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Keywords: Gender (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: April 2022 to present)

DR-288671-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 11/30/2023

Infamous Bodies: Early Black Women's Celebrity and the Afterlives of Rights

The countless retellings and reimaginings of the private and public lives of Phillis Wheatley, Sally Hemings, Sarah Baartman, Mary Seacole, and Sarah Forbes Bonetta have transformed them into difficult cultural and black feminist icons. In Infamous Bodies, Samantha Pinto explores how histories of these black women and their ongoing fame generate new ways of imagining black feminist futures. Drawing on a variety of media, cultural, legal, and critical sources, Pinto shows how the narratives surrounding these eighteenth- and nineteenth-century celebrities shape key political concepts such as freedom, consent, contract, citizenship, and sovereignty. Whether analyzing Wheatley's fame in relation to conceptions of race and freedom, notions of consent in Hemings's relationship with Thomas Jefferson, or Baartman's ability to enter into legal contracts, Pinto reveals the centrality of race, gender, and sexuality in the formation of political rights.

Lynn Kaye
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)

FEL-288736-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2024 – 7/31/2025

Power and the People: Lay People's Voices in Ancient Jewish Adjudication

Research and writing towards a book on interactions between judges and lay advocates in the Babylonian Talmud (6th century CE).

This project establishes the cross-cultural significance of narratives depicting exchanges between lay people and judges in the Babylonian Talmud, the foundation of Jewish law (6th c. CE). Adjudication narratives, ubiquitous in the Talmud, typically comprise only case details and the verdict. However, some interactions between petitioner and judge brim with drama, evoking the human stakes of court cases. The purpose of these details and their impact on the law is yet unexamined. Reading the stories both from literary critical, and comparative legal perspectives, foregrounds the creativity of lay people, and their subtle subversions of authority. The project has implications beyond Jewish studies. The roles of religious courts in the Roman and Persian empires are germane to studies of legal pluralism, classical studies, Christian history, and comparative religion. Exposing the dynamics between experts and lay people enriches the study of gender, narrative, and power in the humanities.

Maria Sonevytsky
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)

FEL-289096-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 8/31/2023

Singing for Lenin in Soviet Ukraine: Children, Music, and the Communist Future

Research and writing leading to a book about Soviet education and children’s musical practices in Soviet Ukraine, from 1934 to 1991.

Spectacles of musical childhood were widespread in Soviet life. Children’s groups performed at political events, factories, and international festivals. They were showcased on Soviet radio and television and institutionalized in "Palaces of Pioneers." Inculcating children into Soviet norms of citizenship, gender, and musicality was a vital project to ensure the longevity of the USSR, yet both children and music present unruly vectors through which to achieve the goals of norming. My research follows the “imperial turn” in Soviet historiography to Soviet Ukraine, where I interpret the dynamic arena of children’s musical practices through newly discovered archival materials and original interviews. My research reveals how Soviet Ukrainian children and their educators creatively recast the prerogatives of Soviet education, with its promise of a stateless Communist future. Soviet Ukrainian children’s music captures the tensions inherent in imposing Soviet ideology on musical practice.

David Wheat
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)

FEL-289625-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2023 – 7/31/2024

The Atlantic Itineraries of Afro-Caribbean Entrepreneur Catalina de los Santos, c.1590-1600

Research and writing leading to a book on the social history of race and gender in the Afro-Caribbean Atlantic World of the 1590s.

This book retraces the remarkable itineraries of an Afro-Caribbean merchant and widow named Catalina de los Santos during the 1590s. After purchasing a 100-ton vessel in the Azores, she traveled aboard her ship to Seville and the Canary Islands in Spain's Indies fleet, returning to the Caribbean several years later. As a transregional social history, this book uses her story to reconstruct the experiences of free women of African descent in the Greater Antilles, the Azores, and the Canary Islands during the second half of the sixteenth century. It emphasizes ways their lives were shaped by diverse forms of oceanic traffic that linked these archipelagos to one another and to Seville, and the influences that these women in turn exercised within their communities. In so doing, this book contributes to our understanding of the Caribbean, the Azores, and the Canary Islands in the late 1500s as interconnected spaces located at the center of multiple, overlapping maritime circuits.

Southern Illinois University (Carbondale, IL 62901-4302)
Amy J. Etcheson (Project Director: November 2022 to present)

DR-292377-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2023 – 9/30/2024

Open-Access Edition of Utopian Genderscapes by Michelle C. Smith

In Utopian Genderscapes, author Michelle C. Smith explores the interconnected rhetoricity of gender, class, and work through the case studies of three nineteenth-century utopian communities: Transcendentalist Brook Farm, the Harmony Society, and the Oneida Community. By looking at the networks of bodies, spaces, objects, and discourses that defined women’s work in these distinct communities, Smith reveals how labor was not only gendered but also raced and classed. These communities offer evidence of how industrialization differentiated labor across gender, class, and race and what gender reforms were thinkable in the mid-nineteenth century. This innovative rhetorical history advances valuable lessons for contemporary discussions in the discipline of teleological rhetorics, rhetorics of exceptionalism, and rhetorics of choice.

Riya Das
Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77445-6850)

HB-281426-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

Women at Odds: Indifference, Antagonism, and Progress in Late Victorian Literature

Research and writing leading to a book reassessing female solidarity in the Victorian novel.

My monograph project challenges traditional accounts of female solidarity as a driver of narrative and social success for women. By contrast, my project shows that in prominent novels of the late nineteenth century, antagonism and indifference are surprisingly effective tools for women looking to break out of traditionally defined roles. On the one hand, this antagonism disrupts the status quo in unanticipated ways—a patriarchal society that has come to expect solidarity between women finds it difficult to deal with female competition—and it helps open new domestic and professional pathways for women. On the other hand, in the effort to achieve gender equality, the professional New Woman’s rhetoric recycles distinctly sexist, racist, and classist mid-Victorian conventions, thereby bringing middle-class Englishwomen dialectically into the labor pool of the British empire, even as they resist patriarchal institutions.

Valerie M. Fridland
University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)

FEL-281445-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

I Hate When You Say That! Exploring the rise, reign and significant cultural value of our most pilloried linguistic quirks

Research and writing leading to a book for the general reader on modern American language phenomena and how cultural resistance to such colloquial speech is indicative of larger racial, gender, generational, and class differences.

This request outlines a book project that unpacks the history behind and linguistic processes that drive what’s changing in the language around us, and the negative consequences of steadfastly adhering to a doctrine of linguistic prescriptivism and bias. Informed by a theoretical linguistic perspective but written for a lay audience, the book will argue that our most popular and pilloried linguistic quirks are really about our immense capacity for social adaptivity. Each chapter takes on a particularly maligned and misunderstood speech feature and uses it as a springboard into a larger discussion of how language changes, noting how cultural biases and language forms become interwoven. By offering historical analysis and insight from contemporary research, the book offers a unique perspective that language is more than just structure, more than just grammar, that what we tend to deride as imperfections and unwelcome changes are integral to its larger communicative purpose.

Liz Przybylski
Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

HB-281490-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream, 2008-2018

Completion of a book and two open-access articles about Indigenous hip hop musicians, media professionals and the concept of sonic sovereignty.

What does sovereignty sound like? The book Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream answers this question through ethnographic research and media analysis undertaken with Indigenous hip hop musicians and media professionals. The research is rooted in Winnipeg, an Indigenous music broadcasting center in Canada whose resonance is heard across borders. It reveals the wide and deep impacts of Streetz FM, the first Indigenous hip hop station, and probes the forces that led to the station’s closure, even as its music continued to find popularity with audiences. I extend research that explores the racialization and gendering of urban-format popular music and detail the implications on how Indigenous artists are heard—and silenced—through popular music distribution. Musicians are actively building what I call sonic sovereignty, navigating the expectations of mainstream airplay while pushing aesthetic and political boundaries.

Kristina Marie Sessa
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)

FEL-281583-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Disaster in Late Antiquity: A Cultural and Material History

Research and writing leading to a book on natural and man-made disasters in Late Antiquity (ca 250 – 700 CE).

This book is the first cultural and material study of human-made and natural disasters in Late Antiquity (ca 250 – 700 CE). Focusing on the fourth to seventh centuries CE and on the tri-continental expanse of the late Roman Empire, it places disaster at the center of analysis, and investigates how late ancient Romans from across the socio-economic spectrum variously perceived and experienced disasters like warfare, climate change, earthquakes, and pandemics. Instead of approaching disaster as the primary variable driving a predetermined narrative of “decline and fall,” this study presents a multi-scalar, differential history of disaster, and shows how it led to a variety of outcomes that were directly related to social and political status, available economic resources, religious identity, gender, and geographic location.

Sara J. Bernstein
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

FEL-281728-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

The Metaphysics of Intersectionality

Research and writing of four peer-reviewed articles on the metaphysics of social intersectional identities, drawing on the philosophy of race and feminist philosophy.

Viewing social identities as intersectional has become central to understanding how various dimensions of race, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, and class interact to form more complex forms of discrimination than those suffered by persons who fall under only one category. This project develops a comprehensive metaphysical theory of intersectional social categories and intersectional oppression, with results and applications for many disciplines.

Kimberly Diane Bowes
University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)

FEL-281918-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Living Through the Roman Empire: An Economic History of the 90%

Research and writing leading to a book on the economic history of the poor in the Roman empire (2nd century BCE to 3rd century CE).

This project presents the first economic history of working people and the poor during the Roman empire. Examining everything from small-farm agriculture and the nature of wages to the physical bodies of the working poor, it considers how the advent of a global, monetized economy impacted everyone from peasants and artisans to the mass of seasonal workers. It argues for daily survival strategies that blurred legal and gender categories, including those between the enslaved and the free, producing an intersectional economic space defined by shared strategies for getting by. The book thus not only proposes a wholly new perspective on the Roman economy, but also one which speaks to the challenges of laborers and “gig” workers today, getting by in a complex global world.

Christian Lee Novetzke
University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98195-3650)

FEL-282143-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

A Flower of Fire: Religion, Caste, and Gender in the Political Poetry of Savitribai Phule (1831-1897)

Research and writing leading to a book on the work of Indian poet, educator, and social reformer Savitribai Phule (1831-1897).

Savitribai Phule was born into an impoverished subaltern caste of Shudra (“low caste”) agricultural workers in India in 1831 and she became one of the first Shudra women in India to receive an education. Along with her husband Jotirao Phule, Savitribai Phule opened schools for Dalit (“Untouchable”) and Muslim girls, and for children of all disadvantaged communities. This experience as an activist in education led her to write two books of political poetry in Marathi, each articulating her powerful vision for social justice and her fight against caste patriarchy. Her ideas about religion, caste, gender, and power made her one of the most important critical thinkers in Indian history. However, Savitribai Phule is hardly known outside of India and there is no English monograph devoted to her critical thought. I seek NEH support to complete the first scholarly monograph in English on the critical thought of Savitribai Phule.

Jennifer Lynne Palmer
University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)

FEL-282164-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2023

Race, Gender, and Property Ownership in the Eighteenth-Century French Atlantic World

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of property in the 18th-century French Atlantic.

In the eighteenth-century Atlantic world, the emergence of plantation capitalism alongside modern bureaucratic states reshaped who could own, what they could own, and how ownership was established. In the process, ownership transformed into a white patriarchal privilege. A close focus on the French Atlantic demonstrates the novelty of this development. Race, Gender, and Property Ownership in the Eighteenth-Century French Atlantic World illuminates how this transition occurred by examining the ownership practices of white women and free women of color in the French Caribbean and France at the moment these opportunities disappeared. By focusing on how social relations structured early modern ownership as much as the law, this monograph challenges prevailing narratives of the role of race and gender in the rise of the plantation economy and ultimately capitalism.

Sarit Kattan Gribetz
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)

FEL-282246-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2023 – 6/30/2024

Jerusalem: A Feminist History

Research and writing leading to a history of Jerusalem from biblical times to the present, focused on the experience of the city’s women.

The history of Jerusalem is usually told as a story about King David, Emperor Constantine, and Sultan Salah al-Din – that is, as the history of a city that was founded, built, and ruled by powerful men. Throughout its history, however, from antiquity through the medieval and modern periods, the city of Jerusalem has been built, ruled, mourned, visited, and populated by women. Moreover, Jerusalem is often personified as a woman and depicted in feminine terms, a common literary trope providing important angles through which to explore how constructions of gender so profoundly shaped historical and theological conceptualizations of the city. "Jerusalem: A Feminist History" offers an alternative historical narrative that builds upon descriptions of women’s experiences, spaces, practices, and contributions to tell a new story. As a work of feminist history, it simultaneously probes how constructions of gender have conditioned depictions of the city’s history from antiquity to modernity.

Alexander Hidalgo
Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)

FEL-282338-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Mexican Soundscapes of the Colonial Era

Completion of a book on the cultural meaning of sound in colonial Mexico.

Mexican Soundscapes of the Colonial Era tells a new story about the way cultural difference, linguistic diversity, and social categorization shaped people’s interpretation of the things they heard. Set during a turbulent period that witnessed widespread rioting, racial tension, and changing gender norms, sound functioned as a disciplinary force in the hands of officials who imposed order by utilizing important technology including bells, cannons, and firearms to shape their authority. A rich archive of alphabetic and print sources, paintings, and hand-made objects speak forcefully about how the audible elements of everyday life carried meaning differently across ethnic lines and how Natives, Blacks, and mixed race groups controlled the acoustic environment through spoken language and song but also laughter, shouting, rumor, and incantation.

Lisa Miracchi
Colorado Seminary (Denver, CO 80210-4711)

FEL-282501-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

New Foundations for the Study of Biological and Artificial Intelligence

Research and writing of a book on the distinction between artificial and human intelligence.

The primary deliverable will be an academic monograph, "Explaining Intelligence: New Foundations for the Study of Biological and Artificial Intelligence," which will provide much-needed philosophical foundations for understanding the nature of intelligence, elucidating and advancing its empirical study, and understanding its social and ethical impacts. The PI will develop and support a novel, non-reductive approach to the study of intelligence centered on minded intelligence: the kind of intelligence that beings with minds (including humans and many non-human animals, but not current AI systems) have. This work will demonstrate the central importance of humanistic inquiries into the complexities of studying intelligence in cognitive science, AI, and, and robotics contexts.

Sean Hanretta
Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)

FEL-282679-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

Dying and Marrying Muslim in Ghana: Ethics of the Body, Secrecy, and Privacy

Research and writing leading to a book on the role of funerals and weddings among Muslims in colonial Ghana, including their implications for the study of ethics.

My project analyzes the history of ethics and bodily discipline among Muslims in colonial Ghana. I trace the ways male and female Muslim teachers used funerals and weddings as opportunities to develop and promote new techniques for managing emotions, regulating social behavior, and fashioning a pious self in the face of the moral crisis provoked by European conquest. Gender relations, sexual norms, transnational religious movements, and political economy all contextualized these teachings and in turn contributed to their disappearance. But I also emphasize the philosophical creativity and consequences of the ideas, which produced a framework for action at a time when the state could no longer be counted on to maintain the conditions for ethical behavior. Recognizing the intellectual significance of African social innovations resists the erasure of the continent from Islamic Studies and the marginalization of African contributions to global debates over issues of great public urgency.

Valerie A. Martinez
Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78207-4689)

HB-282804-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Embajadoras: Latina Servicewomen and Hemispheric Politics during World War II

Research and writing leading to a book on the Benito Juárez Squadron, a U.S. Army unit of Mexican American servicewomen recruited during World War II. 

Embajadoras, Ambassadors, reconceptualizes traditional notions of diplomacy and international actors by investigating how the recruitment and service of Latina women in the Benito Juárez Squadron during World War II embodied the Pan-American ideal of an imagined hemispheric system of unity and reciprocity in the Americas. Embajadoras examines this pivotal moment in the history of U.S.-Latin American relations and Mexican American Civil Rights and argues that while male officers and civilian leaders utilized the women's bodies and military participation to further their diplomatic and social justice goals, Latina servicewomen in turn defined a gendered civil rights project that included the legal rights afforded to all U.S. citizens as well as full ownership of their highly policed lives, bodies, and sexuality.

Hilary J. Holbrow
Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)

FO-282996-22
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
Research Programs

Totals:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Fading at Dusk? Gender and Ethnic Inequality in Japan’s New Era of Demographic Decline

Research and writing leading to a book on the effects of Japan's population decline on hiring and promotion practices in the white-collar workplace, with a particular focus on women and immigrants. 

Japan is at the forefront of global population decline. I examine the implications of this unprecedented demographic transition in the context of the Japanese white-collar workplace. I show that firms are hiring and promoting more women and immigrants, but that gender remains a deeper fault line than ethnicity. This stands in contrast to Western nations, where native-born women are advantaged over immigrant men. I argue that because Japan restricts migration for the purposes of low-paid work, Japanese women remain the face of the low-status workforce, reinforcing views of women as less capable and deserving. In contrast, Asian immigrant men are able to disrupt historical prejudices. By demonstrating that the composition of low-level jobs is more important for boundary construction and inequality than that of upper-level jobs, this study overturns assumptions about how status beliefs form in the workplace, and advances understanding of how shrinking populations will reshape inequality.

University Press of Mississippi (Jackson, MS 39211-6453)
Craig Gill (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

ZRE-283204-22
ARP-Organizations (Research-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$144,000 (approved)
$144,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2022

University Press of Mississippi (a proposal to support salary costs and create new humanities positions)

An important university publisher to maintain three existing jobs and create four new positions.

University Press of Mississippi (UPM) is a nonprofit humanities publisher of ground-breaking scholarly books in African American studies, folklore, gender studies, history, literary studies, and popular culture. UPM succeeded during the pandemic due to demand for certain product lines, especially ebooks, institutional electronic access for libraries and universities, and online sales via print-on-demand vendors. UPM met this demand thanks to investments in technology and a talented staff that quickly transitioned to remote work and a digital workflow. This transition and the new work created by shifts in the market placed unsustainable stress on the staff and systems. To maintain output and create future growth, UPM needs additional staff to transform the emergency response into a long-term digital structure. UPM seeks funds from the NEH to create four new humanities positions. NEH funds will ensure the future of UPM as a successful and sustainable humanities organization.

Chicago Humanities Festival (Chicago, IL 60654-3300)
Nathalie Kohen (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Brittany Pyle (Co Project Director: November 2021 to present)

ZPP-283310-22
ARP-Organizations (Public-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Chicago Humanities Festival 2022 Humanities Discussions

Creation of six humanities programs on racial justice, gender equality, and building an inclusive society.

The COVID-19 crisis had an immediate impact on the Chicago Humanities Festival, which, in a normal year, presents over 100 in-person programs on the humanities, arts, and culture to audiences of over 40,000 in-person, and reaches hundreds of thousands more online. The Festival proposes a project to bring at least six in-person conversations to Chicago audiences in 2022, with programs being recorded and presented for free to online audiences. These six-plus programs will consist of topics closely related to the NEH’s “A More Perfect Union” initiative, using a humanities lens to look at topics such as racial justice, gender equality, and how we can move forward to build a more inclusive society. NEH funding will be used to support and hire critical staff on the Programming, Production, and Audience Services teams for this project.

Fairfield Historical Society (Fairfield, CT 06824-6639)
Michael A. Jehle (Project Director: May 2021 to November 2021)
Heather Maxson (Project Director: November 2021 to September 2022)
Michelle Cheng (Project Director: September 2022 to present)

ZPA-283371-22
ARP-Organizations (Preservation-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$125,565 (approved)
$125,565 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Presenting a More Complete Picture of Southwestern CT’s Diverse Colonial History

The hiring of a curator and funding for two current staff, along with contracting for design and fabrication services, to install a long-term exhibition that explores the diversity of southwestern Connecticut’s seventeenth and eighteenth-century history.

Fairfield Historical Society (DBA Fairfield Museum / FMHC) seeks $125,565 to create a new long-term exhibition exploring CT’s diverse and complex 17th and 18th c. history. The exhibit will include new research and archeological discoveries on pre-colonial Native American history, the English subjugation of those Native communities, the role of African Americans in CT’s early economy, and how regional dynamics of race and class influenced early social and political life. The proposed exhibition will provide vital context for FMHC’s school and community programs planned to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence in 2026 by presenting a more complete historical look at how race, gender, and class dynamics influenced the establishment of colonial Connecticut, how those forces continue to reverberate in contemporary society, and how citizens today can draw from those perspectives to help create a more just, inclusive and sustainable society for the future.

Edith Wharton Restoration, Inc. (Lenox, MA 01240-0974)
Anne K. Schuyler (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

ZPP-283402-22
ARP-Organizations (Public-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Humanities Programming for The Mount 2022

Resumption of full-time, on-site literary and history programming.

The Mount, Edith Wharton's Home, is seeking funding to resume full-time on-site humanities programming in 2022, following two years of reduced programming, attendance, and income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We will also continue to host online events as we did during the pandemic because it has allowed us to reach new, more diverse audiences. The Mount’s 2022 humanities programing will strengthen our core activities with a new focus on issues of racial justice, gender equality, and immigration. Our major goals are to: • Relate our interpretation of Edith Wharton to the present day by using her life and writings as the framework for conversations about class, gender, religion, ethnicity, and race. • Engage audiences with the literature of our own time, with a focus on writers who explore contemporary experience from underrepresented perspectives. • Present scholars and writers who interpret history from new or previously untold points of view.

Betsy Ross House (Philadelphia, PA 19106-3323)
Lisa Acker Mounder (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

ZPP-283744-22
ARP-Organizations (Public-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2021 – 10/31/2022

Meet the Women of 18th Century Philadelphia

The expansion of interpretive programs regarding women in Philadelphia during the last quarter of the eighteenth century.

The Betsy Ross House (BRH) plans to expand the History Maker (first person interpretation) program through a new initiative called, “Meet the Women of 18th Century Philadelphia”. This program will address the issues of class, gender, ethnicity, political differences, and socio-economic status and tie them to contemporary issues and audiences. “Meet the Women of 18th Century Philadelphia” will transform the BRH courtyard into an experiential learning space where visitors will have the opportunity to engage with HMs representing a cross-section of the women who lived in Philadelphia in the last quarter of the 18th century. The program will use storytelling as an avenue to highlight women who made a significant impact on history.

Fort Ticonderoga Museum (Ticonderoga, NY 12883-0390)
Miranda Peters (Project Director: May 2021 to November 2022)
Beth L. Hill (Project Director: November 2022 to present)

ZPA-283778-22
ARP-Organizations (Preservation-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$199,300 (approved)
$199,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Opening the Vault: Pathways of Accessibility to Ticonderoga's Hidden Collections

The retention of seven staff and the addition of archival consultants to inventory and assess the archival records of a Revolutionary War fort in New York and, in collaboration with a local Native American tribe, to create public programs and exhibitions that explore the war and its impact in new ways.

This project seeks to provide the first comprehensive inventory of over 1000 archival records in Fort Ticonderoga’s history and pilot a project to make one particular source not only more accessible to learners of all ages across the country, but more engaging. In partnership with the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, we will collaborate to use the diary of Ensign William Johnson, a young officer serving with the British Indian Department, to explore the collision of language, culture, gender, war, and revolution during the trauma of the American War of Independence.

Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)
Lina Wilder (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

ZED-283800-22
ARP-Organizations (Education-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$94,923 (approved)
$94,923 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2022

Bridge funding to ensure courses in English and related disciplines at Connecticut College

The hiring of a one-year visiting professor and poet-in-residence.

This grant will fund a full-time visiting professorship and distinguished poet-in-residence position to Dr. Kate Rushin for AY 21-22, filling an important gap in faculty resulting from a hiring freeze due to the financial impact of Covid on the College operating budget. This appointment would enable the College to sustain its curricular offerings in creative writing, English, and Africana Studies. These courses would contribute to NEH’s area of interest “A More Perfect Union: Exploring America’s Story and Commemorating its 250th Anniversary” given their exploration of African-American literature and experience, racial justice and gender equity.

Lyman Allyn Art Museum (New London, CT 06320-4130)
Tanya Pohrt (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

ZRE-284144-22
ARP-Organizations (Research-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$48,505 (approved)
$48,505 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2022

The Way Sisters: Miniaturists of the Early Republic

The creation of a new exhibition and catalogue on early American art, and retaining three jobs at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London, Connecticut.

The Lyman Allyn seeks funding to support the installation of the museum’s upcoming exhibition: The Way Sisters: Miniaturists of the Early Republic and to support the development and production of a catalogue for the exhibition. This exhibition, which will be on view from October 30, 2021 to January 23, 2022, will present the work of sisters Mary Way (1769–1833) and Elizabeth Way Champlain (1771–1825), pioneering women artists who helped expand both their artform and gender roles for women in the early days of the new republic.

Enfield Shaker Museum (Enfield, NH 03748-3503)
Shirley Teresa Wajda (Project Director: May 2021 to September 2022)
Sharon D. Koomler (Project Director: September 2022 to present)

ZPP-284154-22
ARP-Organizations (Public-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$49,943 (approved)
$49,942 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

#EnfieldEverywhere: Planning and Developing Integrated Physical and Digital Exhibition Sites to Commemorate the 250th Anniversary of Shakerism in America at Enfield Shaker Museum

The Enfield Shaker Museum in New Hampshire to create two new exhibitions, retain two positions, and create two new jobs.

Enfield Shaker Museum will plan, develop, and script two distinct but complementary exhibitions to open in 2024, the 250th anniversary of the arrival of the Shakers’ founder, Ann Lee, to America. These exhibitions—one a physical site and the other digital—will be integrated with the Museum’s website and social media during and after the project’s completion (2023-2026). The physical site exhibition will explore Shaker religious tenets and their social manifestations as communalism, gender and racial equality, and pacifism, as well as their reification in the Shakers' material culture and built environment and shaping of the natural environment. The exhibition website (#EnfieldEverywhere) will include Enfield artifacts and documents at Enfield and at other museums and libraries and in private hands, a database of Enfield Shakers (already in production), and an expansion of themes beyond the physical exhibition's capacity.

Indiana Medical History Museum, Inc. (Indianapolis, IN 46222-4599)
Sarah Halter (Project Director: May 2021 to March 2022)
Norma Erickson (Project Director: March 2022 to present)

ZRE-284287-22
ARP-Organizations (Research-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Voices from Central State: People, Places, and Experience

The research and development of online content related to the history of the Central State Mental Hospital, supporting two existing staff, one new part-time researcher, and two graduate student interns.

Through its Voices from Central State initiative, the Indiana Medical History Museum works to focus more attention on the lives and experiences of the patients who lived and sometimes died within the hospital grounds. Building upon past work of the Voices initiative, IMHM is now developing an online memory forum and digital archive for former patients, employees, neighbors, and families to learn about the hospital's history and share their own stories, photos, and memories. This next phase of the initiative includes collection of oral histories and scholarly research to produce a comparative analysis of race, class, and gender, through the lens of personal accounts, architectural and planning history, and the intersection of medical and legal history. We will consider how the development of psychiatry is reflected in personal accounts, the changing landscape, legal precedence, and the trend of hospital deinstitutionalization.

Mount Saint Mary's University (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1599)
Lia Roberts (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Stephen Inrig (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284466-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,899 (approved)
$148,899 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2025

Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana Border Project

The development of a project to study and preserve the history and culture of Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana (WALAT) border region, including the development of a Gender and Border Studies minor.

MSMU’s proposed Women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana Border Project (“WALAT Border Project”) is a three-year humanities initiative to study and preserve the history and culture of women at the Los Angeles-Tijuana border. The project will 1) Develop a new WALAT Border Project minor—“Gender and Border Studies”—highlighting women’s experiences at the border. This minor will include new multidisciplinary humanities courses and include undergraduate humanities research opportunities, co-teaching, and/or guest lectures. 2) Form a WALAT Border Project Working Group comprised of MSMU faculty and external faculty partners at other universities in Southern California and Baja. 3) Launch a WALAT Border Project Symposium in final year of the project. These activities ensure engagement in the content by a wide range of scholars and the public while also encouraging the participation of emerging undergraduate scholars.

San Diego State University Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-1931)
Elizabeth Ann Pollard (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Pamela A. Jackson (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AC-284523-22
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,998 (approved)
$149,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Building a Comics and Social Justice Curriculum

A two-year project to develop 10 new courses and a certificate program in comic studies.

Scholars who study comics and graphic novels have long recognized their power to perpetuate harmful stereotypes; but also, more recently, their capacity to challenge injustice. Through engagement with issues like racial discrimination, gender inequality, sexual identity, and immigration, the ever-changing medium of comics is a change-maker. Humanists are well-positioned to trace that change and, through scholarship and teaching, make meaning of its power. Comics@SDSU seeks $150,000 for a two-year initiative to 1) develop ten new courses that will deepen and expand our humanistic comics curriculum, 2) use these courses to populate a proposed certificate in Comic Studies, and 3) support workshops that bring scholars to campus to energize comic studies at our Hispanic Serving Institution. The humanistic approach to the study of comics that we will cultivate through workshops, courses and a certificate program will empower thousands of students to visualize and manifest a more just future.

Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)
Jessica Richard (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285095-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$58,005 (approved)
$58,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Maria Edgeworth Letters

Planning for the creation of a fully searchable corpus of Maria Edgeworth’s letters through crowdsourced transcription, expert annotation, and TEI-encoding. Her letters are held at 26 libraries across the United States and United Kingdom, and this would be the first effort to unite them digitally.

The Maria Edgeworth Letters project provides open access to the thought and wide-ranging correspondence network of an extraordinary woman writing at the turn of the nineteenth century whose ideas on gender, race, religion, education, and science have important ramifications today. The grant would support the early stages of development of a digital edition of the letters of Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849), an Anglo-Irish novelist and educational theorist who was more famous in her day than Jane Austen. Her letters, held at archives around the world, have never been comprehensively edited or accessible; this digital project will gather the scattered letters and create their associated metadata, allowing for network and other analyses. This collaborative endeavor between four universities provides research and learning opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students and engages the public through the Zooniverse crowdsourcing initiative.

Women Make Movies, Inc. (New York, NY 10001-5059)
Julie F. Wyman (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
Grace Wang (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

TT-285462-22
Short Documentaries
Public Programs

Totals:
$149,996 (approved)
$149,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 10/31/2023

Instrumental: The Elayne Jones Story

Production of a thirty-minute film about Elayne Jones, a pioneering percussionist who challenged racial and gender stereotypes in classical music.

INSTRUMENTAL is a 30-minute documentary about Elayne Jones, who broke through racial and gender barriers in classical music but paid a personal toll for fighting against a culture of exclusivity. The film accompanies this 93-year-old African American timpanist as she reflects on the difference she’s made and the work that remains to be done. A collaboration between feminist documentary filmmaker Julie Wyman and American Studies scholar Grace Wang, INSTRUMENTAL is a critical, historical, and creative media research project that tells the story of Jones’s life, work, and fight for inclusion in classical music.

Mars Hill College (Mars Hill, NC 28754-9134)
Karen Lynn Paar (Project Director: September 2021 to present)
Leila Weinstein (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

AKA-285733-22
Humanities Connections Planning Grants
Education Programs

Totals:
$34,932 (approved)
$34,932 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

The Appalachian HEART Hub: Reimagining a Campus Museum as an Active Learning Hub

Planning to repurpose an on-campus museum into a humanities hub where students will engage in humanistic inquiry in a multi-disciplinary context.

Mars Hill University is seeking an NEH Connections planning grant to reimagine its extant campus museum as an inclusive active learning hub in which students will engage in humanistic inquiry across disciplines. This learning hub will be a space where students, faculty, and other learning professionals will come together to curate museum exhibitions; design innovative curricula; engage in conversations, lectures, workshops, and learning communities; visit museum exhibitions; and explore this region in a profoundly interdisciplinary way through experiential coursework and co-curricular activities. The structure and work of the Appalachian HEART (Humanities Education Across disciplines in the Region Together) Hub will center on students and making their voices heard through exhibitions and programs, thus contributing to a sense of belonging and, therefore, retention. This work will embody the “habits of mind” used in the humanities and will engender critical thinking and empathy.

Jennifer Suzanne Cramer
University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)

FT-285977-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

The Social Life of Appalachian Englishes

Revisions to four chapters of a book that explores how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and age shape language use throughout the Appalachian region. 

Appalachian Englishes possess an array of linguistic features that distinguish them from other American Englishes, yet the rich history of language in the United States has created a wealth of linguistic resources though immigration, contact, etc., providing the environment for these varieties to grow and adapt in ways that are also like other varieties. No single monograph exists in the linguistics or popular literature that exemplifies the diversity of Appalachian Englishes in terms of language production, perception, and their entanglement with identity factors. This project seeks to remedy this situation; with a colleague, I am working on a book project (under contract with Routledge) called The Social Life of Appalachian Englishes, which takes a sociocultural approach to exploring specific linguistic features of Appalachian varieties and connecting those to the social life of Appalachian varieties in terms of linguistic perceptions and use.

Sebastian James Langdell
Baylor University (Waco, TX 76798-7284)

FT-285980-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 6/30/2022

Thomas Hoccleve's Collected Shorter Poems: A Critical Edition (1422-26)

Research and writing leading to a critical edition of the shorter poems of Thomas Hoccleve written between 1422 and 1426.

This project will produce the first modern critical edition of the first author-curated “collected poems” in the English language, by the medieval English poet Thomas Hoccleve (d. 1426). The poems are preserved in two manuscripts—and, in a truly rare occurrence, both are in Hoccleve’s own hand. Although medieval French authors had produced career-spanning collections of their own poems, no English writer—not even Chaucer—had attempted anything similar until Hoccleve. The collection includes some of the earliest experiments in autobiography, and explorations of gender, subjectivity, heresy, and theological complexity. This project will be the missing piece in creating a complete, up-to-date corpus of Hoccleve’s work, and will make a significant contribution to the fields of English, philosophy, medieval studies, political studies, transnational literature, and theology. The edition is under contract and will be published by Liverpool University Press. 

Ashley Dawn Farmer
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)

FT-286071-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Black Women Activists and the FBI

Research and writing of a book that charts the rise and fall of the FBI’s twentieth-century Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO) through surveillance records of Black women activists and allies.

The FBI’s targeting of Black male leaders such as Dr. King and Malcolm X is now the subject of scholarly and popular lore. Often overlooked, however, are the Black women who endured similar government repression. Gendering Surveillance: Black Women Activists and the FBI charts the rise and fall of the FBI’s twentieth-century Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO) through surveillance records of Black women activists and allies. The book explains the intertwined histories of the Black Freedom Struggle and the FBI, explores the origins of COINTELPRO; its expansion at home and abroad; and agents’ targeting, jailing, and attempted murder of Black women. An investigation of Black women’s experiences with government surveillance further elucidates how marginalized groups define democracy and shape the contours of citizenship and civil rights. The project will help deepen discussions about the complicated relationships between rights, government protections, and federal surveillance.

Shannon Burke Draucker
Siena College (Loudonville, NY 12211-1462)

FT-286167-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

How Musical Science Shaped Representations of Gender and Sexuality in British Literature, 1850-1914

Research and writing towards a book on Victorian authors’ understanding of music and musical science, 1850–1914. 

My book, Sounding Bodies: Music Physiology and the Queer Overtones of Victorian Literature, argues that new scientific discoveries of music’s effects on the body fundamentally shifted how Victorian writers captured corporeal life. As acoustical scientists like Hermann von Helmholtz and John Tyndall learned that music could penetrate the ear, tickle the nerves, and excite the muscles, Victorian writers embraced new opportunities to explicitly represent bodily sensations of pleasure, desire, and intimacy. From Thomas Hardy to Vernon Lee, Victorian writers drew on music physiology to depict and defend those whose gender presentations, sexual desires, and preferred forms of intimacy incited social stigma, legal punishment, or even violence. Though often associated with prudish or conservative attitudes towards gender and sexuality, Victorian literature was in fact full of subversive representations of embodied life.

Elizabeth Marie Perego
Appalachian State University (Boone, NC 28608-0001)

FT-286209-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

Algerian Women in Conflict: Representations of Gender, “Terrorism,” and Islam on the Verge of the War on Terror

Research and writing leading to a book on the depiction of Algerian women as victims in Western and French media during the civil war in the1990s-2000s.

Algerian Women in Conflict examines how local and global artists, activists, and journalists depicted Algeria’s civil conflict (1991-2005), a political struggle between the state and insurgents, as a “war against women.” It argues that depictions of women’s suffering in the war at the hands of “Islamist extremists” helped to prime global audiences for envisioning women as the ultimate victims of Islamic militantism just as U.S. politicians employed such narratives to justify the War on Terror. Yet, these stories obscured the Algerian conflict’s greater complexities. Comparing Algerian women’s experiences to gendered narratives of the 1990s war from the three countries that followed the conflict closely (Algeria, France, and the U.S.) and drawing on queer and feminist theories of conflict, this project explores the centrality of gender to Neo-Orientalist visions of the Muslim world as expressed through art, literature, and journalism in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Amy Elizabeth Swanson
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)

FT-286235-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/17/2022 – 7/16/2022

Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Dance of Senegal

Research and writing leading to a book about gender, sexuality, and contemporary dance in Senegal.

I am seeking an NEH Summer Stipend to complete research for the first chapter and epilogue of my book project. The book examines how contemporary choreographers in Senegal recalibrate national and transnational constructions of gender and sexuality through dance practice, pedagogy, and performance. Positioned in both a climate of severe gender and sexual regulation in Senegal and the progressive international contemporary dance touring circuit, the book seeks to understand how artists navigate these entangled spheres. Drawing on several years of ethnographic research, the book illustrates the contemporary dance studio and stage as privileged sites of knowledge production about gender and sexuality. It argues that artists code their bodies as variously legible for diverse audiences on local and global stages as a tactic to put forth performances of gender and sexuality that evade disciplinary norms.

Ashley Meredith Williard
University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)

FT-286254-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/5/2023 – 8/4/2023

Disruptive Minds: Madness in the Early French Atlantic

Research and writing leading to a book exploring seventeenth and eighteenth century conceptions of madness in France and its Atlantic colonies.

My book project, Disruptive Minds: Madness in the Early French Atlantic, argues that madness exposes the workings of and transgressions against colonial power in the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French Atlantic. Positioned at a rich intersection of critical disability, gender, and race studies, this research stands to make a significant contribution to understandings of imperialism and resistance in the francophone world and beyond. The five chapters explore competing worldviews and embodied experiences of madness for the diverse populations of the colonial Caribbean. Since mental disability often implied transgressions of expected behavior, my book represents a unique opportunity for interpreting the ways marginalized groups negotiated, suffered under, and struggled against colonialism and slavery.

Ava Purkiss
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

FT-286260-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Fit Citizens: A History of Black Women’s Exercise from Post-Reconstruction to Postwar America

Research and writing of a book about the intersections between Black womanhood, exercise, and citizenship from the 1890s to the 1950s. 

Fit Citizens explores how African American women used physical exercise to demonstrate their “fitness” for citizenship from the 1890s to the 1950s—a time when physically fit bodies garnered new political meaning. It will be the first monograph on the history of black exercise and seeks to expand conventional frameworks of health and citizenship in the humanities, particularly in the fields of history, Black Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, and American Studies. The project shows that black women asserted their moral and physical fitness for citizenship through calisthenics, gymnastics, sports, walking, and other forms of cardiovascular exercise. In placing black women squarely within the history of American fitness, the book decenters labor as the primary mode of black mobility and physicality. It prompts humanities scholars to think more literally, and in effect more critically, about how African Americans actually “exercised citizenship.”

Elizabeth Rachel Escobedo
Colorado Seminary (Denver, CO 80210-4711)

FT-286277-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Military Mujeres: Mexican American and Puerto Rican Women in the World War II U.S. Armed Forces

Writing a history of Latina servicewomen in World War II.

“Military Mujeres: Mexican American and Puerto Rican Women in the World War II U.S. Armed Forces” explores the history of Latina military personnel in the Second World War and the ways in which the military institution served as an avenue for Mexican American and Puerto Rican women to challenge traditional gender roles, better their socio-economic status, and fight for access to first-class U.S. citizenship and civil rights both during and after the war. In focusing on two different populations of Latinas, “Military Mujeres” is also significant in its use of both comparative and relational lenses to explore the arbitrary social constructions of race and gender that federal officials imposed on women from various Spanish-speaking communities, and the implications of these federal policies on the wartime and postwar lives of Mexican American and Puerto Rican military women.

Lisa Hager
Board of Regents of University of Wisconsin System, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53211-3153)

FT-286503-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/13/2022 – 8/12/2022

Transgender Victorians: Reconceptualizing Gender Identities in Nineteenth-Century British Literary Culture

Research and writing leading to a book theorizing Victorian gender identities through literature and authorial biography.  

The central argument of this book project is twofold. Firstly, we, as humanities scholars, must fundamentally reconceptualize our understanding of nineteenth-century gender to account for the possibility of movement between, across, and among genders. Secondly, we must use this understanding to consider the possibilities of trans narratives within the diversity of gender identities represented throughout Victorian literary culture. In making room for transgender studies’ understanding of gender and sex as multiple, changeable, and constructed, the book’s trans-inclusive vision of Victorian gender identities demonstrates how the categories of woman and man were being constructed and revised throughout the century. Furthermore, it foregrounds how the oppositional, binary discourse of gender necessarily reveals its own contradictions in the form of bodies and genders that refuse to fit into one of only two gender identities.

James Joseph Blasina
Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)

FT-286570-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Gender, Nation, and Empire in Music for St. Katherine of Alexandria, 1050-1400

Research and writing leading to a book about liturgical music written in honor of St. Katherine of Alexandria in Normandy, England, and Italy, and its subsequent dissemination throughout Europe and West Asia, from 1050 to 1400.

In seeking to clarify the widespread popularity of St. Katherine of Alexandria in the fourteenth century, my monograph investigates chant written in honor of the saint during the earliest stages of her cult, three centuries earlier. Hitherto neglected musical sources reveal new details about paths of cultic transmission, those who revered her, and the reasons for which she was appealing. This project considers three distinct musical traditions that evince the gendered and political factors that impacted cultic embedment. Representation of Katherine’s speech was deployed to reinforce state formation and imperialism in the name of Christian orthodoxy, but also gave voice to expressions of gendered dissent not evident elsewhere. This project grounds the widespread fourteenth-century popularity of St. Katherine’s cult in the social, political, and religious contexts of its first century.

University of Hawaii at Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
J. Noelani Goodyear-Kaopua (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286888-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$182,486 (approved)
$182,486 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

A Biography of Native Hawaiian Leader and Scholar, Haunani-Kay Trask (1949 - 2021)

Preparation of a coauthored book on the life and work of Haunani-Kay Trask (1949-2021), Native Hawaiian scholar, educator, poet, and community leader. (24 months) 

An intellectual and political biography of Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask. A poet, political scientist, activist, and international advocate for human rights, Trask is arguably the most important Native Hawaiian scholar of the 20th century. Her life and works contributed to the global rise of Indigenous subjectivity, and she profoundly shaped Hawaiian movements for justice from the 1970s onward. Written for broad audiences, the book will shed light on ways Native Hawaiians have navigated and organized against inequalities resulting from forced political incorporation into the US in 1898. Charting Trask’s roots and routes, the project illuminates connections between major social movements that transformed Hawaiian, Pacific, and American life in the late 20th century and early 21st centuries, including the ways such movements changed universities. The project engages Trask’s work to consider issues of gender justice, Indigenous-settler relations, and ways public universities shape democratic life

Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus (Altoona, PA 16601-3777)
Julie L. Reed (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

RZ-287010-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$229,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2025

Sovereign Kin: A History of the Cherokee Nation

Preparation of a coauthored book on the history of the Cherokee Nation (pre-1600 to 2010). (36 months) 

The most recent comprehensive history of the Cherokee Nation was written in 1963; it continues to sell more than 500 copies a year through an academic press. It fails to address key issues, such as gender and race, raised by social and cultural historians since the 1960s, let alone cover the last sixty years of Cherokee history. Cherokee Nation citizens, journalists, and academics understand its limitations and have requested an up-to-date book written in accessible, engaging prose. We are working with an agent to pitch this project to presses able to bring this book to the widest audience. As we identify a publisher and seek funding, we already are writing "Sovereign Kin: A History of the Cherokee Nation." With the support of the NEH Collaborative Grant, we intend to conduct research trips to the Cherokee Nation and the Oklahoma Historical Society and collect interviews with key Cherokee Nation citizens. We will complete a draft of the manuscript by August 2025.

Jane Kamensky
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)

FZ-287076-22
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Candida Royalle and the Sexual Revolution: A History from Below

Research and writing of a history of the sexual revolution told through the life of Candice Vadala (1950-2015), American adult film performer, director, and producer.

Candida Royalle and the Sexual Revolution is both an uncomfortably intimate biography and an epic history of the late twentieth century United States, tracing the political economy of the postwar period and the attendant restructuring of families, gender roles, and sexuality; the rise of Big Freud and the dawn of Big Porn; and the relationships of law and culture, high and low, self and society in a period of sweeping transformation.

Eric Douglas Plemons
Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0073)

FZ-287125-22
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2023

What to Make of Me: The Transgender Body as a Valuable Resource

Research and writing of a book on the ethics and history of how transgender medical procedures have supported more traditional reproduction and organ transplant technologies.

Research is underway that would transform the tissues removed during transgender people’s reconstructive genital surgeries from medical waste into valuable resources. My book project, What to Make of Me, investigates the conditions and interrogates the implications of two uses to which researchers hope these tissues might be put. In the first case, trans women’s penile tissue is already being used to engineer penises for soldiers who have lost them in battle. In the second case, trans men’s uteruses (and one day possibly vaginas) could be used to enable others to become pregnant. In this emerging medical research, the historically marginalized trans body is resignified as a source of uniquely valuable material capable of consolidating another’s normative gender in ways that nothing else can.

Sophie Kirsten White
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

FZ-287209-22
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2023 – 7/31/2024

Strangers Within: A Cultural and Genomic History of Red Hair

Writing toward a book on the scientific, cultural, and visual history of red hair.

_Strangers Within: A Cultural and Genomic History of Red Hair_ analyzes how redheads have been marginalized and penalized over a wide temporal and geographic swathe. Juxtaposing cultural history with new genomic discoveries, this is an investigation of MC1R gene variant carriers and the gendered and sexualized myths that have been ascribed to this phenotypic group. Grounded in contemporary popular culture and running the gamut from genomic findings (which include medical singularities) to Norse mythology, Celtic folklore, slavery in Ancient Greece and Rome, the Inquisition, anti-Semitism, art historical and literary representations, this book has implications and ambitions beyond red hair as a model for understanding the construction of otherness—and the fear and attraction, adulation and abuse—of the other.