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State: Alabama
Date range: 2015-2016
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FA-232872-16

Deborah Cosier Solomon
Auburn University at Montgomery (Montgomery, AL 36117-7088)

The Poem and the Garden: Rival Media in Early Modern England

A book-length study of the relationships between poetic craft and garden design in 16th- and 17th-century England.
 

This project explores how the major aesthetic conventions of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century poetry take shape through garden imagery. To place poetry in the garden and the garden in poetry was not just a reiteration of old metaphors; it represented a kind of decorum, a means of matching work to site in a way that could offer readers a rich array of multi-media allusions and varied (sometimes paradoxically varied) points of view. In order to demonstrate this aesthetic interchange between garden and lyric, the present study ranges through a number of generic spaces, from sixteenth-century plays and sonnet sequences to seventeenth-century pastoral modes. Drawing attention to the distinctively trans-media manifestations of garden and lyric art introduces new perspectives on the cultural value of form and its involvement in matters of genre, print technology, environment, and self-fashioning.

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PG-233647-16

Historic Mobile Preservation Society (Mobile, AL 36604-2910)
Melanie Thornton (Project Director: May 2015 to present)

General Collections Assessment at the Historic Mobile Preservation Society

A general conservation assessment of the collections housed in the Historic Oakleigh House, a circa 1833 Greek Revival house museum, and the archival collection housed in the Minnie Mitchell Archives building, constructed in 1980.  Two conservators, one specializing in furniture and woodwork and the other in paper-based collections, would review the museum’s holdings and provide the organization a first assessment with which to plan for future preservation.  Highlights of the collection include a Thomas Sully portrait of Madame Octavia LeVert, a portrait of actor Edwin Booth, and several personal items of James C. Calhoun, including his ink well and hair bracelet.  The artifacts and archives support interpretive programs on the antebellum South for 4,000 visitors annually, as well as for students of public history, art history, and material culture at the University of Southern Alabama, Springhill College, and the University of Mobile.

The grant will provide funds for the Historic Mobile Preservation Society to hire conservation specialists to conduct a general assessment of the museum and archival collections housed at the Historic Oakleigh House and the Minnie Mitchell Archives. The museum and archival collection are significant in learning and interpreting the history of Mobile, a 300-year-old port city along the Gulf Coast. With over 1,150 artifacts and roughly 12,500 archival items, the collection is representative of various time periods of Mobile's history, with the primary focus on 1840-1860. The collection is a primary resource for scholars, students, authors and historians, who are researching the history of Mobile. Through our university partnerships, the collection at HMPS is integral to the post-secondary humanities education in Mobile. With the recently adopted Collections Management Policy, a collections assessment is the vital next step in long-term planning for preservation and care of the collection.

Project fields:
African American History; Art History and Criticism; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FT-248921-16

David Head
Spring Hill College (Mobile, AL 36608-1791)

"Wavering on a Tremendous Precipice": George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the Continental Army

A book-length study of George Washington's Continental Army and the Newburgh Conspiracy of 1783 as a significant event in the formation of the new nation.

My project investigates the challenge of reintegrating the military into civilian life as seen in the Newburgh Conspiracy, a still mysterious affair at the end of the American Revolution when angry officers apparently collaborated with nationalist-minded politicians to pressure Congress to approve new taxes that would be used to pay the army, satisfy the nation’s creditors, and strengthen the central government. The book will be the first full study of the episode and its significance for the new nation. Works on the revolution often move from the victory at Yorktown to the origins of the Constitution, and when Newburgh is discussed, it is to praise Washington's leadership, condemn the scheming founders, or evaluate whether it was a true conspiracy. I approach the episode broadly, using it to see how the U.S. transitioned to peace; that is, how soldiers are reestablished in civilian life, how a nation does justice to its soldiers, and how civilians adjust to the return of peace.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Military History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249036-16

Ben Preston Robertson
Troy State University Main Campus (Troy, AL 36082-0001)

The Plays of English Author and Critic Elizabeth Inchbald (1735-1821)

Preparation of the first complete scholarly edition of plays by English writer, Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821).

This project involves the collection and publication of authoritative versions of the complete plays of actor, novelist, playwright, and literary critic Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821). Having collected copies of the manuscripts of all of Inchbald's plays at the Huntington Library (San Marino, California), I would like to use the research period (June and July 2016) to work on transcriptions, critical reception studies, and introductions for each of the twenty plays. The project is already underway and has an estimated completion date of 2020.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


HB-232176-16

Bertis Deon English
Alabama State University (Montgomery, AL 36104-5716)

Civil Wars and Civil Beings: Societal Construction, Reconstruction, and Post-Reconstruction in Perry County, Alabama, 1860-75

Writing and research toward the publication of a book about racial cooperation in Reconstruction-era Perry County, Alabama.

"Civil Wars and Civil Beings" is a scholarly book manuscript about Perry County, Alabama, during the Civil War era. Reconstruction is foremost. Unlike neighboring places in the Black Belt, one of the South’s most violent areas during Reconstruction, Perry County experienced few major economic, political, or racial clashes following Confederate defeat. Nostalgic whites threatened several activist blacks and white Republicans in Perry, but only a handful of individuals were hanged, maimed, shot, whipped, or killed in the county due to prejudice. Instead, whites and blacks in Perry usually developed the types of relationships and institutions that helped African Americans enjoy citizenship. This occurrence was uncharacteristic for Alabama and the remainder of the South from 1865 through 1874, the orthodox years of Alabama Reconstruction.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232632-16

Donald James Fader
University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)

Italian Music in Louis XIV’s France: The Goûts-réunis, Noble Patronage Networks, and the Roots of the Musical Enlightenment

Preparation of a book on French music and patronage networks during the late reign of King Louis XIV (ca. 1685-1715).

This is a study of the social, intellectual, and musical implications of a mixed Italo-French musical idiom (the goûts-réunis) that emerged during the late reign of Louis XIV (ca. 1685-1715). This phenomenon brought an end to the dominance of a style established by Jean-Baptiste Lully as a touchstone of French "good taste" defined against Italian "extravagance." I propose a reevaluation of the period’s cultural history--heretofore seen as a product of the rise of a bourgeois public sphere--by documenting the critical role played by experiments with the Italian style among networks of princely patrons, their courtiers, and artistic clientèles. Their writings and scores reveal the goûts-réunis to be a tectonic shift in French musical language emphasizing the expressive effects of Italian harmonic techniques promoted as part of their broader artistic opposition to royal classicism, and an incubator for Enlightenment concepts of the sublime and the irrational in the arts.

Project fields:
European History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234360-16

Troy State University Main Campus (Troy, AL 36082-0001)
Martin Tyner Olliff (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Wiregrass Common Heritage Project

Digitization of materials about the Wiregrass region, which spans southeast Alabama, southwest Georgia, and northwest Florida, and public programs including a workshop on African American genealogical sources in Alabama. The applicant would partner with the Dothan Landmarks Foundation and Houston-Love Memorial Library to host two community scanning days, post digitized items to the Alabama Mosaic repository, provide public programming intended to engage residents of this region, and commemorate the history of the region, named for the tough grass that fed cattle. While preserving the history of this under-documented region, the project would also provide community training in recording and capturing community archives.

The Wiregrass Archives (WA) of Troy University, working with the Dothan Landmarks Foundation and Houston-love Memorial Library, will host two community scanning days in Dothan, AL. Five scanning teams will digitize and capture Dublin Core metadata from community-supplied photographs and documents. Scanned copies will become property of the WA, which will post them to its website and social media sites, and submit them to the statewide digital database, Alabama Mosaic. WA will provide scanned copies to community donors via thumb drives. A metadata consultant and scanning supervisors will train and supervise scanning team members, and we will recruit local senior citizens to provide historical content information and context about scanned images and documents. WA will host training, two community workshops on preserving family archives and African American genealogical sources, and a project summary presentation. WA will build a traveling exhibit of appropriate scans.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


AV-248374-16

Auburn University (Auburn, AL 36849-0001)
Mark Wilson (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Dialogues on the Experience of War

A literature and film discussion program, focusing on World War I and Vietnam, for veterans in Alabama communities, and two related semester-length courses in Alabama state correctional facilities.

Veterans, family members, and others will join past and present through six reading-discussion programs in six participating communities in Alabama, as well as in two semester-length courses offered in state correctional facilities in Alabama. Each discussion will be based on a different genre—fiction, memoir, and film—on World War One and the Vietnam War. Reading-discussion sessions will be led by NEH discussion leaders who have been prepared in a three-day residential program led by two content experts (one who is a veteran); one Veterans Administration counselor (also a veteran); one English professor who is an expert discussion leader (and also a veteran); one humanities council program director who has worked with groups on a similar program.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Dialogues on the Experience of War

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$74,127 (approved)
$74,127 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


FT-229986-15

Jennifer M. Feltman
Unknown institution

Moral Theology and the Cathedral: Sculpted Programs of the Last Judgment in Thirteenth-Century France

Summer research and writing on Art History and Criticism, History of Religion, and Medieval Studies.

The Last Judgment, the moment in Christian theology when Christ will separate the Blessed and Damned, was depicted in no less than 20 monumental sculptural programs in thirteenth-century France. Unlike the rare twelfth-century examples at Autun and Conques, these dramatic portals do not emphasize judgment, but rather the potential for salvation: Christ shows his wounds instead of pointing to Heaven or Hell. This book places the novel imagery of the Last Judgment in the context of the new, practical literature for pastoral care, which spread from the University of Paris through clerical networks and--it is argued--was made visible in sculptural programs at the cathedrals of Chartres, Paris, Reims, and Amiens. Perhaps of greatest significance, the book opens up a new way for thinking about sculpted program as works of visual exegesis. This methodology highlights the importance of intellectual history and manuscript studies for the understanding of portal sculpture--and vice versa.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History of Religion; Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


BH-231421-15

Alabama Humanities Foundation (Birmingham, AL 35205-7011)
Martha V. Bouyer (Project Director: March 2015 to present)

"Stony the Road We Trod...": Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road" is a comprehensive, interactive teacher workshop that includes lectures by renowned scholars, an opportunity to enter into discourse with movement participants, development of instructional units, and travel to key sites of memory dedicated to the Modern Civil Rights Movement. Each week of Stony the Road We Trod (Stony), teachers will participate in a comprehensive study of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and the role that Alabama played in thrusting the struggle for civil rights to the forefront of every media outlet in the world. Teachers, by participating in interactive lectures and discourse with noted scholars and historians, will come to understand the true impact of the movement and how the events in Alabama were central to the movement. The two week-long sessions will take run June 26-July 2 and July 10-16, 2016.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,370 (approved)
$179,370 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/1/2016