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33 matches

Program: Collaborative Research*
Date range: 2016-2018
Sort order: Award year, descending

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RZ-260848-18

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Christopher J. Ratte (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Notion Archaeological Research Project: The Biography of an Ancient Greek Urban Community

Excavation and analysis at Notion, an urban site from the Hellenistic and Roman periods, located in western Turkey. (36 months)

Archaeological excavation at Notion will examine how a community living in a port town in western Anatolia responded to developments in Greek urbanism and the expansion of Roman power. Notion lies in ancient Ionia, 15 km north of Ephesus. We focus on the tumultuous era of the 3rd century BCE to 1st century CE, when many cities were radically transformed through local initiative and external coercion. During this period Notion was relocated to a new site, but then abandoned after only a few centuries. Building on the results of archaeological survey, we will examine the historical and social processes enacted in the ultimately unsuccessful reinvention of the city through investigation of its residential areas. Research at Notion on urban development and devolution at the household scale offers a new approach to the study of western Anatolian cities, and contributes to comparative urban studies, household archaeology, landscape biography, and Ionian history.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$220,000 (approved)
$220,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


RZ-260900-18

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Jeffrey Barnet Fleisher (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Kathryn M. de Luna (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Matthew C. Pawlowicz (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)

The Demographics of Pre-History: South Central Africa Through Archaeology and Linguistics

Archaeological and linguistic research leading to a study of migration patterns in central Africa, 500-1500 CE.

The proposed project reconstructs the cultural history of mobility in south central Africa between the 6th and 16th centuries. Language shift and human migration have long served as explanations for the expansions of language families and populations. This project will be the first to study human mobility in such demographic histories as a historical problem in its own right, capturing the motives and contingencies that shaped changing forms of and ideas about mobility and, as a result, actually changed the pace and path of the larger expansion process. Such research on human mobility is only feasible with the creation of an interdisciplinary archive linking archaeological, ecological, ethnohistorical, and historical linguistic data. Each dataset will be developed at research sites in Zambia, a place lacking the traditional archives of humanistic research. The project illuminates the material, political, and cognitive lives of people who shaped the demographic history in this region.

Project fields:
African History; Anthropology; Linguistics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$209,724 (approved)
$209,724 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


RZ-260918-18

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Jeannette Eileen Jones (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

To Enter Africa from America: The United States, Africa, and the New Imperialism, 1862–1919

Research and preparation of an online resource and print publication about United States engagement with Africa during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. (36 months)

To Enter Africa from America (TEAA) is a collaborative research project whose goal is to reveal little known patterns of American movement across Africa in the context of broader American ideas about the continent that emerged during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. Specifically, TEAA places those actions in dialogue with the “African Question”—a body of political discourses that emerged during the mid-19th century that sought to articulate the meaning and relevance of Africa in an increasingly Eurocentric interconnected world. The collaborators argue that scholars have overlooked, underestimated, and understudied the new imperialism in Africa in the historical context of U.S. expansion and empire. TEAA will explore how such connections formed through American diplomatic, social, religious, and leisure activities in Africa, producing a published, peer-reviewed scholarly digital project, an interdisciplinary symposium, and a peer-reviewed edited volume of interpretive essays.

Project fields:
American Studies; International Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$216,106 (approved)
$216,106 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


RZ-260906-18

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Fallou Ngom (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

'Ajami Literature and the Expansion of Literacy and Islam: The Case of West Africa

Research and preparation for online and print publications of texts written in the West African languages Fula, Hausa, Mandinka, and Wolof that use Arabic script (‘Ajami). (36 months)

'Ajami is the Arabic term that refers to languages other than Arabic that are written in the Arabic script. 'Ajami has been instrumental in the spread of Islam beyond the Arab heartland and, while 'Ajami literatures of the Middle East and Asia are well-documented, scholars have tended to overlook the rich 'Ajami legacies of sub-Saharan Africa. This project will highlight the 'Ajami literatures of Hausa, Mandinka, Fula, and Wolof and their role in the spread of literacy and Islam in West Africa. Available on a freely accessible multimedia website, a general interpretive essay comparing the four literatures will be accompanied, for each of the four languages, by twenty digitized 'Ajami manuscripts. Each will include interpretive materials, annotations, Latin alphabet transcription, and French and English translations. Of these twenty, a select five will feature video interviews and recitations by native speakers. A selection of the work will be published in the journal Islamic Africa.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Languages, General

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2022


RZ-260683-18

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (Carbondale, IL 62901-4304)
Sara G. Beardsworth (Project Director: November 2017 to present)
Julia Kristeva (Co Project Director: November 2017 to present)

The Philosophy of French Intellectual Julia Kristeva

Preparation for publication, in both print and digital editions, of a volume of essays devoted to the thought of the French philosopher, psychoanalyst, feminist theorist, and novelist Julia Kristeva. (36 months)

A collaboration of about 30 scholars will relate an oeuvre of major contemporary intellectual significance to public concerns through interdisciplinary dialogue. Julia Kristeva’s multidisciplinary thought in philosophy, literature, feminist theory, and psychoanalysis unifies the collaboration. Her intellectual autobiography will provide general access to the scholarly dialogue. The dialogue, composed of essays by her foremost interpreters and critics together with her replies, will interpret, question, and extend the theoretical writings. It will address contemporary intellectual and cultural movements. It will discuss Kristeva’s public works on disability, health, and motherhood. The only published full bibliography will provide access to the original writings. The project is designed to stimulate further multidisciplinary scholarship and provide models for bringing the humanities to a general audience. The book will be the next volume in the Library of Living Philosophers series.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, General; Philosophy, General

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$39,300 (approved)
$39,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021


RZ-260752-18

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Stephen Douglas Houston (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Thomas G. Garrison (Co Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Citadels and Surveillance: State Defense at the Classic Maya Fortresses of La Cuernavilla

Archaeological investigation at the ancient Maya site of La Cuernavilla near Tikal, in present-day Guatemala. (36 months)

Proposed excavations at La Cuernavilla, Guatemala, target a defensive system of unprecedented scale for the ancient Maya. On current evidence, its dates align with an incursion by the Mexican metropolis of Teotihuacan. Attested in texts and imagery, that incursion may now have its martial “footprint”: a chain of elevated citadels and moated redoubts extending at least 17.6 km, siege features such as rock-cut reservoirs, rapid-response ramps from citadel summit to base, and evidence of surveillance over wide swathes. This research will test whether these facilities were built at one time and whether they are special-purpose garrisons and defensive bulwarks that served the city of Tikal, Guatemala.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$140,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


RZ-260766-18

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Douglas R. Appler (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Brent Cebul (Co Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Reassessing the History of Urban Renewal in the United States, 1950–1975

A conference and publications on the impact of urban renewal in the United States, 1950-1975.

During the mid-20th century, civic and political elites in more than 1,200 communities across the United States used federal urban renewal program funds to initiate locally planned slum clearance and redevelopment efforts. These projects had profound consequences for the communities involved, as they frequently targeted their oldest neighborhoods and most vulnerable populations. Efforts to write the history of urban renewal have been hampered by difficulties accessing data that correspond to its broad national impact. Many new data sources are making it possible for urban historians, planners, and architectural historians, among others, to more closely align urban renewal scholarship with the diverse geographies affected by the program. This conference will explore the consequences of urban renewal, prioritizing under-explored geographic scales, including small cities, suburbs, states, and regions, rather than the perspective of the single project in the major central city.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


RZ-255598-17

Goucher College (Baltimore, MD 21204-2780)
Evan Dawley (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Tosh Minohara (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Beyond Versailles: Reverberations of World War I in Asia

A multinational symposium that will bring together contributors of an edited volume to explore common research questions on the legacy of World War I in Northeast Asia. (20 months)

This project is a collaborative inquiry into the events and implications of the year 1919 for states and peoples across Northeast Asia. It asks, how did Northeast Asians shape their own realities, and the broader global situation, in the post-Great War world? Collaborators will conduct original research and analysis, viewing this pivotal year through the lenses of diplomacy, nation-building, social and cultural change, and the aftereffects of war. The project will culminate in the publication of a volume of essays, a summary article for publication in an academic journal, and a public symposium, all to occur in the centenary year of the Treaty of Versailles to draw attention to our interpretation of new beginnings in Asia after the War. We will demonstrate that the diplomatic and military endeavors, intellectual pursuits, and nation-building efforts of individuals and groups within Northeast Asia challenged European and American hegemony, and wrought fissures within the world order.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; History, General

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,293 (approved)
$33,293 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


RZ-255594-17

University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9055)
Bradley J. Parker (Project Director: December 2016 to February 2018)
Matthew Edwards (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Rory J. Becker (Co Project Director: February 2018 to present)

A Comprehensive Approach to Inca and Wari Imperialism in the Nazca Headwaters, Ayacucho, Peru

An archaeological study of the rise and fall of the Wari and Inca Empires, examining road networks and surrounding territory in the Andes mountains in the southern province of Ayacucho in Peru, to result in a website, an open-access database, journal articles, and a monograph. (36 months)

In her seminal chapter simply entitled "Empires," Carla Sinopoli (2001) lamented the fact that scholarship on ancient empires, the largest and most complex of pre-modern states, is far less developed than scholarship on other less complex ancient polities. This circumstance is further compounded by the fact that theoretical constructs used to organize, categorize and frame our understanding of ancient empires have been slow to develop. This situation is about to change. This grant will support a comprehensive field project aimed at disentangling the archaeologies of empire in a large study area in southern Ayacucho province of central Peru. Taking a multi-scalar approach, this project will produce comprehensive datasets from pre-Wari, Wari, pre-Inca and Inca times. Comparing these datasets will not only allow us to study phases of expansion, consolidation and collapse of two ancient empires, but will also enable us to examine the effects of imperialism in other regions and periods.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Latin American History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2018 – 1/31/2022


RZ-255604-17

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Emma C. Blake (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

An Archaeological Field Survey in the Trapani Province of Western Sicily

Field survey and interpretation of finds from the coastal area near Marsala, Italy, in order to investigate cultural interaction with North Africa across the Sicilian Channel over the past 7,000 years. (36 months)

This archaeological field survey in Sicily addresses millennia-long interactions with Tunisia, 90 miles across the Sicilian Channel. The project will include two field seasons of artifact collection and one study season for analysis of survey findings. Results will be presented at conferences, in journals, and as a field report. The Channel is one of the busiest crossings for undocumented migrants entering Europe. Current migrations are the latest manifestations of a history of crossings in both directions. Although scholars of particular historical periods have noted the ties linking Tunisia and western Sicily at moments in history, this story of evolving interactions over millennia has never been told. A collaborative project involving intensive field surveys in the corner of Sicily closest to Tunisia is ideal to investigate this complex story. The proposed project will re-construct and explain the Tunisian presence in Western Sicily over time.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics; Cultural History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,988 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


RZ-255605-17

College of New Jersey (Ewing, NJ 08628-0718)
Jo-Ann Gross (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

A Documentary History of Ismailism, the Second Largest Branch of Shia Islam, from the 16th-20th Centuries

Preparation for publication of a co-authored book and the creation of an open access digital repository of primary documents relating to Ismaili genealogical histories in Badakhshan in Central Asia. (36 months)

This project will examine the genealogical and documentary history of the Nizari Ismaili community of Badakhshan. The perception of Badakhshan as a remote and “peripheral region” in the Islamic world has marginalized the study of Ismailism and the peoples of the Badakhshan region within the scholarship on Islamic Central Asia. This project undertakes a detailed study of original Badakhshani Ismaili genealogical histories of pirs and khalifas from Tajikistan and Afghanistan dating from the 16th-20th centuries, in addition to letters and financial documents associated with them. Our goal is to render a defined corpus of these Persian-language texts legible as historical sources by digitalizing them; identifying their features; defining the local genres of genealogy, letter writing and document production as historical practices; and analyzing them as a source for local knowledge of the Ismaili tradition of Badakhshan. The end result will be an online open-access digital collection; a printed book manuscript; two international conference panels and a 1-day symposium at The College of New Jersey. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
History, Other; Near and Middle Eastern History; South Asian History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$301,000 (approved)
$271,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


RZ-255635-17

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Lisa Ann Maher (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Danielle A. Macdonald (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan

Excavation and analysis of early settlements of hunter-gatherers at the Paleolithic site of Kharaneh in eastern Jordan. (36 months)

The transition from hunter-gather to food-producing societies in southwest Asia was a pivotal shift in prehistory. The 20,000-year-old hunter-gatherer aggregation site of Kharaneh IV exhibits multi-seasonal, prolonged and repeated habitation, making it the largest Paleolithic site in the region and one that evidences emerging sedentism and settlement, economic intensification, and ritual behaviors associated with dwelling, almost 8,000 years earlier than previously known. As a central hub of occupation for groups from throughout the region, this site is uniquely able to inform us about the construction of communities and interaction networks across a broad social landscape by exploring the nature and motivations for aggregation by reconstructing the spatial organization of domestic and symbolic activities, and undertaking comparative analyses of material culture at contemporary sites to trace how the site’s inhabitants were integrated into broader spheres of social interaction.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 2/28/2021


RZ-255672-17

Iowa State University (Ames, IA 50011-2000)
David Marshall Miller (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Revolutions in the History of Early Modern Philosophy and Science

A conference of contributors to The Cambridge History of Philosophy of the Scientific Revolution, at which the contributors will refine their essays for the volume. (15 months)

A conference of international scholars, to be held at Iowa State University, considering new methodologies and results in the study of sixteenth- through eighteenth-century philosophy and the simultaneous birth of modern science, leading to the publication of an edited volume.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Philosophy; History of Science

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$63,113 (approved)
$63,113 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


RZ-255623-17

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Jane Buikstra (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Eleanna Prevedorou (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

An Archaeological Study of the Ancient Phaleron Cemetery near Athens, Greece

Archaeological study and analysis of 8th-5th-century of the cemetery of Phaleron, the ancient port of Athens, Greece. (36 months)

This study focuses upon the cemetery of Phaleron, at the port of the ancient city of Athens. The cemetery dates to the Archaic - Early Classical period (ca. 750-480 BCE), characterized by major sociopolitical reforms, including changes in ruling tenure, early codification of law, tyranny, and democracy. Phaleron cemetery consists of hundreds of burials, mainly simple pit graves, jar burials of infants, and skeletons with evidence for captivity, violence, and execution. The nature of the cemetery suggests the presence of lower status individuals, such as non-elites, outlaws, and the unwanted. By integrating archaeological and historical information with osteological, biochemical, and genetic data, we will address the identity of the people of Phaleron within what appears to have been a port community of diverse backgrounds. We ask for funding for a three-year project (2017-20) for the in-depth study, interpretation, and publication of the human burials of the Phaleron cemetery.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ) - Applicant/Grantee
American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,124 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


RZ-255760-17

Archaeology Southwest (Tucson, AZ 85701-1107)
Aaron Wright (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Archaeology and Oral Histories along the Lower Gila River in Southwestern Arizona, 600-1830 AD

Artifact survey at 43 Native American sites in the Gila River Valley in Arizona, leading to the development of interpretive print and online publications, lectures, and a book. (36 months)

The Lower Gila River Ethnographic and Archaeological Project (LGREAP) is an interdisciplinary, collaborative research program that is exploring and interpreting the relationship between cultural identity and migration along the lower Gila River in southwestern Arizona from 600 A.D. to 1830 A.D. through a Native American lens. In particular, LGREAP aims to couple archaeological and tribal interpretations of the past to yield a comprehensive, multiple narrative history on the dynamics of cultural identity in contexts of religious difference and migration. LGREAP has avid support from the four tribes with whom ethnographic research will be carried out. Furthermore, the Arizona State Historic Preservation Office has determined that the proposed archaeological fieldwork will not have an adverse affect on the historic properties, as regulated by Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Project deliverables include at least four peer-reviewed articles and a documentary film.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Comparative Religion; Native American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$175,000 (approved)
$175,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


RZ-255645-17

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3002)
Julia A. King (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Indigenous Borderlands of the Chesapeake: The Lower Rappahannock Valley Landscape, 200-1850 CE

Excavation and artifact analysis at eleven Native American sites along the lower Rappahannock river in Virginia, leading to the development of interpretive print and online publications and GIS datasets. (26 months)

The project seeks NEH support to develop a baseline history of an understudied but key watershed in the Chesapeake region of North America. The Rappahannock River valley, located between the better known Potomac and James rivers, was, circa 1608, densely populated with well-organized polities, presupposing a dynamic but still unknown history. Using collections- and fieldwork-based methodologies along with GIS technologies, Saint Mary's College of Maryland and its collaborators will explore this borderland river drainage, addressing questions of migration and mobility, political development, the forging of group identities, and responses to colonialism. Our approach is rooted in landscape, the digital humanities, and a perspective that emphasizes the long durée.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


RZ-255741-17

Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Sonia Hernandez (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
John Morán González (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

A Conference on the History and Legacy of the 1919 Canales Investigation in Texas

Organization of a conference on the 1919 Canales investigation into violence along the US-Mexican border. 36 months)

Reverberations of Memory, Violence, and History: The Centennial of the 1919 Canales Investigation places a traumatic event in U.S. history at the center of a public conversation about how instances of state violence not only exemplified deep socio-economic transformations in our nation and along its borders, but how community responses to such violence have left a long-lasting legacy. This project seeks to mark the centennial of the J.T. Canales Investigation of 1919 that called for an inquiry into the violence committed by the Texas Rangers, the state’s elite law enforcement organization, which proved to be the first major government investigation of anti-Latino violence in U.S. history. The Project will feature a two-day conference on the centennial and legacies of the Canales Investigation. It will subsequently produce the first scholarly edited volume based on selected and further expanded conference presentations.

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$65,000 (approved)
$65,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


RZ-255733-17

Center for Documentary Studies (Durham, NC 27705-4854)
Wesley Hogan (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
William H. Chafe (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

The 1965 Voting Rights Act and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee

The collection of oral histories, to be archived in a digital repository and interpreted in a scholarly book, of the work done by field workers of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee towards the expansion of voting rights in the 1960s. (24 months)

A central idea legitimizing U.S. democracy is that of “one person, one vote.” Though laid out in the country’s Constitution as “We the people,” it is far less clear how that ideal came to practical fruition nearly two centuries later in the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This project seeks to generate a new perspective on that pivotal moment, providing, in the process, a more precise and useful interpretative framework for understanding the civic activism of the broader civil rights movement. It pioneers a very different model than anything done before—active collaboration to create new scholarship between archivists, scholars, and those who “made” the history within the freedom movement.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$225,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


RZ-255780-17

University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Christopher J. Newfield (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Laura C. Mandell (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

The Limits of the Numerical: Metrics and the Humanities in Higher Education

Research and writing of a monograph and open access web materials describing the history and cultural theory of metrics in higher education. (24 months)

Our project seeks to develop a historical and cultural theory of metrics in higher education that can account for universities' and colleges' adoption of quantitative measures and offer humanistic methods for evaluating their educational and research impacts. We are particularly concerned with their impact on humanities disciplines, and with the ability of humanities disciplines to develop responsive practices that grow out of our methodologies. We will examine the origins and current operation of three areas of measurement discourse--research bibliometrics, learning outcomes assessment, and the value of college education--and investigate alternative models for improving research productivity and learning quality.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$175,000 (approved)
$174,416 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


RZ-249888-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Stephen Railton (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Worthy N. Martin (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Implementing Digital Yoknapatawpha

Continued development of the website http://faulkner.iath.virginia.edu/ that will map Yoknapatawpha County, the fictional setting of novels by William Faulkner, with links to places, characters, and events in the novels, as a resource for scholars, teachers, and students.

Underway since 2011, Digital Yoknapatawpha is a collaboration of 35 Faulkner scholars from 34 colleges and universities with a highly experienced digital humanities team at the University of Virginia. During the 3-year grant period this team will: complete the analysis of every location, character and event in Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha fictions—14 novels and 54 stories; enhance the project’s display and search capabilities; and publish its scholarly results online, in print and through conference presentations. As both resource and publication, the project will create transformative pathways into and yield new critical insights about one of the nation’s central imaginative accomplishments. Faulkner’s quest to create modern art out of American history, his long engagement with major social issues like slavery and race, and with challenging experimental forms of narrating time and space provide a perfect site for constructing new modes of scholarly interpretation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$286,000 (approved)
$286,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


RZ-249777-16

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Justin Leidwanger (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

The Marzamemi Church Wreck

Excavation and analysis at the underwater shipwreck site of Marzamemi in Sicily. See website at https://marzamemi.stanford.edu/.

With its immense and well-preserved cargo that includes prefabricated 6th-century religious architectural and decorative elements, the famous Marzamemi "church wreck" off Sicily raises critical questions about interrelated issues of private commercial and directed exchange, local and imperial patronage and propaganda, urban and provincial religious life, and maritime connectivity more generally. The site's unique material assemblage, its location astride some of the busiest Mediterranean sea lanes, and its historical context amid the twilight of the Roman Empire provide an ideal opportunity to evaluate the role of communication and exchange in these profound transformations of the ancient world. This proposal seeks funding to support a three-year multidisciplinary research program of excavation, digital modeling, and analysis as a window into this remarkable site.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


RZ-249786-16

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Allen E. Buchanan (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Russell Powell (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)

The Evolution of Moral Progress

Preparation for publication of a co-written book about the possibility of a theory of moral progress in light of current evolutionary explanations of morality.

Evolutionary theories of morality paint a pessimistic picture of moral progress, suggesting that certain types of moral progress may be unrealistic or inappropriate for beings like us. At the same time, our history of moral achievements indicates that morality is far more plastic than evolutionary accounts might suggest. In this collaborative book project, we combine our philosophical expertise to revisit the question of moral progress within the strictures of our best scientific understanding of human psychology and society. We explore what moral progress consists in, how it is possible given the kinds of beings that we are, the avenues through which it is effectively achieved, and what its ultimate limits might be.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$110,000 (approved)
$109,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


RZ-249792-16

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Nicola Terrenato (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

At the Roots of Roman Urbanism: The Gabii Project

Archaeological excavation and analysis at the ancient city site of Gabii, near Rome. See website at https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/gabiiproject/.

The Gabii Project is in the process of making a very significant difference to our understanding of the origins of Roman urbanism. It revolves around a decade-long, large-scale excavation of a unique major center, the Latin city of Gabii. Since the city was almost completely abandoned by the 1st century BCE, it offers unparalleled access to those Mid-Republican, Archaic and Iron Age levels that have proven so elusive elsewhere. Seven campaigns of excavation have so far already produced key advances in our knowledge. This complex stratigraphic context is being recorded with innovative 3D digital techniques, directly geared to a new kind of peer-reviewed online publication of the excavation results. Continuing and extending this excavation would allow the discovery of another major Mid-Republican public area of the city and the complete investigation of an Iron Age elite compound, throwing more crucial light on the formation process of Roman cities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$246,780 (approved)
$219,646 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


RZ-249860-16

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Nanxiu Qian (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Richard J. Smith (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Reconsidering the Sino Cultural Sphere: A Critical Examination of the Use of Literary Chinese by East Asian Cultures

An international scholarly conference with participants from Asia, North America, and Europe, reconsidering the role of classical Chinese written language in the development of China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam.

This conference brings scholars from Asia and the West into a direct conversation about the way that the classical Chinese written language, or literary Sinitic, has contributed to the shaping of the Sinosphere (China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam). For hundreds of years, the Sinosphere shared this language for recording and transmitting its rich cultures. A close reading of this huge but understudied body of literature will not only enhance our knowledge of the complicated process by which East Asian cultures negotiated their respective identities, but also contribute to a larger and much-needed academic conversation about similar processes in other parts of the world. To achieve this goal, we need to subvert the longstanding Sinocentrism of East Asian Studies, showing that once cultural products travel into another cultural context, they quickly become embedded in that physical and intellectual space, and evolve into new forms of literary life that bear indigenous qualities.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$65,000 (approved)
$65,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


RZ-249862-16

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Alexander Nagel (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Elizabeth Anne Horodowich (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Amerasia: A Renaissance Discovery

Research and writing for a book on how Europeans, during the Age of Encounters in the 16th and 17th centuries, saw Asia in the “New World," where Mexico could be India and North America could be part of China.

Amerasia: A Renaissance Discovery reveals many ways in which Europeans during the Age of Encounters saw Asia in the newly discovered lands of the Americas. We demonstrate that the association of America and Asia dominated the geographical imagination of Europe for over a century after 1492. By considering a plethora of texts, maps, objects, and images produced between 1450 and 1700, this study immerses the reader in a coherent if malleable vision of a world where Mexico really was India and North America was an extension of China. What does it mean, we ask, that Europe was coming into self-definition during the very period that it inhabited an Amerasian worldview? The resulting book and web portal will bring into view a dynamic model of the world and of Europe's place in it that was later suppressed by Eurocentric narratives. To rediscover this history is, we believe, a necessary part of coming to terms with the emergent polyfocal global reality of our own time.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Latin American History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


RZ-249825-16

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Intertextual Networks: Reading and Citation in Women's Writing 1450-1850

Research and online publications by the Women Writers Project (WWP) on the influence of reading practices on literary composition of early modern women writers.

The Women Writers Project (WWP) at Northeastern University seeks funding for a collaborative research project aimed at exploring and theorizing the representation of intertextuality, focusing on the citation and quotation practices of the female authors represented in the WWP’s digital collection, Women Writers Online (WWO). The project will cover three main activities. Members of the team will pursue research projects that contribute to our understanding of intertextuality, engaging with materials from Women Writers Online, and their outcomes will be expressed as public exhibits published in Women Writers in Context. Second, members of the team will produce a series of blog posts on intertextuality which will be synthesized as a final report on intertextuality. Finally, the WWP will extend its encoding of intertextual phenomena to represent quotations, citations, and other intertextual references in the WWO collection, with a comprehensive bibliography of referenced works.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


RZ-249831-16

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
William Henry Honeychurch (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Joshua Wright (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)
Chunag Amartuvshin (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)

Innovative Disruptions: The Archaeology of Nomadic Statehood in Eastern Mongolia

The Dornod Mongol Survey (DMS) will excavate, analyse, and publish findings on archaeological sites in the Sukhbaatar region of eastern Mongolia, looking to answer questions about Mongolia's political traditions, the rise of the Great Wall, and the rivalry between the civilizations of China and Inner Asia.

This proposal requests support for a three year archaeological survey and excavation project (2017-2020) to test a new model for Xiongnu state emergence. The Dornod Mongol Survey (DMS) project seeks to test this model in a part of Mongolia where archaeological research is still greatly under-represented, specifically in the southeastern steppe region of Sukhbaatar province. Our study not only adds significantly to knowledge of Mongolia’s political heritage, but to a fuller understanding of the development of East Asia as a vast territory composed of diverse political traditions alternately in competition and alliance over millennia. Study of these processes helps to explain the making of the Xiongnu state, the rise of the Great Wall frontier, and the enduring legacy of rivalry between the very different civilizations of China and of Inner Asia.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$221,059 (approved)
$219,918 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2020


RZ-249909-16

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Andrew I. Cohen (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Jennifer Anne Samp (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Reparative Justice and Moral Injury among Post-Deployment Soldiers

A multidisciplinary study of the impact of moral injury on members of the armed forces through structured focus groups guided by philosophical questions.

In this project, we draw together a multidisciplinary team of scholars and experts to investigate how the humanities can synthesize the lived experience of soldiers who have endured the discrepant experiences of moral injury. Humanists will collaborate with field investigators to explore core unresolved questions about how to understand and interpret moral injury. The results of this study will advance understandings of the normative significance of moral injury for relationships between armed forces members and their families, their communities, and the state.

Project fields:
Communications; Ethics; Religion, Other

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$180,000 (approved)
$180,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


RZ-249870-16

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Daniel Tichenor (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

States of Immigration: The History, Culture, and Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion

Preparation for a book, state-specific reports, several articles, and conference and workshop papers on four states of immigration with very different and revealing traditions and policies: Arizona and New Mexico in the Southwest, and the Beltway States of Maryland and Virgina.

This proposed project, States of Immigration, will provide the first in-depth, comparative analysis of the distinctive history, culture, and governing regimes of specific states shaping immigrant inclusion and exclusion. Our study trains a spotlight on four states of immigration with very different and revealing traditions and policies: Arizona and New Mexico in the Southwest and the Beltway States of Maryland and Virgina. The new knowledge will allow us to understand when and why a state's response to immigration is inclusive or exclusive and how the reaction to immigration impacts the character and culture of the state more broadly. We offer new insights on how integration is shaped by not just who the immigrant is, but also where one settles and when one arrives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Government

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 1/31/2019


RZ-249965-16

Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28036-9405)
Darian Totten (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Giovanni De Venuto (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)
Goffredo Roberto (Co Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Life on the Lagoon: Reconstructing the Biography of Human-Landscape Dynamics on the Salpi Lagoon, Italy

Archaeological excavation and analysis of the transformation from the Roman to the medieval period at the environmentally precarious lagoon site of Salpi on the Adriatic in the Apulia region of southern Italy. See website at http://salapiaexplorationproject.com/

This project studies human-environment interaction in the landscapes of the Salpi Lagoon, on the Adriatic Coast of southern Italy. This ancient lagoon, resource-rich but environmentally precarious, provides an opportunity to explore topics of humanistic relevance: the historical transformation from the Roman to the medieval worlds and the role of human-environment interaction as part of economic, social and cultural processes within this change. The project includes an integrated plan of archaeological excavation at Roman Salapia/Medieval Salpi; field survey and remote sensing on the lagoon; geomorphology; and cartographic and textual analysis. These data are brought together into a multi-phase GIS map to track changes and continuities over time, building a landscape biography of the lagoon. Thus, the project contributes a compelling historical case of how people mastered natural resources, influenced their environments, and confronted the challenges posed by both.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics; Medieval Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2020


RZ-249951-16

University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Lisa Hajjar (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Omar Al-Dewachi (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)
Mark A. LeVine (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Human Rights in the Arab World: Research, Advocacy and Public Policy

Preparation of a scholarly monograph, an annotated bibliography, articles, and policy papers, as well as the creation of a website, on human rights in the Arab World.

Human Rights in the Arab World will produce empirical research and comparative analysis about human rights in the region as a whole, and thus will contribute to the production of humanistic knowledge about human rights practice and discourse in ways that also will enhance future research, rights advocacy, and public policy. Our research incorporates an historical comparative view, but is particularly attentive to the relationship between human rights activism and the revolutionary upheavals – and in some contexts counter-revolutionary repression – since 2011 (i.e., the so-called "Arab Spring"). Our overarching goals are to probe the impact of struggles to promote and defend rights prior to and since these upheavals, to document and analyze the work of human rights organizations across the region, and to assess the degree to which human rights discourse informs public consciousness and political struggles for democratic change as well as accountability for gross violations.

Project fields:
International Relations; Law and Jurisprudence; Sociology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 8/31/2019


RZ-249953-16

Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
Catherine Cymone Fourshey (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Rhonda M. Gonzalez (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)
Christine A. Saidi (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Expressions and Transformations of Gender, Family, and Status in Eastern and Central Africa 500-1800 CE

Collection, analysis, digital mapping, and interpretation of historical linguistic data relating to 55 societies across Bantu-speaking Africa, and co-authoring a book about social life and gender roles in precolonial Africa.

This collaboration is centered on questions about lineage and gender as dimensions of authority, identity, belonging, and worldview historically. It builds on the esteemed work of colleagues who have undertaken historical studies of gender in Africa to interrogate epistemological assumptions. Words are a portal into how people lived in past societies. We study the history and meanings of words people spoke to understand what they did, produced, and valued. We will collect a new set of linguistic data focused on spheres related to the above inquiries for approximately 55 societies across Zambia, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Mozambique. Our aim is to produce a monograph examining how historically matrilineages underpinned the way communities determined organization, inheritance, and social authority. We leverage our prior individual work in Africa for a comparative trans-regional analysis and expand the geographic and linguistic scope.

Project fields:
African History; Gender Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


RZ-249985-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Donald A. DeBats (Project Director: December 2015 to present)

Newly Discovered Voices from America's Most Turbulent Time: Black and White Oral Voting in the First Enfranchisement

Completion of an online database and digital resource, as well as research and writing of journal articles and book chapters, related to voting records and social networks in two Kentucky counties during the late 19th-century.

This project investigates individual voting behaviors, black and white, following the Civil War and black male enfranchisement. Two Kentucky counties with large African-American populations and contrasting economies and historical information are the focus. Only Kentucky continued oral or viva voce voting after black enfranchisement, creating in poll books a treasure trove of never before used individual political data. The project focuses on the context in which voting occurred, linking census, tax, and membership records (religious affiliation as possible) for all residents. One county is mapped at the individual level. The project follows black and white voters across multiple elections, revealing the political effects of network and neighborhood. Now we can understand why black voting continued, or did not, and appreciate both political courage and cross-racial alliances in which blacks and whites, fierce partisan opponents, cooperated in selecting local judicial and law-enforcement officials.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$280,000 (approved)
$280,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2020