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Funded Projects Query Form
280 matches

Grant programs:Summer Stipends*
Date range: 2019-2021
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FT-278123-21

Jonathan Brunstedt
Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
The Soviet-Afghan War and the Shadow of Vietnam

Research and writing toward a monograph examining the cultural legacies of the Vietnam (1961–75) and Soviet-Afghan (1979–89) wars.

My project is a book-length historical examination of the entangled cultural legacies of the Vietnam (1961–75) and Soviet-Afghan (1979–89) wars. While Vietnam became a crude metaphor for military quagmire that observers readily applied to Soviet involvement in Afghanistan, my project pursues the far deeper cultural connections between the wars. Building on Michael Rothberg's concept of "multidirectional memory," my book will explore the dynamic process by which the wars in Vietnam and Afghanistan, and by extension American and Soviet political identities, were continuously framed in relation to one another. The project's core hypothesis is that the Vietnam-Afghanistan analogy was central to how Americans and Soviet Russians negotiated both the meaning of these two conflicts and their countries’ place in the world. As I contend, these negotiations hastened the USSR’s collapse and fueled the revival of an American exceptionalism that outlived the Cold War itself.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Russian History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2023 – 9/30/2023


FT-278142-21

Trent Masiki
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Afro-Latino Memoirs and their African American Influences

Research and writing of a book examining Afro-Latino memoirists’ use of African American aesthetics across the 20th century. 

Under contract with the University of North Carolina Press, Afroethnic Renewal: Afro-Latino Memoirs and their African American Influences, examines understudied African American narrative strategies, cultural tropes, and political genealogies in contemporary Afro-Latino coming-of-age memoirs. Using literary and historical analysis, I argue that Afro-Latino memoir writers use their affiliation with the African American condition to authenticate and assert their sense of national and diasporic belonging. The coherence of Afro-Latinidad, I contend, can be better understood by analyzing the depth and scope of its influence by Black nationalism and cosmopolitanism. The book finds that Afro-Latinos are shaping US culture in ways that open and extend the conventional definitions of African American literature and identity. I am applying for an NEH Summer Stipend to research and write the chapter on Marta Moreno Vega’s memoir When the Spirits Dance Mambo: Growing Up Nuyorican in El Barrio.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Hispanic American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278149-21

Logan James Connors
University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL 33146-2926)
Theater, Gender, and War in the Age of the French Revolution

Research and writing two chapters of a book on French theater, gender, and the military in revolutionary France from 1756-1804.

A stipend would provide me with two months of dedicated writing to draft two chapters of a book on theater and the military in eighteenth-century France and its empire. My project unearths the relations between the military and the theater in France and its colonial spaces from the Seven Years War (1756-1763) to Napoleon’s coronation in 1804. Grounded in theater and performance studies, in literary analysis of drama, and in cultural, military and gender history, it is the first examination of theater’s engagement with military cultures in France and of the military’s influence on the codes of drama and theatrical performance. The stipend will allow me to draft two chapters about theater, gender, and war during the French Revolution: a chapter in which I read military “event plays” through the lens of theories of reenactment and repetition; and, a chapter that draws from the same corpus to describe the role of women in the Revolutionary war effort and its on-stage representations.

Project fields:
Cultural History; French Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278187-21

Heather E. Ostman
Westchester Community College (Valhalla, NY 10595-1693)
Rhetorical Lives: American Women Activists and Autobiography

Research and writing of a book on the rhetorical strategies used in the autobiographies of American women activists. 

This book-length project explores the rhetorical strategies within the autobiographies of six diverse women at the forefront of social and political change in the United States over the last 100 years: Jane Addams (1910), Emma Goldman (1934), Dorothy Day (1952), Angela Davis (1974), Mary Crow Dog (1990), and Betty Friedan (2000). The study looks at the ways each woman activist used gender as well as the conversion narrative and other conventions as rhetorical strategies for the advancement of their individual visions for a new, transformed world.

Project fields:
American Literature; Composition and Rhetoric; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278260-21

Harshita Mruthinti Kamath
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Poetry, Power, and the Making of Gods and Kings in Telugu South India

Research for a book on the South Asian poet Annamayya (1424-1503) and his role in the history of the Hindu temple at Tirumala in south India.

My proposed project, “Poetry, Power, and the Making of Gods and Kings,” will culminate a critical history of the poet Annamayya (1424-1503 C.E.), his songs inscribed on 2,752 copper plates, and his impact on shaping the powerful presence of the Tirumala temple, which is located in Andhra Pradesh, India. My project examines the life of Annamayya and his songs in order to trace the rise of Tirumala from a regional sectarian site to the most popular Hindu temple in the world today. By examining the intersection of religion, poetry, and patronage in Tirumala, I challenge current scholarship that poses a separation of religion and kingship in South Asia, suggesting that poets like Annamayya had the power to make both gods and kings.

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Literature; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 10/31/2021


FT-278282-21

Rebecca Wingo
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Housing and Adult Education on the Crow Reservation, 1884-1934

Revision leading to a book on federal house-building and adult education initiatives on the Crow Reservation during the Assimilation Era.

My in-progress monograph, Reframing the Crows, examines three under-researched aspects of Native American history during the Assimilation Era: housing, adult education, and photography. My book argues that the Office of Indian Affairs (OIA) fetishized the house as a conduit of education and catalyst for cultural change for tribal adults. Rooted in settler colonialism and misguided Progressive Era philanthropy, the OIA constructed frame houses around Indigenous peoples in an effort to instill American family structures, land use, and moral authority. The government used architectural determinism (the belief that the physical structure of the house could restructure the behavior of the residents within) to erase tribal cultures. On the Crow Reservation in Montana, the OIA meticulously documented employees’ efforts through photography, wittingly or not also documenting the Crows’ resistance. This proposal seeks funding to support revisions of the final two chapters over June/July of 2021.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278293-21

Sabrina Thomas
Wabash College (Crawfordsville, IN 47933-2484)
The Soul of Blood and Borders: Brown Babies, Black Amerasians and the African American Response

Research for a book on the African American response to biracial children born in the wake of World War II and the Vietnam War.  

The Soul of Blood and Borders: Brown Babies, Black Amerasians and the African American Response is a comparative analysis of the African American community’s disparate responses to the brown babies (the children of African American soldiers and German women born as a result of the Second World War) and the black Amerasians (the offspring of African American soldiers and Vietnamese women born during the Vietnam War). It examines how domestic and foreign factors shaped and reshaped the way African Americans understood race, identity, and progress at two critical points in U.S. history—the modern Civil Rights Movement and the aftermath of the American defeat in the Vietnam War. It contends that at each moment, the brown babies and black Amerasians forced African Americans to reconsider what it meant to be black in America as they fought for racial equality.

Project fields:
African American History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 9/30/2021


FT-278376-21

David Greenberg
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)
A Biography of John Lewis (1940-2020), Civil Rights Leader and Politician

Research for a biography of civil rights leader and politician John Lewis (1940-2020). 

John Lewis: A Life in Politics will be the first cradle-to-grave biography of the late Georgia congressman. Lewis was central to America’s fight for racial justice since 1960, when he and fellow Nashville students applied Gandhian ideas to integrate Jim Crow lunch counters. A founder and chair of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Lewis led major campaigns from the Freedom Rides to the March on Washington to the Selma voting rights march. Ousted as SNCC chairman in 1966, Lewis entered politics, joining Robert Kennedy’s 1968 presidential bid, registering Blacks to vote in the 1970s, and in 1986 winning a seat in Congress, where he rose to be a deputy to the Speaker. Legislatively, he helped extend the Voting Rights Act, established a Black history museum in Washington, and served as “the conscience of Congress.” Lewis’s life story thus shows how the energies of the 1960s civil rights movement, in his person, carried on the drive for racial equality in the following decades.

Project fields:
African American History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278380-21

Emily Berquist Soule
CSU, Long Beach (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)
Spain and the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1402-1898

The writing of a book on the Spanish Empire’s role in the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1402-1898.

This chapter examines the various arrangements Spain made with foreign governments and trading companies to deliver slaves to Spanish territories from 1692 through 1744. It is a chapter of my book in progress, The Atlantic Slave Trade and the Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire (under contract, Yale University Press).

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022


FT-278381-21

Kristina Frances Nielsen
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)
Composing Histories: Aztec Music and Dance in Los Angeles

Research and writing leading to a book about Aztec music, dance and indigenous cultural heritage in contemporary Los Angeles.

Across Los Angeles, Mexican-American men, women, and children of all ages participate in Aztec dancing, a communal dance performed to the beat of an Aztec log drum. Many Aztec dance communities have recently tried to remove European elements from their repertoires, restructuring their music to align with interpretations of a pre-Hispanic Aztec aesthetic. Ongoing disagreements in the community pit dancers who view transmission as historically accurate––regardless of European influences––against those who prefer “recovered” traditions that originate from contemporary Indigenous communities. In this project, I consider this gap in perceptions of history and tradition, and the ways it informs participant’s understandings of Indigenous identity and cultural heritage.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Latin American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/20/2021 – 6/20/2021


FT-278389-21

William Mychael Sturkey
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
To Be An American: The Ballad of Master Sergeant Roy P. Benavidez (1935-1998)

Writing of a biography of Vietnam War veteran, Congressional Medal of Honor winner, and iconic military figure Roy Benavidez (1935-1998).

“To Be An American” is a biography of Vietnam War hero Roy Benavidez. Beginning with his family's history as Texas pioneers in the 1800s, it chronicles the saga of Benavidez, tracing his life from the Texas cotton fields to the Pentagon. Through the lens of this legendary Mexican American, this book explores the intersectionality of American citizenship, race, military service, political rhetoric, and public policy against the backdrop of the Cold War and the rise and fall of the liberal welfare state, ultimately examining America’s relationship with its most revered heroes, balanced against what it requires of them in return.

Project fields:
Labor History; Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278393-21

Mary Channen Caldwell
Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Musical Hagiography and the Medieval Cult of St. Nicholas in Western Europe (ca. 1100-1500)

Research and writing leading to a book about the music and hagiography of St. Nicholas in Western Europe, from 1100 to 1500.

One of the most widely-venerated saints in medieval Europe, St. Nicholas was also one of the most popular saintly subjects for composers and musicians. Music for Nicholas across genre, register, and language outpaced that composed for virtually all other non-biblical saints in the Middle Ages. Despite its quantity and diversity, however, Nicholas’s musical hagiography has yet to be examined. This project explores for the first time how the creation of new musical repertoires shaped and responded to the expansion of Nicholas’s cult, ca. 1100-1500. Nicholas presents an exceptional case among medieval saints since hagiographical texts repeatedly draw attention to song and its role in defining and disseminating his cult. I argue that music became a lynchpin in hagiographical and cultural negotiations, powerful enough to intervene in discourses around the saint and rituals of time and place, liturgy and devotion, race, religious identity, language, and nationhood.

Project fields:
Medieval History; Medieval Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278418-21

Hallie G. Meredith
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Fragmentary and Unfinished Art: Documenting Undocumented Late Roman Art and Process

Research and writing leading to a monograph on late Roman carving techniques through the study of incomplete stone sculptures.

This project investigates the unfinished work of anonymous Roman artists in order to document their artistic processes. The research focuses on the third to seventh centuries AD, a period not only representing a zenith in late Roman carving but for which numerous excavated production sites are extant. This research is vital for two core reasons. First, no written sources exist documenting production by anonymous artists. Second, the Roman practice of concealing evidence of carving has led to fundamental gaps in our knowledge concerning production. This award will support research at archaeological sites and on related objects. The approach will enable unfinished pieces to take center stage by accessing fundamentally important – but obscured – visual information. This project will make a significant interdisciplinary contribution to discourse in archaeology, ancient history, art history, classics, craft history and theory, and economic studies, among other fields of study.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Arts, Other; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/16/2022 – 7/15/2022


FT-278425-21

Humberto Garcia
University of California, Merced (Merced, CA 95344-0039)
Asian Seafarers in Eighteenth-and Nineteenth-Century English Literature: The Forgotten Black Slaves of the Transatlantic

Research and writing leading to a book on Asian seafarers in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English literature.

During the height of the African slave trade, British officials initiated the lesser-known forced migration of lascars or Asian sailors, known as “black slaves.” They manned Atlantic-bound ships under conditions that resembled those of enslaved Africans. My book project addresses this gap in critical histories of racial enslavement by examining literary representations of lascars, a workforce that fueled east-west commercial shipping from the late seventeenth century to the end of World War II. Stranded in Britain, they appeared as specters to English writers who imagined a social solution for them different from the one they had devised for black Africans—a moral sympathy wedded to a policy of detention and deportation rather than abolition. My proposed monograph not only bridges hemispheric divisions in humanities scholarship but also creates a new field for studying Indo-Atlantic conceptions of slavery, skin color, migrant labor, and citizenship in English literature and culture.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278452-21

Alexis Culotta
Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund, The (New Orleans, LA 70118-5698)
Fare la Bella Figura: Mapping and Documenting the Vanishing Tradition of the Roman Frescoed Façade

Archival research and fieldwork to document 16th century frescoed façades in Rome leading to the creation of an online database and article.

In early sixteenth-century Rome, a trend emerged in which illustrious patrons commissioned elaborate façade decorations in fresco and sgraffito. These cycles relayed a remarkable array of motifs and were celebrated in their day and even documented (albeit very sporadically) by artists. Today, only a fraction of these façades are still detectable along Rome’s streets. Before this legacy has completely disappeared, my goal in requesting the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipend is to embark on a larger initiative to map these various decorated spaces as they once existed in Rome’s center to both chronicle this often overlooked aspect of Renaissance Roman artistic production and to investigate the themes and meaning of this fascinating practice more fully. The products of this chronicle will include a publicly available comprehensive virtual database of images and materials relating to these façades as well as publication draft materials on the topic.

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2022 – 7/15/2022


FT-278462-21

Marc A. Hertzman
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Palmares after 1695: The Historical Afterlife of a Runaway Slave Community in Northeastern Brazil and Zumbi, its Leader

Research and writing of a book on the destruction of the Quilombo dos Palmares, a large community of runaway slaves in northeastern Brazil, and its legacy.

On November 20, 1695, the Black Brazilian maroon Zumbi died defending Palmares, one of history’s largest fugitive slave settlements. Most histories of Palmares conclude here. My book, however, treats Zumbi’s death and the destruction of Palmares as a starting point for new diasporas and forms of inheritance. By studying African and Afro-Brazilian religious beliefs and practices, place names, and oral traditions alongside previously overlooked colonial documents, I show how memories of Zumbi and Palmares survived in multiple forms in the aftermath of 1695. And I show that a full reckoning with slavery’s legacies and a truly comprehensive system of reparations are impossible without accounting for lineages and histories that derive from other, less commonly recognized forms of inheritance. This book project transforms how we think about fugitive slave communities and diaspora and reshapes conversations about reparations, not just in Brazil but across the Americas.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-278463-21

Victor Seow
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Industrial Psychology in Modern China

Writing of a book on the history of industrial psychology in China, from its inception in the 1930s to the present.

This project involves the research and writing of an academically rigorous yet accessible book on the history of industrial psychology in China, from its inception in the 1930s to the present. At the broadest level, this project is interested in exploring how work became and functioned as a subject of scientific inquiry and how sciences of work such as industrial psychology shaped and was shaped by larger societal understandings about the meaning and value of work. Grounded in a bounty of archival materials, an array of published sources, and a range of oral histories, The Human Factor will trace the history of industrial psychology as a technology of production in China, showing how the development of this field of study sat at the intersection of changes in science, industry, and labor over the course of almost a century. Along the way, it sets out to examine shifting assumptions and contentions about what work is and what it should be.

Project fields:
East Asian History; History of Science; Labor History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278474-21

Kara Dixon Vuic
Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)
Drafting Women

Research for a book on the history of public debates about gender and military conscription in the United States. 

The United States is on the cusp of making one of the most significant changes to American society in the nation’s history: drafting women. Although women have voluntarily served in the military throughout American history, the government has never required them to risk their lives for their country. That exclusion from compulsory military service has had far-reaching consequences for women’s legal standing, economic opportunities, and citizenship. Requiring women to register for Selective Service will remove the last major legal distinction between the obligations and benefits of citizenship for men and women. Drafting Women will provide the necessary historical background for an informed public discussion about what that decision means. The question of drafting women is, at its heart, a question about what it means to serve in the military. It is a question about the relationship between military service and full citizenship. It is a question about what it means to be an American.

Project fields:
Military History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 7/31/2022


FT-278482-21

Laila Amine
University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Return Travel: The African Diaspora Across Genres of Mobility

Research and writing one chapter of a book examining Anglophone Black literature’s representation of mobility in the African diaspora.  

I am applying for the 2021 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend to research and write the third chapter of my second book, Return Travel: The African Diaspora Across Genres of Mobility. By return travel, I refer to critical discourses that have remained cordoned off in the study of contemporary black Anglophone literature: African diasporic return to an ancestral home, reverse migration to post-colonies, and the return visit of exiles to their country of origin. Whether temporary, frequent, or permanent, return constitutes quests for freedom. Drawing on and bridging travel, diaspora, and postcolonial studies, Return Travel explains the significance of ubiquitous homecomings that outlasted the American civil rights movement and the independence of African and Caribbean nations.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Comparative Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278486-21

Anabel Maler
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Seeing Voices: Analyzing Sign Language Music

Research and writing of a book about deafness and music in the United States, including the history and analysis of sign language music, from 1800 to the present.

This monograph contextualizes recent musical practices in Deaf culture within the history of deafness and deaf education in America, and proposes a methodology for engaging analytically with the musical products of Deaf culture, in the form of musical works created and performed in sign language. The project’s aim is to bring the long and rich history of sign language music to the attention of music theorists, to engage with it seriously and thoughtfully as a musical art, to understand what elements of music are resilient across modalities, and to grapple with the methodological quandaries that signed music raises for the discipline of music theory. In redefining music as movement, the book argues that sign language music, rather than being marginal or extraneous to histories and theories of music, is in fact central and crucial to our understanding of all musical expression and experience. It argues, above all, for the resilience of music in the face of enormous obstacles.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278507-21

Scott Selisker
Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
“Networked Collectives in the Fiction of Silko and Yamashita”

Research and writing to complete the final chapter of a book examining representations of social networks in contemporary fiction.

I am requesting support for archival research for the final chapter of a book-in-progress on social networks in contemporary U.S. fiction. The book analyzes for the first time a formal feature of fictional narrative I call its “character network,” the web of connections between characters. It places contemporary fictional uses of character networks in conversation with the roles of network metaphors in discussions of media technologies, business networking, and centralized and grassroots political formations since the 1970s. Drawing on and complementing current sociological work in network analysis, I claim that recent fiction uses networks in innovative ways in its representations of precarity, exclusion, and individual and collective action. I seek funding to visit archives for key draft and process documents for two major novels on multiethnic coalitions in grassroots political movements, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead and Karen Tei Yamashita’s I Hotel.

Project fields:
American Literature; Sociology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/6/2021 – 7/5/2021


FT-278537-21

Jennifer Bryan
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1057)
Chaucer’s Ovidian Arts: Poetic Influence and Innovation at the Beginning of English Literature

Research and writing towards a monograph about the influence of the Roman poet Ovid (43 BCE–17/18 CE) on the medieval English poet Geoffrey Chaucer (1340s–1400 CE).

“Chaucer’s Ovidian Arts: Poetic Influence and Innovation at the Beginning of English Literature” will investigate the influence of the Roman poet Ovid (43 BCE–17/18 CE) on the medieval English poet Geoffrey Chaucer (1340s–1400 CE). It will consider how Chaucer’s lifelong engagement with Ovidian techniques, modes, questions, and ideas resulted in some of the most remarkable and innovative poetry in the English tradition. It will be a significant resource for Chaucer scholars without intimate knowledge of Ovid, at a time when more Chaucerians than ever are conscious of Ovid’s importance, but few are conversant with that poet’s works. It will make major contributions to the ongoing historicization of literary forms, and to concepts of poetic influence and literary “tradition,” while providing a richer sense of Chaucer’s own understanding of the purpose of poetry and the relationships between art and life.

Project fields:
British Literature; Classical Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/7/2021 – 7/6/2021


FT-278538-21

Gerardo Con Diaz
Regents of the University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
Digital Access: Copyright Law and the Birth of the Online World

Archival research and writing a book on the history of internet copyright law.

I will finish Digital Access, a book that recounts the human stories behind the rise and current state of Internet copyright (under contract, Yale Press). This is public-facing scholarship grounded entirely on original interdisciplinary research. It will show that the future of a media-rich, free-flowing Internet depends on understanding how the technological and commercial systems that sustain the online world have developed jointly with, and are inseparable from, the past and present of U.S. copyright law. The book argues that the struggle to regulate the flow of creative works online has 1) eroded the cultural and political boundaries that distinguish copyright enforcement from censorship, 2) transformed legal and legislative proceedings into battlegrounds for competing conceptions of the Internet and its future, and 3) infused global Internet governance with unsolved legal puzzles over the meaning of creativity and media reproduction that date as far back as the 1960s.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Legal History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278557-21

Gene Zubovich
SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Amherst, NY 14228-2577)
Culture Warriors Abroad: a Global History of the American Culture Wars

Research for a book on how American religious organizations intervened in the cultural and political affairs of other countries after World War II.

Culture Warriors Abroad: a Global History of the American Culture Wars will be the first book-length historical study of how Americans exported the culture wars and worked in tandem with allies in Africa, Europe, and Asia to further their visions of democracy. By exploring the history of the culture wars abroad from the 1960s to the present day, and the transnational links that sustained them, it will show that today’s divisions about what a democracy should look like are nothing new. The book will explore historical precedents to today’s debates about the health of democracies, including race, gender, education, birth control, free speech, abortion, and AIDS medication, and the relationship between religion and secular democratic states. In doing so, Culture Warriors Abroad offers a genealogy of today’s political realignments underway in the United States and beyond.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/24/2021 – 7/23/2021


FT-278558-21

David Thomson
Sacred Heart University (Fairfield, CT 06825-1000)
Debt Defaults and the Perils of 19th Century American Capitalism

Research leading to a book about how state debt defaults shaped the development of the national finance system in the United State from the 1840s through the 1870s.

State debt in the 19th century played a large role in defining and imperiling American capitalism. I am interested in reconstructing the role and activities of United States state debt defaults in the 1840s and the 1870s. During both periods of time, numerous states in the North and South defaulted leading to widespread national and international ramifications. The state debt defaults offer a fascinating window into nineteenth century economic life and play a role in understanding the nationalization of American financial infrastructure during this time period. This realization of the nation’s latent financial power during a period of great financial turmoil and Civil War goes a long way towards explaining the reorientation and refashioning of American finance in the nineteenth century along national lines—but with lingering transnational consequences.

Project fields:
Economic History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-278565-21

Caryn E. Murphy
University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh (Oshkosh, WI 54901-8610)
Dramatic Inventions: Writers and Producers in Early Network Television

Writing and research for two chapters of a book examining how creative personnel in the television industry found opportunities to engage social issues as a result of a changing network system in the 1960s. 

This project examines how television writers and producers approached controversial subjects and introduced new storytelling formats during the 1960s, the early era of centralized network control. The network era is examined as a time of transition, in which the new dominance of the filmed series substantially altered the craft of television writing. The goal of this project is to reassess an era of television history that has previously been dismissed for its reliance on formulaic, audience-pleasing programming. I use archival records to argue that creative personnel were aware of the constraints represented by a three-network system, and they balanced the medium’s desire for convention with measured techniques of invention as they developed, executed, and promoted television dramas.

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 7/14/2021


FT-278568-21

Molly Taylor-Poleskey
Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
Food and Culture at the Court of Friedrich Wilhelm (1640-1688), Great Elector of Brandenburg-Prussia

Research and writing toward a monograph examining the court of Prince Elector Friedrich Wilhelm (1640–1688) through its food and culture.

My forthcoming book, Food and Culture at the Court of the Great Elector, is an alternative to the traditional military and bureaucratic narratives about the composite state of Brandenburg-Prussia in the seventeenth century. The food consumption and policies of the court of Prince Elector Friedrich Wilhelm (1640–1688) offer a critical new perspective on how this ruler struggled for stability in the ashes of the Thirty Years War variously through collaboration, coercion, and in cahoots with a range of actors. Although a basic need, food was also a tool of lofty self-representation. At the same time, the need for food made the ruler dependent on his subject-suppliers and was therefore a leverage in the negotiations underlying the development of the state.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/7/2021 – 8/6/2021


FT-278572-21

Andrea Ruth Weiss
CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)
The Five Demands: The Untold Story of the Tumultuous Two Weeks that Changed the Face of Higher Education

Research for a documentary film on a 1969 strike by Black and Puerto Rican students at City College of New York.

This proposal is for a summer stipend to conduct research for a documentary on the 1969 campus strike by Black and Puerto Rican students at the City College of New York. This documentary will tell the dramatic story of this defining moment in the history of student protest, one that literally changed the face of American universities. One of the distinctive aspects of the takeover is that it was led not by white middle class rebels protesting government actions halfway around the world but by Black and Hispanic students in a public institution not serving the public of its surrounding environs. The ensuing policy of Open Admissions remains the longest, most ambitious attempt by any American institution to address inequalities in access to higher education. The challenges this policy presented led to profound changes in thinking about the role and purpose of higher education: what the university is, whom it serves, what is taught—questions that continue to confront us as a nation.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278574-21

Adrian Finucane
Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)
Captive Exchanges: Prisoners of War and the Trade in Secrets, 1700-1760

Research and writing two chapters for a book on the use of prisoners of war in gathering military and commercial intelligence in 18th century British colonies of the American southeast.

Captive Exchanges addresses themes of warfare and incarceration as well as empire and cultural contact in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. This monograph argues that prisoners of war acted as crucial conduits in the development of military and commercial intelligence in the long conflict between the growing British colonies of the southeast and Spanish Florida. It uncovers the varied experiences of prisoners of war before the codification of international laws about the taking and holding of captives. People seized by an enemy might be closely confined, subject to interrogation, allowed to wander freely or quickly returned to their countrymen. Colonial officials sometimes kept captives in enemy cities for weeks or months before freeing them to inevitably bring military information to their own lines. Investigating the impact of intelligence-gathering by prisoners reveals networks of information that were inadvertently created by captives and officials on the edges of empire.

Project fields:
British History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/25/2021 – 8/24/2021


FT-278582-21

Marie Alexis Easley
University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN 55105-1096)
A Biography of Eliza Cook (1812-1889): Victorian Poet, Journalist, and Radical

Research and writing towards a biography of English poet and editor Eliza Cook (1812–1898).

I propose to write a biography of Eliza Cook (1812–89), one of the most famous and influential women of letters in Great Britain during the early and mid-Victorian periods. Cook not only was the prolific author of poetry volumes whose work was widely reprinted in the British and American press but also served as the editor of Eliza Cook’s Journal (1849–54), which rivaled Dickens’s Household Words in popularity. Cook was a political radical and iconoclast who dressed in men’s clothing and had a widely publicized romantic relationship with American actress Charlotte Cushman. This book, when complete, will be the first biography dedicated to Cook—long overdue recognition for a writer who was a well-known feminist, celebrity poet, cultural icon, and innovative journalist. I plan to incorporate a wide range of unpublished archival material from libraries in the UK and US, including letters, manuscripts, and author portraits.

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278594-21

Jacqueline Meier
University of North Florida (Jacksonville, FL 32224-7699)
Animals of a Late Bronze Age Household at Mycenae, Greece

Research and writing two articles on the use and treatment of animals in Late Bronze Age Mycenae in Greece.

Animals played vital roles as symbols, resources and individuals in Late Bronze Age societies. My research uses a context-based approach to elucidate human-animal interactions at Mycenae, Greece in the Late Bronze Age. I employ zooarchaeology to study how ceramic artisans lived with and used animals at the height of the palatial period at Mycenae (LHIIIA2, 14th c. BCE). I focus on faunal remains recovered from a well in the craft-producing household of Petsas House. The well remains are a significant source of evidence about animal lives, as texts and household evidence of animals are rare at Mycenae. With NEH support, I will write two articles to clarify how animal and human lives were intertwined in a Mycenaean household. I will use a life history approach to study household management of animals and domestic faunal refuse. This will challenge current views of human-animal boundaries at Mycenae and reveal how animals were a part of the household in life and death.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/18/2021 – 8/17/2021


FT-278632-21

Chantal Frankenbach
University Enterprises, Inc. (Sacramento, CA 95819-2694)
Isadora Duncan and the Popularization of Race Hygiene and Eugenics in Pre-War Germany, 1902-1905

Research and writing of a book about American modern dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927), her early career in Germany (1902-1905), and pre-World War I German culture and politics.

My book project documents American modern dancer Isadora Duncan’s early career in Germany (1902-1905), where her wildly popular revolt against traditional ballet animated debate across the political spectrum. Coupled with her nearly nude “classical” dancing, Duncan’s writings on Darwinist evolution and her demands for clothing, health, and education reform generated intense interest from the German public. A storm of controversy over Duncan pitted proponents of classical humanism and liberal democracy against neo-conservative nationalist reformers—all struggling for the public’s allegiance at a critical turning point in pre-war German politics. I argue that Duncan’s display of the strong, beautiful, natural body gave inadvertent, yet tangible support to the early architects of German Aryanism and National Socialism. Through critical reaction to Duncan’s hold on a politically disenchanted citizenry, we discover new narratives of public persuasion that facilitated Nazism in Germany.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Dance History and Criticism; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278673-21

Michael Todd Rogers
Arkansas Tech University (Russellville, AR 72801-8819)
Anti-Federalist Criticisms of the Electoral College

Research and writing a journal article on the Anti-Federalist critique of the Electoral College during the 1780 Constitutional Convention and Ratification.

Founders like Hamilton and Wilson as well as historians and political scientists like Main, Ellis, Milkis and Nelson have suggested the Electoral College escaped much scrutiny at the founding. Main quantifies this view, saying he did not believe even twelve Anti-Federalists raised criticism of it (1961, 140). Given the last of the thirteen original states ratification documents became available at the end of 2019 through The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution, a content analysis can be completed that shows Main grossly underestimates the number and extent of Anti-Federalist criticisms of the Electoral College. To promote the civic education of Americans and encourage more objective debate of it free of deference to the founding, a manuscript will be published in a leading history or political science journal (possibly the Journal of American History), which disproves the Electoral College lacked much reproach during the 1780s ratification debates.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Government; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278675-21

Elizabeth Perez
Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Faces of Faith, Kindred Spirits: Black & Latinx Transgender Religious Lives

Complete revisions of five chapters of a book on the religious practices of transgender African-Americans and Latinx people.

NEH’s Summer Stipend would support the completion of my second book, Faces of Faith, Kindred Spirits: Black & Latinx Transgender Religious Lives. The fruit of a decade of ethnographic and archival research, the book reveals that the history of trans liberation is American religious history. Faces of Faith shows that trans people have re-envisioned established religious forms so as to be seen and heard within their chosen traditions. In the U.S., these forms include singing in Gospel choirs; cooking “church food”; quoting Bible verses and preaching; building altars for saints and the Virgin Mary; and paying homage to Afro-Diasporic gods and ancestors. Faces of Faith documents the reclamation of these religious forms through innovative “de-Othering” strategies. The first book to provide a richly textured analysis of Black and Latinx trans religious practitioners, Faces of Faith promises to be a pathbreaking contribution to religious studies, anthropology, and women’s and gender studies.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; History of Religion; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278679-21

Jyoti Puri
Simmons College (Boston, MA 02115-5898)
Migrant Death: Funeral and Mourning Practices among Sikh and Muslim Immigrants in the United States

Ethnographic research into attitudes towards death and funeral practices among South Asian immigrants to the United States.

This book project focuses on migrant practices regarding death and mourning in the U.S. from the early 20th century to the present. Centering on death practices among non-Christian migrants, it tracks the inexorable impact of racism, religious intolerance, and white nationalism. It also highlights how burials, cremations, and mourning among Sikh and Muslim migrants dignify communities and forge a vital sense of belonging to the nation, its land and territory. Thus, death offers a unique lens to understand the histories of American social and cultural politics that endure in the 21st century. This view complicates dominant accounts of death in the U.S.—as either essentially private or managed by the funeral industry. It chronicles, too, the need to revise established sociological lineages in the study of death and to expand the scope of South Asian migration studies, issues that have gained additional urgency in the wake of the current pandemic.

Project fields:
American Studies; Sociology; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278682-21

Swati Srivastava
Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Algorithmic Empires: The Political and Ethical Implications of Data Extraction by Technology Companies

Writing two chapters for a book on the development and use of algorithms by big technology companies.

Big technology companies like Facebook and Google concentrate power over the world in “algorithmic empires” — the concept this book develops to describe the extraction of vast amounts of personal data to feed digital systems that structure what we know and how we are known. Algorithms convert individual experience into data, the most valuable global commodity, and generate artificially narrow content to capture our attention. Through mass surveillance and information manipulation, algorithmic empires contribute to an erosion of trust in technology and a misinformed citizenry. The book makes sense of algorithmic empires by: 1. Tracing the logic of algorithmic empires for resource extraction and social control and its relationship to “surveillance capitalism”; 2. Cataloguing Facebook scandals in privacy violations and microtargeting along with gaps in its global regulation; 3. Theorizing public responsibility that shifts our relationship to algorithmic empires from consumers to subjects.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; International Relations; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278699-21

Tatyana Gershkovich
Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
The Legacy of Leo Tolstoy Inside and Outside Russia, 1920-1928

Archival research in Moscow and writing two chapters of a book on the reconstruction and the reinterpretation of Tolstoy's works by Communists in the Soviet Union and by Russian émigrés who fled Russia after 1917.

Tolstoy Red and White will be the first comparative account of Tolstoy’s literary and philosophical afterlife in the Soviet Union and in Russian emigration. Drawing on archival material in Berlin, Prague, Paris and Moscow, I reconstruct a “White Tolstoy”—the Tolstoy of the émigrés—alongside the “Red” one. By comparing Tolstoy Red and White, how these figures were formed and how they were put to use, I elucidate how these two rival societies, each defining itself against the other, navigated their indebtedness to the same cultural past. I expect to shed new light on Tolstoy, too. By examining his double afterlife pedagogically, performatively, and in posthumous publications, and doing so in the context of his own ideas on education, art, law, and religion, I show how Tolstoy’s texts resisted or failed to resist these attempts to assimilate and domesticate them.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Intellectual History; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022


FT-278702-21

Marcio Siwi
Towson University (Towson, MD 21252-0001)
Making the Modern and Cultured City: Art, Architecture, and Urbanism in São Paulo and New York (1940 - 1960)

Writing and revising a comparison of art, architecture, and urbanism in New York City and São Paulo, 1940-1960.

My book recasts standard narratives of São Paulo and New York through an analysis of art, architecture and urbanism, arguing that North-South elites worked together (though not always agreeably) to create a shared vision of the modern and cultured city in the post-WWII period. Exploring these distinct but interrelated practices from the 1940s to the 1960s from a transnational perspective, I argue that efforts to make São Paulo and New York into regional leaders earned these cities international standing, even as it intensified patterns of uneven development, spatial segregation and racial anxiety. Popular sectors, I show, readily responded to racialized visions of the city, setting-up the stage from which different sectors of society would negotiate the shape that modernity would take.

Project fields:
History, General; Latin American History; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278708-21

John S. Garrison
Trustees of Grinnell College (Grinnell, IA 50112-2227)
The Pleasures of Memory in Shakespeare's Sonnets

Research and writing towards a book about memory as it appears in William Shakespeare’s sonnets.

This fellowship would allow me to complete my current book project, “The Pleasures of Memory in Shakespeare’s Sonnets.” The volume, under contract with Oxford University Press, analyzes this famous set of poems in order to contribute to the larger, interdisciplinary study of memory. The book contends that modern scientific accounts of how memories are formed leave out the possibility of agential techniques for memory making, techniques that were explored by a number of early modern thinkers including Shakespeare. By drawing upon insights from contemporary neuroscience, psychoanalytic theory, and what early modern writers called “the art of memory,” the book explores the notion that we begin to prefigure pleasurable experiences in our minds based not just on past recollection but also on hope for how our future self will look back upon them.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278710-21

Eva Michelle Wheeler
Oakwood University (Huntsville, AL 35896-0001)
When Black Stories Go Global: How Racial Language is Rendered in Translations of African American Literature and Film

Research and writing leading to an article and a podcast about how racialized language in African-American literature and film is translated into Spanish and Portuguese.

This project analyzes how racial language from African-American literature and film is translated into Spanish and Portuguese. As I explore this question, I am particularly interested in the translation of racial labels and of racialized linguistic practice. The analysis of the translation of racial language in film and literature is an area of inquiry that has seen substantial growth over the past decade. Significantly, to this point, the translation of racial labels and the representation of racialized linguistic practice have been parallel but ultimately separate lines of research. A review of academic literature on the topic reveals that no existing study examines both translation phenomena. The present study seeks to fill that gap. In addition to the project’s significance as a scholarly endeavor, it is also a significant inquiry for the current social and political moment. Final products will include research talks, an article manuscript, and a podcast episode.

Project fields:
Comparative Languages; Linguistics; Romance Languages

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278715-21

Michael Thomas Dango
Beloit College (Beloit, WI 53511-5595)
The Changing Definition of Rape in Contemporary Art and Literature

Writing one chapter of a book examining the humanistic frameworks through which rape has been explicated as a social ill.

Many leading works of the 1970s antirape movement, from Kate Millett’s Sexual Politics to Andrea Dworkin’s Woman Hating, were literary criticism. But today, discussions of sexual violence are dominated by the law and public health. What Does Rape Look Like? seeks to reinvigorate humanistic contributions to the antirape movement. I argue that contemporary American art and literature, especially by women and queer people of color, better understands sexual violence than legal and public health discourses. Whereas the law classifies interpersonal crimes and determines individual responsibility for them, and whereas public health surveils a population to model the incidence, causes, and economic burden of violence, an aesthetic discourse asks how a larger cultural context creates rape, how the genres and forms in which the story of rape is told set the boundaries of its intelligibility, and how metaphorical thinking can transform those boundaries.

Project fields:
American Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278719-21

Richard J. Bell
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
The First Freedom Riders: Streetcars and Street Fights in Jim Crow New York

Research for a book on the desegregation of mass transit in New York City before and during the Civil War.

I seek the NEH Summer Stipend to conduct 2 months of archival research for a new book project. The First Freedom Riders is the story of Elizabeth Jennings, the 25-year-old New Yorker who launched the first successful civil disobedience campaign in U.S. history. On Sunday, July 16, 1854, Jennings stepped onto a ‘whites-only’ streetcar on Third Avenue becoming the first among a small army of young black women and men to fight to forcibly desegregate mass transit in New York City. The First Freedom Riders argues that their campaign to stage a civil war in miniature was unprecedented, radical, and highly coordinated. To disrupt and destroy Jim Crow in Gotham City, black activists built a new organization, the Legal Rights Association, that pioneered the art and science of protesting in public and developed strategies of civil disobedience—public set-pieces, boycotts, petitions, defense funds, etc.—that have become the hallmarks of grassroots anti-racism protests ever since.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/21/2021 – 8/20/2021


FT-278729-21

Elizabeth Andrea Ramirez Soto, PhD
San Francisco State University (San Francisco, CA 94132-1722)
Global South Filmmakers in European Experimental Television

Research and writing of a book about Latin American filmmakers who worked in European public broadcasting during the 1980s and 1990s.

This project provides a history of the cultural, aesthetic, political, and institutional exchanges between European public broadcasting and filmmakers from the Global South during the 1980s and early 1990s. Specifically, it examines the work of Latin American directors who, fleeing the Southern Cone dictatorships, relocated in Europe where they continued making films under the support of various television networks. The main goal is to explore the characteristics of these collaborations studying the context in which these films emerged, how they were made, their promotion, reception, and circulation within and beyond television. While doing so, it advances an understanding of Latin American cinema as a deeply transnational one, largely produced outside the boundaries of the nation-state. Overall, this research offers a historical account of an overlooked period of rich transatlantic and pan-European cultural dialogues.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Latin American Studies; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-278743-21

Marissa O'Connor Nicosia
Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus (Altoona, PA 16601-3777)
Seasonal Tastes: English Literary and Recipe Culture, 1550-1750

Research and writing towards a book examining the intertextual links among domestic writing, food culture, and early modern English poetry.

Seasonal Tastes investigates poetic style, culinary flavor, and the construction of diurnal time in early modern English literary works and practical handbooks. In early modern usage, the word “season” was a verb, describing the act and art of flavoring dishes, and a noun, indicating a specific time of the year. Likewise, “taste” referred both to bodily sensation and readerly pleasure; the consumption of food as well as a discerning appetite for literary culture. Seasonal Tastes puts literary works and “how to” literature in dialogue to explore flavor, time, literary form, and climate in the early modern period. This project intervenes in debates about how nature is depicted within literary studies, and within the humanities more broadly, by taking seasons as its central focus.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278744-21

Joanna Wuest
Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Biology and the Construction of Identity: Science, Citizenship, and Inequality in the LGBTQ+ Movement

Writing of a book on the influence of scientific concepts of queer identity on policy debates.

In examining the tenacity of biological visions of identity, my book manuscript “Born This Way: Science, Citizenship, and Inequality in the American LGBTQ+ Movement” reveals that we cannot conceive of political campaigns, litigation, and public discussion of LGBTQ+ rights as existing distinct from the realms of genetics and neurological research, biomedicine, and psychology. It demonstrates how this narrative of identity has been produced and reproduced by scientists, nonprofit leaders, litigators, and activists who have worked together to construct and to deploy biological conceptions of identity since the mid-twentieth century. Thus, the book illuminates the role that biologically inflected visions of human nature have played in the formation of political identities and attendant demands for full and equal citizenship. In other words, it posits that scientific institutions and authority should be properly understood as foundational to the character of American LGBTQ+ advocacy politics.

Project fields:
American Government; Gender Studies; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278756-21

Tai Elizabeth Johnson
Longwood University (Farmville, VA 23909-1800)
Shifting Nature: Agriculture, Environment, and Health on the Hopi Indian Reservation since 1882

Research for a book on how economic and environmental forces have affected ecological and human health on the reservation of the Hopi Tribe in northern Arizona.   

Shifting Nature: Agriculture, Environment, and Health on the Hopi Indian Reservation since 1882 is the first book to analyze how economic and environmental forces transformed one of North America’s oldest and most biologically diverse food systems, disrupting human and environmental health in the process. Intertwining archival research with oral histories conducted collaboratively with the Hopi Tribe, the book asks questions at the heart of environmental humanities: How do communities lose or maintain control of the cultural, economic, and environmental resources in which their subsistence is rooted? How does the erosion or resilience of traditional foodways shape human and ecological health? And how can oral history help us understand historic shifts in indigenous food systems, disease, and the environment? The project illuminates these questions by using the Hopi story as a microcosm through which to explore shifting histories of subsistence, ecology, and health in modern America.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 6/30/2022


FT-278757-21

Meredith Oda
University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)
Japanese American Resettlement and Alien Belonging, 1941-1952

Research leading to a book on the resettlement of Japanese Americans after internment during World War II.

This book project is a case study of aliens legally and categorically excluded from citizenship, yet privy to the extensive rights and responsibilities usually associated with citizenship. From 1941 to 1952, both citizen and alien Japanese Americans were deemed “enemy aliens,” incarcerated, and resettled in U.S. communities. This project explores the latter understudied resettlement period to understand the paradox of “alien belonging”: literally excluded Japanese Americans became the beneficiary of expansive state and private largesse, largesse not without constraints but inaccessible to most citizens. This aid helped Japanese migrants and their U.S.-born children to leave incarceration camps and craft forms of belonging in adopted communities that belied their alien status. Their story demonstrates a resonant alien inclusion, as Americans today struggle to understand our obligations towards detained migrants, asylum-seekers, religious minorities, and others seen as alien and excluded.

Project fields:
Immigration History; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 6/30/2022


FT-278766-21

Kritish Rajbhandari
Reed Institute dba Reed College (Portland, OR 97202-8199)
Rewriting the Past and Tracing the Limits of Community in Contemporary Indian Ocean Fiction

Writing of a book on the relationship between fiction and history in a selection of contemporary South Asian and Eastern African novels written in French and English.

This book project confronts the importance of lateral exchanges in the Indian Ocean in shaping the cultures and communities of the region. It takes the Indian Ocean as a transnational framework to explore the relationship between fiction and history in contemporary Anglophone and Francophone novels from South Asia and Eastern Africa. Examining the novels alongside multi-lingual, trans-historical archives, ranging from legal and administrative documents to travel narratives, photographs, and film, I contend that the novels employ a self-conscious mode of rewriting history, which exposes the limits of the various forms of community imagined in the region. This interdisciplinary project formulates a historically and culturally informed reading of the Indian Ocean that is sensitive to the region’s complex history of colonization and decolonization and at the same time responsive to its racial, linguistic, and cultural heterogeneity.

Project fields:
African Literature; Comparative Literature; South Asian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/28/2021 – 8/27/2021


FT-278790-21

Rita Lucarelli
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Agents of Punishment and Protection. Assessing the Demonic in First Millennium BCE Egypt

Research leading to preparation of a book on ancient Egyptian texts about the place of demons in religion. 

Demonology is an integral, though often neglected aspect of the ancient Egyptian religion. Defining “demons” poses issues of ontological classification, especially when dealing with an ancient civilization whose sources of study are not always descriptive neither comprehensive. In the ancient Egyptian magical texts and representations, a variegated series of liminal beings act as agents of punishment but also of protection towards the living and the dead. A contextualized and in-depth study of each of the available sources, which will be carried out in the proposed book-project, is necessary in order to understand the role that those agents played in the ancient Egyptian religious beliefs and how people would communicate with demons through magical practices and the help of professional ritualists. By assessing the existence of an ancient Egyptian demonology, the author will also attempt a comparative study with other discourses on demons in the ancient world.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Near and Middle Eastern History; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-278792-21

Elizabeth Ann Fretwell
Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA 23529-0001)
Tailoring Identities: Craft, Gender, and Material Culture in Urban Benin

Archival and ethnographic research so that she can finish drafting chapters two and three of her manuscript on "petty" economy in Benin, especially the practice of buying cloths and tailoring them to made-to-order clothes.

This book manuscript project is a history of tailors and clothing in Benin from the era of the precolonial Kingdom of Dahomey (c.1600 – 1894) to the recent past. In this part of West Africa, men and women regularly bring cloth purchased in local markets to artisan tailors to sew made-to-order outfits for ceremonial and everyday wear. By tracing the long history of the objects, craft knowledge, and practices of tailoring, this project shows how the making and wearing of tailored clothing gave form and expression to modernity, urbanization, and political transformations. In doing so, “Tailoring Identities” reveals how international and regional markets in cloth and clothing intersected with colonial, national, and local politics, as well as regimes of taste and shifting notions of identity and affinity. Employing archival, visual, material, and oral sources, this project posits that as tailors made clothes, they also crafted ideas and gendered experiences of self, city, and nation.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-278800-21

Maddalena Rumor
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)
'Dreckapotheke' in Ancient Mesopotamia and the Graeco-Roman World

Research and writing leading to a book about how ancient Mesopotamian medical knowledge influenced later Greco-Roman scholars.

This project uses a novel methodology of identifying likely mistranslations of pharmaceutical ingredients to expand the current thinking about the interrelation between Babylonian and Graeco-Roman medicine. It challenges the commonly-held notion that no textual parallels can be found in their respective medicinal/pharmacological literature. These findings not only contribute to the broader reconstruction of the social and intellectual context within which ancient medicine developed, but also lead to a better grasp of the often elusive connection between academic and popular healing practices. This study thus develops our understanding of how ideas circulated, developed, created a tradition, and eventually were transmitted in the Ancient World.

Project fields:
Classics; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/15/2021


FT-278823-21

Marc Becker
Truman State University (Kirksville, MO 63501-4221)
Philip Agee and the CIA in Ecuador, 1960-1963

Research leading to a journal article on Philip Agee’s 1975 account of his personal experience in the CIA, with a focus on Ecuador during the Cold War, 1960-1963.

Philip Agee published "Inside the Company: CIA Diary" in 1975 as the first uncensored exposé of CIA operations. His account drew both praise and condemnation for “naming names” of CIA case officers and their agents. Questions have always lingered regarding Agee’s motivation as well as the veracity of the information he includes, particularly since he did not have access to CIA or other government reports to write the book. Now, years later, with corroborating CIA and State Department documents along with foreign ministry records from Latin America, we can begin to answer these questions. Rather than examining this material through the lens of diplomatic history or international relations, this project employs a social history methodology to understand what we can learn from Agee’s account about those who were the targets of his investigations. The result will be a scholarly article in a peer-reviewed journal that will advance our knowledge of the Latin American left.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278842-21

Erin A. Smith
University of Texas, Dallas (Richardson, TX 75080-3021)
Rereading American Women's Crime Fiction of the Cold War

Archival research relating to a book on women’s genre fiction in the cold war era.

Feminine Noir?: Rereading American Women’s Crime Fiction of the Cold War is a scholarly monograph-in-progress. I have three purposes: (1) to think about women’s crime fiction as cultural documents of the Cold War that engage with what historian Elaine Tyler May calls “domestic containment”; (2) to present a comparative reception study of these books in their Cold War pulp paperback formats and in their contemporary feminist reprints; and (3) to rewrite the history of American crime fiction to more accurately reflect the centrality of women writers. Using a history of the book approach, I argue that these books illuminated how women navigated a society in which literal and symbolic violence against women and children was quite ordinary, and state authorities were often indifferent or hostile to the victims. In an era before second-wave feminism made cultural conversations about rape, sexual violence, and child abuse public, these texts engaged precisely those issues.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2021


FT-278860-21

Amy Gore
North Dakota State University (Fargo, ND 58102-1843)
Material Matters: Book and Bodies in Indigenous Literary History, 1772-1936

Complete a five-chapter manuscript on Indigenous book history, spanning 1772-1936.  

Material Matters focuses on Indigenous authors during the long nineteenth century, from 1772 to 1936, to examine the known firsts of Indigenous literature through their book history. Starting with Samson Occom’s A Sermon Preached at the Execution of Moses Paul (1772) as the first book published in English by a Native author, and moving to other first entries into Indigenous literary production, I argue that the publication history of Indigenous books matter: they embody a frontline of colonization in which Indigenous authors battle the public perception and reception of Indigenous books and negotiate the representations of Indigenous bodies. Few Indigenous have ever been studied extensively in terms of their book history, and through textual and bibliographical analysis along with substantial archival research, I attend to this significant scholarly gap by demonstrating the cultural connection between book history and the histories of displacement and resistance of Indigenous peoples.

Project fields:
American Literature; Native American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278865-21

Ireri Elizabeth Chávez Bárcenas
Bowdoin College (Brunswick, ME 04011-8447)
Singing in the City of Angels: Race, Identity, and Devotion in Early Modern Puebla de los Ángeles

Research and writing of a book about devotional songs and early modern culture in seventeenth-century New Spain.

I plan to conduct archival research in Mexico for my book project “Singing in the City of Angels: Race, Identity, and Devotion in Early Modern Puebla de los Ángeles.” The book examines the relationship between devotional songs and early modern culture in seventeenth-century New Spain.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American Studies; Music History and Criticism; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2021


FT-278869-21

Constance J. S. Chen
Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, CA 90045-2650)
Impacts of Travel Culture on the Formation of Chinese, Japanese, and U.S. Modernity and Global Identities from 1880 to 1940

Writing a chapter for a book on the impact of transpacific travel on U.S.-Asian cultures and relationships, 1880-1940.

Situated on the intersection of Asian American studies, U.S. history, and East Asian studies, my book manuscript uses archival materials in China, Japan, Taiwan, and the United States to analyze the ways in which transpacific exchanges between the 1880s and 1940s unsettled and reframed political, racial, and cultural modalities for Asians and Americans within the dual contexts of the U.S.' global rise and shifts in Asian axes of power. It seeks to highlight the role of Asians and Asian Americans as cultural intermediaries and to contribute to the study of U.S. history by incorporating transnational perspectives. The vogue for travel among Americans and Asians developed coterminously with the creation of new forms of intercultural relations and recalibrated nationalist projects on both sides of the Pacific. Ultimately, encounters between China, Japan, and the United States enabled the three nation-states to craft global identities and definitions of modernity for their own purposes.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; East Asian History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278874-21

Timothy Wayne Lorek
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Making the Green Revolution: Landscapes of Conflict and Peace in Colombia

Research for a book analyzing the place of Colombia in the history of the Green Revolution in agriculture that began in the 1960s. 

Making the Green Revolution connects the global Green Revolution in agricultural science and technology to modernization politics in Colombia and that country’s long-running rural conflict and violence. This book is based on archival research in over a dozen locations in Colombia, Puerto Rico, and the mainland United States. It is a revision of my 2019 Yale dissertation, which won prizes from Yale and the Agricultural History Society. The manuscript is under advanced contract with the University of North Carolina Press for the award-winning environmental history series “Flows, Migrations, and Exchanges.” An NEH Summer Stipend would facilitate targeted research to respond to reviewers' comments (in hand) and complete the manuscript by August 15, 2021. If public health conditions allow, I plan to spend June 1 - July 31, 2021 in Cali and Bogota, Colombia.

Project fields:
History of Science; Latin American History; Rural Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2022 – 8/9/2022


FT-278888-21

Sandra Lynne Shapshay
CUNY Research Foundation, Hunter College (New York, NY 10065-5024)
Bodies in Stone and Steel: An Aesthetics and Ethics of Commemorative Art

Writing toward the completion of a book on the function of monuments for the commemoration of shared civic ideals.

Bodies in Stone and Steel: An Aesthetics and Ethics of Commemorative Art, aims to be the first monograph devoted to a philosophical investigation of commemorative art. It takes up questions such as: What are the characteristic aesthetic effects of deliberate monuments and memorials, that is, how do they characteristically make spectators think and feel? How have the aesthetic codes of monuments and memorials developed historically and how might they fruitfully evolve in response to current controversies? Should societies continue to utilize such works to impart political and ethical lessons in public space, or should monuments become a mere relic in modern, pluralistic societies? A major aim of my project is to offer a moderate defense of monuments in the U.S. against iconoclastic arguments.

Project fields:
Aesthetics; Ethics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278925-21

Carla L. Keyvanian
Auburn University (Auburn, AL 36849-0001)
Architectural Design and the Emergence of a Modern Notion of History: The Hospital of Santo Spirito in Sassia in Renaissance Rome

Research and writing of a book on the architectural history of the Hospital of Santo Spirito in Sassia in Rome.

My project is a book manuscript investigating the relationship between architecture and historical understanding in 15th-century Italy that focuses on a monumental public hospital built in Rome. Its architect is unknown, the architecture not in line with current views about Renaissance architecture and its significance has gone undetected. I have identified the architect as one of the most important of his generation, leader of a group of vanguard humanists who collaborated on the design. I argue they manifested in that design their idea of architecture and its relation to new notions of history. My book inserts the hospital in the canon of Renaissance architecture; shows how architectural languages can provide evidence about intellectual contexts where written documents stop short; and examines the phenomenon of architects advancing history-writing methods, thereby contributing to our understanding of the genesis of architectural history and the discipline of history.

Project fields:
Architecture; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2021


FT-278927-21

Lale Can
CUNY Research Foundation, City College (New York, NY 10031-9101)
Empire of Exile: Treason and Banishment in Late Ottoman History

Research and writing for a history of internal exile in the late Ottoman Empire (1700-1900).

This project investigates how one of the world’s most important empires—the Ottoman Empire (1299-1922)—deployed exile as a tool of governance and offers a novel case study of treason in Middle East history. It reconstructs how exile shaped Ottoman political and social history, particularly conceptions of imperial belonging and territoriality. Weaving together legal, administrative, and literary sources, it considers the exercise and limits of state authority and violence, the notion of a collective that traitors were charged with acting against, and the emergence of an idea of an imperial homeland. In essence, “Empire of Exile” asks what it meant to be an Ottoman subject through the study of people accused of threatening the social and political order. The NEH grant will support the writing of a journal article that charts the constellation of crimes that constituted treason and traces the emergence of a uniquely Ottoman culture of exile.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History; Political History; Turkish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278929-21

Joshua David Katz-Rosene
Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, PA 17603-2827)
From Protest Song to Social Song: Music and Resistance in Colombia Through Fifty Years of Conflict

Writing and revising an ethnomusicological study of Colombian folk songs written between the 1960s and the 1990s. 

My project registers the development of Colombian protest song in the 1960s alongside the rise of communist guerrillas and tracks its rebranding as social song in the 1990s, when public support for the rebels waned. I argue that the terminological shift from protest song to social song represents a profound transformation in Colombian society’s views of armed resistance amidst a fifty-year civil conflict. My book is the first to analyze oppositional music in Colombia, a country where guerrilla violence persisted long after it dissipated elsewhere in Latin America. By evaluating the complicated legacies of twentieth-century revolutionary rhetoric and the protest music that propagated it, my project will contribute new perspectives to Latin American cultural and political history. Insomuch as it investigates the changing contexts within which musical resistance was defined in Colombia, it will also inform scholarly inquiry into the contingent nature of resistance.

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; Latin American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 9/30/2021


FT-278930-21

Robin Adele Greeley
University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)
Memorialization as Symbolic Reparation in the Inter-American Human Rights System

Writing the final two chapters of a book on public art intended to function as symbolic reparation within the context of Human Rights Law in the Americas.

In international human rights law, symbolic reparation has emerged as a compelling mode of embodying both the duty to repair victims of human rights violations and aspirations toward a more moral and just society. For the Inter-American Human Rights System, symbolic reparation has become a key juridical tool in promoting human rights. Yet the translation of those values into effective results remains a challenge. This book project unites the discourses of art history and international human rights law to address the role of memorialization in symbolic reparation in the context of the IAHRS. It examines five emblematic IAHRS decisions involving memorials, each encapsulating vital concerns regarding the protection and promotion of human rights, to analyze their successes and failures. It mounts an argument for the reparative and transformative potential of memorialization, centered on victim agency, process, aesthetics, and activating the connection between repair and transformation.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Latin American Studies; Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/11/2021 – 7/10/2021


FT-278937-21

Julia Bursten
University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Making Knowledge: Synthesis and the Aims of Science

Research and writing a book about how the study of nanotechnology contributes to the philosophy of science.

The branch of philosophy known as epistemology investigates how human knowledge works. The foundational question of this discipline is “How do we know?” That is, what counts as knowledge, and when do we have it? Science is often cited as generating special access to certain kinds of knowledge, but philosophical study of how science contributes to epistemology has primarily analyzed scientific theories, models, and explanations as the houses of knowledge. Philosophers have overlooked how the fruits of scientific making — that is, the synthesis of chemicals, materials, and biological parts — contribute to the structure and character of scientific knowledge. Using case studies from nanoscience, this project will establish an account of how synthesis generates and shapes scientific knowledge. The account will form the concluding chapter of my in-progress debut monograph, which concerns the contributions of nanoscience to philosophy of science.

Project fields:
Philosophy of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278946-21

Anna Insolio Corwin
St. Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA 94575-2715)
Encountering the Divine: Religious Intelligences in a Catholic Convent

Writing an article on how Catholic nuns talk about religious experience.

The proposed research will provide a critical foundation to understanding what religious intelligences are and how they interactively arise. Taking Catholic nuns as its focus, the present project will bring focused analysis to an existing corpus of data gathered in a Catholic convent in the midwestern United States with expert experiencers to ask the following questions: (1) what knowledge, associated outcomes, and community impacts do Catholic nuns associate with religious intelligences (defined here as: the specific knowledge and skills that arise from interaction with the divine) and (2) what are the communicative conditions through which religious intelligences arises and are shared in the convent. By devoting analytic attention to uncovering how religious intelligences arise and are shared in one ethnographic field site, the project will develop a research framework for the investigation of religious intelligence that will be available to be applied to future research.

Project fields:
Linguistic Anthropology; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278947-21

ShaDawn D. Battle
Xavier University (Cincinnati, OH 45207-1092)
Chicago Footwork: Re-Imagining Community and Interrogating the Politics of Home through Dance

Research and writing for the first chapter of a larger book project examining the practice of Chicago footwork, a contemporary dance form.  

Chapter 1 of my book project is titled “Footwork was My Sanctuary”: Toward an African Diasporic Spiritual Heritage. Chicago Footwork is a cultural practice endemic to Chicago and performed by Black youth on the South and West sides. As cultural critic and former practitioner, I will examine Footwork's potential for nation-building, "homemaking," and self-actualizing, in response to structural inequities and repressive power structures in Chicago. But this chapter, specifically, achieves this goal by situating Chicago Footwork culture within an Afro-Diasporic spiritual heritage, dating back to prehistoric Africa and transatlantic slavery. As a humanities research project, it examines a cultural formation birthed from interlocking systems of oppression, as well as the artform as an embodied vernacular dance of liberation. Thus, I locate Chicago Footwork as part of the Black expressive tradition ripe for interdisciplinary study in fields such as African American and Cultural Studies.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2021 – 8/9/2021


FT-278950-21

Corey Lee Twitchell, PhD
Southern Utah University (Cedar City, UT 84720-2415)
Rewriting Good and Evil: The Ethics of Narrative Causality in Holocaust Fiction of Edgar Hilsenrath (1926-2018)

Research and writing the fourth chapter of a book on Edgar Hilsenrath's novels, which analyzes the aesthetics of depicting disfigured and deformed characters.

Research and writing leading to publication of book on Holocaust survivor and German Jewish author Edgar Hilsenrath (1926-2018). The Holocaust has generated tremendous discussion about good and evil, much of which revolves around the notion that we can clearly distinguish between perpetrators and victims. In Hilsenrath’s works, both Jewish victims and Nazi perpetrators are rendered disfigured, transformed by violence, despite being on opposite ends of the spectrum. Hilsenrath thus rewrites common conceptions of good and evil. My project, Rewriting Good and Evil: The Ethics of Narrative Causality in Edgar Hilsenrath’s Disfigured Holocaust Fiction, is the first wide-ranging study to introduce the author and his fiction to English-speaking scholars, students, and other readers interested in the history of the Holocaust and its representation in literature. I seek support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Summer Stipends program to complete the book's fourth chapter.

Project fields:
European History; German Literature; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-278955-21

Marko Dumancic
Western Kentucky University (Bowling Green, KY 42101-1000)
Militarized Masculinity in the Bosnian Genocide

Research and writing towards an article analyzing the function of gender in defense strategies during war crimes tribunals following the Yugoslav Civil Wars in the 1990s.

This article-length research project focuses on the trials of Croatian and Serbian men accused of committing crimes against humanity and crimes of genocide during the Yugoslav Civil Wars of the 1990s. Specifically, I will study the trial records associated with 59 men sentenced by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Through a narrative analysis of court transcripts, judgments, and testimonies of those sentenced, I will identify the defense strategies the indicted perpetrators employed to create an explanatory framework for their wartime crimes. This research will delineate how culturally dominant ideas about masculinity during wartime create a context in which “ordinary men” can transform into war criminals and become agents of genocide. The project’s results will enhance our understanding of ethnic cleansing operations in Bosnia as motivated not only by regional ethno-religious grievances but also by local and context-specific gender dynamics.

Project fields:
European History; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2022 – 7/14/2022


FT-278965-21

Peter William Walker
University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY 82071-2000)
The Church Militant: Loyalism, the Church of England, and the American Revolution

Write three chapters of a history of Loyalist Anglicans during the American Revolution.

This project is about religious modernity and its discontents. It focuses on Anglicans in colonial New England and the Mid-Atlantic, a community notable for their overwhelming and forceful Loyalism during the American Revolution. This project treats their Loyalism as one aspect of a larger counterrevolutionary project comprising a series of novel political, intellectual, theological, and spiritual orientations. These Anglican Loyalists should be seen, not as stubbornly anachronistic reactionaries, but as key observers of and participants in religious modernity. They were occupied by the question of how to be religious in a modern, democratic society, a question which in the present moment is more important than ever. This project thus traces contemporary debates about religion and the public square back to the nation's founding, and is intended as a contribution to the public discussion occasioned by the Revolution's upcoming anniversary.

Project fields:
British History; History of Religion; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278978-21

Maryann Bylander
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-8091)
Safe Migration: Documentation, Debt and Development in Southeast Asia

Research and writing a book about governmental and non-governmental initiatives on migration between Cambodia and Thailand, and the impact on the migrants themselves.

Safe Migration is an ethnography of migration and development in Southeast Asia. Based on six months of multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in Thailand and Cambodia, and informed by over a decade of humanistic research in migrant sending communities, this book explores the intensifying efforts to order, regulate, and manage migration in Southeast Asia. The book has two central goals: first, it aims to complicate development discourses that conflate regular migration with safe migration. In doing so, it also draws attention to changing migration dynamics in the Global South, and describe how intensified entanglements with formal institutions (states, NGOs, and financial institutions) can generate new costs and risks for both migrants and their families at home. NEH funding will be used to provide support for two months of writing, allowing me time to complete a finalized manuscript of the book.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Geography; Sociology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278982-21

Liz Karine Moreno Chuquen, PhD
Idaho State University (Pocatello, ID 83201-5377)
Visual Narratives of Afroporteños Presence and Social Prestige in the Photographic Archive of Alexander Witcomb (1838-1905)

Writing of a scholarly article on blackness in Buenos Aires, using archival photographs from the collection of Alexander Witcomb, whose studio was open between 1880 and 1970.

I examine Alexander Witcomb’s photographic archive through the lens of cultural, race, and visual studies I will contribute to the understanding of the crucial role that Afroporteños have played in the construction of Argentinean culture and identities in the first decades of the 20th century. My project inserts the case of Afroporteños into broader discussions on race inside and outside Argentina, where race studies have primarily focused on whiteness, Jewish and Italian migration, and the occasional study of indigenous communities. I hope to intervene in this debate by pointing out the Afrodescendant presence in official archives and Argentinean visual culture beyond stereotypes and the performance of comic roles.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Hispanic American Studies; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278983-21

Toral Gajarawala
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
The Stranger: Existentialism and the Modernist Arts of South Asia

Research and writing of a book on the development of existentialist thought in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh during the 1960s and 1970s.

How did modernist poets, playwrights and artists imagine the idea of freedom in the early moments of a newly decolonized India, Pakistan and Bangladesh? The Stranger: Existentialism and the Modernist Arts of South Asia draws on the artistic trope of the “stranger” to consider the development of existentialist thought by writers, artists, and critics from South Asia in the 1960s and 70s. Arguing that existentialism offered a realm of freedom philosophically and aesthetically distinct from that augured by a new postcolonial citizenship, this project considers the range of texts that played with abstraction, metaphysics, and spirituality, insisting that the problem of the postcolonial self was still to be negotiated, even after Independence. I focus specifically on two artistic engagements with French writers Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus to ask how South Asian intellectuals created a distinct sense of the modern arts while also contributing to a global existentialist language.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; South Asian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/15/2021 – 2/13/2022


FT-278997-21

Zoe Ann Griffith
CUNY Research Foundation, Bernard Baruch College (New York, NY 10010-5585)
Capital and State-Formation in the Ottoman Mediterranean, 1680-1830

Writing a history of maritime trade in the eastern Mediterranean during the late Ottoman era, focused on ports along the Egyptian coast.

This project analyzes a virtually unstudied network of regional port cities and coastal communities in the eastern Mediterranean that played a crucial role in the Ottoman Empire’s transition to state centralization and economic marginalization around the turn of the nineteenth century. The study is centered on Egypt’s Mediterranean coast, home to a middling stratum of Muslim brokers, merchants, landowners, ship captains, and petty officials who resisted and mediated imperial challenges of revenue collection, European encroachment, and crises of political legitimacy leading to centralizing reforms in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire by the mid-nineteenth century. This is the first book-length study of Ottoman port cities that were not primarily defined by their relationship to European capital. Instead, it emphasizes aspects of Ottoman-Islamic financial, legal, and commercial culture that are often subsumed to European forms as the hallmarks of modernity in the eastern Mediterranean.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-278999-21

Larissa Kopytoff
University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)
Citizenship and its Boundaries: Law, Islam, and Empire in Senegal, 1870s-1930s

Research and revise chapter five and the introduction for a book that examines how Senegalese citizenship was continuously redefined and re-imagined by African men and women who negotiated their notions about identity at the beginning of the twentieth century.

This project explores how African men and women imagined and practiced citizenship in French colonial Senegal. Senegal was the site of a legal anomaly: four towns whose inhabitants claimed and exercised rights generally reserved for French citizens, yet did so while conducting their personal affairs according to Muslim law rather than the French civil code. This seeming contradiction held implications for the expansion and restriction of rights in other colonies and prompted decades of debate. Through laws, court cases, elections, petitions, and protests, we see how Senegalese men and women shaped that debate, mobilizing their own ideas about citizenship to seek political rights, legal protections, religious autonomy, and economic and educational opportunities. I argue that as they made claims on the French state, they also raised questions about the compatibility of French citizenship and Muslim law and called attention to the contradictions underpinning the French imperial project.

Project fields:
African History; European History; Legal History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279021-21

Cameron Hunt McNabb
Southeastern University, Inc. (Lakeland, FL 33801-6034)
Dramatic Prosthesis: Disability Studies and Drama

Research and writing for a book on the representation of disability in theatrical performances. 

This monograph theorizes frameworks for a dramatic disability studies, a much-needed intervention in the field of literary disability studies, and provides three case studies of its application. Challenging current text-based approaches, foremost "narrative prosthesis," the project interrogates how staged drama's reliance on embodiment--both of actors and audience members-- shifts representations and interpretations of disability. It offers analyses of Sophocles' Oedipus, Shakespeare's King Lear, and Nottage's Ruined as examples.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279028-21

Matthew Kenneth Shannon
Emory and Henry College (Emory, VA 24327-0947)
The American Mission in Mid-Twentieth Century Iran

Writing two chapters of a book on the influence of American missionaries in Iran, 1940-1970.

My NEH project is titled “The American Mission in Mid-Twentieth Century Iran.” It explores the multiple meanings of “mission” – or, the literal and figurative influence of the American Presbyterian missionaries – and how it became manifest in Iran during the mid-twentieth century. It argues that the Presbyterians contributed to a joint American-Iranian mission from the historical ruptures of the 1940s through the peak of U.S. global power in the 1960s. In an era associated with oil sales and arms deals, missionaries mediated the American encounter with Iran and informed the nationalist vision of Iran’s last shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; International Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279035-21

Abigail Clare Meert
Texas A & M International University (Laredo, TX 78041-1920)
Suffering, Struggle, and the Politics of Legitimacy in Uganda, 1958-1996

Archival research in Uganda and the United Kingdom, as well as conducting semi-structured follow-up interviews with previous informants, and writing one academic article as part of a book on the Ugandan Civil War in 1981-1986.

This project investigates the relationship between violence, fear, and political decision-making during the 1981-1986 Ugandan Civil War. In January 1986, the National Resistance Movement (NRM) took power in Uganda after a brutal civil war in which hundreds of thousands of Ugandans died. This project investigates the circumstances and motivations that drew civilians to the NRM during the 1981-1986 Ugandan Civil War. It does this to understand how communities understand and confer political legitimacy in moments of intense and protracted violence. Although based on my doctoral dissertation research, this project goes beyond the dissertation to provide the first comprehensive history of the Ugandan Civil War. An NEH Summer Stipend will support the final oral and archival research necessary for the completion of a book manuscript in the fields of African Studies and History, tentatively titled Suffering, Struggle, and the Politics of Legitimacy in Uganda, 1958-1996.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Military History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279045-21

Lori Kay Pearson
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)
Sexuality and Secularization: Marianne Weber (1870-1954) and the Origins of Religious Studies

Writing a chapter of a book on Marianne Weber’s (1870-1954) role in the formation of religious studies as an academic discipline.

My book uses the work of Marianne Weber (wife of Max Weber) to explore how debates about women’s rights informed early 20th-century theories of religion. Around 1900, Marianne Weber wrote about sexual ethics and family law, and participated in analyses of Western modernity among scholars in and beyond Max Weber’s circle. The works these thinkers produced became methodological cornerstones of numerous disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. I argue that gender was constitutive for their definitions of religion, modernity, and secularization in ways that have gone unnoticed: these definitions were marked not simply by liberal Protestant ideals of individualism and autonomy, but also by convictions about the value of dependence, relationality, and submission for modern life. With summer support I would draft a final chapter, spelling out the implications of my argument for current scholarship on the place of gender in definitions of religion and in ideologies of secularism.

Project fields:
Comparative Religion; Gender Studies; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/14/2021 – 8/13/2021


FT-279047-21

Sean Patrick O'Rourke
University of the South (Sewanee, TN 37383-2000)
A Rhetorical History of the Civil Rights Struggle in Greenville, South Carolina, 1947-1972

Research and writing for a rhetorical history of the Civil Rights Movement in Greenville, South Carolina.

This project is a study of the rhetorical aspects of the Greenville, South Carolina Civil Rights Movement. Inspired in part by former NEH Chair William Ferris’s contention that we have failed to adequately study the local chapters of national movements and events, this study investigates Greenville’s important but untold chapter of that history. Despite some recent scholarship, Greenville’s share of the Civil Rights Movement is poorly understood. Greenville’s efforts to desegregate are now so shrouded in the myth – perpetrated by the city’s chamber of commerce – that Greenville enjoyed “integration with dignity,” integration carried out with “grace and style,” that we have lost sight of what really happened. And if the history of the period is little understood, the rhetorical appeals that were made in the effort to desegregate the public and private facilities are downright unknown, as are the rhetorical strategies of resistance and control.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Legal History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/27/2021 – 8/26/2021


FT-279054-21

Lilya Kaganovsky
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Fifty Years of Soviet Women's Cinema, 1929-1979: The Visible and the Invisible

Research and writing one chapter of a book examining the role of women and attitudes regarding gender in the development of the Soviet film industry.

Focusing on fifty years of women’s cinematic production (1929-79), this project makes crucial interventions in our understanding of the role of women filmmakers in the establishment and development of Soviet cinema. It tells a new story about Soviet film history with new archival evidence, giving attention to directors, cinematographers, and film editors whose significant contributions have been elided or erased by previous accounts, and offering case studies of films and filmmakers that provide an in-depth look at examples of women’s cinematic production from the 1920s avant-garde to the late Soviet period. It also engages with feminist film theory (classic and contemporary) to think about what “women’s cinema” is or might be. Soviet examples challenge our received notions of female authorship, the female gaze, and feminist filmmaking, because those were based on an incomplete historical archive that never included films or filmmakers from the USSR.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Film History and Criticism; Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279061-21

Leslie Louise Marsh
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA 30303-2538)
Black Cinema in Brazil: Rethinking Authorship and Agency

Research and writing of a book on Afro-Brazilian Cinema from the 1960s to the present.

I submit my project, “Black Cinema in Brazil: Rethinking Authorship and Agency” to be considered for support by the NEH. In this monograph, I examine the history of Black Brazilians in audiovisual production and trace changing ideas of race and cultural identity in Brazil. I seek support to complete chapter 2 of this film historiography. In chapter 2, I examine the work of Zózimo Bulbul (1937-2013), who acted in Cinema Novo films before becoming the first Black Brazilian to direct a film. He later advocated for Pan-African film, cinema negro (Black Cinema), and inspired a new generation of Black Brazilian artists. I analyze how Bulbul shaped Afro-Brazilian representation and his significant contributions to Afro-Brazilian intellectual history. This project contributes a humanistic study to a growing body of scholarship on Black Brazilians in the social sciences and will interest scholars of Brazil, Latin America, Latin American Cinemas, Pan-African Cinemas, and the African Diaspora.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-279076-21

Sarit Kattan Gribetz
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
Jerusalem: A Feminist History

Research in Jerusalem for a history of women in the city, from ancient times to the present day.

The history of Jerusalem is usually told as a story about King David, Emperor Constantine, and Sultan Salah ad-Din – that is, as a history of a city that was founded, built, and ruled by powerful men. Throughout its history, from antiquity through the medieval and modern periods, however, the city of Jerusalem has been ruled by women; built by women; mourned by women; visited and populated by women. Moreover, Jerusalem is often personified as a woman and depicted in feminine terms, a common trope throughout the literary corpus. Despite the fact that Jewish, Christian, and Muslim women have played such prominent roles in every aspect of Jerusalem’s history, in every chronological period, women’s contributions are rarely foregrounded in accounts of the city’s history. Jerusalem: A Feminist History seeks to tell this history by demonstrating the ways in which Jerusalem’s women – historical and metaphorical – played central roles in the city’s conceptualization and development.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Jewish Studies; Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2021 – 8/14/2021


FT-279088-21

Kristin Gee Hickman
University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)
Representations of Black Migrants in the Moroccan National Imaginary

Research and writing leading to an article and eventually a book on the perception of Blackness in Morocco from the late 19th century to the present.

This project proposes to rewrite the standard account of Moroccan nationalism by beginning with its racialized borders. Specifically, I investigate how different representations of Black migrants have variously marked the shifting outer edges of Moroccan national identity from the nineteenth century to the present. In contemporary Morocco, the term “migrant” is strongly linked to the figure of the “illegal” West African traveling through Morocco en route to Europe. This project reinscribes this figure within a longer history of Black migrants who have been traversing Morocco for generations. I focus on five migrant figures: the sub-Saharan pilgrim, “Senegalese” soldier, Black anti-colonial activist, West African exchange student, and “illegal” African migrant. I then ask: How have Moroccans variously positioned these figures vis-à-vis the Moroccan nation? What do these shifting representations of otherness tell us about Moroccans’ own struggles with defining their national identity?

Project fields:
African Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-279170-21

James Gregory Given
Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
The Letters of Ignatius of Antioch between Forgery and Fiction

Research and writing leading to a book on the multiple interpretations of the letters of Ignatius of Antioch (c. early 2nd century CE).

The letters of Ignatius of Antioch seem to offer a tantalizing view into the earliest phase of Christianity. But the collection exists in many different versions, of widely varying length and composition. Scholarly efforts from the 16th to the 19th centuries sought to determine which version, if any, is the authentic witness of Ignatius. These efforts stimulated developments in critical methods and historical argumentation, practices which are foundational to the modern humanities. The solutions eventually proffered by these methods, however, only partially account for the manuscript evidence from antiquity. Against centuries of efforts to fix a single authentic Ignatius, I demonstrate that the letters are best interpreted as an “open text,” a corpus constitutively open to rearrangement, excerpting, or expansion. This allows us to see how the collection is adapted to function within specific historical and literary contexts—even, I suggest, as fictional narrative.

Project fields:
Ancient Literature; Classics; History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-279174-21

Olga Touloumi
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
An Architectural History of Public Interiors: United Nations and the Ordering of the World

Research?and writing for a?book analyzing the architectural integration of media and technology into the design of the U.N. Headquarters’ interior spaces, and how that design reflected contemporary conceptions of global governance and diplomacy.

My project presents the first book-length examination of the media and material construction of the United Nations, with attention to the new spaces for global governance that emerged in the immediate years following World War II (1945-1955). The United Nations, as the multilateral structure to regulate the passage from a colonial to an institutional organization of the world, brought forward new diplomatic practices, means of assembling, anticipating that the introduction of a global polity in its main organs. This book examines how the United Nations used architecture and media in its Council Chambers, General Assembly, courtrooms and conference halls to produce a new kind of public interior that insulated governing bodies from the publics they governed. My goal is to interrogate how these public interiors reconfigured the "imaginary institution" of globality and instrumentalized mass media and architecture for liberal internationalism.

Project fields:
Architecture; Diplomatic History; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-279175-21

Emily Drumsta
Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Good Measure: Poetic Form, Popular Politics, and Questions of Meter in Modern Arabic Poetry

Research primary sources and write the first chapter of a book that examines the use of classical poetry forms among modern Arab poets.

Good Measure offers a new history of modernity in the Arab world, focusing not on changes in political leadership or economic relations, but rather on poetry and poetics— and specifically, on the surprising durability of classical poetic forms in modern Arabic poetry. To compose metered poetry in Arabic, I argue, was not necessarily to be backward-looking or conservative. Meter and rhyme facilitated the oral transmission of poetry when publishing resources were limited, and the ancient meters were often used as forms of anti-colonial protest. When Arab poets discussed topics like “freedom,” “constraint,” “unity,” and “originality” in poetry, they were talking about much more than meters, strophes, and rhymes. The language of poetic form, I argue, was a metonymic one: poetry and its critical paratexts became the spaces where Arab intellectuals worked through questions of Arab identity, national citizenship, technological modernity, religion, secularism, and interactions with the West.

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Comparative Literature; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-279180-21

Anne Blankenship
North Dakota State University (Fargo, ND 58102-1843)
Religion, Race, and Immigration: How American Jews, Catholics, and Protestants Faced Mass Immigration, 1882-1924

Writing two chapters on religious responses to immigration in the United States, 1882-1924.

This book will explore how Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant leaders and organizations faced the mass immigration to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century and the subsequent immigration restrictions that peaked with the National Origins Act of 1924. Protestants inspired by the social gospel fought for just immigration reform and established settlement houses to aid and Americanize new immigrants. Other Protestants joined groups to restrict immigration and promote white Protestant supremacy. The challenge of mass immigration was more complicated for Irish Catholic and German Jewish Americans. As established American citizens they revered many of the same cultural values as Protestants, and the habits and beliefs of their co-religionists from eastern and southern Europe threatened to destabilize the acceptance they had gained in a Protestant-dominated society. While most sought just immigration policies, they disagreed on how new immigrants should fit with American society.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279219-21

Nicole Sackley
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Cooperatives, International Development, and American Visions of Capitalism, 1941-2000

Researching and writing one chapter for a history of cooperatives in American business after World War II.

This project reveals an important but unknown history of 20th-century Americans who debated US capitalism and furthered their own economic development dreams through international cooperative ventures. During the Cold War, debates about economic models and ideologies occurred within an international landscape where the cooperative model seemed to offer a malleable “middle way” between American “free enterprise” and Soviet and Chinese “collectivism.” International cooperative models attracted a diverse range of Americans. While some US cooperators hailed “co-op” capitalism as an ideal “American way” to be exported around the world, others saw in cooperatives blueprints to remake global capitalism and opportunities for international solidarity. My project inserts new actors, new ideologies, new hopes, and new failures into the scholarly understanding of how Americans participated in international development and how development visions came home to shape US culture and society.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 8/31/2021


FT-279242-21

Ben Max Davidson
Saint Michael's College (Colchester, VT 05439-1000)
Freedom's Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation

Writing and editing two chapters of a book on how the first generation of Americans who came of age during the Civil War and Reconstruction understood freedom.

What did freedom mean after the end of slavery in the United States? In order to answer that question, this project investigates the lives of black and white children, in the North, South, and West, who grew up during the Civil War era. By tracing the lives of figures both well-known and obscure from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries, I contend that this generation’s experiences illuminate how kinship, childhood, race, and domestic life intertwined at the heart of the struggle over freedom’s meanings. While scholars have conducted important work on nineteenth-century childhoods and on Civil War memory, this book demonstrates that “freedom’s generation,” a group of young people who exercised enormous influence both on meanings of freedom during the Civil War era and on fights over memory after the conflict ended, have not yet received their due as one of the most pivotal generations in U.S. history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 6/30/2021


FT-279247-21

Alexander Hidalgo
Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)
Mexican Soundscapes of the Colonial Era

Research leading to a book on the history of sound in colonial Mexico City.

My second book project, Mexican Soundscapes of the Colonial Era, considers the way ethnic diversity and racial difference structured people’s understanding of sound and listening during the long eighteenth century. Support from an NEH Summer Stipend would facilitate archival and field research in June and July 2021 in Mexico City to inform the drafting of three chapters.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279249-21

Rose S. Aslan
California Lutheran University (Thousand Oaks, CA 91360-2787)
The Intersections of Traditional Turkish Art, Religion, and Culture in Contemporary Istanbul

Research in Istanbul for a book on the place of traditional Islamic art in modern Turkey.

This project applies an interdisciplinary approach grounded in religious studies, and, over the summer, I will complete qualitative fieldwork among networks of artists in Istanbul. This research will result in a monograph on the history, production, and consumption of traditional art in contemporary Turkey. The project explores if and how traditional Turkish art is determined to be "Islamic" and modern and how different values are incorporated into Turkish artists' work through their art. The rise of neo-Ottomanism and political power of the Islamist AKP party has inspired a rising group of middle-class religious Turks who proudly embrace their religious identity. Supported by the pro-Islam government, traditional Turkish art has become increasingly popular and plays a significant role in expressing piety in a public context. This project reveals how art, spirituality, and culture influence each other and together shape society in Turkey.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Nonwestern Religion; Turkish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-279268-21

Rachel Trocchio
University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2009)
Endless Things: Jonathan Edwards, Puritanism, and the Art of the Infinite

Research and writing to complete one chapter of a book examining various modes of thinking employed in developing American Puritan theology.

I apply for an NEH grant to complete research for the last chapter of my first manuscript, a study on Puritanism and cognition. Tracing how 18th-century theologian Jonathan Edwards plied the new science of infinity to explain religious “awakening,” this chapter revises our understanding of the circumstances and stakes of two disparate historical moments: the mass religious revivals in the Connecticut River Valley known as the Great Awakening (1730s-1740s), and the mathematical advancements that peaked with the introduction of calculus. “Jonathan Edwards, Puritanism, and the Art of the Infinite” argues that calculus gave Edwards a language for apprehending the heart of evangelical conversion: the experience of instantaneous change over time. I now solicit support for a final research trip to Connecticut archives, in order to discover whether application of the infinite was an art unique to Edwards.

Project fields:
American Literature; History of Religion; Intellectual History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022


FT-269538-20

Roslyn E. Weiss
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
Justice in Plato's Republic: The Lessons of Book 1

Research and writing two chapters for a book about a new interpretation of Plato’s definition of justice in The Republic.

Although Socrates offers a novel definition of justice in Book 4 of Plato's Republic, it is argued that the place to learn what justice really means for Socrates in The Republic is Book 1. It is here that, through a series of conversations, Socrates teaches that conventional rules of justice, though important, are to be set aside if they lead to harmful consequences; that justice harms no one, neither friend nor foe; that justice cares for others and, in particular, for the weaker; and that the function of just government is first and foremost to encourage virtue in its citizens.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics; History of Philosophy; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269830-20

Leyla Ozgur Alhassen
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Qur’anic Stories: God, Revelation and the Audience

Completing a book analyzing the narrative and rhetoric of the Qur’an to understand the text and its worldview.

Despite excellent comparative work on biblical and qur’anic stories and research on historical aspects of the Qur’an, there are few books that exclusively explore qur’anic narrative technique. Yet, without such an understanding, we are left with an incomplete understanding of how qur’anic stories function as narrative. My book, Qur’anic Stories: God, Revelation and the Audience, remedies this gap by developing a methodology to analyze qur’anic stories, given their dual status as narratives that are religious, and analyzes a few qur’anic stories in order to explore the Qur’an’s use of narrative technique to reinforce theological beliefs. I am applying for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer fellowship to support the revision of my book. Edinburgh University Press is considering this book for publication in the Edinburgh Studies in Classical Arabic Literature series. I am planning to revise the final manuscript, after it is sent out for peer review.

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Near and Middle Eastern Literature; Religion, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


FT-269846-20

Kevin Kenny
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Slavery and immigration, an American history (1789-1889)

Research and writing leading to a book on the interrelationship of immigration standards and slavery in federal policy, constitutional reform, and political action after the Civil War.

Immigration and slavery are separate subjects but their histories are tightly entangled. Before the Civil War, the federal government played almost no role in immigration. National laws regulating the movement of one kind of people (immigrants) would have affected the movement of others (free black and slaves). The states set their own terms for the admission, exclusion, and expulsion of foreigners, and for the movement of free blacks and enslaved persons. Only after slavery was abolished did the Supreme Court rule unequivocally that immigration was a federal matter. By this time, the Chinese were subject to the kinds of racial practices that had been used against free blacks in the antebellum era. To justify Chinese exclusion, the Supreme Court ruled in 1889 that federal authority over immigration resided in the inherent sovereignty of the nation, rather than any particular part of the Constitution. This doctrine has been the basis of U.S. immigration policy ever since.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-269853-20

Julie Walsh
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Women and Freedom in the Works of French Philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632-1705)

Writing of two chapters of a book on the metaphysical account of human freedom developed by the French philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632–1703).

My project is a book-length analysis of the view of human freedom elaborated by French philosopher Gabrielle Suchon (1632–1703). Largely ignored by historians of philosophy, Suchon is nevertheless one of the first Western thinkers to leave a substantial body of work devoted to developing a metaphysical account of freedom that is tied to women’s social, political and moral lives. Her key philosophical innovation was to argue that freedom for women requires that they choose what she calls “the neutral life,” foreswearing personal and professional relationships. I offer the first systematic treatment of Suchon’s philosophical system, showing how it offers new, feminist perspective on early modern treatments of human freedom. By placing Suchon in the context of feminist thought, I join the larger scholarly tradition, led by feminist historians, of giving women their proper place in intellectual history.

Project fields:
European History; Gender Studies; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 8/14/2020


FT-269856-20

Jon David Schaff
Northern State University (Aberdeen, SD 57401-7198)
A More Perfect Union: The Political Philosophies of Jefferson, Hamilton, and Lincoln

Writing a historical study comparing the political philosophies of Thomas Jefferson (president, 1743-1826), Alexander Hamilton (secretary of the treasury, 1757-1804), and Abraham Lincoln (president, 1809-1865).

Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton are rightly depicted as adversaries in the American founding era. Jefferson was the tribune of people and a believer in small government based in the yeoman farmer. Hamilton promoted government support for banking and industry and showed deep skepticism toward democracy. This project argues that Lincoln serves as a synthesis of Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian ideas. Lincoln's thought marries Jefferson's preference for self-sufficient labor and natural rights to Hamilton's belief in a national economic policy and skepticism of Jeffersonian populism. Looking at each statesman's views on economics, presidential power, war, the Constitution, natural rights, and populism we see that Lincoln was able to blend ideas of both founders to build better than either intended. As the nature of the founding-era conflicts still inhabit contemporary politics, we can prosper from appreciating Lincoln's fusion of the best of Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian ideas.

Project fields:
American Government; Political Theory; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2020 – 7/15/2020


FT-269862-20

Grant Bollmer
North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
Measurement and Technological Inscription in the Psychology of Emotions, 1850 to the Present

Completion of a book on the history of technologies used to measure human emotions.

This project examines the history of emotions in American psychology through particular technologies used in empirical, laboratory research. It argues that psychological definitions of emotion have long been directly modified by the physical qualities of these laboratory technologies, following how, from 1850 to the present, psychological research on the emotions has confused the biology of an emotion with the physical qualities of tools psychologists use to measure emotion. The implications of this project demonstrate how “emotion” and “affect” have long been linked with how various technologies inscribe physiological signs of the human body, converting the body into data, with implications for contemporary technologies used in digital media--such as machine vision used in social media, surveillance, and security technologies--to identify internal emotions.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269883-20

Katie Johnson
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Racing the Great White Way: A Counter History of Early 20th-Century Broadway

Research and writing leading to a book about interracial collaboration in theater in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s, with analysis of performances staged on Broadway, in Harlem, in Greenwich, and in films.

I seek an NEH Summer Stipend to complete my third book, a monograph that charts a fresh account of one of the most vital moments of U.S. culture. Racing the Great White Way: a Counter History of 20th-Century Broadway shows that during a time when U.S. culture was profoundly segregated, the theatre was a site of interracial collaboration. Diverse theatre artists were integrating not only theatrical spaces, but also shaping aesthetics and cultural discourse. The project steers the reader away from the glistening lights of Broadway toward sparse performance spaces in the Village or the basement of the Public Library on 135th Street. Broadway and its adjacent spaces were not only major producers of theatre but also crucial architects of cultural work during the 1920s and 1930s. The central claim of the book is that by racing beyond Broadway, we discover not only a rich history of diverse theatrical performances, but also a powerful archive of U.S. culture transitioning to modernity.

Project fields:
African American History; American Studies; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/26/2020 – 8/24/2020


FT-269886-20

Kimberlee Sue Moran
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden (Camden, NJ 08102-1405)
The Arch Street Project: Visualizing the Historical, Archaeological, and Bioanthropological Evidence from the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia’s Burial Ground

Development of a digital map to present the results of salvage excavations of a historic cemetery in Old City, Philadelphia.

The “Arch Street Project” is a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional effort centered around the disturbance of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia’s cemetery, also known as LaGrange Place. The aim of the Arch Street Project is two-fold: 1) to maximize the research potential of this assemblage prior to its reinterment in 2023, and 2) to set a new collaborative model of bioanthropological research through full inclusivity, meaning all disciplines are welcome and able to contribute to and inform data gathering and interpretation. This proposal aims to produce a web-based, interactive archaeological site map depicting each individual burial and all its associated data. The map will allow users to filter and query data, view spatial distributions, and generate graphs and charts. Such a tool will greatly aid in the historical, archaeological, and bioanthropological interpretation of the cemetery and its integration into the larger historical narrative of early Philadelphia.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269888-20

Kacy Kim Tillman
University of Tampa (Tampa, FL 33606-1490)
The Liberty of Loyalty during the American Revolution: Black Loyalism in the Book of Negroes

Research and writing of an article on “The Book of Negroes,” a Revolutionary War manuscript that documents Black loyalists to the British cause held at the British National Archives as part of the British Headquarters Papers, 1774–1783.

For Black loyalists during the American Revolution, loyalty meant liberty. Responding to British Proclamations that promised freedom in exchange for fealty to the Crown, three thousand Black loyalists left New York in 1783 to start new lives elsewhere at the end of the American Revolution. Their long-overlooked stories are preserved in a little-known text called “The Book of Negroes.” The few historians who have discussed this book have treated it as little more than a ledger, but I argue that it is one of the earliest and largest collections of circumatlantic Black authorship, if we just know how to interpret it. This NEH grant would support the development of a peer-reviewed article concerning Black loyalist writing as it is represented in “The Book of Negroes.” Specifically, it would fund archival research at the National Archives in Kew (UK) to access the British Headquarters Papers, 1774–1783, a collection that contains “The Book of Negroes” and its ancillary documents.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269893-20

John Eicher
Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus (Altoona, PA 16601-3777)
Influenza, War, and Religion in Rural Europe, 1918-1920

Researching a history of the 1918 influenza epidemic in rural Europe, investigating the social, political, and religious factors shaping responses to the medical crisis.

This book project compares the 1918 influenza pandemic’s cultural effects on rural communities in the British isles (Great Britain and Ireland) and Central Europe (Germany and Switzerland) in order to understand popular perceptions of science and religion at the end of Europe’s first total war and the beginning of western medicine’s “golden age.” My transnational and comparative framework helps us understand the pandemic through multiple lenses including (1) wartime solidarities, (2) rurality, (3) religion, and, (4) empire. I hypothesize that: 1) Interpretations of the flu varied between urban/rural contexts and across national/confessional lines. 2) Rural communities placed greater trust in local leaders than in overburdened national authorities. 3) In contrast to modern Europeans’ dependency on a welfare state, rural Europeans in 1918 had fewer expectations that governments were responsible for citizens’ health, which enhanced social stability during the crisis.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; History of Science

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 11/30/2020


FT-269903-20

Jeehyun Lim
SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Amherst, NY 14228-2577)
Unforgetting the Korean War: Cultural Representation and Memory, 1950-2017

Writing of a chapter and related article for a book examining cultural representations of the Korean War.

The Korean War is commonly known as the “forgotten war.” Curiously, however, it was first named as such in a US News and World Report in 1951 when the war was still active. While the moniker has come to generally mean that there is scant cultural memory of the Korean War, memory is an ironic pathway to understanding the forgetting which first concurred with the unfolding of the events of war. My current book project, purposefully entitled “Unforgetting the Korean War,” comparatively examines representations of the Korean War in American literature and culture during the 1950s and the post-Cold War era to elucidate the cultural politics of memory on this war. It attempts to locate the cultural politics of the war in the very trope of forgetting by analyzing assemblies of Korean War representations—which are surprisingly numerous, varied, and noteworthy—at two high points of literary and cultural engagement with the war.

Project fields:
American Studies; East Asian Studies; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269909-20

Monica Dominguez Torres
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Pearls for the Crown: European Courtly Art and the Atlantic Pearl Trade, 1498-1728

Research and writing for a book on the history and influence of the Atlantic pearl industry on 15th-18th-century European art.

At times called the “Pearl Age,” the early modern period saw a sharp increase in the number of pearls that were fished, traded, and consumed around the globe. The discovery of rich pearling beds in the Americas, in particular, prompted the emergence in Europe of exquisite artworks featuring pearls and pearl-fishing scenes. Yet, such pieces have often been regarded as innocuous luxury items of interest only to art connoisseurs. "Pearls for the Crown" focuses on five under-studied artworks hailing from the Atlantic pearl industry in order to unveil the messages they conveyed within their geo-political contexts. Specifically, it looks at the discourses they articulated about imperial expansion and human mastery over nature, notions of great importance in courtly circles linked to the Spanish Crown. Such notions, moreover, helped legitimize the indiscriminate exploitation of natural and human resources that eventually laid out the foundations for the Anthropocene.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Hispanic American Studies; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-269921-20

Timothy J. Lombardo
University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL 36688-3053)
Beer Cities: How Craft Brewing Remade Urban America

Research for a book on the craft brewing industry’s impact on urban renewal.

This project examines the craft brewing industry's structural, cultural, and political effect on American cities. Since the 1980s, small scale, independently-owned brewing operations have acted as a catalyst for urban revitalization and cultural change. Architects and city planners have begun calling the process of craft breweries acting as beachheads for urban revival “beer urbanism.” This project seeks to historicize this process through an in-depth and comparative examination of the craft brewing industry in various U.S. cities. More than an exploration of craft brewing, this project is about cities, how they change, and for whom. In addition to situating beer urbanism in the context of recent American urban, cultural, and political history, this project also addresses broader questions about capitalism, gentrification, and unequal urban renewal.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269937-20

Omar Santiago Valerio-Jimenez
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Refuting History Fables: Collective Memories and History among Tejanos, 1930s-1960s

Research and writing one chapter of a book on how Tejanos (Texans of Mexican ancestry) worked to include their community in histories of Texas.

This project explores the efforts of scholars to challenge the omissions and negative characterizations of Tejanos in the state’s history and in public school textbooks. By analyzing the scholarship, historical preservation efforts, and activism of Carlos E. Castañeda, Adina Emilia De Zavala, José T. Canales, and María Elena Zamora O’Shea, the book will explore how these intellectuals sought to revise the historical interpretations of Tejanos to prove their loyalty, improve their public image, and advance their education. The state’s Anglo-centric history textbooks, they argued, were biased, and helped justify contemporaneous discrimination (including segregated schools) against Tejanos. The primary sources include Spanish- and English-language correspondence, speeches, organizational documents, newspapers, and essays. The final products will be published articles and a book, which will appeal to students of U.S. history, civil rights, and Mexican American Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Immigration History; Latino History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FT-269949-20

Amanda Laury Kleintop
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (North Adams, MA 01247-4100)
The Balance of Freedom: Abolishing Property Rights in Slaves during and After the Civil War

Research and writing one chapter of a book interrogating the significance of policies governing property rights in slaves before and after Emancipation.

Until the US Civil War, legal recognition of property rights in slaves enabled slaveholders, merchants, and investors to buy and sell slaves on credit and to mortgage slaves. The US government’s wartime decision to abolish slavery without reimbursing slaveowners for the lost value of freed slaves threatened to send this complex system of finance, founded on human property, into chaos. From 1864-1871, southern and federal lawmakers and judges, as well as everyday southerners, argued over who ought to be responsible for the financial burden of emancipation. This project explores the little-known history of white southerners’ defense of their perceived right to own slaves or to be reimbursed for their value. Their debates, ranging from former Confederate states to the US Capital, reveal that immediate, uncompensated emancipation in the US South was not an inevitable outcome of Union victory in the Civil War, and the process of emancipation extended well beyond the abolition of slavery.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Legal History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-269950-20

Brian Glover
East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
The Boswell Club of Chicago, 1942-1972

The writing of an article about the Boswell Club of Chicago (active 1942–1972) and the role of this elite society on the American reception of Scottish writer James Boswell (1740–1795).

This scholarly article, which will be finished with the assistance of the NEH Summer Stipend, interprets the eighteenth-century Scottish author James Boswell's second "career" in the twentieth-century United States. Specifically, it will draw on previously unstudied archival documents to trace the history of the Boswell Club of Chicago (1942-1972), an organization of ordinary, non-scholarly readers dedicated to Boswell's life and work, to eighteenth-century literature more generally, and above all to male sociability. The project aims to enlarge not just our understanding of Boswell's literary significance, but our larger understanding of sociability and gender among the last generations of Americans whose childhood outlooks were shaped entirely by print media. It will be submitted to a scholarly journal by the end of August, 2020.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/20/2021 – 8/20/2021


FT-269994-20

Hannah Weiss Muller
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Alien Invasions and Revolutionary Contagion: : The Aliens Acts, the 1790s, and the Changing Contours of Citizenship

Research for a book on British, Canadian, Caribbean, and American immigration legislation during the 1790s in response to the French Revolution.

An NEH Summer Stipend will make possible two months of archival research in London focused on reconstructing legislation passed in the British Caribbean against aliens between 1793 and 1794. This research is part of my next book project, Alien Invasions and Revolutionary Contagion, which provides the first comparative study of British, Canadian, Caribbean, and American aliens acts passed during the 1790s in response to the movements of individuals fleeing revolutionary France. The book places aliens acts in their broader context and also elucidates how international rivalries and fear of French-inspired radicalism shaped security policies, early immigration law, and citizenship practices throughout the Anglo-Atlantic world. At its broadest level, it documents a critical shift in how “aliens” and "enemies" were defined during the Age of Revolution, where political principles, rather than religious affiliation, came to distinguish “insider" from "outsider."

Project fields:
British History; History, Other; Immigration History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270008-20

Bobby J. Smith II
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Food Power Politics: Race, Civil Rights, and Food Access in the Mississippi Delta

Research and writing two chapters of a book on food politics in the Mississippi Delta during and after the civil rights movement.

Food Power Politics is the first book to analyze the interaction between oppressive and emancipatory practices of food power as exercised in the Mississippi Delta from the civil rights era to today. By documenting this dynamic, my book shifts the way we understand civil rights history and current struggles against food disparities in black communities. It offers a new line of inquiry that uncovers a neglected period of the movement when activists expanded the meaning of civil rights to address food as integral to social and economic conditions. This meaning-making process is used as a model by black communities today that mobilize around the food justice movement. By making these connections, my book shows how current concerns for food disparities in black communities are rooted in the civil rights struggle and how black communities work to create solutions to those disparities locally and nationally.

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division: