the Republic and the Laws. Virtually unknown to scholars of Latin America or antiquity, this treatise provides a detailed account of the impact ancient political thought had on how Europeans approached the Americas on both a conceptual and practical level. In contrast to the bulk of what is known about how classical legacies influenced early modern colonialism, Peramás draws on his own experience living among the Guaraní to offer a rebuttal to European visions of both antiquity and the Americas. My project demonstrates that this treatise is not merely an antiquarian curiosity, but rather a serious attempt to intervene in a European political discourse.

Project fields:
Classics; European History; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270826-20

Michael Stevens Leese
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Institutions and Economic Development in Ancient Greece

Research and writing an economic history of ancient Greece, focused on the impact of developing political and cultural institutions.

Economic history is still largely built upon assumptions of a stark dichotomy between the irrational behavior and mentality of premodern individuals and the rationality of the modern West. My project builds upon the conclusions of my first book which overturns the idea of an irrational ancient Greek economy, and makes a case for turning our attention away from theories of psychological differences between the ancient and modern economies and towards institutional factors. Institutional problems such as the lack of effective property rights enforcement for commercial and financial capital and the absence of corporate institutions in the ancient Greek world can explain many of the differences between the ancient and modern economy that scholars have traditionally attributed to a new, rational mentality in the modern West. My study challenges widely-held notions of modernity, and therefore has important implications for scholars in anthropology, classics, economics, and philosophy.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Classical History; Economic History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270858-20

Louise Siddons
Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, OK 74078-1016)
The Visual Politics of Navajo Sovereignty: The Work of American Photographer and Artist Laura Gilpin (1891-1979)

Completion of a book on American photographer Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), documenter of the American southwest and Navajo life and culture.

My book manuscript, "Good Pictures are a Strong Weapon," analyzes the role prominent modernist photographer Laura Gilpin (1891-1979) played in documenting and interpreting Navajo (Diné) sovereignty for white audiences at midcentury, comparing it with the work of Diné artists engaged in discussions of Navajo cultural and political sovereignty today. Gilpin moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1945, prompted by personal as well as professional considerations, as the city was a center for lesbian as well as Indigenous culture in the Southwest. By the 1940s, Gilpin had established herself in photographic circles as an authority on the prototypically modern southwestern landscape, and on the people and material culture of the Pueblo and Navajo nations that surrounded her. Gilpin had begun working on the Navajo Nation when her partner, Elizabeth Forster, accepted a job there in 1931. She subsequently spent over three decades developing her 1968 book, The Enduring Navaho.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Native American Studies; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2020 – 7/14/2020


FT-270860-20

Maria Massi Dakake
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
The Qur'an Commentary of Muslim Scholar Nusrat Amin (1886-1983)

Research on and translation of the Qur’anic commentary of Iranian scholar Nusrat Amin (1886–1983), leading to a book-length study of her writing.

The aim of this project is the production of a book-length study and selective translation of the only known, complete work of Qur'an commentary produced by a Muslim female scholar, Nusrat Amin's Makhzan-i `Irfan (Treasury of True Knowledge). Nusrat Amin (1886-1983) was a religious scholar and authority in Iran, and is well known for her conservative religious views, but also her great erudition, and her mystical approach to the Islamic scripture. A critical study, selective translation, and annotation of this work will make an important contribution to the larger project of bringing Muslim women’s voices into the discussion about Islam and its traditional texts, and contribute to a growing body of scholarship in the field of Islamic and feminist studies that seeks to nuance the understanding of women’s agency within conservative Muslim contexts.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/25/2020 – 8/25/2020


FT-270878-20

Sreenjaya Ria Banerjee
CUNY Research Foundation, Stella and Charles Guttman Community College (New York, NY 10018-2602)
British Modernist Fiction and Spatiality

Research and writing of the conclusion for a book on metaphors of spatiality in modernist fiction, looking at the work of E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, and T. S. Eliot’s discussions of “space and place.”

I am applying for an NEH Summer Stipend to support full time work over July-August 2020 to complete my book, Drafty Houses: Modernist Fiction and Spatiality. This book project grew out of dissertation research and has matured substantially in the last five years as I have presented sections of my argument in competitive academic venues. With NEH support, I will complete revisions and submit the manuscript to the three academic presses currently interested in the project based on my proposal (completed Summer 2018). Drafty Houses considers literary setting to be of primary importance, and studies how three well-known authors used descriptions of space and place in their works to “talk back” to larger debates about modern social organization and nationhood.

Project fields:
British Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270886-20

Ashley Parcells
Jacksonville University (Jacksonville, FL 32211-3394)
Ethnicity, State-Building, and the Making of Apartheid, ca. 1951 to 1994.

To complete interviews and two chapters for a book on apartheid and sovereignty in KwaZulu, South Africa (1951-1994).

This project examines how sovereignty was refashioned around ethnic identity in apartheid South Africa. In the face of global decolonization, the apartheid state sought to create ethnically defined “homelands,” or bantustans, that could be portrayed internationally and domestically as “independent” nation-states. This book explores how KwaZulu, the homeland for “Zulus,” came to include populations that never recognized the Zulu monarchy before colonialism. Rather than solely focusing on the actions of the central state, this project shows in detail how white officials, royal family members, and prominent Zulu leaders negotiated the project of bantustan “state building” and the codification of legal boundaries of Zulu ethnicity. It also explores how people in KwaZulu's multi-ethnic borderlands navigated apartheid's regime of ethnically-defined homeland citizenship.

Project fields:
African History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270892-20

Sarah Beth Rowley
DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Congresswomen, Gender, and Political Culture in the 1970s

Research and writing one chapter of a book about the political careers of five women who first won their congressional seats at the 1972 election.

After the 1972 election, a headline announced, “There’s a New Breed of Woman on the Hill!” Five new congresswomen--all lawyers, all running on independent, professional records-- joined a growing cohort in the House. Four of the new representatives were liberal Democrats and feminists: Patricia Schroeder (CO), Barbara Jordan (TX), Elizabeth Holtzman (NY), and Yvonne Burke (CA). Marjorie Holt (MD) was the lone conservative Republican. "Congresswomen, Gender, and Political Culture in the 1970s" takes these five figures as jumping-off points to consider how gender operated in the political culture across party lines. I argue that this “new breed” changed Washington’s institutions, challenged masculinist ideas of leadership, shaped political realignment, and participated in cultural debates about women’s social roles, particularly in combining work and motherhood. Questions of gender shaped both the new conservatism and a redefined liberalism in an era of transformation.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/25/2021 – 7/23/2021


FT-270901-20

Alison Noel Altstatt
University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0001)
Wilton Abbey in Procession: Religious Women’s Music and Ritual in the Thirteenth-century Wilton Processional

Research and writing leading to a book about the 13th-century musical and literary culture at Wilton Abbey in England, based on study and analysis of recently rediscovered leaves of a medieval manuscript.

The proposed book is an interdisciplinary musicological study of the Wilton processional: a thirteenth-century musical manuscript from the women’s house of Wilton Abbey. This manuscript was known only from a nineteenth-century copy until my discovery in 2015 that the book had been broken and sold by American manuscript scholar and dealer Otto F. Ege. To date, 41 of 165 original leaves have been identified: primary sources of Wilton’s ritual, musical, and literary life. This study will enhance our understanding of the cultural practices of an institution that educated English noblewomen for over six hundred years. It will contribute to the fields of musicology, liturgy, history, literature, drama, and manuscript studies. The book also includes a full-text digital inventory of the manuscript’s contents. This project is significant to the humanities as a case study in the intellectual and artistic culture of religious women in the Middle Ages.

Project fields:
Medieval History; Medieval Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


FT-270903-20

Richard Hamilton Armstrong
University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Theory and Theatricality in the Early Work of Sigmund Freud

Research and writing three chapters of a book on the influence of Greek tragedy on psychologist Sigmund Freud’s ideas.

I am completing a book under contract with Oxford UP’s series Classics in Theory that discusses the influence of theatricality on the early psychoanalytic work of Sigmund Freud. The study details the relationship between dramatic performance in Paris and Vienna in the fin de siècle and the scientific milieu in which Freud trained and worked, with particular focus on Freud’s formulation of cathartic therapy and the theory of the Oedipus complex. In detailing the cultural influences and performance practices on the science of the time, this work is both a contribution to classical reception studies (specifically of Sophoclean drama and Aristotelian catharsis) and the Medical Humanities. It combines scholarship on the stage practices of Paris and Vienna with new work on the performativity of hysteria at the Salpêtrière clinic where Freud trained, and outlines in detail the direction Freud’s work took as he veered towards his distinctive form of treatment and psychological theory.

Project fields:
Classics; Comparative Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270915-20

Katherine M. Bentz
St. Anselm College (Manchester, NH 03102-1310)
Prelates, Health and the Villa in Early Modern Rome, 1550-1620

Research and writing leading to a book on how concerns about health influenced the conception and design of gardens in country villas near Rome during the 16th and 17th centuries.

“Prelates, Health and the Villa in Early Modern Rome, 1550-1620” examines sumptuous villa gardens built by popes and cardinals during the seemingly austere period of the Counter-Reformation. While elaborate gardens provided prelates with luxury and prestige, they also served as places for the salubrious recreation and exercise considered essential for healthy living. Maintaining good health was a political imperative for these churchmen, for disease could threaten the very stability of the Church. By exploring the culture of preventative medicine in early modern society, I show how ideas about health and hygiene shaped villa design and use. I thus offer new conclusions about the crucial role gardens played in Roman and Italian society, and a new perspective on how early modern society conceived of the relationship between their bodies and the environment. The NEH Summer Stipend will support the completion of a chapter of this project during a critical moment in its development.

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-270917-20

Ashley Wright
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Gender, Law and Colonial Rule in British India and Burma, 1858-1915

Research and writing leading to a book analyzing legal conflicts in colonial India and Burma that involved women displaced by the expansion of British imperial power between 1858 and World War I.

This project analyzes a series of legal conflicts in colonial India and Burma, occurring between the beginning of direct British rule in India in 1858 and the First World War. Each conflict involved the imperial regime and women who were, in different ways, displaced by the forces of empire: ‘orphans’ from an Irish Catholic military family in North India, a Bengali indentured labourer in Assam, ‘European’ barmaids working in Rangoon and Calcutta at the turn of the century, a Malay Muslim mother and daughter in Burma, and a Burmese woman married to a Chinese man in colonial Rangoon. In every case, the life circumstances of the woman or women involved in the conflict were shaped by the migrations that accompanied the expansion of British imperial power. I analyse these legal conflicts to show what each one reveals about the social world of the woman at its centre and about the nature of imperial governance in India and Burma.

Project fields:
British History; South Asian History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 7/15/2021


FT-270920-20

Leah Vonderheide
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1057)
Cinema of Indigenous Maori Filmmaker and Actress Merata Mita (1942-2010)

Research and writing leading to a book about Maori filmmaker Merata Mita (1942-2010) and her film and television work in New Zealand over three decades, from the context of global cinema and feminist film practice.

Maori filmmaker Merata Mita was a leader in the film and television industry of Aotearoa New Zealand (and beyond) for over three decades. This project considers her body of work in its entirety, revisiting her groundbreaking documentaries such as Bastion Point and Patu!, and connecting the filmmaker’s cinema to her later works on self-determination and social justice. Exploring Mita’s myriad on-screen roles alongside her early collaborative projects, this study also considers why, and demonstrates how, some of Mita’s contributions to the global cinema of Indigenous Peoples – often deemed the “fourth cinema” – are overlooked. By acknowledging the role of “women’s work” in the film and media industries worldwide, and engaging the canon of fourth cinema as a mode of exhibition as well as a category of production, this project argues that not only are Mita’s works a reflection of the core values of Maori culture, they also contribute to a growing feminist fourth cinema.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270934-20

Helen Jin Kim
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Transpacific Piety and Politics: Cold War South Korea and the Rise of American Evangelicalism

Research for a book on evangelical Christianity and politics in South Korea and the United States after the Korean War.

I recast the history of US evangelicalism and conservatism through an overdue and innovative Pacific-facing framework, from the Korean War to the rise of Reagan. In the 1950s, US fundamentalists insisted on Christianity’s global expansion, in spite of the critiques of modernism, colonialism, and communism. At this time, South Koreans preachers, politicians, military officials, martyrs, widows, and orphans were indispensable for the transpacific re-birth of US evangelicalism. As the lesser ally, South Koreans were the objects of US Orientalist fears and desires. At the same time, South Koreans used these alliances to reimagine their own place in the world order, for they aspired to replace the US as the leaders of Christian empire. These non-state transpacific alliances ultimately foreshadowed the rise of the Christian Right in the US and South Korea. Given ongoing attention to the two Koreas as well as the role of US evangelicals in politics, this is a timely history.

Project fields:
East Asian History; Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


FT-270942-20

Gregory Duff Morton
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Return from the World: Stories of Leaving Economic Growth Behind in Northeastern Brazil

Research and writing of a chapter for a book on why migrant laborers in northeast Brazil choose to leave their higher-paying urban jobs and return to their rural homes.

This project investigates the everyday meanings of economic growth during Brazil’s cycle of boom and bust at the dawn of the 21st century. Through ethnography and archival research, the project focuses on two Northeastern villages. A stream of migrants came back to these villages during the boom years, turning down the rising urban wages and returning to live below the poverty level as subsistence farmers. Why did these migrants move away from growth? Their exodus illuminates a core dilemma for development: people can experience growth as a loss of freedom. The manuscript pays attention to migrants as they debate the importance of growth in their lives. I consider their phone calls home, their bus rides back, the money they remit, and the houses they build. Return from the World thus strives to understand growth through the stories told by those who leave it behind. In so doing, the manuscript builds an argument about the limits and possibilities of contemporary economic freedom.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Economics; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270969-20

John Hoover Burns
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Translation of Ave Soul by Peruvian Poet Jorge Pimentel (1944- )

Research, writing, and translating a book of poetry by Peruvian poet Jorge Pimentel (1944- ).

Translation from Spanish into English of a powerful and original book of poetry titled Ave Soul (1973) by Peruvian poet Jorge Pimentel (Lima, 1944- ). A sweeping, lyrical meditation on human bonds in times of tumult, this book is a poetic consideration of the urban experience. Full of insights into Peruvian culture, Ave Soul poses questions and posits answers on the matter of what it means to inhabit a city: to leave it, to return to it, to experience its evolution and contribute to its culture. This translation project includes an introduction of approximately ten-thousand words in length to help the interested English-language reader to situate Pimentel’s work in the traditions to which he belongs, including the neo-avant-garde group known as Hora Zero, of which Pimentel was a co-founder. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Latin American Literature; Spanish Language

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270974-20

Sharon M. Quinsaat, PhD
Grinnell College (Grinnell, IA 50112-2227)
The Active Diaspora: How Protest Forges Transnational Filipino Communities

Research for a book on the development of the Filipino diaspora in the United States and Europe, as a case study to understand how diasporas evolve.

The proposed project is the completion of data gathering for a chapter in the book manuscript "The Active Diaspora: How Protest Forges Transnational Filipino Communities." The book argues that diasporas are outcomes of transnational activism. Using the NEH Summer Stipend Grant, I will travel to the Netherlands to undertake life history interviews with five multigenerational families to understand the experience of homecoming and the meaning of "return" among migrants. The project shows the role of collective storytelling in interrogating, imagining, and performing belonging to the Philippine nation-state. The documentation of stories allows us to think of migrant and refugee communities as active producers of knowledge and not just objects of study. Preserving these narratives is the bedrock of future research on underrepresented groups, especially as they simultaneously validate and disrupt dominant narratives.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; International Studies; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270983-20

Steven Emmett Harris
University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, VA 22401-5300)
Flying Aeroflot: A History of the Soviet Union in the Jet Age

Research and writing of two chapters for a book on the history of the Soviet airline Aeroflot.

My book project, “Flying Aeroflot,” uses commercial aviation to rethink how Soviet state and society evolved from the end of World War II to the communist system’s collapse in 1991. Aeroflot’s dramatic growth from an undeveloped sector under Stalin to the “world’s largest airline” under Brezhnev tells the broader but still little understood story of the Soviet Union’s postwar transformation from an inward-looking terror state focused on industrial production to a superpower that wagered its legitimacy on fulfilling consumer needs at home and establishing a formidable global presence abroad. By examining Aeroflot as a microcosm of the Soviet system, my project explains the country’s broader, sustained growth in the postwar era as the result of the state’s successful attempts to create a consumer-oriented, but not consumer-driven economy, propelled by technological development, global expansion, and the legitimizing discourse of Marxist-Leninist ideology.

Project fields:
Cultural History; International Studies; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 7/15/2021


FT-270682-20

Julia Alice Sienkewicz
Roanoke College (Salem, VA 24153-3794)
Form in Transit and Translation: Sculptural Embodiments of Union, Disunion, and White Empire, 1836-1865

Research leading to a book on three sculptors who competed for a commission at the U.S. Capitol building in 1836.

This monograph project focuses on the sculpture of Horatio Greenough, Luigi Persico, and Ferdinand Pettrich. These three sculptors—the first born in the United States, the second in Southern Italy, and the third in Dresden—gathered at the United States Capitol in 1836, each intent on securing a federal commission. The story of the resulting monumental sculptures, commissioned from Greenough and Persico, is well known. In “Form in Transit and Translation,” though, I relocate these sculptures out of the familiar national context and into a complex network of transnational art, aesthetics, and politics. The project considers ideal sculptural bodies as agents of political union and white supremacy—concepts with equal appeal in Italy during the Risorgimento and in the United States leading up to the Civil War. Understanding the transnational iconography of these ideal neoclassical bodies permits a deeper exploration of white hegemony as an artistic force in both Europe and America.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270692-20

Anat Schechtman
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Non-Quantitative Notions of Infinity in 17th Century Philosophy

Writing two chapters of a book on the concept of infinity in the writings of philosophers of the 17th century.

Relatively little attention has been devoted to the study of important, yet often overlooked, non-quantitative notions of infinity in 17th century philosophy, in contrast to the considerable attention devoted to treatments of infinity in quantitative contexts in the period, especially in mathematics and physics. My project aims to fill the lacuna left by such previous studies. One of its main innovations is that it will examine non-quantitative notions of infinity in the early modern period alongside quantitative notions, and clarify how they are different. The intended final product of the fellowship is a book manuscript, which is under contract with Oxford University Press. I anticipate that it will reshape the existing debate on infinity in medieval and early modern philosophy, and will be an invaluable resource for scholars and graduate students working in these fields.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Metaphysics; Philosophy of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270711-20

Jessica R. Waggoner
University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Race, Gender and the Roots of Disability Consciousness, 1900-1950

Research and writing of an introduction and one chapter of a book on disability consciousness in American culture before 1950.

An interdisciplinary archival project, Crip Activisms will be the first monograph to establish the relationship between U.S. cultural production and early disability social movements. Using a historicist lens, I propose that current scholarship overlooks early disability activism, especially by disabled women, queer people, and people of color, due in part to the assumption that collective disabled self-advocacy did not begin until the 1960s. Crip Activisms, however, uncovers criticism of eugenics and rehabilitation discourses within artistic and activist production by and about marginalized, non-veteran people with disabilities. I argue that many of these critiques were manifested through cultural production in the first half of the twentieth century—therefore providing alternative representations of disability that display multivalent responses to ableism.

Project fields:
American Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/30/2020 – 8/30/2020


FT-270715-20

Sarah Nelson
Regents of the University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)
The Correspondence of Italian-French Noblewoman Marie Mancini (1639-1715): A Digital Edition

Research and writing leading to digital publication of the transcriptions, translations, and annotations of approximately 25 letters written by Italo-French noblewoman Marie Mancini (1639-1715) as well as the creation of the project website.

Creation of a public website containing my transcriptions, translations, and annotations of 20-25 letters by Marie Mancini (1639-1715), as well as an analytical introduction. Mancini’s correspondence offers a window on the conditions of early modern women’s lives that other famous women letter-writers of the age do not provide, because Mancini also published a memoir. I produced the only modern English edition of her memoir, including extensive annotation. The comparison of her public and private writing allows analysis of her conscious fashioning of a public image and her strategic deployment of that image. The website will be a useful resource for scholars of literature, early modern women’s lives, gender studies more broadly, and European diplomatic history. It also has the potential to attract a broad audience of non-specialist readers, drawn by the dramatic adventure of Marie’s life and enticed, by rigorous scholarship and the author’s authentic voice, to further exploration.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


FT-269937-20

Omar Santiago Valerio-Jimenez
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Refuting History Fables: Collective Memories and History among Tejanos, 1930s-1960s

Research and writing one chapter of a book on how Tejanos (Texans of Mexican ancestry) worked to include their community in histories of Texas.

This project explores the efforts of scholars to challenge the omissions and negative characterizations of Tejanos in the state’s history and in public school textbooks. By analyzing the scholarship, historical preservation efforts, and activism of Carlos E. Castañeda, Adina Emilia De Zavala, José T. Canales, and María Elena Zamora O’Shea, the book will explore how these intellectuals sought to revise the historical interpretations of Tejanos to prove their loyalty, improve their public image, and advance their education. The state’s Anglo-centric history textbooks, they argued, were biased, and helped justify contemporaneous discrimination (including segregated schools) against Tejanos. The primary sources include Spanish- and English-language correspondence, speeches, organizational documents, newspapers, and essays. The final products will be published articles and a book, which will appeal to students of U.S. history, civil rights, and Mexican American Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Immigration History; Latino History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-269949-20

Amanda Laury Kleintop
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (North Adams, MA 01247-4100)
The Balance of Freedom: Abolishing Property Rights in Slaves during and After the Civil War

Research and writing one chapter of a book interrogating the significance of policies governing property rights in slaves before and after Emancipation.

Until the US Civil War, legal recognition of property rights in slaves enabled slaveholders, merchants, and investors to buy and sell slaves on credit and to mortgage slaves. The US government’s wartime decision to abolish slavery without reimbursing slaveowners for the lost value of freed slaves threatened to send this complex system of finance, founded on human property, into chaos. From 1864-1871, southern and federal lawmakers and judges, as well as everyday southerners, argued over who ought to be responsible for the financial burden of emancipation. This project explores the little-known history of white southerners’ defense of their perceived right to own slaves or to be reimbursed for their value. Their debates, ranging from former Confederate states to the US Capital, reveal that immediate, uncompensated emancipation in the US South was not an inevitable outcome of Union victory in the Civil War, and the process of emancipation extended well beyond the abolition of slavery.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Legal History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269950-20

Brian Glover
East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
The Boswell Club of Chicago, 1942-1972

The writing of an article about the Boswell Club of Chicago (active 1942–1972) and the role of this elite society on the American reception of Scottish writer James Boswell (1740–1795).

This scholarly article, which will be finished with the assistance of the NEH Summer Stipend, interprets the eighteenth-century Scottish author James Boswell's second "career" in the twentieth-century United States. Specifically, it will draw on previously unstudied archival documents to trace the history of the Boswell Club of Chicago (1942-1972), an organization of ordinary, non-scholarly readers dedicated to Boswell's life and work, to eighteenth-century literature more generally, and above all to male sociability. The project aims to enlarge not just our understanding of Boswell's literary significance, but our larger understanding of sociability and gender among the last generations of Americans whose childhood outlooks were shaped entirely by print media. It will be submitted to a scholarly journal by the end of August, 2020.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/20/2021 – 8/20/2021


FT-270716-20

Allison Manfra McGovern
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Long Island Dirt: Recovering our Buried Past through Historical Archaeologies

Research and writing the introduction of a book on the historical archaeology of Long Island, New York.

The purpose of this book is to demonstrate, through recent historic and archaeological research, how historical archaeology can reveal dynamic and multi-faceted views of the past. Specifically focused on Long Island, New York, this book explores site-based histories through archaeology, material culture, landscape studies, and archival research to highlight the many unexplored aspects of history that can yet be discovered, and to re-examine some historic sites for new insights into past lives and experiences. The book project is scholarly in method, but publicly accessible in tone, as it demonstrates to scholarly and public audiences the contributions that archaeology can make to understanding broad patterns in American history in general and New York history in particular, and emphasizes the importance of preserving our past.

Project fields:
American Studies; Archaeology; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/8/2020 – 8/10/2020


FT-270735-20

Damian Fleming
Indiana University, Purdue University at Fort Wayne (Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1445)
Hebrew in England Before and After the Norman Conquest

Writing the final chapter for a book on the use of the Hebrew language in early medieval England.

Manuscript materials that reveal early medieval Christian interest in the Hebrew language have never been researched or published before, outside of my brief preliminary studies. Standard intellectual and literary histories suggest that Christians only became interested in studying Hebrew in the thirteenth century and that study only flourished during the Reformation. My book, Reading Hebrew in Early Medieval England, will reconfigure how we think about Christian knowledge and engagement with the Hebrew language in the early Middle Ages, by addressing the intellectual history, material sources, uses, and implications of “Christian Hebrew” in early medieval England (c. 600-1150). I will use the Summer Stipend period to write the final and most challenging chapter: “Hebrew Across the Conquest: The Eadwine Psalter, Durham Jerome, and Stowe 57.”

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270742-20

Roger Glenn Robins
University of Tokyo (Komaba, Meguro-ku 153-8902 Japan)
From Piety to Politics: The Political Mobilization of American Pentecostals

Archival research for a history of the political development of American Pentecostals during the twentieth century.

Over the course of the twentieth century, the American Protestant movement known as Pentecostalism shifted from an apolitical (and often pacifist) stance to its current state of active political engagement. This transition has had a major impact on social and political life in the United States. However, although the fact of that political turn has been noted, and its importance recognized, no comprehensive account of it has yet been given. This project is part of an effort to provide such an account. It will explore the various factors that drove this transformation and will outline the textures and contours of its unfolding. In so doing, it will have significance for many disciplines, but most especially for religious history, political science, and the sociology of religion.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Political History; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 9/30/2021


FT-270746-20

John Bennett Shank
Regents of the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070)
A History of the French Académie Royale des Sciences, 1495-1746

Research and writing leading to publication of the first volume of a planned three-volume history of the French Royal Academy of Sciences from 1495 to 1746.

I am requesting a two-month NEH Summer Stipend to allow me to complete volume one of a proposed three-volume history of the French Académie Royale des Sciences (ARS) during the Old Regime. Viewed in its broadest conceptualization, my book proposes a new comprehensive history of the ARS during its initial period of development. It also proposes a newly integrated approach that aspires to use the academy and its history to examine the wider history of the early modern sciences overall together with the history of the modernization of the French state between the 16th and the 18th centuries. The ultimate goal of my book project is to trace the entangled development of early modern French science and the French state, and to examine how each was involved in the co-production of the other after 1500. If awarded, my fellowship would allow me to complete the final chapter of volume one of this study, and to begin conversations with potential publishers about its publication.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270748-20

Heather Wholey
West Chester University of Pennsylvania (West Chester, PA 19383-0001)
Cultural Heritage Futures: Narrating Loss and Legacy along the Delaware Bay

Development of an interactive digital map combining environmental and archaeological data from around the Delaware Bay.

Climate driven sea level rise (SLR) threatens cultural heritage resources in coastal areas. The Delaware Estuary is the second largest on the U.S. Atlantic coast and is experiencing some of the gravest effects from SLR along the eastern seaboard. Archaeological and historical evidence reveal the area’s rich heritage, including thousands of years of Native American occupations; 17th century Swedish and Dutch settlements; a colonial maritime tradition; early18th century resort towns; and, extant World War II defensive installations. The shoreline is fringed by salt marshes, which are being assaulted by storm surge, and converted into mudflats or open water at an alarming rate. The Delaware Bay Climate and Archaeology project has yielded decadal level, site specific projections of SLR threats until the year 2100. This project will use maps, photographs and digital reconstructions to translate science-driven research into a humanities-oriented visual narrative of compelling case studies.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/25/2021 – 3/25/2021


FT-265547-19

Jessica Starling, PhD
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-8091)
Leprosy, Social Work, and Ethical Praxis in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism

Research for a scholarly article and book on contemporary Japanese Buddhist care for leprosy patients.

This research focuses on Buddhist social work at leprosaria across Japan and its former colonies. Leprosy, or Hansen’s Disease, has long been seen as a morally culpable condition in Japan. Premodern Buddhists understood the illness as a form of karmic retribution for one’s past immorality. In modern Japan, Western medicine added the discourse of germs and contagion to earlier stigmas, and the government forced those infected with the bacteria to relocate to national leprosaria. After the war, however, many Japanese came to see leprosy and its stigmatization as the central human rights issue of their time. Stirred by these stories of discrimination and dehumanization, my True Pure Land Buddhist informants now regularly visit residents of Japan’s former leprosaria. Employing ethnographic and historical methods, this project illuminates contemporary Buddhist ethics as they are expressed through encounters between priests, laypeople and leprosy survivors at these leprosaria.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; History of Religion; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265568-19

Zeynep Esra Santesso
University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Representations of Islam and Muslims in Contemporary Graphic Narratives

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the representation of Islam and Muslims in contemporary graphic novels, cartoons, and web-comics.

This is a book project focused on the representations of Islam and Muslims in contemporary graphic narratives (graphic novels, cartoons, web-comics). Adopting a transnational approach, my project brings literary studies together with the visual arts in order to trace the aesthetic and political transformation of the Muslim within the graphic narrative tradition—from the vilified Other to relatable comics commodity. The book essentially demonstrates that these narratives are increasingly concerned not only with pluralizing and humanizing the Muslim figure but also with exploring new and innovative visual representations of this faith group to validate unofficial accounts of history written from the margins. As I argue, multifaceted representation of Islam, with an eye toward gender equality, civil liberties, self-determination, and democratic participation, illustrates a desire to address the shallow representations of Islam, and usher into a new era of activism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Literary Criticism; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264952-19

Elizabeth Elaine Tavares
Pacific University (Forest Grove, OR 97116-1797)
The Repertory System before Shakespeare, 1582-1594

A book-length study of four 16th-century British theater companies and their contributions to the history of theater, performance, and the early modern English economy.

The generation of theatre makers before William Shakespeare enjoyed greater marketplace diversity than at any other time in the early modern period. 1580s playgoers were spoiled for choice, with more than fifty professional troupes at hand. If plays weren’t systematically advertised, playhouses were in close proximity, and one could see a different play every night of the week, how did one choose? My book, “Playing the Stock Market: The Repertory System before Shakespeare” (under contract with Palgrave) examines four seasons of four companies to expose the interconnections between thematic concerns and staging techniques—revealing that it was repetition, revision, and collaboration rather than novelty that produced their financial success. Attending to the collective process that was the Elizabethan theatre industry, this is the first book to offer a dramaturgical approach comparing several early troupes, proving an important contribution to theatre history and performance studies.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance History; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264956-19

Douglas Leo Winiarski
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet: A Microhistory of Religious Violence on the Early American Frontier, 1805–1815

Research and writing two chapters of a book on interactions between Shakers and Native Americans on the Ohio frontier before the War of 1812.

I seek NEH funding to research and draft the two central chapters of my current book project, Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet. This braided microhistory chronicles the fascinating, but troubled relationship between the Shakers—the religious sectarians infamous for their ecstatic worship practices, communal social organization, celibacy, and pacifism—and the militant followers of Tenskwatawa, the so-called Shawnee Prophet and brother of the famed war captain Tecumseh. Written for a broad audience of students, scholars, and general readers and drawing upon understudied Shaker manuscript letters and journals, Shakers and the Shawnee Prophet examines the local sources of religious violence on the early American frontier during the years leading up to the War of 1812. I anticipate that the book will resonate with readers attuned to the politics of religious difference and the troubling connections between religion and violence in our own times.

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-264958-19

Martin Kalb
Bridgewater College (Bridgewater, VA 22812-1599)
Nature and the Making of German Southwest Africa, 1885-1915

Research and writing leading to publication of an environmental history of German Southwest Africa (1884-1915).

My book project is an environmental history of empires, in this case, of German Southwest Africa (1884-1915). I contend that taking environmental factors into account further complicates existing understandings of German colonial fantasies. Germany dreamed of a model colony, envisioned as a profitable agricultural settler society. Realities on the ground, however, threatened such visions of empire, and repeatedly hindered German efforts in the region. The most important challenges were tied to issues of land accessibility and water scarcity. Massive investments into harbor structures, irrigation, and other imperial infrastructures soon shaped broader policies, especially following the 1904 Herero and Nama Uprising. Unintended consequences and overall failures, combined with the employment of everyday violence of the colonial state to achieve its fantasies, eventually transformed nature and people but also shaped the imperial imaginations of German colonialists. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
African History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-264962-19

Eduardo Ledesma
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Blind Cinema: Visually Impaired Filmmakers and Technologies of Sight

A book-length study and companion website about visually impaired filmmakers and their use of various technologies, which illuminate the experience of blindness through film.

"Blind Cinema," for which I seek an NEH Summer Stipend, has two key aims: first, to raise critical awareness about the existence of blind filmmakers, and second, to establish the contours of a blind cinematic style through theories of the gaze and haptic film. It is the first book to study how visually impaired filmmakers use digital media both to make visible the experience of disability and to destabilize stereotypes about the blind. My analysis of films by blind and visually impaired directors, as well as of collaborations between blind and sighted filmmakers, shows how the aesthetics and content of these works represent the experience of blindness. I combine film and disability studies approaches to consider how new technologies of vision are giving blind filmmakers access to the tools and techniques of filmmaking and how their innovations are transforming our experience of film.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


FT-265455-19

Faith Barrett
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA 15282-0001)
Let Music Rise from Every Tongue: Reading and Writing Poetry in Antebellum African American Communities

Research leading a book on African-American poets in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Chapel Hill before the Civil War.

Let Music Rise from Every Tongue examines how African Americans used poetry to constitute community in the antebellum US. Focusing on literary circles in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Chapel Hill, I argue that African Americans found in poetry a means of articulating not only their political commitments, but also their affective experience: poetry thus plays a crucial role in establishing communities that are both political and social. With chapters focused on the poetry in friendship albums, the Black press, an anthology of New Orleans writers, and single-author collections by Frances Harper and Georges Moses Horton, my book contends that poetry was a central genre for African Americans because of the ways it brings together solitary and collective voices.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265463-19

Marguerite Hailey Rippy
Marymount University (Arlington, VA 22207-4299)
Orson Welles, Macbeth, and Africa: Collective Genius and the Diaspora

Research leading to publication of a book about the contributions made by African and African American artists to Orson Welles’ 1936 Federal Theater Project production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

This project seeks to produce a book-length monograph that would reposition scholarly and general understanding of the production that came to be known as the 1936 “Voodoo” Macbeth. Directed by a youthful Orson Welles, the 1936 "Macbeth" has been widely recounted in theater history as a work of Welles’ budding genius, a product of his collaboration with producer John Houseman and Federal Theatre director Hallie Flanagan. Many of the materials regarding the contributions of the over 100 African and African American participants, however, have yet to be studied alongside the conventional history of this production. This project brings together archival materials from multiple collections to illuminate the contributions of African and African American actors, artists and musicians in the 1936 Federal Theatre Project production of "Macbeth."

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265484-19

Naomi Macalalad Bragin
University of Washington, Bothell (Bothell, WA 98011-8246)
An Ethnographic Cultural History of Streetdance since 1970

A book-length historical and ethnographic study of hip hop dance in California, from the 1970s to the present.

Black Power of Hip Hop Dance is an ethnographic cultural history of Streetdance in 1970s California—an archive of African American dance under-researched in dance studies. I show New York hip hop culture’s aesthetic foundations in West Coast dances of Popping, Locking, Robot and Waacking. At first prohibited in dance studios, Streetdance is now a global culture spanning international classes, competitions, viral videos, reality TV and popular film. I bridge dance analysis, cultural theory, American and black studies, to assert that Streetdancers create nuanced forms of political engagement by moving their bodies in public spaces. I center the role of motion in the production and transmission of culture and formation of community. Streetdance contributes to conversations on race, power and difference, using movement as a non-verbal, embodied way of knowing. Black Power of Hip Hop Dance emphasizes the value of community history in motion—dance studies key lens of inquiry.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Dance History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/15/2019 – 9/14/2019


FT-265503-19

Theresa Sims
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Zulu Figurative Art and Colonial Engagement, 1860–1920

Preparation of a book that analyzes the emergence of figural art made by the Zulu people of Southern Africa between 1860 and 1920.

Research and writing leading to the publication of a book-length study of Zulu figurative sculpture from colonial South Africa. The sudden appearance of figural elements in artistic production by the Zulu in the second half of the 19th century was due to the exposure to prints and photographs brought to the people by missionaries, traders, and colonizers. A close analysis of different sculptural forms and their meanings will illuminate the circumstances of their production from an African perspective and attempt to explain why the figural elements are fragmentary in nature, rather than representing a complete body. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265510-19

Monica Lynn Mercado
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911

Research and writing a book on the experiences of young Catholic women in the United States during the 19th century.

Breaking from histories of 19th-century U.S. Catholicism that center anti-Catholic narratives about women and girls, my book project The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911, refocuses on Catholics’ own understandings of themselves. Using a rich but overlooked set of print and manuscript sources (the vast output of a vibrant U.S. Catholic publishing industry and the convent school pedagogies, book clubs, and reading retreats that grew up around it) I illustrate the formation of a Catholic cultural identity and argue for the special role of young women as makers of class and status for their upwardly mobile, second- and third-generation Catholic families. Given a recent resurgence of interest in the world of the convent school, and contributing to the rich historiography of U.S. Catholic laywomen, this project gives voice to the girls shaped in religious institutions, whose futures were expected to shape the Roman Catholic Church in America.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2019 – 8/9/2019


FT-265418-19

Jennifer Forestal
Stockton University (Galloway, NJ 08205-9441)
The Shape of Democracy: Building Political Spaces in a Digital Age

Writing and revising a book for publication about the challenges that digital technologies such as social media pose for fostering democratic practice.

The Shape of Democracy is a book that deals directly with a pressing contemporary problem: how have digital technologies changed, or challenged, the traditional practices of democracy? Using examples from Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter, I show how the problems often associated with digital technologies exemplify three enduring challenges of democratic politics--the problems of 1) an expanding population, 2) self-segregation, and 3) instability. Ultimately, I argue that these three problems can be overcome, in whole or in part, by building digital spaces that meet three criteria: 1) they must have clearly marked and relatively limited boundaries, 2) those boundaries must be flexible, and 3) the resulting spaces must be stable over time.

Project fields:
Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265424-19

Heather Lynn Ferguson
Claremont McKenna College (Claremont, CA 91711-5929)
Sovereign Valedictions: "Last Acts" in Early Modern Habsburg and Ottoman Courts

Research and writing leading to publication of a monograph on last sovereign acts during 16th century Habsburg and Ottoman Empires.

Scholars attentive to early modern rivalries address the competitive dynamics of the Ottoman and Habsburg dynasties with increasingly sophisticated projects. "Sovereign Valedictions" explores the often-mimetic nature of early modern courts from a rare vantage point: the undertakings, directives, and landmarks that define—even if retrospectively—the last acts of a sovereign. These “last acts” reveal moments of potential fragility and vulnerability for both the individual ruler and the empire embodied in his personhood. I turn to the “last acts” of dynastic representatives not as an academic conceit, but rather as a new kind of historical index that serves as a repository of early modern forces at work. Tactics pursued to preserve the pretense of control, bend political turmoil toward dynastic endurance, commemorate triumphs, forfend disaster, and shape posterity also unmask the structures, concepts and tropes deployed to render Ottoman and Habsburg rule integral if not invulnerable.

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 4/1/2020


FT-265433-19

Laura E. Helton
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
The Making of African American Archives, 1910-1950

Writing two chapters of a history of African-American archives in the early 20th century.

"Black Archival Publics" charts the making of early-twentieth-century African American archives in order to understand the relationship between historical recuperation, forms of racial imagination, and black social movements. It traces a generation of black bibliophiles, librarians, and scrapbook makers in New York, Chicago, Raleigh, Detroit, and Washington, DC, who created repositories of African diasporic material between 1910 and 1950. At a moment when most scholarly and popular accounts rendered blackness as unlettered and absent from history, these collectors assembled books and manuscripts, organized “Negro collections” in local and university libraries, and made such collections active sites of black public life. In so doing, they did more than simply bequeath to the future a storehouse of research materials. They also activated the urgent declaration of Afro-Puerto Rican bibliophile Arturo Schomburg that “the American Negro must remake his past in order to make the future.”

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265453-19

Nicole Svobodny
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
The Feeling Mind: A Study of Russian Dancer Vaslav Nijinsky's St. Moritz Notebooks (1917-1919)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about the personal notebooks of Polish-Russian dancer Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950).

What happens when “the greatest male dancer of all time” stops dancing and sits down to write? What are the physical and cognitive processes involved? My project addresses these questions through an examination of the personal notebooks kept by Vaslav Nijinsky when he was cut off from the Ballets Russes, right before his catastrophic breakdown in 1919. These notebooks contain handwritten words in Russian (the diary), ink and pencil drawings, and drafts for a dance notation system. My book is the first in-depth study of the original Russian manuscript. Drawing on extensive archival research, I consider the writing in the post-war context and in relation to Nijinsky’s isolation and diagnosis of schizophrenia, his engagement with past literary masters, his live performances, and his other attempts to explore and “to fix" movement through the creation of visual art and dance notation. My study concludes with an investigation into the transnational migration of Nijinsky’s notebooks.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Dance History and Criticism; Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/17/2019 – 8/17/2019


FT-265388-19

Katherine B. Gustafson
Indiana University Northwest (Gary, IN 46408-1101)
Novel Marketing, Novel Writing, and the Development of the Adolescent, 1740-1815

Completion of the first book-length study of adolescence as a modern social category in 18th-century British novels and its affiliated marketing industry.

I seek support from the NEH to complete the last chapter of a scholarly monograph. My book, "Novel Marketing, Novel Writing, and the Development of the Adolescent, 1740-1815," argues that the evolution of the novel in eighteenth-century England occurred in dynamic response to the development of adolescence as a modern social category. It contributes to humanistic study both by rewriting the history of the novel and by providing a history of eighteenth-century adolescence. By historicizing the conditions under which canonical eighteenth-century novels were written, published, and marketed, my work restores adolescence to its rightful place within the novel’s evolution, and demonstrates that many of the novel’s formal developments responded to cultural anxieties about adolescent readers. My last chapter will examine works by Sir Walter Scott and Maria Edgeworth to demonstrate the increased stratification of the novel market for adolescents in the early nineteenth century.