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Funded Projects Query Form
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Keywords: transatlantic slave database (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)
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RA-259197-18

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Nan Wolverton (Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Long-term Research Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

24 months of stipend support (2-6 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) is an independent research library of early American history, literature, and culture through 1876 located in Worcester, MA. Founded in 1812, the Society's collections include over four million items--the largest collection of early American printed materials anywhere in the world. Building on decades of support from the Endowment, the AAS is applying for renewal funding for its program of long-term fellowships, to run from 1/1/2019 through 6/30/2022, for thirty fellowship months per year, enabling scholars from around the country and a variety of career stages to visit AAS to conduct sustained research for a period of 4 to 12 months. These fellowships are crucial to the Society's robust set of scholarly programs, and to its mission of fostering innovative humanities research of the highest quality that presents the unique holdings of the Society's library to a broad set of audiences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$318,812 (approved)
$318,812 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


PW-234691-16

University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Gregory E. O'Malley (Project Director: July 2015 to September 2019)
Final Passages: The Intra-American Slave Trade Database

The addition of thousands of records of intra-American slave trafficking and a new “Final Passages” web interface into Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.

Later this year, www.slavevoyages.org will complete seven years of operation offering public access to details of 34,934 documented slave-trading voyages from Africa to the Americas. On average, more than 1,000 visitors consult the site each day. As great a resource as it is, however, the database is limited in one key respect. It only includes voyages across the Atlantic, whereas recent research shows that arrival in the Americas did not end many captives' journeys. Instead, approximately 25% of arriving Africans quickly boarded new vessels for distribution within the Americas. This project seeks to add such intra-American trafficking to www.slavevoyages.org. We will construct an additional interface, offering the same search options for intra-American migration as currently exist for transatlantic voyages. This addition promises a more complete picture of enslaved migration, since many American regions acquired slaves indirectly, rather than straight from Africa.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; Latin American History; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$220,000 (approved)
$220,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 3/31/2019


HK-230986-15

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
David Eltis (Project Director: February 2015 to May 2019)
Allen E. Tullos (Co Project Director: July 2015 to May 2019)
Enhancing and Sustaining www.slavevoyages.org

The enhancement of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (also known as slavevoyages.org) to add additional records about the intra-American movement of enslaved persons and to recode the underlying database to allow for long term sustainability.

Slavevoyages has become the basic reference tool for anyone studying the transatlantic slave trade, and is used widely by teachers, genealogists, and scientists as well as scholars of slavery and the slave trade. The site is nevertheless facing an uncertain future, possibly extinction, as the code in which it was written is made obsolete by evolving server operating systems.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,992 (approved)
$324,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 2/28/2018


PW-51254-11

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
David Eltis (Project Director: September 2011 to October 2013)
The Origins of Identities of Africans Entering the Transatlantic Slave Trade

Supplemental work to add information to the database reflecting research in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and London, United Kingdom. The work will integrate information from slave trade registers surviving in England and Sierra Leone. The work will additionally accomodate new, digitized photographic material into the database. Finally, the supplement will allow for the retention of the project manager's services for six additional months.

Supplement funding is requested for the following: For additional research in Sierra Leone, Freetown, and London. To integrate the London and Sierra Leone registers. To accomodate new photographic material. Administrative support to allow retention of services of project manager for six months.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$27,000 (approved)
$27,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 6/30/2013


RA-50075-09

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Paul J. Erickson (Project Director: August 2008 to April 2016)
NEH Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

The equivalent of three fellowships a year for three years.

This application seeks continued funding for the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) under the NEH's initiative supporting Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions. Previous grants since 1975 have helped support a rich and growing body of scholarship in fields including American history, literature, religious history, art history, musicology, and the history of the book. The funding requested reflects the increased level of NEH fellowship stipends, and would include funds to award three full-year fellowships at the maximum stipend annually for three years. For more than three decades, the AAS-NEH fellowship program has made AAS's unparalleled resources for the study of American history, literature, and culture through 1876 accessible to scholars from throughout the nation, has fostered a culture of collegiality and scholarly interaction among fellows and staff, and has enabled AAS to more effectively promote humanistic scholarship in and about the United States.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$471,600 (approved)
$466,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013


PA-51985-06

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
David Eltis (Project Director: July 2005 to October 2010)
Martin Douglas Halbert (Co Project Director: July 2005 to October 2010)
The Expanded, On-Line Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database

This award will support the addition essential records to an electronic database on transatlantic slave voyages. The work will add 8,000 new entries, enhance an additional 9,000 entries, and create a Web-based resource to serve with specialized interfaces for scholars and researchers, as well as K-12 students and the general public.

January 1, 2008, marks the bicentennial of the abolition of the slave trade in the U.K and the U.S. This project proposes to commemorate this anniversary by creating an interactive, Web-based resource about the transatlantic slave trade. Using as its foundation information about 27,233 voyages documented in the renowned Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database CD-ROM (Cambridge 1999), this project will produce a revised and significantly expanded database that will contain more than 35,000 voyages—fully 90 percent of the slave trade—and will be published via the Internet. The project will present the database and its auxiliary materials in a two-tier format: one designed for professional researchers and another for K-12/generalist audiences.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$324,011 (approved)
$324,011 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 6/30/2010


RT-21506-93

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Henry Louis Gates (Project Director: September 1992 to February 1998)
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: A Database

This project will support the creation of a database that will consolidate existing national studies of the transatlantic African diaspora, providing a searchable resource of over half of the slave trade voyages made from Africa to the Americas between 1650 and 1867.

We propose to produce an accurate portrait of the transatlantic African diaspora by combining existing national studies into a consolidated database, covering over half of the slave trade voyages made from Africa to the Americas between 1650 and 1867. The database will contain detailed information on volume, origin, and destination of the trade; age, sex, mortality and ethnicity; economic organization, productivity and profitability; and will be of enormous utility to social, cultural, medical, demographic and economic research on Africa, the Americas, and Europe.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Reference Materials - Tools

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$137,121 (approved)
$137,121 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1993 – 6/30/1997