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Key words: 'Washington Irving' (this phrase)
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GE-235074-16

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Michael Lord (Project Director: August 2015 to present)

Historic Hudson Valley: Washington Irving and the Art of Storytelling

Planning for public programs, including support for research, concept design, audience evaluation, and design workshops exploring the stories and life of Washington Irving at his home.

HHV seeks funding for a public programming initiative that will make a meaningful connection between the tales of Washington Irving and the art of American storytelling by transforming the visitor experience at Irving's home Sunnyside. The humanities themes include 1) stories play an essential role in the American experience, 2) through his Hudson River Valley stories, Irving made an essential contribution to the development of regional literature in the United State, and 3) Washington Irving fashioned Sunnyside, his riverfront estate, to embody his creative spirit. The project incorporates public programs, both onsite and online, for a diverse audience including culture-seekers, families, teachers, and students.

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2017


BH-50639-14

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2014 to present)

The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers that use the Hudson River for a study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

This workshop focuses on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. By focusing on art, literature, and architecture alongside the developments in commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, the workshop reveals the several ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, discussions, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. Participants begin by considering the mouth of the Hudson as an estuary and economic gateway; they survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving, visit his home, Sunnyside, and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. A session on "Race, Labor, and the Landscape" illuminates the stories of African Americans in the Hudson River Valley. Finally, an afternoon boat trip--enhanced by readings in period guidebooks--enables participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Judith Richardson (English and American studies, Stanford University), Myra Young Armstead (history and Africana studies, Bard College), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in translating the Hudson River workshop to other local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,734 (approved)
$169,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FA-57571-14

Jeffrey Einboden
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)

Islamic Literacy in Early America: Muslim Sources of U.S. Authorship

Uncovering Islam's formative impact on the nation's literature, this project traces covert genealogies of Arabic and Persian influence, extending from Revolutionary beginnings to the Civil War. Complementing NEH's Bridging Cultures initiative, this monograph excavates portraits of our most iconic authors, while also giving voice to unknown Muslim writings penned in the young republic. During the proposed year of work, the author will complete archival research for this book and develop a polished typescript. Two months of targeted library visits will allow for the remainder of the award period to be reserved for textual analysis, translation, and core writing.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


BH-50481-12

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2012 to present)
Stephen P. Rice (Co Project Director: August 2012 to present)

The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America. Ramapo College offers a workshop on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. The study of art, literature, and architecture, alongside the developments of commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, reveal the diverse ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. The workshop begins by considering the mouth of the Hudson as estuary and economic gateway; participants survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving; visit his home, Sunnyside; and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded-Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. Finally, a morning boat trip-enhanced by readings in period guidebooks-enable participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Roger Panetta (Curator of the Hudson River Collection, Fordham University), Judith Richardson (English, Stanford University), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in the translation of the Hudson River workshop to local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,876 (approved)
$176,276 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


BH-50395-10

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Stephen P. Rice (Project Director: March 2010 to present)
Meredith Davis (Co Project Director: March 2010 to present)

The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers that will use the Hudson River as a focus for the study of nineteenth-century intersections of art, culture, commerce, and nature.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$175,114 (approved)
$175,114 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $0
Supplement (2011) $7,832


RY-20511-84

Andrew B. Myers
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

Research for Washington Irving Biography

To support research for Washington Irving biography.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1984 – 8/31/1984


RP-20440-83

Twayne Publishers (Boston, MA 02111)
Caroline L. Birdsall (Project Director: November 1982 to present)

A History of New York by Washington Irving, in The Works of Washington Irving, edited by Michael Black and Nancy Black

To support publication of A History of New York, a volume in the definitive edition of The Complete Works of Washington Irving.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,261 (approved)
$6,261 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1983 – 3/31/1984


RP-20490-83

Twayne Publishers (Boston, MA 02111)
Caroline L. Birdsall (Project Director: May 1983 to present)

Toward Publishing Costs of "Journals and Notebooks," VolumesIV and V, in "The Complete Works of Washington Irving"

To support publication of the final two volumes of journals and notebooks in The Complete Works of Washington Irving.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$3,200 (approved)
$3,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1983 – 3/31/1985


RE-20153-82

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Richard D. Rust (Project Director: October 1981 to present)

The Complete Works of Washington Irving

To support the completion of an authoritative edition of the complete works of Washington Irving.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$30,326 (approved)
$29,377 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1982 – 6/30/1984


RP-*1981-81

Twayne Publishers (Boston, MA 02111)
Caroline L. Birdsall (Project Director: May 1981 to present)

Letters, Volume III: 1839-1946 and Volume IV: 1847-1859 in the Complete Works of Washington Irving

To support publication of the final two volumes of THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WASHINGTON IRVING. The final volumes contain Irving's letters, which have rarely been published and only in fragmented form.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$10,131 (approved)
$10,131 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1981 – 12/31/1982


GM-114079-79

Sleepy Hollow Restorations, Inc. (Pocantico Hills, NY)
Nancy Campbell (Project Director: November 1979 to present)

Sunnyside Orientation Slide Show Sequence

To produce two slide-tape programs for Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving. The first will serve as a basic orientation for visitors to the site. The second presentation will be used as a post-visit program for students and interested adult groups.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Museums and Historical Organizations, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$7,710 (approved)
$7,710 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/1979 – 10/31/1980


GM-*1140-79

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Nancy Campbell (Project Director: May 1979 to present)

Sunnyside Orientation Slide Show Sequence

To produce two slide-tape orientation programs for historic Sunnyside, home of Washington Irving.

Project fields:
Unknown

Program:
Museums and Historical Organizations, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$7,710 (approved)
$7,710 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/1979 – 10/31/1980


RE-*1160-79

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Richard D. Rust (Project Director: May 1979 to present)

The Complete Works of Washington Irving

Supports the preparation of a complete edition of the works of Washington Irving.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Unknown

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$35,328 (approved)
$27,579 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1979 – 12/31/1981


RE-*0310-77

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53212-1255)
Ralph M. Aderman (Project Director: February 1976 to present)

THE COMPLETE WRITINGS OF WASHINGTON IRVING, 27 VOLUMES

To complete The Complete Works of Washington Irving in 27 volumes, primarily for transcribing and annotation for the final volumes of Irving's letters.

Project fields:
Unknown

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$55,619 (approved)
$55,619 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1977 – 6/15/1979


RE-10351-76

Long Island University (Brookville, NY 11548-1300)
H.L. Kleinfield (Project Director: September 1976 to present)

The Complete Writings of Washington Irving, 27 Volumes

To complete The Complete Works of Washington Irving in 27 volumes, primarily for transcribing and annotation for the final volumes of Irving's letters.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$57,460 (approved)
$57,460 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1976 – 8/31/1978


FT-12588-75

Bruce Granger
University of Oklahoma, Norman (Norman, OK 73019-3003)

Essay Serials in America

To complete a book on Essay Serials in America from Franklin to Irving. Following the tradition established by Addison and Steele's serial publications, The Tatler and The Spectator, Benjamin Franklin began the tradition in America with his Dogood Papers (1722), and Washington Irving ended it with Salmagundi (1807-1808). Between 1722-1808 American newspapers and magazines carried more than 50 essay serials, some written anonymously, others by major writers. Among important literary genres in colonial America none has been so neglected as the periodical essay.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1975 – 8/31/1975


FT-12424-75

Richard D. Rust
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

Definitive Edition of James Fenimore Cooper's The Pathfinder

P.I. edited Washington Irving's Astoria as part of The Complete Works of Washington Irving, and is now editing James Fenimore Cooper's The Pathfinder as part of a ten-volume series of Cooper's best-known works, scheduled to be published by the State University of New York Press. P.I. will collate all available forms of the work, establish a definitive reading text which comes closest to the author's intentions, write a historical essay and a textual essay, provide annotations for the text, and compose various textual lists. Research and editing project has a direct relationship to the bicentennial observance of the American Revolution. The Pathfinder (1840) illustrates the roots of national character as well as tendencies of American destiny.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1975 – 8/31/1975