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Funded Projects Query Form
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Keywords: 'Library of America' (this phrase)
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PY-263669-19

San Diego Historical Society (San Diego, CA 92138-1825)
Mari Tina Zarpour (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Border Dwellers/Los de la Frontera

Digitization events to collect local history materials in two communities in the South Bay region of the San Diego metropolitan area, Old Town National City and San Ysidro.  A majority of residents are of Spanish-speaking descent, many with family roots in the area dating before the 1848 border demarcation.  Photo archivists at the San Diego Historical Society would lead the events in collaboration with two social services agencies, Casa de Salud/Old Town National City Committee in National City and Casa Familiar/The Front Art Gallery in San Ysidro.  The events would feature workshops on preserving family memorabilia and be followed by presentations based on the digitized images by a local historian and author, Barbara Zagora.  With donor permission, the materials would be made available on the website of the San Diego Historical Society, the Online Archive of California/Calisphere, and the Digital Public Library of America.

Border Dwellers/Los de la Frontera will examine the border community of the South Bay, San Diego County’s. The San Diego-Tijuana international border is unique historically, culturally, and sociologically than other border locales, and yet the history of this region has yet to be explored. This project, the first of its kind in the South Bay, represents a critical first step in the recognition of the cultural heritage of its border residents. The San Diego History Center plans to focus on the cultural heritage of two South Bay communities: San Ysidro and Old Town National City. The digitization event and surrounding programs will collect family photographs, portraits, and documents like letters, military papers, and ephemera. A follow-up event will consist of a slideshow and history lecture presented by a historian based on the items digitized from the participants, and a discussion session for attendees to share memories. SDHC staff will be present to record these memories.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Latino History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021


PY-263670-19

Bowling Green State University (Bowling Green, OH 43403-0001)
Michelle Sweetser (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Preserving and Contextualizing the Islamic Culture and Heritage of Northwest Ohio.

One digitization event and two public exhibits and programs focused on the history of Northwest Ohio’s Muslim community.  The proposed project represents a partnership between the Center for Archival Collections (CAC), which is a unit of the Bowling Green State University (BSGU) Libraries, and the Islamic Center for Greater Toledo (ICGT), which was founded in 1954 and represents the first community to build a mosque in Ohio and the third in the nation.  BGSU archivists and students would assist with digitization, and ICGT volunteers would assist with translating information about the historical items brought in by community members, which are likely to include personal documents and family artifacts in Arabic, Farsi, Kurdish, Urdu, Hindi, and Bengali.  With donor permission, materials would be featured in an Omeka-based digital exhibit and made available for research in the Digital Public Library of America through CAC’s participation in the Ohio Digital Network.

The Center for Archival Collections (CAC) and the Islamic Center of Greater Toledo (ICGT) will host a community scanning day and two public exhibits and programs focusing on the history of Northwest Ohio’s Muslim community, as well as the role of the ICGT within that history. Members of the ICGT and general public will be invited to bring any historical materials related to the project theme for reformatting and preservation by the CAC. The scanning day will present a significant opportunity for initiating the preservation of the region’s Islamic heritage, which has been anchored by the ICGT and the religious, educational and cultural programs offered to both its members as well as the greater Toledo community. Subsequent public programs and exhibits will allow the community at large - Muslim and non-Muslim - to learn about and engage with Islamic traditions and culture, and to better appreciate the significant role that Muslims and the ICGT have played in the history of the region.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021


PW-259113-18

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Henry F. Raine (Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Digitization of the New-York Historical Society's Subway Construction Photograph Collection

The digitization of 66,000 photographs produced by the New York City Board of Transportation before and during construction of the New York subway system from 1900 to 1950, documenting people, buildings, streetscapes, and the construction process throughout the subway network across Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.

The New-York Historical Society will digitize its Subway Construction Photograph Collection, dating from 1900-1950 and numbering 66,000 images, and make them publicly available through the use of its new Islandora digital portal, N-YHS Digital Collections, the Digital Public Library of America, and WorldCat. The photograph collection documents the construction of New York City's subway system in four boroughs including Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, and Queens. The collection also documents the face of the city, including its built environment, streetscapes, and people during the first half of the 20th century. Many of the photographs are works of art completely unknown to researchers and the public alike. The digitized collection will facilitate their use for educational and scholarly purposes. The images will include enhanced metadata as well as geo-coding with latitude and longitude information.

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$87,310 (approved)
$87,310 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2020


PW-259144-18

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Susan Luftschein (Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Rachel Mandell (Co Project Director: February 2019 to October 2019)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
L.A. as Subject Community Histories Digitization Project

Digitization of around 17,000 items including paper materials, historic photographs, video recordings, and cultural objects from collections held by six community archives in the L.A. as Subject research alliance.

The L.A. as Subject Community Histories Digitization Project will make publicly accessible via the USC Digital Library and Digital Public Library of America collections held by 6 community archives from the L.A. as Subject research alliance: the Filipino American Library, the First AME Church of Los Angeles, the Go for Broke National Education Center, the Pasadena Museum of History, the Southern California Library, and the Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum. The 6 collections document the experiences of post-WWII Filipino immigrants; videos of 400 sermons by Rev. Dr. Cecil "Chip" Murray at a socially engaged African-American church in South Los Angeles; firsthand perspectives of Japanese-American WWII veterans in 1,100 video oral history interviews; the daily lives of late 19th and early 20th century African-American, Asian-American, and Latino communities; and Jewish women's groups. The project will publish 2,950 hours of video and 15,000 photos and pages of paper materials.

Project fields:
American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Urban History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$270,000 (approved)
$270,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2021


GW-259323-18

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Max Rudin (Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters Today

Production of an anthology of African American poetry and an accompanying series of reading and discussion programs.

Library of America requests a grant in the amount of $458,418 in partial support of Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters Today, a major national initiative to explore and reassess the multifaceted African American poetic tradition, its complex engagement with American history over 250 years, and its ongoing relevance to our national life. The project has two related objectives. One is to bring together Americans of varied backgrounds around the country to engage with the richness of this essential American tradition in ways that illuminate the continuities and discontinuities between past and present and offer context and insight into questions that remain of vital national importance. The second is to make permanently available a groundbreaking anthology reflecting several generations of scholarly and archival research and rediscovery that will encourage exploration and discussion of the tradition’s meanings and resonances long after the project is over.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Community Conversations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$369,000 (approved)
$369,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 6/30/2021


PW-259094-18

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Naomi L Nelson (Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Voices of Change II: Bringing Radio Haiti Home

Enhanced description of nearly 4,000 audio recordings in the Radio Haiti Archive and a pilot project to test more effective access channels for Haiti and other underserved areas.

Voices of Change II: Bringing Radio Haiti Home, a twelve-month, $85,753 project at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University, will result in the enhanced description of the Radio Haiti Archive and a roadmap for repatriating the Archive’s 5,300 audio recordings to Haiti. The Radio Haiti team will create detailed, trilingual description for all the recordings, vastly improving the ability to search the individual programs and making the collection more accessible to those who do not speak Haitian Creole. They will also complete a pilot to explore whether YouTube, Internet Archive or a low-bandwidth version of the Duke Digital Repository would provide the most effective access for people in Haiti and other underserved areas. Voices of Change II provides far-reaching access to a singular archive of information and voices and provides a model for the repatriation of other such displaced archives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$85,753 (approved)
$85,753 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


PY-258672-18

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
Carolyn Goldstein (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Local Rappers, DJs,B-Boys and Graff: Documenting the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Community from the 1970's to the Present

A digitization event held at the Boston Public Library’s central branch in Copley Square at which staff from University Archives and Special Collections of the University of Massachusetts Boston would invite members of the community to share materials related to the city’s hip-hop culture: demo tapes, performance videos, flyers, posters, photographs, clothing, and accessories. Items would be digitized for the participants’ personal use and, with their permission, possibly included in the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive, which is housed on UMass Boston’s Open Archives. The resulting digital collections would be harvested by the Digital Commonwealth and the Digital Public Library of America, making these materials and the participants’ stories discoverable to a wide-reaching audience. Boston Public Library would also present a series of four public programs celebrating and exploring elements of hip-hop culture: rapping (MCing), DJing (turntabling), breakdancing (b-boying), and graffiti art (graff). The events would include demonstrations by local artists, invite public participation, and be guided by two scholars of hip-hop music and culture, Dasan Ahanu from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and Michael Jeffries from Wellesley College.

The University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) in the Joseph P. Healey Library at the University of Massachusetts Boston requests a Common Heritage Grant in the amount of $11,919. This grant will allow UASC to collaborate with the Boston Public Library (BPL), the Boston hip-hop community, and noted scholars Dasan Ahanu and Michael Jeffries to accomplish two goals: host a digitizing day to collect artifacts and stories that will be uploaded to the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive; and present four public outreach programs showcasing the four original elements of hip-hop culture: rap, DJing, dance, and graffiti art, contextualizing the materials collected at the digitization event. Community members who participated in the development of hip-hop culture in Massachusetts will contribute artifacts to the event and serve as audience and participants in the public programs, thereby documenting, preserving, and celebrating cultural memory from a marginalized part of the state’s history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; Urban Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,919 (approved)
$11,777 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PW-253676-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Nancy M. Shawcross (Project Director: July 2016 to July 2017)
Philip S. Palmer (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2019)
Digitizing Annotated Books, 1472-1814

The digitization of 76,600 pages of annotated printed books dating from 1472-1814.  The selected pages have extensive contemporary (or near-contemporary) manuscript additions, which include reading notes, proofreaders’ and/or printers’ marks, scholarly commentary, drawings, and pen trials.  In addition, 279 original catalog records would be created for the annotations, and the digital content would be made accessible through Calisphere, the California Digital Library’s website, as well as through the Digital Public Library of America.

UCLA's Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies, which administers the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, seeks to produce and make freely available on the Internet digital facsimiles of 76,600 pages—containing more than 2.5 million (2,500,000) handwritten words—of the Clark's copiously or extensively annotated printed books from the hand-press era. The facsimiles will be hosted by the California Digital Library (CDL) on its website, Calisphere. Metadata about and links to the facsimiles will be harvested by the Digital Public Library of America and be freely available to other sites and scholarly endeavors. Complete sets of the 600- or 400-dpi TIFF files created by the project will be archivally stored by both the UCLA Digital Library and CDL. Metadata already gathered about the nature and extent of the annotations will be made available through original cataloging records created in OCLC during the course of the project.

Project fields:
British Literature; European History; Western Civilization

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$261,000 (approved)
$261,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 10/31/2018


PY-253047-17

Athens Regional Library System (Athens, GA 30606-6331)
Angela C. Stanley (Project Director: May 2016 to January 2017)
Rikki M. Chesley (Project Director: January 2017 to April 2018)
African American History in Athens, Georgia

Three day-long digitization events to document and preserve historical sources relating to the African American experience in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia. The digitization events would each be held at different venues, including the East Athens Resource Center, the historic First A.M.E. Church, and the Athens-Clarke County Library, and the materials would be accessible online. With this project, the applicant aims to address the paucity of historical materials chronicling the lives of black Athenians in the region’s cultural institutions. The events would not only build out the collections that tell the stories of local residents, but also facilitate the community stewardship of the materials that document these stories, including photographs, scrapbooks, funeral pamphlets, church bulletins, and other objects, mementos, and artifacts. In order to provide deeper understanding of yhe experiences of African Americans in the region, public programs would also take place. Author Michael Thurmond would discuss his book A Story Untold: Black Men and Women in Athens History, and tours would be offered of the African American section of the Oconee Hill Cemetery, the First A.M.E. Church, and the Morton Theater in downtown Athens. Also planned are a course on researching ancestry taught by the President of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society and presentations on how to preserve, access, and use digitized items.

Spared Sherman's wrath but not the havoc of Great Cities, Athens' Black residents and their historic neighborhoods have fought for their existence.  With the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, the applicant wishes to aid in the digitization of privately held historical sources relating to the African American experience in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, at a series of three day-long digitization day events. These scan days will take place at the East Athens Resource Center; the historic First A.M.E. Church; and the Athens-Clarke County Library, where patrons will be able to convert special A/V formats using our conversion equipment.  Digitized material would be made available to the public with donor permission via our partnership with the Digital Library of Georgia and the Digital Public Library of America. The project would also include a public lecture series and tours of Black historic sites led by partner groups.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,962 (approved)
$11,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


PY-253100-17

Ferguson Library (Stamford, CT 06901-2312)
Elizabeth Joseph (Project Director: May 2016 to May 2018)
Tell Your Story

Six events to digitize materials related to targeted groups within Stamford, Connecticut, including African Americans, Latinos, European immigrants, women, and veterans.  At these events, library staff and consultants would record oral histories and then digitize items such as photographs, letters, memorabilia, and audiovisual materials that supplement those stories.  The oral histories and digitized content would be made available through the library’s digital archive as well as an onsite exhibit.  Lectures by local historians would be scheduled to coincide with each digitization event, and topics would be selected to feature targeted communities, such as early settlers, Jewish immigrants, and local artists.  Docent-led tours of the final exhibit would also be offered.

If America is a nation of immigrants, then Stamford is America in microcosm. From its original 29 Puritan settlers to today's population of 125,000 (36% of whom were born outside the United States), Stamford has been home and haven to generations of immigrants to America. "Tell Your Story" is a series of day-long digitizing events at the library's Digital Lab that will capture resident's lives through interviews, diaries, photos, letters, souvenirs and other cultural/historical artifacts in order to preserve and understand the cultural history of this vibrant city. The project will also be part of the city's anniversary celebration, 375 Years Strong, as well as Stamford Through the Years, a visual exhibit of images and text winding throughout the floors of the Library during 2017.  Contributors will receive a digitized copy of their content to keep, and the entire digital contents will be shared with the CT Digital Archive, CT State libraries, and the Digital Library of America.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/30/2017


PY-253019-17

Citadel Military College of South Carolina (Charleston, SC 29409-0001)
Kerry Taylor (Project Director: May 2016 to October 2019)
Marina Lopez (Co Project Director: January 2017 to October 2019)
Aqui Estamos - Documenting the Latino Heritage of the South Carolina Low Country

Two days of digitizing community contributions, including personal and official correspondence, photographs, diaries, recipe books, beloved objects, scrapbooks, and other materials to illuminate the life and history of the Latino communities of the South Carolina Low Country. The Citadel would partner with several local organizations for this project: the Special Collections department at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library (a local affiliate of the South Carolina Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America), the Charleston County Public Library, El Círculo Hispanoamericano de Charleston, the Hispanic Business Association, and radio El Sol AM 980. The project would recruit bilingual volunteers from the Citadel, the College of Charleston, and Charleston Southern University to help staff the events and translate for the creation of metadata to describe the items brought in for digitization. This project would build on an existing oral history program at the Citadel focused on the Latino community. Of particular interest to the project organizers is the history of the development of Latino-led institutions, such as businesses, civic groups, and churches in the area. During Hispanic American Heritage month of 2017 (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15), the project directors would return to Charleston public libraries to hold community forums to present some of the items brought in during the digitization days.

The Citadel Oral History Program is offering a series of public programs and digitization events for the Latino community. Harvest days will take place in the spring of 2017 at Charleston County libraries (Johns Island and North Charleston). The materials collected will be processed and evaluated during the summer and deposited with the College of Charleston's Special Collections. During Hispanic Heritage month of 2017, we will return to the libraries to hold community forums to present the results of the project. Citadel professors Aguirre and Taylor will draw from the materials that we gathered to facilitate discussions on immigration, identity, exclusion and belonging, community building and civil rights. The forums will attract students, workers, scholars, and activists. The materials will be shared with the public through the Low Country Digital Library. We will continue to promote "Aqui Estamos" and encourage teachers to use the collection in the classroom.

Project fields:
Latino History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,990 (approved)
$11,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PY-253034-17

Connecticut State Library (Hartford, CT 06106-1569)
Christine Pittsley (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)
Remembering World War One: Sharing History/Preserving Memories

Fifteen digitization day events across the entire state of Connecticut to collect materials related to the state and its population’s involvement in the First World War.  The state played a role in the war effort from the beginning as a major manufacturing hub for firearms and as the home of the U.S. Navy’s first submarine base.  The applicant also notes that this history represents diverse communities, as many African Americans from the South and European immigrants came to work in the factories.  Digitized items would be housed in the Connecticut Digital Library, which is also a hub for the Digital Public Library of America. Along with the digitization days, public events would include lectures related to Connecticut and World War I, with a focus on the particular communities in which the events are held.

This  project is based on the commemoration of the First World War. Working with partners across the state, the State Library will conduct Digitization Day events to surface privately held photos, letters and keepsakes that tell the stories of individual men and women who served during the war. These objects and stories are often held by children of WWI veterans and are in danger of disappearing, as younger generations no longer have ties to the people and events associated with these objects. Through digitization we will preserve them for generations to come.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Military History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,329 (approved)
$11,329 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


PY-234009-16

Pennsylvania Highlands Community College (Johnstown, PA 15904-2948)
Barbara Zaborowski (Project Director: June 2015 to November 2016)
Families Forever: A Cambria Memory Project

A series of community digitization events focusing on the immigrant history of Cambria County, Pennsylvania, through the collection of family photos, mementos, and artifacts. The Cambria County Historical Society, St. Francis University, the Johnstown Area Historical Association, and the Pennsylvania Highlands Community College would each serve as a scanning location and host cultural programs for the public, to include presentations entitled Healing African Dance, Pennsylvania German Groundhog Lodges, and Sevdalinka: A Musical Tour of Bosnia. In addition to the cultural heritage programming, Pennsylvania Highlands Community College in Johnstown would offer two workshops on how to handle and preserve family items using simple preservation materials readily available to the public.

Cambria County, Pennsylvania has a rich history of ethnic immigration. Families in the county have amassed historical relics brought from their native countries by grandparents and great-grandparents. In addition, there is a strong sense of family and genealogy. Many ethnic social organizations exist to keep alive the traditions of these various old world countries. This project will focus on capturing family photos, mementos, and artifacts in digital format. The digital images will be uploaded into a statewide repository, PowerLibrary, which will be a part of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). In order to generate interest in this project, a combination of social media, traditional print, and outdoor advertising will be used. A comprehensive series of public programs will also be offered to reinforce care and treatment of family heirlooms and the history of immigration. This project will highlight best practices and serve as a model for other organizations.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Immigration History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,222 (approved)
$4,222 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


LD-234222-16

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Erika Lee (Project Director: June 2015 to November 2017)
Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present

Implementation of a year-long project of public forums and smaller-scale public programs on the history of immigration in Minnesota that would also include a digital oral history project on recent immigrants’ experiences.

Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present, a year-long series of dynamic public
programming organized by the Immigration History Research Center (IHRC) at the University
 of Minnesota, will engage diverse public audiences across the state in ongoing public
reflection on immigration's role in shaping American life. The IHRC will collaborate with
humanities scholars and community organizations to produce public forums, programs, and
educational resources that discuss a wide range of multigenerational immigrant histories in
Minnesota, a state with a long and rich history of both “old” and “new” immigration. The IHRC
is requesting funding from the Humanities in the Public Square program to support both
large-scale public forums with award-winning writers and scholars and smaller-scale
community-based programs and discussions during 2016, which will cost a total of $205,800.
We are requesting $148,015 from the NEH and will cost share the remainder.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Immigration History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities in the Public Square

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$148,015 (approved)
$148,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 3/31/2017


PY-234322-16

Mead Public Library (Sheboygan, WI 53081-4563)
Debbra Voss (Project Director: June 2015 to June 2017)
Preserving the History of Sheboygan Through Digital Images

A series of community digitization events at several cultural heritage organizations in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, to preserve personal photographs, letters, memoirs, posters, artwork, and other privately-held sources documenting the history and culture of the region. The materials would be made accessible via “Recollection Wisconsin,” a statewide digital repository that contributes content to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The applicant would also collaborate with the Sheboygan County Historical Society and Museum to develop an exhibit that would featuring selections from digitized sources and also host a six-part series of public lectures on local history by the director of the Sheboygan Historical Research Center. Finally, the curator of a local historic property, the Wade House, would offer a related set of public events entitled “Restoring the Past,” inviting visitors to participate in hands-on historic restoration activities.

This project offers individuals the opportunity to have digitized their historical photographs, documents, and works of art that have a City of Sheboygan connection. Items previously digitized by any publicly accessible digital archive will be excluded. A series of scanning days will be held throughout the grant period, on-site and off-site, to ensure the greatest opportunity to capture these images. Individuals will be encouraged to sign a Deed of Gift so these images can be included in the Ozaukee & Sheboygan Memories digital database. This database will be harvested by Recollection Wisconsin, which will soon become a hub of the Digital Public Library of America. Collaboration with the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center, Sheboygan Museum, and the Wade House will connect the community with its past through presentations and exhibits on how this unique history shaped and influenced not only the lives of current day residents but extended to national and international borders.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,802 (approved)
$10,716 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234326-16

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, Inc. (New Bedford, MA 02741-2052)
Laura Corinne Orleans (Project Director: June 2015 to April 2017)
Salted, Pickled, or Smoked: Preserving and Presenting the Cultural Heritage of New Bedford’s Fishing Community

A day-long digitization event and subsequent follow-up to preserve cultural heritage materials held by members of the New Bedford area fishing community, and attendant public programming. The applicant would partner with the University of Massachusetts, Boston, which has run the “Mass Memories Road Show.” University staff would provide support during the digitization day and would also train volunteers. Images would be stored in the University’s digital collections, as well as at New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, the Digital Commonwealth, and the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Items anticipated for scanning include photographs, documents, and artifacts. Public programming would have three themes: sustaining community, life on shore, and life at sea. Programs would include presentations by members of the fishing community before the digitization day event at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center; a workshop by New Bedford Public Library staff on proper archival storage on the day of the event; and an exhibit of digitized materials after the event.

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center proposes to digitize the cultural heritage of the local fishing community. Commercial fishing is often a family activity with skills and knowledge passed from one generation to the next. Consequently, much of this history resides in the photo albums, documents, and artifacts of fishing families. This project will digitize these materials through a day-long public event in combination with “house calls” to digitally document materials from individuals who are unable to attend the event. The project will be bookended by a variety of public programs which will serve to inspire community participation, evoke memories, and provide an interpretive framework for materials that are brought forward. Digitizing these materials, making them publicly available, and using them to tell the story of the fishing community will create a lasting legacy for families who have spent generations working the water in what is one of the nation’s oldest occupations.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Folklore and Folklife; Labor History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 2/28/2017


PY-234453-16

Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. (Kansas City, MO 64108-1644)
Glenn North (Project Director: June 2015 to September 2017)
Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project: Jazz Age and the Great Depression, 1918 - 1941

The digitization of community photographs, letters, employment records, artworks, and artifacts pertaining to the African American experience in Kansas City, Missouri, during the early 20th century. The applicant would collaborate with the Kansas City Public Library, which would make the sources accessible via its Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project. The Library would also ensure that digital items could be found through the WorldCat bibliographic network as well as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). In cooperation with the American Jazz Museum of Kansas City, the applicant would also offer public lectures by area scholars and musicians about the history of Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression and would sponsor screenings of films held by the Jazz Museum, including the documentary “Women in Jazz.”

The Black Archives of Mid-America is an institution that showcases Kansas City’s rich socio-cultural history through the preservation of valuable documents, photographs and objects. Through a strategic alliance with the award-winning Kansas City Public Library, it has increased its ability to present insightful scholarly and artistic programming to the Midwest region of the United States and beyond. This exciting partnership calls for the Black Archives of Mid-America to support the Kansas City Public Library in the “Kansas City Digital Encyclopedia Project.” The next planned series will highlight the period of 1918-1941, with a specialized focus on the Jazz Age and the Great Depression, and will be supported through community digitization events and associated programming. This project exposes community members to important historical information and allows participants to protect the integrity of artifacts through digitization, while further developing a sense of belonging.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,624 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PW-234844-16

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: July 2015 to present)
Giao Luong Baker (Co Project Director: June 2016 to January 2019)
R. Wayne Shoaf (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
The Fire Last Time: Digitizing the Independent and Webster Commission Records on the 1992 L.A. Civil Unrest

Digitization of 182,264 pages of archival records and 291 hours of audiovisual recordings of the Independent and Webster Commissions, convened to investigate the 1991 Rodney King beating and the 1992 civil unrest in Los Angeles.

Our project will digitize for free online public access the records of the Independent and Webster Commissions, which investigated the causes of the 1991 Rodney King beating and the 1992 civil unrest. Upon its conclusion, we will publish 182,264 pages of historical records and 291 hours of audiovisual recordings in the USC Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$196,961 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


GI-235149-16

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Max Rudin (Project Director: August 2015 to present)
World War I: A Centennial Exploration Through the Words of Americans Who Lived It

Implementation of nationwide library programs, a traveling exhibition, a website, and a publication of an anthology exploring how World War I reshaped American lives.

The Library of America requests a grant in the amount of $702,345 in partial support of World War I: A Centennial Exploration Through the Words of Americans Who Lived It, a major national program marking the centenary of the country’s entry into the war in 1917. The project has two related objectives. The first is to bring members of the veteran community together with the general public to explore the transformative impact of the First World War by learning about, reading, discussing, and sharing insights into the writings of Americans from diverse backgrounds who experienced it first-hand. The second objective is to develop, curate, and make permanently and widely available an annotated narrative collection of firsthand American World War I writings in print and ebook form that will encourage exploration and discussion of the war’s meanings and resonances long after the centennial is over.  

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$550,000 (approved)
$550,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


HK-230916-15

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Erika Lee (Project Director: February 2015 to July 2019)
Elizabeth Venditto (Co Project Director: July 2015 to July 2019)
Immigrant Stories

Expansion of a project that engages recent immigrant and refugee communities as they create and share digital video narratives about their lives and experiences. During the implementation phase, the applicant would collaborate with national stakeholders to develop an easy-to-use, web-based framework to produce these digital stories, which would be publicly available via the Minnesota Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America.

The Immigration History Research Center's Immigrant Stories project fosters humanities research and public dialogue around immigration by empowering recent immigrants with the tools to document, preserve, and share their experiences with the wider American public. It helps first- and second-generation immigrants and refugees create digital stories about their experiences--short personal videos with images, text, music, and audio--that are preserved and made publicly available through the IHRC Archives, the Minnesota Digital Library, and the Digital Public Library of America. Immigrant Stories uses immigrant-centered digital tools and training to expand participation in the digital humanities regardless of education, English proficiency, and access to technology. Its archive makes valuable content on contemporary immigration accessible to both humanities scholars and the broader public.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Immigration History; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,121 (approved)
$321,432 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2017


PW-228182-15

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN 55455-0433)
Kris Kiesling (Project Director: July 2014 to September 2017)
Guthrie Theater Archives (1963-Present): The 21st Century Collection

The arrangement and description of 800 cubic feet of archival material documenting the history of the Guthrie Theater from 1963 to the present.

The University of Minnesota Libraries seeks $137,020 in NEH funding to support an 18-month project to arrange, preserve, and describe the records of the nationally-recognized Guthrie Theater (guthrietheater.org) to current archival standards. Additionally, we will actively work with the Guthrie Theater leadership and staff to review and revise the current records management plan in order to address institutional changes and to create a sustainable plan for future accruals that includes born digital records. The work of gaining adequate intellectual and physical control of the collection is the necessary first step in making these materials publicly available through digitization, which is being planned for 2016. In the course of arranging and describing the materials, we will identify and flag materials that can be digitized at this later stage for thematic inclusion in national digital aggregation initiatives, such as the Digital Public Library of America.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,366 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017


FT-60963-13

Marion Elizabeth Rodgers
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
The Days of H. L. Mencken: Trilogy and Accompanying Notes

H. L. Mencken (1880-1956), the prolific author, editor, newspaperman, and philologist, influenced two generations of writers, spanning the period from World War I through the 1920s. In light of Mencken's importance to the nation's cultural and literary heritage, I have been chosen to edit his autobiographical trilogy, "Happy Days, Newspaper Days and Heathen Days." This scholarly Library of America edition will also include the first publication of Mencken's "Additions, Corrections and Explanatory Notes," the last major primary historical documents released under time-lock. New knowledge includes how he honed his craft as well as intimate details of childhood and family, filling in personal and historical gaps in Mencken's biography. In Mencken's attempt to draw serious and meaningful conclusions about his life, flaws and imperfections, the man who emerges is not the vague legendary figure but the actual Baltimorean, who influenced such writers as Sinclair Lewis and Richard Wright.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 8/31/2013


HC-50017-12

Digital Public Library of America, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Maura Marx (Project Director: July 2012 to May 2013)
John G. Palfrey (Project Director: May 2013 to October 2013)
Daniel J. Cohen (Project Director: October 2013 to May 2017)
Digital Public Library of America Digital Hubs Pilot

The incorporation and launch of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), a groundbreaking project that seeks to digitize and bring together the contents of our nation's libraries and archives, and make them freely available to all online. Project activities to be completed during the grant period will include the creation of four state or regional "service hubs," each responsible for developing a standard set of services to local organizations, and meetings with both service hubs and existing large-scale "content hubs" to formulate content provider agreements.

The DPLA Digital Hubs Pilot will take the first steps to bring together existing United States digital library infrastructure into a sustainable national digital library system. Foundational to the DPLA collection will be the rich historic materials held by archives, public libraries, museums, and historic societies across the country.These materials are important to historians, genealogists, sociologists and scholars of a wide range of humanities disciplines studying every aspect of American life. The goal of the project is twofold: to develop, test and implement the agreements and methods by which existing content hubs -- large scale digital content repositories -- become part of an interconnected national network, and to strengthen local services to institutions and communities and to develop guidelines for sustainable regional digital cooperatives, while enabling hub participation and data ingestion in the DPLA.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$1,250,000 (approved)
$1,250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2016

Funding details:
Original grant (2012) $1,000,000
Supplement (2015) $250,000


GI-50416-12

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Max Rudin (Project Director: August 2011 to October 2015)
Civil War 150: Exploring the War and its Meaning Through the Words of Those Who Lived It

Implementation of a multiformat project that would encourage public exploration of the transformative impact and contested meanings of the Civil War through the words of a wide variety of first-hand participants.

The Library of America requests a grant in the amount of $686,367 in partial support of "Civil War 150," a major national program designed to encourage public exploration of the transformative impact and contested meanings of the Civil War through the words of a wide variety of first-hand participants.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$625,000 (approved)
$625,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2012 – 3/31/2015

Funding details:
Original grant (2012) $500,000
Supplement (2013) $125,000


HC-50008-11

Open Knowledge Commons (Cambridge, MA 02138-2735)
Maura Marx (Project Director: April 2011 to April 2014)
Digital Public Library of America Technical Workshop

The first official meeting of the Digital Public Library of America's technical workstream group.

The first official meeting of DPLA's technical workstream would explore the requirements for indexing large-scale U.S. digital libraries and begin to make recommendations for the overall technical architecture of a DPLA. It would also incorporate a meeting of the Steering Committee to plan for a Fall 2011 plenary meeting.

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$29,858 (approved)
$29,858 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2011 – 8/31/2011


GI-50059-09

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Max Rudin (Project Director: August 2008 to September 2013)
Lincoln in American Memory

Implementation of a book, a public programming resource, and a website, all designed to encourage exploration of the ongoing meaning and uses of Abraham Lincoln's legacy in American history, society, and culture.

The Library of America requests a grant in the amount of $299,750 in partial support of Lincoln in American Memory (to borrow a title from Merrill Peterson's authoritative study): a book, a public programming resource, and a website, all designed to encourage exploration of the ongoing meaning and uses of Abraham Lincoln's legacy in American history, society, and culture. Organized to mark the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth in February 2009, Lincoln in American Memory will complement other projects organized to commemorate the bicentennial, including traveling exhibitions and public programming initiatives supported by NEH, for which our project would provide a unique and indispensable resource. The project is designed to make the Lincoln Bicentennial an even more significant and substantive occasion for public conversation.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$299,750 (approved)
$299,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


LP-50014-07

National Book Foundation (New York, NY 10016)
Harold Augenbraum (Project Director: September 2006 to February 2009)
Rumors of My Death Are Greatly Exaggerated: The Life and Work of Mark Twain

Planning of reading and discussion and other programs to be held at 100 library or other community sites around the nation along with a traveling exhibition and an extensive website about Twain and his lasting cultural influence.

The National Book Foundation, in conjunction with the Mark Twain House & Museum, seeks a planning grant of $39,972 of a total budget of $62,401 to plan "Rumors of My Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated...: The Work and Life of Mark Twain", a series of public programs that will explore themes in the work and life of Mark Twain (1835-1910) on the centennial of his death and the anniversary of his birth. The planning process will include: 1) a national planning meeting , 2) development of an honorary committee, 3) draft of a Twain timeline, 4) draft of a useable bibliography, 5) draft of a filmography, 6) a survey of institutional holdings, 7) an outline for a travelling exhibition, 8) a speakers list of scholars, 9) a plan for recruitment of venues, 10) research on a new Library of America volume, 11) draft of a participants' handbook, and 12) a corporate and foundation funding packet.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Libraries Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$39,972 (approved)
$39,972 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


FB-52943-07

Brad D. Gooch
William Paterson University (Wayne, NJ 07470-2152)
A Biography of Flannery O'Connor

"Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor" will be the first major literary biography of a fascinating and increasingly influential American twentieth-century author. Balancing her background as a Roman Catholic writer, living in middle Georgia, confined to her mother's dairy farm by the lupus from which she died at 39 years old, she wrote two novels as well as two collections of short stories considered masterpieces of the form. O'Connor was chosen as the first postwar figure included in the canonic Library of American series, and is widely taught today in colleges and universities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 6/30/2007


LI-50001-06

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Cheryl Hurley (Project Director: September 2005 to November 2008)
Early American Writing in The Library of America

The publication of "American Poetry: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries" (two volumes) and an expanded volume of selected works by Captain John Smith and other early exploration narratives.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Libraries Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2006 – 2/29/2008


PA-50164-03

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Charles Howell (Project Director: July 2002 to January 2006)
Preserving and Improving Access to the Collections of the Library of American Broadcasting

The arrangement and description of 140.5 linear feet of correspondence and manuscripts, 1,500 photographs, and 48 scrapbooks in 18 collections held in the Library of American Broadcasting that focus on women in the broadcasting industry from 1920 into the1980s. A finding aid to the collections would be mounted on the Internet.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$98,585 (approved)
$97,462 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2003 – 4/30/2005


GL-20992-91

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Cheryl Hurley (Project Director: September 1989 to June 1994)
American Poetry and Verse to 1900: A Proposal to Publish a Two-Volume Anthology in the Library of America

To support the publication of a comprehensive anthology of American poetry and verse to 1900.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Libraries and Archives

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$90,000 (approved)
$90,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1990 – 12/31/1993


GL-20934-89

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Cheryl Hurley (Project Director: January 1989 to February 1992)
THE LIBRARY OF AMERICAN LIVES A proposal for a new series of autobiographical & biographical writings

To support development of an editorial process, including selection criteria, textual authority, and production standards, for a series of American autobiographical and biographical writings.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Libraries and Archives

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$72,200 (approved)
$72,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/1989 – 11/30/1990


GL-20669-86

Tucson Public Library (Tucson, AZ 85726)
Rolly Kent (Project Director: September 1985 to October 1988)
America: A Reading

To support a series of reading and discussion programs using works in the Library of America series and other selected American literature as the centraltexts. Participants will consider the themes found in the works of these major American writers.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Projects in Libraries and Archives

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$206,605 (approved)
$205,364 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1986 – 6/30/1988


GL-20717-86

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Daniel Aaron (Project Director: March 1986 to June 1989)
The Complete Plays of Eugene O'Neill: A Proposal to Publish a Three-Volume Complete Edition in the Library of America

To support the scholarly and editorial expenses for the first complete and authoritative edition of the plays of Eugene O'Neill. The three-volume set willconform to the textual, editorial, and manufacturing standards established for all Library of America publications.

Project fields:
American Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Projects in Libraries and Archives

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$160,000 (approved)
$160,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1986 – 12/31/1988


GL-20599-85

Tucson Public Library (Tucson, AZ 85726)
Rolly Kent (Project Director: August 1984 to October 1990)
Solitary Music: American Literary Classics

To support a series of programs using themes in American literature as the sub-ject for lectures and book discussions. Works in the Library of America serieswill be used as the central texts for the programs.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Projects in Libraries and Archives

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1985 – 3/31/1986


FA-25554-85

Sally (Sarah) M. Fitzgerald
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
Life and Work of Flannery O'Connor

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$25,496 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1985 – 5/31/1986


GP-21038-83

Literary Classics of the United States (New York, NY 10022-1006)
Cheryl Hurley (Project Director: March 1983 to December 1986)
The Library of America: Henry James Criticism & Henry Adams History of the U.S.

To support the development costs for five volumes in the Library of America, tobe published over the next two years. Included are a two-volume set of Henry James's Criticism and a three-volume set of Henry Adams's History.

Project fields:
American Literature; History, General

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$210,000 (approved)
$210,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1983 – 7/31/1986


RE-*1393-79

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Robert H. Hirst (Project Director: May 1979 to October 1990)
The Mark Twain Papers

To edit the previously unpublished literary manuscripts, journals, and collected correspondence of Mark Twain.

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$109,902 (approved)
$109,827 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1979 – 12/31/1980