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Key words: Gender (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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HB-251162-17

Angela Vergara-Marshall
California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)

Unemployment in 20th-Century Chile

Completion of a book on the history of unemployment in Chile from the Great Depression through the 1980s.

In this project, I examine how social, racial, and gender categories shaped public efforts to regulate the labor market and selectively protect workers facing unemployment in Chile throughout the twentieth century. I argue that traditional efforts to distinguish between vagrants and the “real” unemployed, social fears toward the non-working poor, legal definitions of formal work and people’s own expectations about work influenced the experience, protections, and rights of unemployed and non-formally employed men and women in modern Chile. More generally, I contribute to the humanities by looking at unemployment beyond exclusively class and economic analyses and outside traditional industrial countries. Using the tools of social history and based on a wide range of archival and periodical sources, I narrate the story of the unemployed and the efforts of the State to define and control the labor market in Chile from the 1930s-Great Depression to the Debt/Oil crisis of the early 1980s.

Project fields:
Labor History; Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


HB-251183-17

Francis Hugh Wilford
California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

The History of the “Special Relationship” between Great Britain and the U.S. from the Colonial Era to the Present

Research for and writing of a book-length study of British-U.S. relations as viewed through family and emotional ties.

This project examines the history of the “special relationship” between Great Britain and the United States from the perspective of intimate relations. Influenced by the recent cultural and emotional turns of diplomatic history, and drawing on a wide range of historical sources and cultural texts, it examines how matters of the heart have linked – and divided – British and American men and women from the colonial era to the present. It also considers how the language and imagery of intimate affiliation – in particular, of gender, emotion, and sex – have both reflected and shaped political relations between the two English-speaking empires. By turning its focus on the personal sphere of trans-Atlantic relations, The Anglo-American Romance provides a new, critical lens for interrogating the evolution of an alliance that continues to hold tremendous global significance in the twenty-first century, for both good and ill.

Project fields:
British History; Diplomatic History; U.S. History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


HB-251216-17

Sandrine Sanos
Texas A & M University, Corpus Christi (Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5503)

Representations of Violence, Displacement, and Gender in Post-World War II France

Completion of a book on the cultural and intellectual history of war and violence in post-World War II France.

This book is a cultural and intellectual history of political imagination in Cold War France from 1954 to 1967. It analyzes how war, genocide and displacement shaped political ideas and cultural identities in a "postwar" time rife with conflicts in France and abroad. While in the shadow of the Holocaust, the French empire was consumed by violence--especially the bloody and brutal Algerian War of Independence. This interdisciplinary project explores how two groups (Francophone writers and artists who had migrated to France after experiencing war, genocide, or torture as well as French anti-colonial authors) proposed new ways of thinking about political community and belonging. The gendered rhetoric they used anchored their vision of politics and framed how injured and violated bodies were discussed. While most histories of the postwar tend to cast war and displacement as exceptional, this project shows how they are central to political imagination in a post-colonial global society.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Gender Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 5/31/2018


FA-252423-17

Erik S. McDuffie
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

Marcus Garvey and the American Heartland, 1920-1980

A book on the impact of Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) in the American Midwest in the 20th century.

Garveyism in the Diasporic Midwest: The American Heartland and Global Black Freedom, 1920-80 is the first book to connect the Midwest to transnational black political protest. Through Garveyism and the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the largest black protest movement in world history, the U.S. industrial heartland emerged as an epicenter of black internationalism. Its global manufacturing centers and political infrastructures offered blacks opportunities that they could not find elsewhere – fertile ground for the region to emerge as a stronghold of the UNIA and subsequent black freedom movements. Attending to the paradoxes and gendered contours of Garveyism, my book uses the framework of the diasporic Midwest to globalize African American history and to reorient the study of the African diaspora by taking into account the significance of the American heartland in shaping the history of the twentieth-century black world.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Gender Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252471-17

Katherine Henninger
Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4600)

Southern Childhood in U.S. Literature and Film

A book-length study on representations of childhood in southern literature and film.

Made Strangely Beautiful is an interdisciplinary rhetorical analysis of tropes of childhood in literature and film of or about the South. Rather than the experiences of actual children, southern or not, I am interested in how ideas of childhood, southern-ness, and American-ness have been made through and against each other. A long tradition of strangeness (queer, grotesque, Other) attached to representations of the South is reflected in representations of its children. But as much as a peculiar South has served to contrast a normative nation, the South--particularly, I argue, its children--has been and continues to be central in narratives drawing region and nation together. Figures of both innocence and corruption, purity and ambiguity, southern children are made to embody the fissures of race, sexuality, gender expression, and class that threaten to undermine liberal rhetorics of U.S. national identity, and also to represent the nation’s best hope of transcending those divisions.

Project fields:
American Literature; Film History and Criticism; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


FA-252595-17

Monica Kittiya Lee
California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)

A Linguistic Study of Brasilica, the Hybrid Portuguese Language of Colonial Brazil

A book-length study of Brasílica, the linguistic middle ground in Brazil between speakers of indigenous and Portuguese languages.

My book is a social and cultural history that revises the historiography of colonial and imperial Brazil. It demonstrates that indigenous peoples, far from fading from sight, actively engaged society and shaped history. Through spoken utterance, the Indians infused the medieval Catholicism brought by the Portuguese with their own concepts and forged a syncretic religion. My detailed study of the translation manuals of the Brasílica, the lingua franca spoken between peoples of different languages, introduces new and understudied archival materials. It sheds light on linguistic evolution and on the relations sustained between colonizer and colonized. The heart of this project examines the social practices that reflect how peoples have dealt with diversity, and how variety innovated practices, constructed communities, engendered divisions, and so, molded identities.

Project fields:
History of Religion; Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PG-252919-17

University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)
John Edge (Project Director: 05/03/2016 to present)

Southern Foodways Alliance General Assessment

The Southern Foodways Alliance (SFA), based at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (CSSC), will use the NEH Preservation Grant to hire the consulting firm AV Preserve to review primary source materials, both physical and digital archives, to assess their condition and offer recommendations for preservation as the first steps of creating a new and central SFA archive housed at the CSSC, which will be able to be accessed via research visits and a website. The SFA collection offers a window into the American South through its changing foodways, amassing primary resource materials important to academic work in humanities fields that include U.S. economic, social, and political history; immigration history; labor history; cultural studies, gender studies, race studies, studies, geography, and cultural anthropology. The SFA collection includes 802 completed digital oral histories and 102 documentary films including 700 hours of raw interview and b-roll footage.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


AC-253405-17

CUNY Research Foundation, Bronx Community College (Bronx, NY 10453-2804)
Peter Kolozi (Project Director: 06/22/2016 to present)

"Presente": Developing Latino-Centered Learning Communities

No project description available

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


AC-253436-17

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (Edinburg, TX 78539-2909)
Linda English (Project Director: 06/23/2016 to present)

Revising the Women's Studies Program

No project description available

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Women's History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$68,028 (approved)
$68,028 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-231915-16

Susanah Shaw Romney
University of Arkansas, Little Rock (Little Rock, AR 72204-1000)

Personal Interactions and Imperial Geographies in Early Modern Dutch Colonies

No project description available

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232028-16

Romita Ray
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

The Visual Cultures of Tea Consumption in Colonial and Modern India

Research for a book-length study on the development and visual culture of tea in India from the late 17th century to the present.

Transformed into a prized beverage and a botanical novelty, Chinese tea spawned a vibrant culture of tea drinking in Britain, while triggering revolutions and wars in two continents. It also altered the landscape of India where Britain’s vision to become a self-sufficient producer of tea eventually crystallized in the wake of the Opium Wars in China. Ushered through the Canton trade, tea united the histories of China, Britain, India, and North America, transforming swathes of land into plantations in India and Sri Lanka, and producing botanical specimens, tea utensils, and furniture. These artifacts in turn engendered scientific research, social exchange, medical debate, commercial advertising, and patriotic zeal. It is against this backdrop that I examine the visual cultures of tea consumption in India, first under the auspices of the East India Company; next, under the Victorian Raj; and finally, in the post-Independence era when tea became widely recognized as a national drink.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232791-16

Suzy Kim
Rutgers University, New Brunswick (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)

Women Behind the Iron Curtain: A Cultural History of North Korea

Research leading to publication of a scholarly article and book on the role of women and the significance of gender in North Korea during the Cold War.

This project examines the role of women and the significance of gender in North Korea during the Cold War. Rather than duplicating histories of the Cold War as a masculine battle of political acumen, this research emphasizes the affective dimensions of power and dominance of feminine tropes as key to understanding North Korea. Women proved to be the primary cultural icons, and feminine tropes became models for emulation throughout society. If the construction of modern citizenship has always been a gendered process of delineating appropriate masculine and feminine roles in service of the state, this project explores how North Korean women (and men) were mobilized throughout the Cold War as sacrificial mothers. While there are parallel sacrificial women in other contexts, North Korean developments were unprecedented in the ascription of motherhood to men to create a new model of militarized citizenship that was at once masculine and feminine, drawing on transnational Cold War cultures.

Project fields:
Cultural History; East Asian History; Gender Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232937-16

Gina Ann Herrmann
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)

Voices of the Vanquished: Spanish Women of the Left between Franco and Hitler

Archival research for a book-length study of Spanish Republican women who resisted European fascism from the 1930s through the 1960s. 
 

Voices of the Vanquished is a book about Spanish and Catalan women’s oral histories that recount and grapple with their participation in anti-fascist movements in Spain during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), their fight against the dictatorship of Francisco Franco (1939-1975), their involvement in the French Resistance during World War II (1940-45), and for some, their survival of Nazism. The first three chapters of the book are written. NEH support would allow me to complete the last two chapters, comprising a section which brings the story of these women to their work in the French Resistance, and finally to Germany, at Ravensbrück. My project contributes to four areas of inquiry: the history of anti-totalitarian women’s movements in Europe; gendered violence against women political prisoners; oral history; and studies of identity as developed in response to intensely lived ideological affiliations.

Project fields:
European History; Gender Studies; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FA-232982-16

Ellen Hartigan-O'Connor
University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)

America Under the Hammer: Auctions and Market Culture, 1700-1850

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-233399-16

Steven Anthony Barnes
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)

Gulag Wives: Women, Family, and Survival in Stalin's Terror

The completion of a book on the women imprisoned in a Gulag known as Alzhir, a forced labor camp in Soviet Kazakhstan, during Stalin’s “Great Terror” in the 1930s.

This book project offers an in-depth history of a Stalin-era Gulag forced labor camp in Kazakhstan designed to hold the wives of victims of the Great Terror, a group of women arrested for no crime other than being their husbands' wives. Using formerly secret Soviet archival documentation in conjunction with unpublished memoirs, letters, and interviews of former prisoners, the book will reassess women's experiences of dislocation and persecution as a way to better understand not only the history of the Gulag but also women's roles, the shape of gender identities, and the conception of the family in Stalin's Soviet Union. Examining women's responses to the harsh Soviet penal system, the book explores the complicated nature of Soviet policies that simultaneously focused on women's emancipation and entry into the industrial labor force while reinforcing traditional roles as wives and mothers and placing limits on women's labor roles.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Russian History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-233404-16

Elizabeth N. Emery
Montclair State University (Montclair, NJ 07043-1624)

Clémence d'Ennery (1853-1914): A Female Connoisseur in the Age of Male Collecting

Completion of a book-length study of Clémence d'Ennery (1823-1898), the first French woman to build a museum of Asian art, and the social and cultural forces that influenced 19th-century women art collectors in France.

The nineteenth-century French fascination for Asian art has generated much scholarship, little of which mentions women collectors. This book brings light to the social context surrounding Clémence d'Ennery, who assembled 6,300 objects from Japan, China, and India, built a museum with her own money, and willed it to France. She was the first French woman of her time to do such a thing, yet she is unknown today. This case study of d'Ennery and her museum serves as a magnifying glass through which to examine developing cultural forces that made it difficult for nineteenth-century women to make their marks as collectors. The book brings attention to d'Ennery's story by discussing major issues in the humanities, including injustices in the writing of history, stereotypes about ethnicity and gender, the struggle for non-elites to gain cultural capital and respect, and the choices made when acquiring and displaying art.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
French Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


CH-233584-16

Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
James Peterson (Project Director: 05/01/2015 to present)

Black Publics/Lived Experience: Africana Studies and the Public Humanities at Lehigh University

No project description available

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Grants

Total amount offered:
$500,000

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


PG-233753-16

Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5601)
John Anderies (Project Director: 05/05/2015 to present)

Media Cabinet for Audiovisual Collection of the John J. Wilcox, Jr. LGBT Archives of the William Way LGBT Community Center

This application is for the purchase of a media cabinet for the storage and preservation of the audiovisual collection of the John J. Wilcox, Jr. LGBT Archives at the William Way LGBT Community Center. The audiovisual collection of the Archives exists in a variety of formats and addresses topics including LGBT history, civil rights, gender and sexuality studies, religion, anthropology, HIV/AIDS history, and legal history.

Project fields:
History, Other; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$4,128 (approved)
$4,128 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PG-233845-16

Gerber Hart Library and Archives (Chicago, IL 60626-4097)
Lucas McKeever (Project Director: 05/05/2015 to present)

Speaking Out: Preserving the LGBT History of the U.S. Midwest

Historical narratives of the LGBT community in the United States predominately focus on the coasts, specifically New York City and San Francisco. Despite this focus, the first gay rights organization to receive a state charter in the United States was the Society for Human Rights founded in 1924 by Henry Gerber in Chicago, Illinois. Chicago and the greater U.S. Midwest has a vibrant LGBT community with a history worth documenting, preserving, and sharing for generations to come. Gerber/Hart Library and Archives was founded in 1981 and has since grown into the largest LGBT library and archives of the Midwest. Utilizing NEH funding, Gerber/Hart's collection will undergo its first general preservation assessment conducted by the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The resulting report will equip Gerber/Hart staff with the tools necessary to ensure this history remains accessible to researchers for generations to come.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Gender Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,860 (approved)
$5,860 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234522-16

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Rebecca Trivison (Project Director: 06/25/2015 to 01/11/2016)
Anthony Gibbs (Project Director: 01/11/2016 to present)

Ohio Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Scanning Project

The Gay Ohio History Initiative (GOHI) is requesting $12,000 to develop the Ohio Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Scanning Project. The Ohio LGBT Scanning Project is a humanities based project designed to digitize historical materials from members of Ohio’s LGBT community to build a comprehensive history of this community. The LGBT Scanning Project will build on the efforts set forth by GOHI to digitize community collections. GOHI will hold this community event at the Ohio History Connection in Columbus, Ohio.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 11/30/2016


TR-235124-16

Radio Diaries (Brooklyn, NY 11201-8319)
Joe Richman (Project Director: 08/13/2015 to present)

The History of Now

Production of a series of 17 radio documentaries to be distributed as public radio broadcasts and online podcasts examining significant events in 20th-century United States history.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Journalism

Program:
Media Projects Production

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 4/30/2018


FT-248228-16

Judith Steinhoff
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

Grief in Italian Gothic Art

A book-length study of the relationship between images of grieving in paintings and the public display of grief in late medieval Italy.

My project is a book on the ways that 14th-century Italian religious images shaped viewers’ understanding of religiously and socially acceptable grieving behaviors. While the focus is religious images in the church and in the home, also integral to the project are their relationships to sermons, religious plays, conduct literature, and laws regulating funerals. All of these “media”, widely known to the 14th-century public, I argue, informed each other and reinforced acceptable expressions of grief, particularly, but not only, for women. My work reveals that gendered social behaviors were encoded even in pictures created primarily for purposes of prayer and spiritual edification. It thus brings a wholly new perspective to the functioning of religious visual and performative imagery, and identifies a previously unexamined path of transmission for gendered behavioral expectations in 14th-century Italy.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248808-16

Patricia Ann Tilburg
Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28036-9405)

The Parisian Workingwoman, 1880-1936

A book-length study of French women garment workers in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

Project fields:
European History; Labor History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


FT-248848-16

Febe Dalipe Pamonag
Western Illinois University (Macomb, IL 61455-1390)

Patients' Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s

A book-length study of the leper colony on Culion Island, the Philippines, during the period of American governance, 1898-1950

This project will advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients' engagement with American colonial officials, an understudied theme in the literature on empire and public health policy, and U.S. occupation of the Philippines. In 1905, American health authorities established a leper colony in Culion, an isolated island in Palawan. Suspected lepers were forcibly removed from their homes and relocated to Culion. Most scholarship on Culion highlights its role as a laboratory for civic experimentation and how it was embroiled in major political issues of the day. In this project, I consider the views and practices of leprosy patients to show their resistance, as well as adaptation and accommodation of certain regulations in order to improve their daily lives on the island. This project also addresses such issues as the criminalization of disease and the degree to which individual rights may be compromised in the name of public health, all of which have contemporary resonance.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248888-16

Kim Felicia Hall
Barnard College (New York, NY 10027-6909)

"Othello Was My Grandfather": Shakespeare and Race in the African Diaspora

Research for a book on the relationship between William Shakespeare's play Othello and African American culture, 19th century to the present.

This book project uses versions of Shakespeare’s Othello to connect Shakespeare and freedom dreams in the African Diaspora. It examines stage, print, transnational and digital "performances" of Othello from the 19th century until today to discuss several linked phenomena: the role of Shakespeare in constructions of blackness and race; discussions of race and genealogy in Afrodiasporic thought; the appropriation of Shakespeare by black communities; the policing of canonical literature along racial lines; and the race/gender politics of the American stage and popular media. Othello the play and its performance history become a space through which black writers explore issues of racial belonging, interracial relationships, gender, migration and power.

Project fields:
African American Studies; British Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 9/30/2016


FT-249217-16

Lori Harrison-Kahan
Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)

Pioneering Jewish Women Writers in the Progressive Era

A book-length study of a group of American women Jewish writers based in San Francisco.

“The Deghettoization of American Jewish Literature: Pioneering Women Writers in the Progressive Era” examines a group of turn-of-the-twentieth-century, San Francisco-based writers whose work provides alternatives to the ghetto tale that has long dominated scholarship on early Jewish American literature. Broadening our understanding of pre-World War I Jewish literary history and American women’s writing, this project tells the stories of forgotten women writers (Emma Wolf, Bettie Lowenberg, Miriam Michelson, Harriet Lane Levy, Anna Strunsky, and Rose Strunsky) who made important contributions to American and transnational literary culture during the Progressive Era. The work of these writers may be over a century old, but their writings and careers offer fresh perspectives on Jewishness and gender and compel us to consider how and why certain voices have been excluded from the American literary and cultural canon and from ethnic literary history.

Project fields:
American Literature; Gender Studies; Jewish Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249253-16

Sandrine Sanos
Texas A & M University, Corpus Christi (Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5503)

War Displacement, and Gender in France, 1954-1967

A book-length study of intellectual and cultural responses to France’s colonial conflicts in Indochina and Algeria after World War II.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FT-249262-16

Mona Lesley Siegel
California State University, Sacramento Foundation (Sacramento, CA 95819-2605)

Women and the Transnational Promise of 1919

Archival research leading toward completion of a book on feminist activism and peace negotiations at the end of World War I.

Women and the Promise of 1919 will offer the first comprehensive account of feminists’ global efforts to construct a new, gendered political order in the aftermath of World War I. The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 generated unprecedented anticipation, as people demanded their leaders deliver justice and democracy to a war-torn world. Largely excluded from the negotiating table by virtue of their sex, women nevertheless met separately, defined their agendas, and took to the streets. From the international feminist and pan-African conferences held in Paris and Zurich, to the meeting of the International Labour Organization in Washington, D.C., to anti-imperial protests in China and Egypt, feminists publicly asserted women’s right and duty to help shape the postwar world. This study will survey and analyze female political activism worldwide during a single, remarkable year, when the geopolitical map and international institutions that we know today were envisioned for the first time.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; History, General; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


FT-249349-16

Elora Shehabuddin
Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)

Feminism, Muslim Women, and Empire

A book-length study about the development of various forms of Muslim feminism from the early modern period to the twenty-first century.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; History, General; Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


RZ-249953-16

Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
Catherine Fourshey (Project Director: 12/09/2015 to present)
Rhonda Gonzalez (Co Project Director: 02/04/2016 to present)
Christine Saidi (Co Project Director: 02/04/2016 to present)

Expressions and Transformations of Gender, Family, and Status in Eastern and Central Africa 500-1800 CE

Collection, analysis, digital mapping, and interpretation of historical linguistic data relating to 55 societies across Bantu-speaking Africa, and co-authoring a book about social life and gender roles in precolonial Africa.

Project fields:
African History; Gender Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


TD-250107-16

Documentary Educational Resources (Watertown, MA 02472-2554)
Margo Guernsey (Project Director: 01/13/2016 to present)

The Price of Survival: A Documentary Film About Pauli Murray

Development of a one-hour documentary film script on the life, work, and historical impact of civil rights activist Pauli Murray.

Project fields:
African American History; American Studies; Women's History

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FZ-250287-16

Charles E. King
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)

The Humanity Lab: A Story of Race, Culture, and the Promise of an American Idea

A book on anthropologist Franz Boas (1848-1942) and the role of his jazz-age New York circle in developing the revolutionary view of social customs in "foreign" cultures that came to be known as cultural relativism. The project addresses the resulting transformation in popular attitudes about race, sexuality, and gender over the last century.

The Humanity Lab is a work of intellectual and social history centered on a small band of contrarian social scientists working in jazz-age New York. Led by pioneering anthropologist Franz Boas and including such critical figures as Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict, this group pioneered a way of seeing the world that is only now coming into broad acceptance. Together, they were puzzling through the details of the theory they would come to call “cultural relativism.” The starting point was the idea that no social customs were advanced or retrograde, higher or lower. Each was, instead, a locally specific solution to some common human problem--an insight that stands alongside many of the great scientific advances of the 20th century. The project addresses the transformation in popular attitudes about race, sexuality, gender, and "foreign" customs over the last century and will result in a single-author book published by a commercial press and aimed at the serious general reader.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Public Scholar Program

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$40,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FV-250761-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN 46202-2915)
Edward Curtis (Project Director: 02/19/2016 to present)

Muslim American Identities, Past and Present

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and cultures of Muslims in the United States.

Project fields:
Religion, Other

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$108,969 (approved)
$108,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


BH-250767-16

University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9055)
Robert Goldberg (Project Director: 02/19/2016 to present)

Manifest Destiny Reconsidered: The Utah Experience

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two schoolteachers on migration to and settlement of Utah.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$159,981 (approved)
$159,981 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/30/2017


ES-250805-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Shawn Alexander (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Teaching the "Long Hot Summer" of 1967 and Beyond: Racial Disturbances in Recent US History

A three-week summer institute for thirty schoolteachers on the urban riots of 1967, placed in a broad historical context.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$180,247 (approved)
$180,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


FS-250826-16

University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Nancy Young (Project Director: 02/24/2016 to present)

Gender, the State, and the 1977 International Women’s Year Conference

A one-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on the National Women’s Conference of 1977 and its impact on American public life.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$71,678 (approved)
$71,678 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


ES-250902-16

Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY 10014-2840)
Katie Beganics (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare's Plays

A two-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers focusing on the representations of family life in William Shakespeare’s plays Twelfth Night, Hamlet, and The Winter’s Tale

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$146,826 (approved)
$146,826 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


BH-250914-16

City of Holyoke (Holyoke, MA 01040-3904)
Penni Martorell (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Women Making Change: Activism and Progressivism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two schoolteachers on Gilded Age and twentieth-century women reformers in Holyoke, Massachusetts

Project fields:
Labor History; Women's History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$126,267 (approved)
$126,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


BH-250930-16

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2446)
Diane Mutti Burke (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom and the Missouri-Kansas Border Wars

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two schoolteachers on the “border wars” in Kansas and Missouri during the Civil War era.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,990 (approved)
$179,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


BH-250947-16

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jennifer Masengarb (Project Director: 02/25/2016 to present)

The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

Project fields:
Architecture; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$160,800 (approved)
$160,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


HB-50517-15

Candace Bailey
North Carolina Central University (Durham, NC 27707-3129)

Music and the Performance of Women's Culture in the South, 1840-1870

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


PG-52568-15

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (La Jolla, CA 92037)
Hugh Davies (Project Director: 05/05/2014 to present)

Disaster Preparedness Training and Supplies

The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) requests an NEH Preservation Assistance Grant of $6,000 in order to purchase equipment and supplies to establish emergency caches at two of the Museum’s locations, and through the project provide training to prepare staff to deal effectively with emergencies or their initial response as necessitated by our Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan. Though the Museum has established a useful store of emergency supplies at its main location in La Jolla, CA, its new Downtown gallery space and off-site storage buildings (Chula Vista, CA) are lacking in this same supply of disaster materials. To fully comply with MCASD’s 2010 Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, it is critical that the Museum outfit all its locations and provide its staff with the necessary training by Balboa Art Conservation Center in line with the 2010 disaster preparedness project.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


PG-52579-15

Historical Society of Long Beach (Long Beach, CA 90807-2802)
Julie Bartolotto (Project Director: 05/05/2014 to present)

Historical Society of Long Beach Photographic Materials Preservation Assessment

This project will help support the preservation of analog and born-digital photographic materials housed in the Historical Society of Long Beach via an assessment by a photographic materials conservator. Over 30,000 photographs in the archive document the history of the city of Long Beach, California over the last century and a half, covering diverse events such as the development of the Port of Long Beach to the local Cambodian diaspora from the 1970s to the present. Of all the materials in the HSLB archive, our photographs are the most often used materials in exhibitions, publications, and other research and educational activities; yet they have never undergone a professional assessment by a preservation consultant who specializes in photographic materials. This assessment would be used to prepare short-term and long-term recommendations for preservation, housing, and environmental conditions of our photographic materials. It will also support the purchase of preservation supplies.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


FA-58189-15

Amy Stanley
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

Stranger in the Shogun's City: A Japanese Woman and Her Worlds,1821-1862

This project focuses on the remarkable life of a woman named Tsuneno to explore gender, work, and urban migration in early nineteenth-century Japan. Tsuneno ran away from her provincial hometown after her two first marriages failed. She settled in the shogun's capital of Edo, where she worked a series of odd jobs, rented a back alley tenement, married (then divorced and remarried) a masterless samurai, and ended up in the service of a famous city magistrate. This microhistory uses Tsuneno's extensive correspondence to illuminate the social history of Edo on the eve of Japan's modern revolution. It offers a new perspective on Japanese women's economic lives by examining work in the lower echelons of the burgeoning service sector, where labor was only loosely tethered to the patriarchal household. As one of the first studies to consider women's labor migration--a common early modern phenomenon--in an East Asian context, it also contributes to scholarship on global early modernity.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


FA-58217-15

Amy K. Kaminsky
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)

Jews, Gender, and Modernity in Argentina

The fabled Argentine Jewish migratory route, from the shtetls of Eastern Europe to the agricultural settlements of the Pampas and then to the urban centers of the nation, is but one of the ways that Argentina’s Jewish history differs from, and thereby illuminates, other Jewish migration and assimilation narratives. This project aims to reconfigure Argentine literary, film, and cultural studies by arguing that the very project of modernity in Argentina relies on the paradox of Jewish otherness in, and identification with, the nation. It claims a central place for Jewish-authored texts and the deployment of Jewishness as an idea deeply infused with discourses of gender and sexuality in shaping Argentina’s cultural landscape. It challenges mainstream Jewish cultural studies to move beyond its current focus on the U.S., Europe, and Israel and takes the growing body of research both in Latin American Jewish studies and on gender, sexuality, and the modern nation in new directions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Jewish Studies; Latin American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


FA-58437-15

Stephanie Berard
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)

A History of Haitian Theater since the 1970s: The Power of the Stage

By retracing the history of Haitian theater from the 1970s until today, this research project aims to reveal the vitality of an art largely unknown and understudied. It examines the generational and gender shifts in dramatic writing from an older group of playwrights under the Duvalier's dictatorship or in exile to a younger generation, from predominantly male to the vibrant participation of contemporary female dramatists. By analyzing the issues, forms and aesthetics of Haitian plays written and performed in French and/or Creole, emphasizing the engaged dimension of this theater, this research reflects upon the collective experience of trauma, loss, and on the power of art to engender rebirth, especially more than four years after the 2010 earthquake. Countering stereotypes and defeatist perspectives commonly associated with Haiti, its theater exemplifies the key role of cultural production as a means of national renewal.

Project fields:
French Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


FA-58550-15

Francois Proulx
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61820-5711)

Reading and French Masculinity at the Fin de Siecle

Victims of the Book offers the first investigation of young men's excessive reading habits as a subject of grave social concern in fin-de-siecle France. It examines a corpus of over 70 novels, most of which have not been studied -- as well as essays, articles, and medical treatises -- that feature these troublesome young male readers. I propose that this literary corpus was a response to national anxieties about the formation of future French citizens. Against this cultural backdrop, I illuminate what was at stake in representations of the young male reader by novelists of the era 1880-1914, from Jules Valles to Marcel Proust. Situating Proust's representation of reading in its historical and cultural context, I show how his pathbreaking ideas about reading profoundly challenged cultural norms about masculinity and literature. The book contributes to 19th century French literary history and cultural studies, and to the broader fields of book history and masculinity studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


FA-58673-15

Wendy L. Wall
SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton (Binghamton, NY 13902-4600)

Changing Demographics in Cold War America

This book project sheds light on one of the most controversial issues of our day—U.S. immigration policy—by exploring the Cold War politics that ultimately produced and shaped the Immigration Act of 1965. That act forever changed the nation’s demographic makeup and transformed vast arenas of American life, but the two-decade campaign that led to its passage and shaped its provisions has received remarkably little attention from historians. Most portray the act as the inevitable product of a liberal consensus, overlooking the extended struggle by ethnic, religious, civic, labor and other groups to advance, shape or forestall immigration reform. This project recovers those lost voices, while restoring a sense of drama and contingency to the story of postwar immigration reform. It places the struggle for immigration reform in the broader context of Cold War politics, and focuses on the role of religious organizations and language, as well as gender and family issues.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2016


MD-226680-15

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (Galloway, NJ 08205-9441)
Lisa Rosner (Project Director: 06/11/2014 to present)

Pox in the City: A 3-D Strategy Game for the History of Medicine

No project description available

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History of Science; U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$99,837 (approved)
$99,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 7/31/2016


AB-226799-15

Virginia State University (Petersburg, VA 23803-2520)
Maxine Sample (Project Director: 06/26/2014 to present)

Imagining Sustainable Environments: Place and Culture in the Global Community

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$94,581 (approved)
$94,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


FT-228625-15

Suzy Kim
Rutgers University, New Brunswick (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)

Women at War: Gender Politics in North Korea during the Cold War

Summer research and writing on Cultural and East Asian History.

This project examines the role of women and the politics of gender in North Korea during the Cold War. Rather than duplicating histories of the Cold War as a masculine battle of political acumen, this research emphasizes the dominance of women and feminine tropes as key to understanding North Korea. Women proved to be the primary cultural icons, and feminine tropes became models for emulation throughout society. If the construction of modern citizenship has always been a gendered process of delineating appropriate masculine and feminine roles in service of the state, this project asks how North Korean women (and men) were mobilized for war throughout the Cold War as sacrificial mothers. While there are parallels of sacrificial women in other contexts, North Korean developments were singular in the ascription of motherhood to men to create a new model of militarized citizenship that was at once masculine and feminine, and that drew on transnational Cold War cultures.

Project fields:
Cultural History; East Asian History; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


AQ-228863-15

Centre College of Kentucky (Danville, KY 40422-1309)
Sara Egge (Project Director: 09/10/2014 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on Citizenship

The development and teaching of a new undergraduate course on what it means to be a citizen.

Project fields:
History, General; Political Science, General; Western Civilization

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$21,975 (approved)
$21,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 4/30/2018


AQ-229066-15

Trustees of Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3800)
Martha Bayles (Project Director: 09/11/2014 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on Virtue and Gender

The development and teaching of a new senior seminar to explore the relationship between virtue and gender.

Project fields:
Western Civilization

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 12/31/2017


FT-229217-15

Rosemarie Stremlau
University of North Carolina, Pembroke (Pembroke, NC 28372-8699)

Barbara Hildebrand Longknife (1828-1903): Southeastern Indian Diaspora in the Age of American Empire

Summer research and writing on Native American Studies and U.S. and Women's History.

Barbara Hildebrand Longknife was an ordinary nineteenth-century Cherokee woman who lived an extraordinary life. As a girl, she survived removal on the Trail of Tears. As a young woman, she went to California with a hope to find gold and return to Indian Territory as a woman of means. Instead, she worked marginal jobs until she left her abusive husband and traveled to Hawaii as a laborer. Throughout her life, Longknife wanted to go home. She never did. Instead, she wrote letters to her family. Some of these letters survive to provide an alternative perspective to those of the people who gained wealth and had power in the American West and Hawaii. Longknife's life was a bridge connecting the Atlantic World and the Pacific World, and my telling of her story will transcend the narrowly focused discussions of gender, labor, and culture in Southeastern American Indian history and connect them to the larger literature on American expansion and the many complex indigenous experiences of it.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229307-15

Rachel Lisa Mesch
Yeshiva University (New York, NY 10033-3299)

French Writings on Marriage in the Belle Epoque

Summer research and writing on European History, French Literature and Gender Studies.

By the end of the nineteenth century in France, marriage was seen as a vulnerable institution, due to rapid social shifts and the legalization of divorce in 1884. However, unlike previous scholarship focused on the various threats to marriage during this time, this book argues that some of the most important responses to the perceived crisis took place within conjugal structures themselves, where shifts in gender norms hit directly up against traditional French values. Through a study of four Belle Epoque literary couples and their writings on marriage, this book will offer a series of "conjugal biographies" that bring to life the multivalent nature of the institution at a transitional moment in French history. Belle Epoque marriage emerges as a highly creative forum for experimenting with gender roles and different forms of partnership usually associated with later generations.

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229357-15

Vitaly Chernetsky
University of Kansas, Lawrence (Lawrence, KS 66045-7505)

Ukraine's Ongoing Social Transformation and its Literary Representations

Summer reading and writing on Slavic Literature.

Since November 2013, ongoing crisis has placed Ukraine on the front pages of global news media. The mass protests that came to be known as the Euromaidan, the collapse of the Yanukovych government, the Russian annexation of Crimea, and the mixture of a civil war with an escalating Russian intervention in Ukraine's east brought unprecedented global attention to Ukraine. In recent months the country has radically transformed, which has profoundly affected Ukrainians' understanding of their identity and their view of Ukraine's place in the global family of nations. This project examines the role of contemporary Ukrainian writers and other public intellectuals in these events--their documentation of and creative response to the experiences of turmoil, psychological trauma, displacement, and the emerging formation of a new Ukrainian identity, which reaches across preexisting divides caused by differences in language, ethnicity, gender, age, and other factors.

Project fields:
Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229388-15

Ibtesam Al Atiyat, PhD
St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN 55057-1574)

An Analysis of Public Disputes over the Amendment of Laws Regulating Gender in Modern Jordan

Summer research and writing on Area and Gender Studies, and Sociology.

In Body Politics and Nation Building in Modern Jordan: An Analysis of Public Disputes over the Amendment of Laws Regulating Gender and Sexuality, I analyze recent disputes surrounding the amendment of laws regulating women's bodies, including those of rape and honor killings. I argue that recognizing them as a clash between "modern" and "traditional" values--as many scholars have done--oversimplifies a complex power struggle between multiple actors (Islamists, women's activists, tribal leaders, government officials). These actors do not directly subscribe to their rhetoric's content; but deploy the concept of "values" as a political expedient and means to an end for political power. My book is intended for social scientists, humanists, and general readers, who seek to understand the status of Jordanian women. On site in Jordan, I will interview women's activists, Islamists, tribal leaders, and public officials, and will also examine court trial scripts in cases of rape and honor crimes.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Gender Studies; Sociology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 8/31/2015


FT-229464-15

Andrea Nicole Mansker
University of the South (Sewanee, TN 37383-2000)

Matchmaking and the Marriage Market in Nineteenth-Century France

Summer research and writing on Cultural and European History and Gender Studies.

This project uses the unexplored history of professional marriage brokers and personal ads to track the commercialization of marriage in nineteenth-century France. Though historians have analyzed the ways in which contemporaries redefined the family at pivotal revolutionary moments, they have overlooked how marriage itself was imagined increasingly as a commercial contract inseparable from the atomistic and corrupt marketplace. The matchmaking industry both responded to and helped shape national anxieties regarding fluctuating nuptial rates, a declining birthrate, a sex ratio imbalance, and changing legislation on marriage and divorce. A study of brokers' and individuals' marketing narratives on love along with court cases, legislation, and literature surrounding the business reveals the intimate and socioeconomic pressures of finding a spouse. It also exposes the multiple ways in which individuals used the matrimonial industry to re-imagine family relationships and marriage rituals.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History; Gender Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 9/30/2015


FT-229470-15

Amy Aisen Kallander
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

Women, Family and the Modern Nation in Postcolonial Tunisia, 1952-2011

Summer research and writing on Gender Studies, and Near and Middle Eastern History.

This project examines the relation between women, family and modernity in postcolonial Tunisia. It engages with scholarly interest in the relation between women, nationalism, and modernity, and debates regarding liberal and Islamic understandings of women's rights. Building upon feminist theorizations of agency, my project challenges the association between legislative recognition of women's equality, women's employment, and liberal individualism with emancipation. Chapters focus on the dissemination of the Tunisian government's "feminist" rhetoric, the image of women, family and modernity in the women's press, the portrayal of rural women by Tunisian social scientists, and how state investments in education and family planning contributed to reforming women into educated wives and mothers. Without claiming to explain the Tunisian Revolution, my research offers insight on Tunisian society and political culture before January 2011 through its attention to women and gender.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229485-15

Michael Paul Bibler
Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4600)

Property, Intimacy, and the Literature of U.S. Slavery

Summer research and writing on American Literature, and Gender and U.S. Regional Studies.

In what would seem a statistical impossibility, the vast historical archive of the slaveholding South is almost completely silent about homoerotic and what we would call homosexual encounters. But this book project demonstrates that the much-neglected literary archive of the antebellum South contains numerous examples of characters, scenes, and storylines that readily depict queer forms of gender and eroticism. Reading pro- and antislavery works together, I show how all erotic relations in this period are deeply intertwined with the property relations of slavery, whereby property not only anchors and defines all forms of intimate attachment but also infuses those bonds with an inescapable eroticism. This NEH support will allow me to complete a key chapter in this project that explains this "possessive intimacy" in William Simms's novels and poems about effete bachelors, mannish wives, master-slave sentimentality, sexual captivity, and companionate marriage.

Project fields:
American Literature; Gender Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 6/30/2015


FT-229517-15

Tracy Lucht
Iowa State University (Ames, IA 50011-2000)

Finding Their Voices: Midwestern Women Broadcasters, 1922-1992

Summer research and writing on Journalism and Women's History.

This project explores the historical experiences and cultural contributions of women broadcasters in the Midwest, a region that has been overlooked in the scholarly literature on women and the media. Until now, the history of women in radio and television, arguably the most important sites of American civic discourse in the twentieth century, has been told almost entirely from the perspectives of women working in large coastal cities. Yet the Midwest launched several female "firsts" in broadcasting and sprouted a significant group of women known as the radio homemakers. Based on archival sources, oral histories, press clippings, and broadcast recordings, this project investigates the influence of gender ideology and regional culture on the careers and community voices of these professional pioneers. The result will be a book prospectus that promises to appeal to a range of readers, especially those drawn to Midwestern history and the stories of exceptional women.

Project fields:
Journalism; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229566-15

Leandra Zarnow
University of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-0001)

Bella Abzug and the Promise and Peril of the American Left (1920-1998)

Summer research and writing on Gender Studies, U.S. and Women's History.

This study evaluates the political life of Representative Bella Abzug, who embodied the nation's ingenuity and discontent as it faced tensions brought on by the Vietnam War, globalization, and the contested visions of a more diverse populace. Although Abzug's congressional career was short (1971-76), she helped forward a substantial and undervalued policy reform wave led by New Politics Democrats that effectively made U.S. democracy more open, responsive, and accountable. Abzug's early student activism, political lawyering, and peace strategist work deeply influenced her leadership style and legislative focus in Congress. More than "women's issues," her broad policy program extended the reach of the law in human rights, privacy, urban renewal, environmentalism, consumer protection, foreign affairs, and executive oversight. Reassessing 1970s policy and its roots, study of Abzug reorients focus around Watergate by recasting this period as one not solely of rising conservatism.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229941-15

Ashwini Tambe
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)

Girlhood and Cultural Difference in the 20th Century

Summer research and writing on Gender Studies, Legal and Women's History.

I seek an NEH summer stipend to complete the final chapter of my book manuscript. In the book I explore transnational forces that shaped increases in the age of sexual consent for girls in the twentieth century, such as new scientific ideas about adolescence, UN legal conventions, and population control. I explain how diverse cultural notions about girls' sexual maturation were negotiated. The book contributes to understanding how the meaning and age span of modern girlhood expanded. In my final chapter I will examine the popularization of the term "girl child" in international advocacy circles. The chapter will trace the term's broad arc from the 1990 South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation Year of the Girl Child to the 2012 UN International Year of the Girl Child. I will show how the term traveled outside South Asia to frame 1990s UN activities and corporate campaigns in the 2000s and 2010s. The chapter will help contextualize the current popularity of framing formerly "women's issues" as now "girls' issues."

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Legal History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-230006-15

Jasmine Elizabeth Johnson, PhD
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)

West African Dance and The Politics of Diaspora

Summer research and writing on African American Studies, Cultural Anthtropology, and Dance History and Criticism.

Rhythm Nation: West African Dance and the Politics of Diaspora explores the relationship between dance, race, gender, and diasporic belonging. Rooted at the intersection of critical dance theory, black performance theory, and African diaspora theory, the project considers dance as a means through which identities are negotiated and new racial and sexual logics of diaspora are rendered. Over the past five decades, a West African arts scene in America has blossomed. Its scope includes dance classes, international workshops, clothing lines, and spiritual retreats; it spans from yoga studios to university campuses. This growing economic niche is constituted by a constellation of contact zones where diverse people, and their ideas about Africa, collide. Rhythm Nation charts the commodification of West African dance from the mid-1960s to the present. In so doing, it maps the transforming purchase--the cultural and economic power---of diaspora both as an identity category and commodity.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Dance History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 9/30/2015


FT-230008-15

Michelle Marie Meinhart
Martin Methodist College (Pulaski, TN 38478-2716)

Sheet Music Collections and Memorializing the First World War in the English Country House

Summer research and writing on British History, Gender Studies, and Music History and Criticism.

This monograph explores the role of music in recasting the formerly-exclusive English country house as a space of healing and transnational exchange for civilians and soldiers during World War I. I use the war-time annotated sheet music collection of Lady Alda Hoare of Stourhead, performed by her, her soldier son, and convalescing Tommies from England, Canada, and Australia, as a launching point for consideration of musical experiences in other country houses, many of which were military hospitals. Here music, as communal therapeutic performance and class-coded repertoires, complicated previous notions of family, class, gender, home, and nation. This project departs from previous inquiry on the War in its treatment of home and war fronts and national boundaries as liminal; formulation of sheet music collections as material, autobiographical memorials of war; and study of musical exchange through life writing and scrapbooks of soldiers and women.

Project fields:
British History; Gender Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


RQ-230464-15

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Harry Stout (Project Director: 12/09/2014 to present)

Jonathan Edwards Center Online Initiative

Preparation for online publication of the collected papers of Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), colonial American pastor, author, educator, and theologian. (36 months)

The Edwards Works Online utilizes the most current standards for electronic documentary editions and provides a broad range of resources to assist readers and researchers. In the next phase, 2015-2018, the Jonathan Edwards Center, intent on staying current with technological developments in digital humanities, will completely update its platform and website; it will use this new platform not only to re-present its current online archive but also to prepare and present previously unavailable texts, focusing on the sermons Edwards delivered during the "Great Awakening" of the early 1740s and to Native Americans during the 1750s, providing an unprecedented view of him as a preacher in these crucial periods; and it will link these documents to a newly scanned bank of manuscript images.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


GE-230775-15

Friends of Alice Austen House, Inc. (Staten Island, NY 10305-2002)
Janice Monger (Project Director: 01/14/2015 to present)

Planning for New Eyes on Alice Austen: Redefining the Museum's Interpretation

Planning for the reinterpretation of the Staten Island home of early twentieth-century photographer Alice Austen (1866–1952), an expanded website, and related educational programming.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Immigration History; Women's History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


EH-231028-15

Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388)
Karin Maag (Project Director: 02/20/2015 to present)

Teaching the Reformation after Five Hundred Years

A three-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the Reformation.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$134,930 (approved)
$134,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


ES-231305-15

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Emily Potter Ndiaye (Project Director: 02/24/2015 to present)

Freedom for One, Freedom for All? Abolition and Woman Suffrage, 1830s – 1920s

A two-week school teacher institute for thirty participants on the relationship between the abolition and women’s suffrage movements in the United States.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$184,138 (approved)
$184,138 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


HB-50437-14

Susmita Roye
Delaware State University (Dover, DE 19901-2202)

Women Writers and the Portrayal of Women in British Indian Fiction

No project description available

Project fields:
Gender Studies; South Asian Literature; South Asian Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


HB-50471-14

Jill Graper Hernandez
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)

Acquainted with Grief: Early Modern Feminist Conceptions of God, Evil, and Theodicy

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


HB-50510-14

Jesse Wolfe
California State University, Stanislaus Foundation (Turlock, CA 95382-3200)

The Muddle and the Dream: Intimacy, Utopia, and the Legacies of Bloomsbury in Contemporary Novels

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Literary Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$37,800 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 5/31/2015


PG-52244-14

Northeast Wisconsin Technical College (Green Bay, WI 54303-4966)
Kim LaPlante (Project Director: 05/06/2013 to present)

Historical Archives Preservation Assessment and Improvement

A preservation assessment; training on processing, organizing, and rehousing; and the purchase of archival supplies and a fireproof storage cabinet for the library's collection of 900 documents and letters, 400 brochures and marketing pieces, 500 books and booklets, 2,500 photographs, and 200 artifacts. Materials document the history of the adult vocational system within a changing labor landscape, offering insight on themes including language education for the region's early immigrants, continuing education for young adults who left school at 14, the impact of the Great Depression and world wars on the region, changing gender roles, and technology. Notable items include brochures of class lists, ledgers for expenditures for courses, and photographs of classroom instruction in basic skills such as electricity, house wiring, sheet metal, cosmetology, physical education, and printing.

Northeast Wisconsin Technical College requests a grant of $5,975 for its Historical Archives Preservation Assessment and Improvement project. Located in the library of the College's Green Bay, Wisconsin, campus, the archives consists of 4,500 items including documents/letters, brochures/marketing pieces, books/booklets, photographs and artifacts. The collection provides a unique glimpse into the history of the adult vocational system and the response of education to the changing labor needs of Northeast Wisconsin since 1912. The project will consist of three activities: (1) a preservation assessment of the collection by a professional consultant, (2) forty hours of training for the project director on processing, organizing and rehousing the collection, and (3) purchase of archival supplies and a fireproof storage cabinet to protect the collection. The goal of the project is to ensure the College's long-term ability to serve as stewards of its historical archives collection.

Project fields:
History, Other; Labor History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,975 (approved)
$5,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FA-57763-14

Quito Jame' Swan
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

Pauulu Kamarakafego, Indigenous Technology, and Global Black Power

All of Africa Is On My Back [sic]: Pauulu Kamarakafego, Indigenous Technology and the Global Black Power is a manuscript about the late Pauulu Roosevelt Browne Kamarakafego, who was a significant yet largely unheralded Black Power and Pan-Africanist organizer from Bermuda. Kamarakafego was also an internationally renowned ecological engineer, and UNESCO consultant on rural development, renewable energy and global sustainability. All of Africa aims to make sense of his remarkable ability to fuse his political world-views with his technical expertise, and to utilize indigenous technology in the service of Black Power, Pan-Africanism and decolonization. It offers a global narrative of Black Power that spans the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia and the Pacific. By highlighting how diverse African Diasporic communities engaged Black Power, this project speaks to NEH's Bridging Cultures Initiative.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; International Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


FA-57813-14

Jocelyn Gladys Wogan-Browne
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

Women, Multilingualism, and Literate Culture in Late Medieval England

This book-project offers a new account of women's literate culture in late medieval England and further establishes the multilingual nature of English medieval society. Unstudied women's texts and documents in the French of England are a major focus, but are treated in relation to English and some Latin texts. Historical factors differentiate women's multilingualism from men's, but gendering multilingualism does not create a separate feminised space. Rather, it opens up women's participation in a multilingual society's changing configurations of language, literature, and documentation. The book adds new texts and contexts to English literary history, explores the multilingual diversity of late medieval women's culture in hitherto unattempted ways, and shows that although ideas of mother-tongue have sustained fictions of nation, empire, and monolingual literary canons since the Middle Ages, medieval English culture complicates modern notions of nation and language.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature; French Language; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 1/31/2015


FA-57970-14

Margaret Abruzzo
University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)

Good People and Bad Behavior: Changing Views of Sin, Evil, and Moral Responsibility in the 18th and 19th Centuries

My planned book explores how Americans rethought wrongdoing in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as many traditional frameworks for explaining sin--such as blaming passions, self-interest, or natural depravity--came under attack. Difficulties explaining wrongdoing helped drive an intellectual wedge between evil and "ordinary" sin; moralists contrasted good people’s "mistakes" with evildoers' intentional villainy. Historians have charted changing ideas about particular vices, but they have been less interested in shifting views of what constitutes a moral failing, why human beings commit them, or how people could understand themselves as flawed but not evil. By historicizing concepts of sin, my research intersects with questions in philosophy and theology about human nature, sin, and the problem of evil; with literary studies on seduction novels and other narratives of wrongdoing; and with interdisciplinary work on the gendered construction of morality.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 7/31/2015


FA-58013-14

Catherine Maria Sama
University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI 02881-1967)

The Correspondence of 18th-Century Venetian Artist Rosalba Carriera (1673-1757): A Translation and Edition

Commissioned by the editors of "The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe" book series (Victoria College, University of Toronto), my book will be the first fully annotated edition in English translation of the correspondence of the Venetian artist, Rosalba Carriera, the most famous female artist in early 18th-century Europe. I am also building an open-access, searchable database of the letters. Carriera's vast correspondence with prominent European patrons, princes, fellow artists, and collectors provide scholars with insight into the politics of patronage, the quotidian aspects of artists' lives and work, and the intersections of literary and artistic worlds in the first half of the 18th century. It is a unique source of information on the ways a female artist crossed the gender boundaries of her society to make a name for herself in a male-dominated profession. This project will make an important contribution to Women's History, Art History, 18th-Century Studies, Digital Humanities.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Gender Studies; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


FA-58063-14

Sonali Thakkar
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

Race, Religion, and Holocaust Memory in the Literature of Postwar European Diasporic Communities

My book examines the significance of Holocaust memory to the literature and culture of postwar Europe's new racialized diasporic communities, comprising labor migrants and former colonial subjects. Through analysis of Anglophone, Francophone, and German-language works, I argue that writers addressing diasporic culture in this period see Europe's violence against the Jews as a paradigm for the limits of diasporic life and the possibility of cohabitation in contemporary Europe. I thus contribute to the emergent field of transnational and comparative studies of Holocaust memory but with several innovations: deploying theories of affect and affiliation drawn from queer and gender studies to interpret the identification with Jewishness that some of my authors express, analyzing race comparatively to show how religious difference disrupts the notion of race as skin color, and incorporating work about the colonized or Arab Jew rather than establishing "Jewish" and "colonized" as binary terms.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Jewish Studies; Literature, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FB-57402-14

Ada Cohen
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

The Idea of Female Beauty in the Ancient Greek World

My project explores the aesthetic premises of ancient Greek culture as related to women's physical appearance and as communicated through the visual arts and material culture. Although the focus is on conceptions of beauty, attention is also paid to beauty's dialectical opposite, ugliness. Both are topics of great cultural import, not least because of their impact on gender identity formation. I explore how beauty and ugliness are described in images and texts and the interesting range of moral implications they entailed. Among the topics addressed are beauty's intersections with sexual attraction and age as well as contradictions embedded in the Greek understanding of feminine beauty. Examples are drawn from various periods of Greek art in a comparative mode and from various media, including painting, sculpture, mirrors, and jewelry. Key mythological figures and stories implicating physical appearance are examined, but anonymous figures and genre scenes are especially considered.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FB-57514-14

Jeffrey Kenneth Hass
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)

A Siege Mentality: Practices and Politics of Surviving War in the Blockade of Leningrad

Using the Blockade of Leningrad (1941-44) as a topic of its own and as a case study, this project analyzes behavior under extreme wartime duress. Leningraders confronted multiple sources of suffering and survival challenges: starvation, mass death, a draconian state, and uncertainty of war. Civilian responses varied with gender, class/occupation, education, and the like, yet most frameworks cannot adequately explain why. Using a wide range of untapped archival data--wartime diaries, postwar recollections, and Party and state documents (investigations, propaganda, policy discussions), etc.--I show how Leningraders grappled with and responded to challenges to survival and to assumptions of normal Soviet life. Gender, social norms, etc. continued to matter because: 1) civilians mediated Blockade suffering by imbuing identities and practices with status, dignity, and meaning; 2) concrete objects, relations, and sites of significance were anchors for shared meanings, even if contested.

Project fields:
Area Studies; Russian History; Sociology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


FB-57572-14

Emilye J. Crosby
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Geneseo (Geneseo, NY 14454-1401)

Women in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the 1960s

I am writing a history of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) with a focus on women and gender. Beginning with the 1960 sit-in movement that formed the basis for the organization through the shift from a "coordinating committee" to an organization of organizers and extending into 1965-66, I am exploring women's experiences and participation, how they shaped the organization, and how they as individuals, and SNCC as an organization accepted, challenged, ignored, defied, and operated within and beyond the accepted gender conventions of the day--in the larger society and in African American communities. I am using a case studies approach and emphasizing those aspects of the organization's history, including community-based work, that are particularly useful for illuminating important patterns and themes, examining key moments, and engaging in comparison. This work is particularly important in a world where power and oppression remain closely linked with gender.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Gender Studies; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


AC-50199-14

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Phyllis Van Slyck (Project Director: 07/01/2013 to 09/10/2014)
Naomi Stubbs (Co Project Director: 12/05/2013 to 09/10/2014)
Naomi Stubbs (Project Director: 09/10/2014 to present)
Richard Brown (Co Project Director: 03/04/2015 to 12/01/2016)
Bethany Holmstrom (Co Project Director: 12/01/2016 to present)

Technology, Self, and Society: A Humanities Initiative

A three-year interdisciplinary project that would examine the theme of technology and the self, in order to enrich introductory courses, as well as the college's capstone course, "Humanism, Science, and Technology."

[Grant products]

Project fields:
English

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$97,532 (approved)
$97,532 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2017


PW-51639-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Candace Keller Claytor (Project Director: 07/22/2013 to present)

MSU Archive of Malian Photography

The cataloging and digitization of 100,000 prints and negatives from the archives of five Malian professional photographers who have been active from the 1940s to the present. These works document traditional cultural and religious practices, the history of dress, gender, and status, and colonialism and modernization in southern Mali.

The MSU Archive of Malian Photography will digitize, catalog, preserve, and render freely accessible to a worldwide audience 100,000 rare images from the original archives of five professional photographers in Mali. Created by prominent African practitioners whose work was commissioned by private patrons as well as State governments, these images document traditional cultural and religious practices, rural festivals, early colonial developments, and processes of modernization in Ségu, Mopti, and Bamako, as the latter transitioned from a small agrarian trading village into an urban center and national capital. Recording local practices from African perspectives, these visual materials contain important twentieth century representations of local aesthetics, methods of identity construction and preservation, and documentary strategies.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$299,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017


TR-50543-14

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc. (Melrose, MA 02176-3933)
Tracy Strain (Project Director: 08/19/2013 to present)

Lorraine Hansberry Documentary Project

Production of a two-hour documentary film and a website probing the life and art of playwright Lorraine Hansberry (1930-1965).

Project fields:
African American Studies; Theater History and Criticism; Women's History

Program:
America's Media Makers: Production Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2014 – 8/31/2017


AQ-51006-14

Tulane University (New Orleans, LA 70118-5698)
Stephanie Porras (Project Director: 09/13/2013 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on Conceptions of Authenticity and Originality

The development of an undergraduate honors colloquium on conceptions of authenticity and originality as debated in literature, music, philosophy, art, and the sciences.

The development of an undergraduate honors colloquium on conceptions of authenticity and originality as debated in literature, music, philosophy, art, and the sciences. Stephanie Porras, assistant professor of art history at Tulane University, develops a course that draws on legal, ethical, and technological issues alongside historical analysis and philosophical debate to explore the question, What is a copy? The first unit, Technology of the Copy, considers the history of reproduction from the invention of print, photography, digital duplication, and three-dimensional molds to gene sequencing. Readings include Elizabeth Eisenstein's The Printing Press as an Agent of Change, Paul Craddock's Scientific Investigation of Copies, Hillel Schwartz's The Culture of the Copy, Erasmus on printed books, Rainer Maria Rilke on Auguste Rodin's bronzes, and Jorge Luis Borges's "The Circular Ruins." The second unit, Copy/Original, explores philosophical views on copying, cognition, and being. Readings include extracts from Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Leibniz, Kant, Heidegger, Benjamin, and Marcus Boon. These theoretical perspectives are then integrated into discussions of aesthetic theory, anthropology, and psychology, thus providing a rich array of conceptual and critical vocabulary for students. Additional readings include Coleridge's On Poesy or Art; Freud's Totem and Taboo; Girard's Deceit, Desire and the Novel; and Michael Taussig's Mimesis and Alterity. The third unit, Copies and Authorship, focuses on debates about innovation, originality, and artistic ownership. Topics include Dürer's ideas about copy and invention, sixth-century Chinese art theory, Brahms' defense of his first symphony, Arthur Danto on Warhol, and Gus van Sant's remake of Psycho. Readings include Forrest and Koos's Dead Ringers: The Remake in Theory and Practice; Jacques Derrida's Copy, Archive, Signature; Marvin Carlson's The Haunted Stage: The Theater as Memory Machine; and David Evans's Appropriation. The final unit, Appropriation, Depropriation and Theft, focuses on ethical, legal, and political ramifications of the copy. Students stage mock trials of recent high profile cases in plagiarism, forgery, and patent litigation. They read sections from Richard Posner's The Little Book of Plagiarism, Siva Vaidhyanathan's Copyrights and Copywrongs, and Howard Brody's Future of Bioethics. Films screened for the course include Banksy's 2010 Exit Through the Gift Shop, the Hong Kong film Infernal Affairs and its remake The Departed, and the documentary Good Copy, Bad Copy. Students create a course wiki and write a detailed analysis of a copy that they own.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$20,234 (approved)
$18,651 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 6/30/2016


AQ-51030-14

University of Wisconsin, Green Bay (Green Bay, WI 54311-7003)
Alison Staudinger (Project Director: 09/13/2013 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Role of Work in Human Life

The development of a first-year seminar on the changing nature of work throughout history, with consideration of its economic, political, and personal importance.

The development of a first-year seminar on the changing nature of work throughout history, with consideration of its economic, political, and personal importance. Alison Staudinger, assistant professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, develops a course on the nature of work. The project director centers the inquiry on four sub-questions. The course begins by asking, What is work? and seeks responses from Hesiod's Works and Days, the ancient myths of Prometheus and Pandora, the Rule of St. Benedict, and Simone Weil's Gravity and Grace. The second question, Are humans workers by nature? is explored through The Human Condition by Hannah Arendt, the "Master Slave Dialectic" from the Phenomenology of Spirit of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, and "Alienated Labor" and "Critique of the Gotha Programme" by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. The third question, What is the relationship between work and justice? takes as its point of departure debates between Plato and Aristotle. Students read The Republic and The Politics for their examination of "natural slavery" and how this concept is relevant to contemporary discussions of inequality. This issue, in relation to consumption and work in a developed country like the United States, is explored through Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and Michael Glawoger's documentary film Workingman's Death, in tandem with a site visit to the Grohmann Museum at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. The last question, What work should I do? introduces issues of race, gender, and class into labor questions, thereby complicating topics previously considered. Readings for this section include Isabel Wilkerson's The Warmth of Other Suns, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Herman Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener," a debate between W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington on the place of work for ex-slaves, and Studs Terkel's Working. As a final project, students add a chapter to Terkel's book based on their own video interviews.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Philosophy, Other; Political Science, Other

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


AQ-51033-14

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Olivera Jokic (Project Director: 09/13/2013 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Nature of Friendship

The development of an undergraduate course on friendship.

The development of an undergraduate course on friendship. Olivera Jokic, an assistant professor of English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, develops and teaches a course that examines the nature of friendship from a variety of perspectives. The course begins by looking at how writers from several time periods and cultures have represented friendship and then considers whether friendships are a function of culture. Next, the course turns to the question of whether friendship is a common good or is motivated by self-interest, and examines the ways that gender and gender roles might influence friendship. The final section of the course investigates the relationship between friendship, difference and equality, and distance, including the role that technologies like Facebook play in developing and maintaining friendships. Course readings include Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Plato's Phaedrus and Lysis, The Epic of Gilgamesh, Jane Austen's Persuasion, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, Oscar Wilde's De Profundis; essays by Vine Deloria, John Stuart Mill, and Michel de Montaigne; and poetry by Sappho, Li Bai and Du Fu, William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Langston Hughes. Readings are supplemented by the viewing and discussion of such films as Some Like it Hot, 4 Months 3 Weeks 2 Days (from Romania), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Thelma and Louise, and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Throughout the course, students keep a journal of their reactions to the readings, produce midterm analytical projects related to course readings and discussions, and create final exhibits about friendships that are displayed on campus.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; International Studies

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$22,000 (approved)
$21,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FT-61652-14

Dassia N. Posner
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

Soviet Productions of American Plays at the Moscow Kamerny Theatre in the 1920s and 1930s

No project description available

Project fields:
Russian History; Russian Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 9/30/2014


FT-61760-14

Carla Jean Bittel
Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, CA 90045-2650)

Phrenology, Gender, and Nineteenth-Century American Science

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Science; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 7/31/2014


FT-61774-14

Leila Philip
College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)

Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011): The Career of a Major Postwar Asian-American Artist

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies; Art History and Criticism; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 7/1/2014


FT-61787-14

Romita Ray
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

The Visual Cultures of Tea Consumption in Imperial and Modern India

No project description available

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 8/31/2014


FT-61909-14

Katarzyna Lecky
Arkansas State University, Main Campus (Jonesboro, AR 72403-0600)

Poet Laureate Poetics and the Aesthetics of Pocket Maps in Renaissance Britain

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 7/31/2014


FT-61931-14