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Date range: 2016-2016
Only grants with coverage: Media Coverage
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CH-51283-16

Studio Museum in Harlem, Inc. (New York, NY 10027-4498)
Sheila McDaniel (Project Director: May 2014 to present)
New Facility Project

Architectural fees, concept design, schematic drawings, and project management, for the museum’s facility expansion.

On the eve of its 50th anniversary in 2018, the Museum recognizes the need for a physical site as exemplary as its current programmatic achievements and its ambitions for the next 50 years. The Studio Museum in Harlem respectfully requests a $500,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of a capital campaign designed to advance the Museum’s dual role as an internationally respected art institution and a cultural resource in Harlem. The campaign will culminate in a facility expansion that will physically embody the scope of the Museum’s mission to provide a home for artists of African descent while reflecting the vitality of the community it serves. Funds from the NEH would be earmarked for architectural firm, pre-construction and project management costs.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African History; Arts, General; Literary Criticism

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/31/2013 – 7/31/2018


FZ-231571-16

Mark Allan Clague
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
O Say Can You Hear?: A Tuneful Cultural History of "The Star-Spangled Banner"

A cultural and musical history of the national anthem composed by Francis Scott Key.

The story of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is the story of the United States of America, yet many know little about the song and what is known is usually distorted by myth and misinformation. My book project—O Say Can You Hear? A Tuneful Cultural History of "The Star-Spangled Banner"—will share the forgotten musical history of Francis Scott Key's song and reveal how the song's story presents a surprising social history of the United States. It will be the first to reveal the full story of the anthem's music: how the version we think of as traditional today, grew over the song's first century. Similarly, Key's now famous lyric was just one of hundreds of American patriotic and protest songs written to this melody. Key's artistry thus offers all U.S. citizens the chance to examine what it means to be American. This book will inspire readers to answer Key's lyrical question for themselves—to show that like the song, America's democratic experiment is always in the process of becoming.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Music History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


FA-232028-16

Romita Ray
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
The Visual Cultures of Tea Consumption in Colonial and Modern India

Research for a book-length study on the development and visual culture of tea in India from the late 17th century to the present.

Transformed into a prized beverage and a botanical novelty, Chinese tea spawned a vibrant culture of tea drinking in Britain, while triggering revolutions and wars in two continents. It also altered the landscape of India where Britain’s vision to become a self-sufficient producer of tea eventually crystallized in the wake of the Opium Wars in China. Ushered through the Canton trade, tea united the histories of China, Britain, India, and North America, transforming swathes of land into plantations in India and Sri Lanka, and producing botanical specimens, tea utensils, and furniture. These artifacts in turn engendered scientific research, social exchange, medical debate, commercial advertising, and patriotic zeal. It is against this backdrop that I examine the visual cultures of tea consumption in India, first under the auspices of the East India Company; next, under the Victorian Raj; and finally, in the post-Independence era when tea became widely recognized as a national drink.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; British History; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


FA-232037-16

Charlotte Brooks
CUNY Research Foundation, Bernard Baruch College (New York, NY 10010-5585)
Immigrants from America: The Chinese American Second Generation in China, 1900-1949

A book-length study of the history of Chinese Americans who migrated back to China in the first half of the 20th century, and of their contributions to the Republic of China.

Before World War II, people of Chinese ancestry born in the United States enjoyed few opportunities in America because of racial discrimination there. After the 1911 collapse of China's last imperial dynasty, many Chinese American citizens began to see the young republic that replaced it as a land of opportunity. Almost twenty percent of Chinese American citizens between 1912 and 1937 eventually left the United States and moved to China for careers, education, and to build the new nation. This project is the first study of these people, who helped shape Republican China's early institutions, organizations, companies, schools, cities, and politics. Through examining the lives and experiences of these forgotten Chinese Americans, the project will offer new perspectives on nation-building and economic development in China, the evolution of US citizenship and expatriation policies, and the fraught Sino-American relationship during the first half of the twentieth century.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
East Asian History; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


HB-232147-16

Ameenah Shakir
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (Tallahassee, FL 32307-3102)
Helen Dickens and Medical Activism in Philadelphia, 1935-1980

Writing and additonal research for a book about the medical activism of Helen Dickens during the years of 1935 to 1980.

I am applying for a twelve month grant for full funding to complete additional research and revise dissertation chapters into a manuscript. Specifically, my project focuses on obstetrician and gynecologist Helen Dickens, an African American woman and dynamic champion for reproductive rights who worked alongside clubwomen to establish community maternal clinics, as well as desegregate medical schools and hospitals. A groundbreaking study, it pushes the perimeters of the literature on the history of African-American women's claims for citizenship to encompass the emergence of female demands for improved access to health care during the Great Depression and throughout the post-World War II period. African-American women's construction of health care reform in Philadelphia provides a necessary corrective to prior assumptions regarding a perceived dearth of physicians' civil rights efficacy. Based on previously untapped archival sources, my book project demonstrates that women's articulation of health care politics in the urban milieu not only challenges traditional temporal boundaries of civil rights advocacy it reinforces the current shift toward analyzing female agency within the medical field.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Women's History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232263-16

Cara Anne Finnegan, PhD
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
American Presidents and the History of Photography from the Daguerreotype to the Digital Revolution

A book-length study of the impact of the U.S. presidency on the history of photography and photographic technology.
 
 

The Camera Politic contends that a history of photography told through the lens of its most official subject, the President of the United States, shows us how generations of Americans learned to understand photography's role in public life. The book will analyze images, texts, and archival material to study how presidents participated in and shaped the public experience of photography at four transformative moments: the introduction of the daguerreotype in 1839; the rise of halftone after 1880; the arrival of 35-mm photography in the late 1920s; and the digital revolution of the early twenty-first century. By challenging the narrow characterization of photography as a political tool and extending political communication scholarship back into the pre-television era, my project invites us to think more broadly about how presidential photography participates in the public sphere, and reminds us that every era negotiates the challenges and opportunities of its own "new media."

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Communications; Communications; Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232317-16

Zachary McLeod Hutchins
Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO 80521-2807)
Newspaper Reading and Early American Narratives of Slavery

An online database of early American newspaper references to slavery and a book-length study of the impact of early newspaper accounts on the development of American slave narratives.

The first North American slave narratives, written by Briton Hammon and Olaudah Equiano, were not published until the late eighteenth century, but stories of enslaved African Americans circulated in colonial newspapers long before those accounts were published. Before Equiano will survey slave-for-sale advertisements, advertisements for runaways, accounts of ships sunk during the Middle Passage, and other textual fragments related to slavery in 6,000 issues of ten colonial American newspapers published before 1760, a project of unprecedented scope. This book will identify rhetorical patterns in newspaper reports of African American experience and identity, providing a linguistic baseline against which the modulations and flourishes of Equiano and later slave narratives can be measured. Transcriptions of the materials related to slavery in these newspapers will subsequently be published in a searchable database accessible to the general public.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232445-16

Eric Calderwood
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
The Memory of Al-Andalus and Spanish Colonialism in Morocco, 1859-1956

A book-length study on how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956).

My book explores how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956). During the colonial period, Spanish writers revived the historical memory of al-Andalus in order to justify Spain’s colonial projects in Morocco. Moroccan nationalists appropriated the Spanish celebration of al-Andalus and repurposed it as a tool of anti-colonial resistance. Thus, the Spanish insistence on Morocco’s Andalusian legacy, which had served as a justification for Spanish colonialism, sowed the seeds of the Moroccan national culture that would supplant colonial rule. My book illuminates the surprising intersections of Spanish colonial discourse and Moroccan nationalist discourse, and it also highlights how the historical memory of al-Andalus has been used to structure debates about Europe’s evolving relationship with the Muslim world.
 

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Comparative Literature; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232505-16

Barbara Milewski, PhD
Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)
Hidden in Plain View: The Music of Holocaust Survival in Poland's First Postwar Feature Film

Preparation of the first authoritative English translation and article-length study of Forbidden Songs (screenplay by Holocaust survivor Ludwik Starski), the first feature film released in Poland after World War II.

My scholarship illuminates a hidden story of Jewish survival during the Holocaust embedded in the first feature film released in Poland after WWII. Forbidden Songs, a light musical comedy based on satirical street songs that were banned by the Nazis, is replayed annually in Poland as a commemorative symbol of national resilience. Yet within the larger context of this work that celebrates the abiding pluck and wit of Poles lies a subtler message, told through the music, about the experience of the screenwriter, Ludwik Starski, a Polish Jew who survived in hiding during the War. Relying on archival sources and interviews with those who knew the film’s creator, I will produce the first comprehensive analysis of the film's music. In addition to publishing my research, I will create the first authoritative English translation of the film and its songs, ensuring that both researchers and the general public outside of Poland have access to a significant treasure of heritage cinema.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
European History; Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232633-16

Lisa H. Cooper
University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Ars Vivendi: The Poetics of Practicality in Late Medieval England

Completion of a book-length study on the relationship between medieval manuals of practical instruction and medieval English literature.
 

The late Middle Ages saw the creation of a vast syllabus of "how-to" books in English, works whose purpose was to help their readers to do something or to make something tangible in the world beyond the page: cookbooks, calendars, hunting manuals, and more. This project reveals the many intersections of these medieval "arts of living" with the more frequently studied forms of medieval "literary" fictions. It takes explicitly practical writings seriously in their own right, arguing that the Middle Ages show us how to imagine a world in which the aesthetically pleasing and the technically proficient, the beautiful and the necessary, need not just warily coexist but might rather mutually enrich one another. The project joins ongoing scholarly conversations about material culture, animal studies, ecocriticism, and the history of the book, and contributes to discussions about the role of the humanities both then and now.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


FA-232675-16

Nina Ariane Rowe
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
The World in a Book: Weltchroniken and Society at the End of the Middle Ages

The completion of a book-length study on German medieval World Chronicle manuscripts and an interpretation of their illustrations.

This study will be the first comprehensive account of illuminated World Chronicle manuscripts and their relationship to the tastes and preoccupations of urban audiences in an era of growing middle class city life, from roughly 1330 to 1430. I investigate sixteen richly decorated manuscripts, filled with texts of a versified world chronicle, written in Middle High German, and adorned with illustrations. My book focuses on texts and images that evince a range of social preoccupations among late medieval city dwellers—commercial and political ambitions, skepticism about Christian religious practices, appreciation of artistic ingenuity, and ultimately the implications of the new technology of print. While most art historical considerations of the late medieval era consider sacred works, my project investigates the secular sphere.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Medieval History; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


CH-232892-16

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (San Francisco, CA 94102-4522)
Corey Keller (Project Director: April 2015 to present)
Digital Engagement Programs in the Photography Interpretive Center

Endowment funding for a new Photography Interpretive Center (PIC).

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to making the art for our time a vital and meaningful part of public life. Currently undergoing a major building expansion, the museum will reopen in mid-2016 with not only an additional 100,000 square feet of gallery and public space but also a completely transformed visitor experience. A key component of the expanded building will be the new Photography Interpretive Center (PIC), which will offer visitors engaging experiences that allow them to better understand the complex processes and artistic choices that go into the creation of a photograph. Endowed funds from an NEH Challenge Grant will fund the most essential operating costs of the PIC: software/hardware and supplies for the ongoing maintenance and refinement of rotating digital interpretive exhibits and a pro-rated share of salaries and benefits for the staff who contribute most heavily to the PIC.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


FA-233025-16

Elizabeth Outka
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Raising the Dead: War, Plague, Magic, Modernism

A book-length study of the literary response to the flu pandemic of 1918-1919.

*Raising the Dead* investigates a modernist mystery: why does the 1918-19 flu pandemic, which killed as many as 100 million people (far more than WWI), seem to make so few appearances in British and American literature of the period? My project explores how the flu became a shadow trauma to the war, amplifying the horror of that conflict, infusing its way into the mourning and the literature of the post-war period, and yet also changing the calculus of risk and blame between the home front and the front line. I recover how the war and the flu together fueled an obsession with the resurrection of the material (and not just the spiritual) body. As corpses flooded the world, writers, filmmakers, religious leaders, spiritualists, and magicians began to believe in or imagine ways the body might return. Recovering the flu’s role in this obsession shifts our understanding of the interwar period and demands a rereading modernist texts as familiar as *The Waste Land* and *Mrs. Dalloway.*

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Cultural History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2017


FA-233104-16

Sarah Winter
University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT 06269-9000)
Habeas Corpus, Human Rights, and the Novel in the 18th and 19th Centuries

A book-length study on the development of habeas corpus and the idea of human rights in 18th- and 19th-century novels.

When James Somerset fled his master in 1771, two years after their arrival in London, the judge ruled that the former slave could not be detained and shipped back into slavery. Chief Justice of King's Bench, Lord Mansfield also granted the writ of habeas corpus used by Somerset's protectors to rescue him from detention so that he could appear before the court. British abolitionists praised Mansfield for ruling "in behalf of humanity" and recognizing slaves' "injured human rights." Beginning with the Ex parte Somerset case of 1772, my book project explores the nexus of habeas corpus jurisprudence, human rights, and the novel between 1760 and 1870. Bridging British literary history and legal history, my book delineates a popular habeas corpus narrative in which fugitive slaves and political prisoners embodied the abstract bearer of human rights. My study offers a new account of the way human rights were envisioned by means of habeas corpus as a judicial remedy for unlawful detention.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Legal History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-233157-16

Sarah Gualtieri
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Syrian Migrants in Southern California, 1880-1945

A book-length study of Syrian migration to Southern California, 1880-1945, based on archival work and oral histories conducted in California, Syria, Lebanon, and Mexico.

Arabness Unbound is the first book-length study of Syrians in Southern California, an area with the largest Middle Eastern population in the United States and, after Metropolitan Detroit, the largest population of Arab origin or descent. Based on archival work and oral histories conducted in California, Syria, Lebanon, and Mexico it demonstrates the theoretical significance of Arab migrants to the study of transnationalism. Special attention is given to multiple migrations and to the creation of multiple homes as migrants moved in diaspora, particularly from Mexico to Southern California and back. By emphasizing movement and inter-ethnic solidarities, the project unbinds Syrian migrants from a single nation and establishes a framework for collaborative ethnic studies, one that connects Arab American to Latino and Asian American studies.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Immigration History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 4/30/2017


FA-233399-16

Steven Anthony Barnes
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Gulag Wives: Women, Family, and Survival in Stalin's Terror

The completion of a book on the women imprisoned in a Gulag known as Alzhir, a forced labor camp in Soviet Kazakhstan, during Stalin’s “Great Terror” in the 1930s.

This book project offers an in-depth history of a Stalin-era Gulag forced labor camp in Kazakhstan designed to hold the wives of victims of the Great Terror, a group of women arrested for no crime other than being their husbands' wives. Using formerly secret Soviet archival documentation in conjunction with unpublished memoirs, letters, and interviews of former prisoners, the book will reassess women's experiences of dislocation and persecution as a way to better understand not only the history of the Gulag but also women's roles, the shape of gender identities, and the conception of the family in Stalin's Soviet Union. Examining women's responses to the harsh Soviet penal system, the book explores the complicated nature of Soviet policies that simultaneously focused on women's emancipation and entry into the industrial labor force while reinforcing traditional roles as wives and mothers and placing limits on women's labor roles.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Russian History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-233404-16

Elizabeth N. Emery
Montclair State University (Montclair, NJ 07043-1624)
Clémence d'Ennery (1853-1914): A Female Connoisseur in the Age of Male Collecting

Completion of a book-length study of Clémence d'Ennery (1823-1898), the first French woman to build a museum of Asian art, and the social and cultural forces that influenced 19th-century women art collectors in France.

The nineteenth-century French fascination for Asian art has generated much scholarship, little of which mentions women collectors. This book brings light to the social context surrounding Clémence d'Ennery, who assembled 6,300 objects from Japan, China, and India, built a museum with her own money, and willed it to France. She was the first French woman of her time to do such a thing, yet she is unknown today. This case study of d'Ennery and her museum serves as a magnifying glass through which to examine developing cultural forces that made it difficult for nineteenth-century women to make their marks as collectors. The book brings attention to d'Ennery's story by discussing major issues in the humanities, including injustices in the writing of history, stereotypes about ethnicity and gender, the struggle for non-elites to gain cultural capital and respect, and the choices made when acquiring and displaying art.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
French Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


CH-233584-16

Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
James B. Peterson (Project Director: May 2015 to December 2017)
Monica R. Miller (Project Director: December 2017 to June 2018)
Kwame Essien (Project Director: June 2018 to October 2019)
Jennifer Swann (Project Director: October 2019 to November 2021)
Terry-Ann Jones (Project Director: November 2021 to present)
Black Publics/Lived Experience: Africana Studies and the Public Humanities at Lehigh University

An endowment to expand the University’s Africana Studies Public Humanities initiatives.

The enclosed proposal requests support to expand Lehigh University's Africana Studies by establishing an endowment that will be used to enhance curriculum, strengthen community engagement, and leverage fundraising goals for the interdisciplinary department.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


CH-233586-16

Chicago Humanities Festival (Chicago, IL 60654-3300)
Jonathan Elmer (Project Director: May 2015 to September 2017)
Alison Cuddy (Project Director: September 2017 to present)
Chicago Humanities: The Next 25 Years

Endowment for the expansion of partnerships with universities, humanities centers, and scholars, and to allow CHF to explore innovative and experimental approaches to programming.

The Chicago Humanities Festival requests $450,000 to allow for the further expansion of partnerships with the Big Ten Universities, humanities centers, and scholars, as well as allow CHF to explore innovative and experimental approaches to programming. CHF envisions many possibilities—commissioned collaborations between scholars and artists; planned engagements with local communities and advocacy organizations; summit panels of national academic leaders on topics of urgency; interactions made possible by the digital dissemination of ideas in real time, and more. Such experimentation involves greater cost and inherent risk. Endowment dollars directed to support such public programming in the humanities will provide a stabilizing foundation. An investment in CHF is equal to investment in the NEH’s goal to encourage collaborations between scholarship and the public humanities.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$450,000 (approved)
$450,000 (offered)
$450,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


CH-233599-16

City of Cornelius (Cornelius, OR 97113-8912)
Karen Hill (Project Director: May 2015 to present)
New Library and Community Convening Space

Construction of a new library building in Cornelius, Oregon.

The Cornelius Public Library in Cornelius, Oregon proposes a $500,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to help build a new library building to house and expand the humanities collection, provide space for more community involvement in humanities programs and strengthen partnerships with community groups and humanities organizations.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Social Sciences, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


CH-233629-16

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Bryan Giemza (Project Director: May 2015 to October 2019)
Nicholas Graham (Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The Southern Historical Collection's African American Collections and Outreach Archivist and Outreach Programming for African

Endowment funding for an African American Collections and Outreach Archivist and associated outreach programming for African American History.

The Southern Historical Collection in UNC-CH Wilson Special Collections Library is applying to the NEH Challenge Grant program for a $500,000 matching grant. The SHC will raise permanent endowment funding ($1,500,000) in matching gifts from individuals and foundations. Income for the endowment raised will support the salary and benefits for the position of African American Collections and Outreach Archivist and will provide the resources needed for that person to conduct outreach programming to in African American history and archives. The long term goal is to strengthen community-driven archives and create sustainable curatorial partnerships with historically under-represented communities.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; African Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 8/31/2022


CH-233705-16

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
Dreanna Belden (Project Director: May 2015 to present)
Dreanna Belden (Co Project Director: March 2016 to July 2016)
NEH Challenge Grant to Support The Portal to Texas History Endowment

Endowment to extend the reach of the Portal of Texas History (PTH), which provides free public access to historical resources.

The UNT Libraries respectfully requests a challenge grant of $500,000 towards a two million dollar endowment to support The Portal to Texas History. The Portal provides free public access to historical treasures from over two hundred collaborative partners at museums, libraries, and archives across Texas, and has been used by scholars for academic research as well as by K-12 students and teachers, and lifelong learners. Income derived from the endowment will support new technology development and acquisition, adding collections and content to the Portal, and the creation of lesson plans, a lecture series, fellowships, webinars, and other educational materials.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


CH-233768-16

Museum of Idaho (Idaho Falls, ID 83403-1784)
David S. Pennock (Project Director: May 2015 to September 2016)
Karen Baker (Project Director: September 2016 to present)
Museum of Idaho Expansion

Construction costs for facility expansion.

The Bonneville County Historical Society (dba Museum of Idaho) is seeking to expand its facility. The facility expansion will create space for a new exhibit program focused on the history of eastern Idaho. Expansion also benefits the long-term financial viability of the Museum of Idaho.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2020


SO-233941-16

Minnesota Humanities Center (St. Paul, MN 55106-2046)
Lisa Belak (Project Director: June 2015 to January 2016)
Susan Heegaard (Project Director: January 2016 to February 2018)
Bryan Ljung (Project Director: February 2018 to November 2019)
Kristin White (Project Director: November 2019 to December 2021)
Kristin White (Project Director: December 2021 to February 2022)
Les Heen (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
State Humanities Program

General operating support for state or territorial humanities council

State Humanities Program

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$3,040,960 (approved)
$2,439,680 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2015 – 10/31/2020

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $145,000
Supplement (2016) $621,640
Supplement (2017) $831,350
Supplement (2018) $840,190
Supplement (2019) $1,500


SO-233958-16

Oklahoma Humanities Council (Oklahoma City, OK 73102-2215)
Susan K. McCarthy (Project Director: June 2015 to June 2015)
Susan McCarthy (Project Director: June 2015 to February 2017)
Ken Fergeson (Project Director: February 2017 to January 2019)
R. Scott LaMascus (Project Director: January 2019 to September 2020)
Valorie Walters (Project Director: September 2020 to December 2021)
State Humanities Program

General operating support for state or territorial humanities council

State Humanities Program

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$2,747,960 (approved)
$2,214,660 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2015 – 10/31/2020

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $145,000
Supplement (2016) $551,060
Supplement (2017) $756,010
Supplement (2018) $761,490
Supplement (2019) $1,100


SO-233976-16

Wyoming Humanities Council (Laramie, WY 82072-3459)
Rex Myers (Project Director: June 2015 to July 2015)
Caroline Mills (Project Director: July 2015 to August 2016)
Nish Goicolea (Project Director: August 2016 to November 2018)
Carol Seeger (Project Director: November 2018 to October 2019)
Bernadine Craft (Project Director: October 2019 to present)
State Humanities Program

General operating support for state or territorial humanities council

State Humanities Program

[Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$1,884,250 (approved)
$1,842,710 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2015 – 10/31/2020

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $125,000
Supplement (2016) $453,010
Supplement (2017) $630,890
Supplement (2018) $632,310
Supplement (2019) $1,500


HZ-234002-16

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
Kevin S. Hawkins (Project Director: June 2015 to March 2021)
John Martin (Co Project Director: May 2018 to March 2021)
Broadening access to books on Texas and Oklahoma

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 146 books on the history of Texas and Oklahoma. The books were selected by the University of North Texas Press, the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Portal to Texas History, the Texas State Historical Association, and the UNT Libraries Scholarly Publishing Services.

This two-year project, led by the University of North Texas Libraries, will broaden access to 141 books selected by one of three publishers or by the UNT Libraries for their relevance to the history of Texas and Oklahoma. It will also broaden access to five humanities-related books to be selected once the grant starts. Those books not yet available online through the Gateway to Oklahoma History, Portal to Texas History, or UNT Digital Library websites will be digitized, with full-text searching, and added to the appropriate site. All books will be converted to EPUB and Kindle formats, made available to download with the digitized version online, and added to the UNT Library Catalog and to WorldCat. The project also includes the production of "print-ready" PDFs from the scans of many of the books to allow them to be made available for sale in print again using print-on-demand technology.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$95,599 (approved)
$90,563 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2019


HZ-234074-16

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: June 2015 to April 2017)
Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 20 classic humanities texts from Cornell University Press in the areas of Slavic Studies, German Studies, and literary criticism.

Cornell University Press seeks $83,635 in funding support for a 12-month effort to make 20 outstanding works of scholarship in foundational disciplines accessible to the world. We will use the funding to: 1) test and refine a methodology for selecting out-of-print titles for the program; 2) gain experience in the digitization, delivery, rights clearance and dissemination of OA monographs in EPUB3.0.1 format; and 3) analyze the results of maximizing the discovery and usage of ebooks across multiple platforms including the Press website, institutional repositories, JSTOR and Project MUSE.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
German Literature; Literary Criticism; Russian History

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$83,635 (approved)
$82,235 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


LD-234222-16

University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2009)
Erika Lee (Project Director: June 2015 to November 2017)
Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present

Implementation of a year-long project of public forums and smaller-scale public programs on the history of immigration in Minnesota that would also include a digital oral history project on recent immigrants’ experiences.

Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present, a year-long series of dynamic public
programming organized by the Immigration History Research Center (IHRC) at the University
 of Minnesota, will engage diverse public audiences across the state in ongoing public
reflection on immigration's role in shaping American life. The IHRC will collaborate with
humanities scholars and community organizations to produce public forums, programs, and
educational resources that discuss a wide range of multigenerational immigrant histories in
Minnesota, a state with a long and rich history of both “old” and “new” immigration. The IHRC
is requesting funding from the Humanities in the Public Square program to support both
large-scale public forums with award-winning writers and scholars and smaller-scale
community-based programs and discussions during 2016, which will cost a total of $205,800.
We are requesting $148,015 from the NEH and will cost share the remainder.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Immigration History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities in the Public Square

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$148,015 (approved)
$148,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 3/31/2017


LD-234311-16

Maine Humanities Council (Portland, ME 04102-1012)
Elizabeth Sinclair (Project Director: June 2015 to April 2017)
A Broad and Sure Foundation: The 14th Amendment in American Life and Imagination

Implementation of a public forum and library-based public programs that explore the 14th Amendment’s history and legal relevance, focusing on African American literature around citizenship.

Taking as its inspiration the 150th anniversary of the passage by Congress of the 14th Amendment, this project will explore the history, evolution, and contemporary significance of three key provisions in that amendment: citizenship, due process, and equal protection of the law. The 14th Amendment has had a profound impact on American jurisprudence and American life: no other constitutional amendment is more cited in legal cases, and none is more directly relevant to many of the key issues we face today. Debates around many of the topics central to our national conversation are shaped by our understanding of 14th Amendment issues. By looking at these issues from historical, legal, and literary perspectives, the Maine Humanities Council (MHC) will provide audiences across Maine with opportunities to explore the history and evolution of how the amendment has been understood and to discuss some of the most important and challenging questions facing our country and our communities.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; Law and Jurisprudence; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities in the Public Square

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$145,000 (approved)
$145,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


PY-234324-16

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
Laura Jean Treat (Project Director: June 2015 to August 2017)
Spotlight on North Texas

A one-day digitization event to preserve moving-image-related resources related to the history of Denton, Texas, which was a vibrant commercial and amateur film community in the early to mid-20th century. Free, online access to the digitized material would be available via the Portal to Texas History. Public programming at venues across the state would be developed in collaboration with the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI). Through public screenings and discussion events, an exhibit on Texas media history, and the Web portal, the project would contextualize the historical materials and prompt audiences to consider the cultural importance of historical preservation, with a special emphasis on home movies and commercial films.

The University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries seek $11,840 to provide access to the rich visual histories of Denton, Texas.  This project will support the digitization of community materials related to the motion picture history of Denton, TX including 40,000 feet of film, 300 hours or videotape, and 1,000 documents. The project will support access and education by providing unrestricted online access to digitized content and public programming that will situate Denton with Texas’s film history.  Denton has a long but unexplored history of commercial and amateur film production dating to 1913 when the city funded a film about their town, Denton: City of Education.  Unfortunately, this history has not been preserved or collected.  By focusing on materials related to our filmic past – home movies, amateur film, advertisements, posters, and photographs – we will illuminate the value of locally created records and redefine how small towns like Denton contributed to film history.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Public History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,840 (approved)
$11,536 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/1/2017


PY-234421-16

Knox College (Galesburg, IL 61401-4999)
Laurie Sauer (Project Director: June 2015 to June 2019)
Struggle and Progress: Documenting African-American History in Galesburg, Illinois

The digitization of privately held historical sources relating to the African American experience in the western Illinois city of Galesburg, which served as a stopping point along the Underground Railroad in the 19th century. Among the materials anticipated for digitization are memoirs, photographs, news clippings, and records from African American businesses and churches documenting the local black community’s participation in the Civil War and World War I, along with 20th century civil rights activities and daily life in the community. New content would be contributed to digital collections maintained by a statewide academic library consortium. The project would also include several public programs, including a media production of the digitization events, an exhibition of selected sources gathered from the community, a public lecture, and a panel discussion bringing together humanities scholars and community members at the Galesburg Public Library.

Knox College and its partners propose to document the experience of African American citizens in Galesburg, Illinois. The project will offer three community digitization days; the resulting digital objects and associated metadata will enrich a publicly accessible digital repository entitled Struggle and Progress. Five public humanities events will be offered over the grant period, from the screening of video from the community digitization days, to a lecture on the history of African Americans in Galesburg, to an Oral History Story Day, at which citizens who contributed objects for digitization will discuss their particular experiences, personal and family stories of struggle and progress. Themes about African Americans to be explored include civic, social, religious and business life; participation in wars; prejudice, discrimination; segregation, integration; public education; and voting rights. The project goal is to enhance a sense of inclusiveness in the Galesburg community.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,700 (approved)
$6,882 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


PY-234454-16

Marquette County History Museum (Marquette, MI) (Marquette, MI 49855-4204)
Kaye Hiebel (Project Director: June 2015 to March 2022)
Sisu Stories

Digitization events and community exhibits in Marquette County, Michigan. The project would support the digitization of family documents and photographs. In order to serve a larger segment of the population in the largely rural county, digitization events will be held in two communities. The project would collect community stories as well as personal and family documents. Following the digitization days, an exhibit based on the contributed materials would be presented at the Marquette County History Museum, along with a series of public events including curator talks, poetry readings, musical performances, and commentary on community history in local newspapers. The proposed events would be organized around the concept of “Sisu,” a Finnish word for determination and perseverance in the face of adversity, and would contribute to understanding of the Finnish American legacy in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

The Marquette Regional History Center will utilize the theme Sisu Stories for our project. Sisu, a Finnish word, describes the character of the people living in our region, a dynamic, persevering and resourceful people, who are shaped by this challenging environment. This deep connection between the people and the landscape will be central to our project. A unique cultural identity has emerged through time. We will use this theme to promote the digitization project as well as the exhibit and related programming. We have chosen to offer this project to the whole county as the population is spread out through this rural area. Marquette County is the largest county in Michigan and as such will require two locations for digitizing materials to make it more accessible for those living in outlying areas to the west of Marquette. The digitization events will take place in the fall of 2016.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,745 (approved)
$11,745 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


AB-234469-16

Hinds Community College (Raymond, MS 39154-9799)
Dan Fuller (Project Director: June 2015 to May 2018)
Black Man's Burden: William Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection

A two-year program that would bring the history of William Holtzclaw, an important but overlooked black educator, to the institution he founded, to the region, and to the nation.

The topic, Black Man’s Burden: Holtzclaw and The Mississippi HBCU Connection, will allow us the opportunity to integrate the history of the institution into our humanities courses by developing summer faculty workshops; creating curriculum and teaching toolkits; and digitizing the work product. The founder, William H. Holtzclaw, utilized his connection to Booker T. Washington and Tuskegee to implement the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute model to create educational opportunities for African Americans in Mississippi. Holtzclaw was a pioneer of the ‘sustainable agriculture’ movement.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,582 (approved)
$99,095 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PY-234561-16

Texas A & M University, Kingsville (Kingsville, TX 78363-8202)
Jonathan Alan Plant (Project Director: June 2015 to September 2017)
Mi Familia - Mi Comunidad

The creation of a collection of family records, photographs, and oral histories specifically related to the Hispanic community of Kingsville, Texas. The seat of rural Kleberg County, Kingsville is home to 25,000 residents, 80 percent of whom are Hispanic. Building on Texas A&M Kingsville’s successful Mi Familia – Mi Comunidad initiative, this project would help community members better understand the value of preserving family history. Hosted at the John E. Conner Museum in partnership with South Texas Archive, Texas A&M staff archivists and students would assist participants during the day-long collection event. Public programming would be held during Hispanic Heritage Month and would include a scholar-led discussion and musical performances by mariachis. Collected resources would be made available online and an exhibition would be developed for display at the Conner museum throughout spring 2017. The exhibition launch event would feature a historian who would discuss contributions by Hispanic and Latino residents in the broader context of South Texas history.

The goal of the project is to create a digital collection of the Hispanic Community’s materials.  The history of this community is not currently preserved or adequately exhibited.  Public programming will encourage Hispanic-American families in the Kingsville community to preserve their own stories, family histories, and items of family interest.  Individuals who participate will have a better understanding of the significance of their own family heritage and take an enhanced interest in researching, documenting, and preserving it for future generations.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,935 (approved)
$11,733 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PW-234642-16

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
James P. Leary (Project Director: July 2015 to March 2021)
Jeanette L. Casey (Co Project Director: March 2016 to March 2021)
Local Centers/Global Sounds: Historic Recordings and Midwestern Musical Vernaculars

Archival processing, digital reformatting and preservation, and increased access to nearly 800 hours of 78 rpm and field recordings and supporting archival materials related to musical cultures of European ethnic communities in the Upper Midwest.

Mills Music Library, the Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures, and partners at the University of Wisconsin-Madison seek implementation support for ongoing efforts to arrange, describe, catalog, conserve, digitize, and disseminate a unique body of historic, regional, endangered, mostly inaccessible sound recordings: "foreign series" 78 rpm recordings produced for immigrant, ethnic, and indigenous audiences by American companies in the first half of the 20th century; and original field and home recordings from the 1950s through the 1990s featuring the Upper Midwest's culturally diverse traditional musicians. This project will result in: online finding aids for 4 significant multi-format collections; the cataloguing and digitization of 800 hours of historic field, home, and 78 rpm recordings; digitization and meta-data for at least 3,000 images and 1,000 pages of field recording indexes and notes; and a series of related public programs.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Folklore and Folklife; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$260,000 (approved)
$257,432 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 4/30/2020


PW-234713-16

Wisconsin Library Services (Madison, WI 53715-1255)
Emily Pfotenhauer (Project Director: July 2015 to September 2017)
Listening to War: Uncovering Wisconsin's Wartime Oral Histories

A planning project to prepare for the digitization of oral history interview recordings documenting 20th-century military conflicts as experienced by residents of Wisconsin, held by libraries, archives, and historical societies throughout the state.

Listening to War: Uncovering Wisconsin's Wartime Oral Histories will identify oral history collections documenting Wisconsin citizens' experiences of 20th century war and its consequences and establish a comprehensive plan to digitize, preserve and provide access to hidden, at-risk personal accounts of life during wartime. The Recollection Wisconsin collaborative statewide digital program will locate and assess collections of sound recordings and moving images held by small, rural and resource-poor libraries, historical societies and other cultural heritage institutions across Wisconsin. By bringing to light oral history collections capturing the everyday lives of Wisconsin residents during World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War, this Foundations project will contribute a multitude of new individual voices to our understanding of the American experience of war in the 20th century.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$39,961 (approved)
$39,898 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


PW-234727-16

Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Patricia Fumerton (Project Director: July 2015 to March 2021)
EBBA: Rare Broadside Ballad Collections in the US and UK

The digitization and integration of 900 new images, and 1882 updated images, into an electronic archive of  17th-century English broadside ballads, along with accompanying text transcriptions of ballads and musical scores, recordings, and informational essays.  The project would also enhance website displays and add a range of analytical tools for computational analysis and visualized results.

The University of California at Santa Barbara requests critical funding to launch an important 6th stage of its digital English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) to archive rare ballads from the Beinecke Library at Yale, Manchester Central Library, and Chetham's Library (900 ballads total). We also seek to update EBBA with 600 ppi color photographs of the 1st collection we archived, the Pepys Ballads (Cambridge). Each library has granted EBBA unprecedented archival permissions. Maintaining our acclaimed standards, we will provide high-quality facsimiles in various viewings, text transcriptions, deep cataloging in TEI/XML/MARC, recordings, and informative essays. In this stage, we will also add transcriptions of musical scores and update our website with a responsive design effective across displays and will add functionality for a range of computational analyses and visualized results. So expanded and enhanced, EBBA will widen access to these artifacts as text, song, art, and metadata.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$260,000 (approved)
$259,029 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2019


PW-234783-16

Max Weinreich Center For Advanced Jewish Studies (New York, NY 10011-6301)
Roberta G. Newman (Project Director: July 2015 to June 2019)
The YIVO Vilna Collections Project

The arrangement and description of 301 linear feet of manuscripts and archives  and the creation of over 458,000 digital images from these sources, which form part of the “Vilna Collections” held by the YIVO Institute, a repository housed in the Center for Jewish History.  Images created by YIVO will be merged with extant holdings of the Lithuanian Central State Archive and National Library of Lithuania as part of a larger seven-year initiative.

The YIVO Vilna Collections project will preserve, digitally reunite, and provide free, online access for both scholars and the general public to collections at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York, and at the National Library of Lithuania and Lithuanian Central State Archives. These unique materials, saved from the destruction of the Holocaust, represent the rich and vibrant Jewish civilization that flourished in Eastern Europe for over 1,000 years. It is the archival materials that are the subject of this proposal: manuscripts, posters and other printed materials, and photographs that are considered one of the world's foremost collections on Jewish history and culture.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
European History; History, Other; Immigration History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$260,000 (approved)
$260,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 4/30/2018


PW-234885-16

Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI 49931-1200)
Donald Lafreniere (Project Director: July 2015 to March 2021)
Copper Country Historical Spatial Data Infrastructure

The creation of the Copper Country Historical Spatial Data Infrastructure, a digital resource that will provide information on the history and environment of the copper mining region of Upper Michigan through a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) portal containing digitized maps and archival documents.

The Copper Country Historical Spatial Data Infrastructure creates a reference resource that combines the construction of an advanced historical geographic information system with a progressive initiative for public engagement. The rich historical and cartographic archives in this important mining region in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, paired with our active heritage community, make the Copper Country an ideal place for implementing this kind of cutting-edge participatory humanities project. A group of interdisciplinary scholars and graduate students is 1) creating digital historical environments in GIS from more than 600 historic maps and 16,000 pages of related social history documents made between 1850 and 1970, 2) building a highly-immersive interactive online Citizen Historians Portal (CHP), and 3) engaging a nation-wide heritage community to help build and contribute to this advanced space-time linked digital archives through the CHP and on-site public outreach workshops.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Geography; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$260,000 (approved)
$259,753 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


GI-234952-16

Kemper and Leila Williams Foundation, Inc. (New Orleans, LA 70130-2179)
Erin Greenwald (Project Director: August 2015 to May 2017)
Jessica Dorman (Project Director: May 2017 to April 2022)
Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808 to 1865

Implementation of a traveling exhibition with artifacts, a panel exhibition, an exhibition guide, and related public programs on the domestic slave trade from 1808 to 1865.

The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC) is honored to propose Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808 to 1865, a multifaceted project exploring the history of the domestic slave trade from the abolition of the international trade in 1808 to the close of the Civil War. Purchased Lives provides resources for understanding the profound impact of the trade on the millions of enslaved individuals who found themselves forcibly separated from their communities and examines New Orleans’s role as the country’s largest and most profitable slave market. Comprising a traveling exhibition with original artifacts; an illustrated catalog; a slate of related public programs; and a facsimile-based panel exhibition, this important project will engage local, regional, and national audiences in exploring how slavery and the domestic slave trade has shaped American society.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$282,190 (approved)
$282,190 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


AQ-234985-16

Winona State University (Winona, MN 55987-3384)
Rafael Fernando Narvaez Vargas (Project Director: August 2015 to May 2019)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on Soul, Mind, and Body

The development and teaching of a new undergraduate course on the relationship between the mind and the body.

Plato postulated that whereas the human body partakes from a lower material order characterized by change and decay (the order of becoming), the soul, by contrast, belongs to a higher and unchanging eternal order (the order of being). This proposition set in motion a millennial concern with questions about body and soul, and attendant debates about the preeminence of materiality or spirituality. Arguably all canonical schools, from Christianity to Materialism, from Idealism to Surrealism, to Third Wave Feminism, have grappled with these questions. The class I propose will survey the history of these debates about body and soul, and their second-order order variants: flesh/spirit, materialism/idealism, profane/sacred and becoming/being. Students will examine the competing answers that writers and artists have provided, and whether and how these debates have marked Western culture, particularly the modern imagination: the ways we understand and indeed experience the world and the self.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Western Civilization

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$19,932 (approved)
$17,048 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


RA-235170-16

American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
Philip Lutgendorf (Project Director: August 2015 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in India sponsored by the American Institute of Indian Studies

18 months of stipend support (2-4 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This proposal seeks support for the award of annual fellowships to post-doctoral scholars in all fields of the humanities to enable them to undertake their research projects in India for up to nine months. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Area Studies; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$245,175 (approved)
$245,175 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


AE-247973-16

Patrick Henry Community College (Martinsville, VA 24112-6693)
Angela Wright (Project Director: August 2015 to June 2017)
Tammy Forbes (Project Director: June 2017 to September 2021)
Humanities Honors Program

A three-year project to create a humanities honors program with thematic emphasis on Appalachian culture at Patrick Henry Community College.

Patrick Henry Community College (PHCC) proposes the creation of a Humanities Honors Program designed with thematic emphasis on Appalachian culture. This project will build upon the college's successful work in collaborative learning to increase student engagement. The project will design and implement a curriculum that offers opportunities for deeper learning and more rigorous standards, while focusing on topics of regional importance. Faculty will engage in a year of exploration into topics of regional importance and will meet to read, discuss, make cultural visits, and hear speakers related to regional issues in order to design and implement the proposed Humanities Honors Program with thematic focus on Appalachian culture.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,722 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2019


AE-248003-16

Wake Technical Community College (Raleigh, NC 27603-5655)
James J. Neilson (Project Director: August 2015 to July 2019)
Barry Malone (Co Project Director: March 2016 to July 2019)
America's Wars: Individual Experience and Collective Memory

A two-year project to incorporate the perspectives of veterans into courses in English, history, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, to support two symposia, one for faculty, one for students, and to create a digital archive of oral histories.

Wake Technical Community College’s (WTCC) proposed project, America’s Wars: Individual Experience and Collective Memory will render more visible the experience of war by incorporating the perspectives of veterans into courses within the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences division. The America’s Wars project will begin in July 2016 with four main activities: 1) faculty symposia led by scholars and experts; 2) student symposia with expert-led lecture/discussions; 3) incorporation of new material into English, History, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology courses; and 4) the creation of a digitally-archived oral history. The faculty and student symposia will be led by faculty from Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-Charlotte, and North Carolina State University, as well as by war veterans and public historians.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,673 (approved)
$99,673 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


AE-248013-16

Research Foundation Of The City University Of New York (New York, NY 10007-1044)
Soniya Munshi (Project Director: August 2015 to October 2018)
Building Asian American Studies across the Community College Classroom

A one-year professional and curricular development program in Asian American studies for fifteen community college faculty members.

The Center for Ethnic Studies at the City University of New York’s Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) proposes a 12-month program to expand the teaching of Asian American Studies in community college classrooms across humanities disciplines. This project will engage the local histories, cultures, and identities of diverse, new, and underrepresented Asian American communities in the New York City metropolitan area. The proposed project will begin with an 8-day Faculty Development Institute for participants to study and develop curricular materials for implementation in the classroom. The Institute will be followed by a monthly Colloquium in Asian American Studies (2016–2017) to highlight emergent interdisciplinary research, cultural production, and innovative pedagogy.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Ethnic Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,998 (approved)
$99,284 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


AE-248016-16

Sitting Bull College (Fort Yates, ND 58538-9721)
Michael Moore (Project Director: August 2015 to present)
Mark Holman (Co Project Director: March 2016 to September 2018)
Standing Rock Lakota/Dakota Language Project

A three-year project to record, preserve, and provide educational access to interviews with tribal elders who are fluent native speakers of the Lakota/Dakota language.

Sitting Bull College (SBC) proposes a three-year humanities initiative designed to record a dwindling collection of fluent speakers of the Lakota/Dakota language on the Standing Rock Reservation in North and South Dakota. These recordings of elders, who began their lives speaking the Lakota/Dakota language, are an invaluable part of efforts to reinvigorate the endangered Lakota/Dakota language. Fluent speakers, immersed in “Lakota/Dakota thought” speak differently and it is important to record this to create a “bridge” between a dwindling generation of fluent speakers and a new generation of young speakers who are learning Lakota/Dakota as a first language and will one day seek to draw on these resources. The project, guided by Sitting Bull College faculty and staff in cooperation with the speakers themselves, will create a vast well of primary source recordings in both audio and video for future generations to draw on. The three part project will engage local speakers in conversation

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Languages, Other; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,998 (approved)
$99,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 12/31/2022


AQ-248263-16

Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI 48197-2214)
W. John Koolage (Project Director: September 2015 to November 2019)
Darlene Leifson (Co Project Director: May 2016 to November 2019)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on Artistic and Scientific Discovery

The development and teaching of a new undergraduate course on discovery in the arts and sciences.

A new course will be developed that encourages students to think deeply and critically about "What is the nature of discovery in the arts and sciences".

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$28,000 (approved)
$23,741 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 4/30/2019


AQ-248267-16

Valparaiso University (Valparaiso, IN 46383-4520)
Allison E. Schuette (Project Director: September 2015 to June 2019)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Concept of the Neighbor

The development and teaching of a new undergraduate course on questions about neighborliness.

This Enduring Questions course will pose the question: who is my neighbor? Questions of how to relate to those who are not family, kin, or clan have ancient roots in our religious and philosophical traditions, and how we define the neighbor and our responsibility towards the neighbor remains deeply relevant today. Is proximity any longer the best or most meaningful measure of this given relationship, or does the neighbor now include people in the next county, across the country, or on a different continent? And what are my responsibilities to this neighbor? How do they differ from my responsibilities to a family member, a friend, a spouse, or a stranger? Will certain conditions promote or inhibit neighborliness, and how much control do I have over those conditions? Students from a variety of majors and programs at Valparaiso University will be invited to explore these and other questions in a humanities, reading-intensive course.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2018


AQ-248280-16

Western Colorado University (Gunnison, CO 81231-7000)
Kelsey L. Bennett (Project Director: September 2015 to October 2018)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Purpose of Art

The development and teaching of a first-year undergraduate seminar, designed primarily for honors students, to explore the purpose of art.

This NEH Enduring Questions course delivers an open and sustained inquiry into the question, What is Art For?, across a range of historical periods and linguistic traditions. The freshman-level honors course, designed for a sixteen-week semester, is interdisciplinary in emphasis and open to students from all majors. The course develops the range of the question, What is Art For?, through a number of significant contexts that provide meaningful ways of addressing it. Each section of the course—On Truth; On Power; On Character; On Beauty and Culture—draws from among works of literature, drama, philosophy, the visual arts, music, and film that together offer a plurality of perspectives on the ways in which people throughout history have understood the purpose of art.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$19,966 (approved)
$19,829 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2018


HD-248360-16

Fitchburg State University (Fitchburg, MA 01420-2697)
Catherine Buell (Project Director: September 2015 to June 2019)
Ricky Sethi (Co Project Director: March 2016 to June 2019)
William P. Seeley (Co Project Director: March 2016 to June 2019)
Scientific Workflows, Image Analysis, and Visual Stylometry in the Digital Analysis of Art

The development of an alpha-level prototype for a tool that would help statistically identify artistic style, and a workshop to discuss the tool’s use and implications in the study of art history.

The goal of the project is to develop a tool for digital image analysis of paintings that is powerful enough to support advanced research in computer science, cognitive science, art history, and the philosophy of art while providing an accessible interface that can be used by researchers or students with little or no computer science background. The tool we envision will implement a broad range of digital image analysis algorithms as scientific workflows using the WINGS semantic workflow system. Scientific workflows allow users to build programs like one would draw a flowchart, dragging shapes representing data sets and image analysis procedures onto the workspace and drawing links between them. The tool can be used to promote computational literacy and data analytic skills among humanities students, introduce science students to research in art and the humanities, and help us understand how viewers perceptually categorize/recognize paintings and otherwise engage with artworks.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Aesthetics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$36,711 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HD-248405-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
Edward James Lazzerini (Project Director: September 2015 to March 2021)
Historical Demography and Population Behavior among Muslims in Russian Central Eurasia, 1828-1918: The Case of Kazan City

Development of a public database that would enable research into the Muslim community of the Russian Empire from 1828-1918 by converting information found within parish registers from the city of Kazan.

The Central Eurasian Muslim Population Project (CEMPP) will create over time a massive relational database of longitudinal vital statistics and social information gathered from the metrical books (parish registers) compiled for Muslim subjects of the Russian Empire between 1828 and 1918. Funding from NEH will support the first phase of the project whereby, seeking proof-of-concept, we will gather data for approximately 25,000 Muslim inhabitants of Kazan, the third largest city in Russia, as organized around 18 mosques and their parishes. One of our major digital tools will be the open, scalable, and extendable "Intermediate Data Structure" that is becoming the standard for longitudinal databases on historical populations. By means of IDS, our database will join those focused on other regions of Eurasia and contribute to large-scale comparative studies of the life course of Eurasia as a whole.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion; Russian History; Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$71,108 (approved)
$37,905 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2018


HD-248410-16

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Pramit Chaudhuri (Project Director: September 2015 to March 2021)
Classical Intertextuality and Computation

A research project on how techniques originally developed for computational biology, such as sequence alignment, can illuminate influences and stylistic attributes among classical Latin and Greek texts.

Literary scholarship has long been preoccupied with identifying verbal and stylistic relations among texts (“intertextuality”). This project is a collaboration between literary critics, systems biologists, and computer scientists to develop new computational tools for the study of such intertextual relations. These tools will enable researchers to trace connections among Latin and Greek texts at much a higher order of scale and efficiency than manual searches: 1) a sequence alignment tool, inspired by a core technique in genomics, which identifies verbal parallels that are close but inexact (the commonest kind of intertextuality); 2) a digital Greek-Latin thesaurus to enable identification of parallels across languages by meaning; 3) a set of tools for classification of texts according to various stylistic metrics, especially useful for studies of quotation and attribution; 4) phylogenetic methods to chart the evolutionary histories of classical texts and their traditions of reception.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,921 (approved)
$74,921 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2018


HD-248450-16

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
James W. Malazita (Project Director: September 2015 to May 2019)
Dean Andrew Nieusma (Co Project Director: March 2016 to May 2019)
3D Printing as Humanistic Inquiry

A set of experiments with 3D printing and a three-day workshop in which scholars explore the philosophical and practical implications of fabrication and “making” in a humanities context.

This project brings together scholars at various stages of their careers from across the Humanities and Digital Humanities to participate in an intensive three-day 3D Making and Critique workshop and follow-on research. The project's goal is to materially brainstorm printed artifacts that serve as critical investigations, while providing time for reflection upon the broader social and environmental contexts of the 3D printing process. The intended results of the project will be to produce and disseminate early-stage critical objects, to generate reflexive theory and critique about 3D printing and making practices, to connect Humanities scholars across both the making and critical bodies of humanistic scholarship, and to create an action plan for collaborative written and made scholarship targeted for publication in open-access presses and exhibitions.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$39,498 (approved)
$38,260 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


AV-248453-16

Minnesota Humanities Center (St. Paul, MN 55106-2046)
Susannah Ruth Ottaway (Project Director: September 2015 to December 2019)
Trista Matascastillo (Co Project Director: March 2016 to December 2019)
Echoes of War

A public discussion program offered by the Minnesota Humanities Center for veterans to explore the lived and recorded experiences of war through literature and war memorials.

Echoes of War, a project of the Minnesota Humanities Center, will explore how war is remembered and memorialized in contrast to and relationship with the lived experiences of Veterans. This project will use Standing Down: From Warrior to Civilian, an anthology by Great Books Foundation, as its core resource and it will involve the study of war memorials at the Minnesota State Capitol. Echoes of War will be co-lead by Dr. Susannah Ottaway, a professor of history at Carleton College, and Trista Matascastillo, Humanities Center program officer and 16-year Veteran. Ten NEH Discussion Leaders will participate in an immersive 5-day residential preparatory program that will prepare them to lead subsequent public discussions. The preparatory program will involves intensive grounding in the literature of war, training in discussion facilitation, and an examination of war memorials. A three-part public discussion series will be held at the Minnesota Humanities Center, St. Paul, and at Carleton

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Literature, Other

Program:
Dialogues on the Experience of War

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 4/30/2017


HD-248462-16

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Project Director: September 2015 to May 2019)
The Colored Conventions Project

Enhancement of a website to document over 120 conventions organized by African-American communities from the 1830s-1880s, including development of a reference database and fifteen interpretive exhibits.

The Colored Conventions Project (CCP) is a digital collection and hybrid site for research and teaching that brings unprecedented public attention to the thousands of African Americans who made up the 19th-century Colored Conventions Movement. ColoredConventions.org collects, for the first time, rare and scattered minutes from more than 100 conventions. A DH Start-Up II grant will enable our interdisciplinary team of faculty, graduate and undergraduate researchers, library professionals, church and national teaching partners to collaborate to 1) create 15 new exhibits showcasing original research and visualizations 2) amass a database of 4,000+ conventions attendees for reference and datasets 3) expand outreach for our crowdsourcing Transcribe Minutes and 4) introduce Translate Minutes with our first international partner. Ultimately CCP will model a more inclusive digital history as we recover a movement for racial, economic and educational justice that resonates in our own time.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; American Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$73,178 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 11/30/2018


AV-248478-16

University Enterprises Corporation at CSUSB (San Bernardino, CA 92407-2318)
Jennifer L. Andersen (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
From Ancient Greece to the Contemporary Middle East: Dialogues on the Experience of War

A reading, viewing, and discussion program, at various sites in the Inland Empire region of California, on classical literature and the Greek-Trojan wars in dialogue with letters, articles, literature and documentaries about more recent conflicts.

Rumination about war has long been a significant part of public, civic culture in the West, as expressed in ancient Greek works such as Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Philoctetes, and Euripides’ Hecuba -- which were recited or performed in the context of civic festivals. Using these ancient Greek texts as part of a dialogue, our proposed NEH program seeks to connect contemporary veterans to this longer tradition for thinking about the experience of war. Our program will foster conversations about some of the deepest, most intense and profound human experiences of fear, danger, risk, trust, betrayal, rage, alienation, guilt, loyalty and comradeship that human beings ever face – by means of fiction, documentary sources, and through the lives of military veterans. At each discussion, we will pair letters, articles, and documentary sources from more contemporary conflicts (the Vietnam War, Afghanistan War, Iraq War, Syrian Civil War) thematically with ancient sources.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Classical Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Dialogues on the Experience of War

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,725 (approved)
$99,725 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


HD-248519-16

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Diana Saiki (Project Director: September 2015 to April 2022)
Valerie Birk (Co Project Director: March 2016 to April 2022)
3D Modeling for Textile Collections

The development of a prototype web application of three-dimensional models of historic clothing for use by researchers, teachers, and the general public. The test collection would consist of World War II-era American clothing from the Beeman Historic Costume Collection.

The funds from the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Level I will be used to create a working prototype of "Fashion Fusion," a publicly available web-based application. Fashion Fusion will be a catalog of historic clothing, enabling interactive study of a three-dimensional digital image of a historical garment and replication of it with downloadable pattern pieces. The project results will be useful to museum professionals, clothing history researchers and teachers, and designers for theater and re-enacting.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$39,713 (approved)
$39,713 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


HD-248577-16

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Doug Reside (Project Director: September 2015 to June 2019)
Gregory P. Lord (Co Project Director: March 2016 to June 2019)
NY Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theater Division - 3D Visualization of Theatrical Lighting Designs

Initial planning and a feasibility study to determine how virtual simulation software could be re-purposed to create representations of historical theater designs based on archival sources.

To emulate theatrical lighting design in a web-based 3D visualization platform that would give humanities scholars a way to see the effects historical lighting designs were meant to create. More specifically, NEH funding would make possible a feasibility study for emulating lighting design using current web-based 3-D technology. Depending on the results of this study, the project team will determine the best way to move forward to build a robust tool for serving emulations of lighting designs in special collection reading rooms.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$35,000 (approved)
$34,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248607-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: September 2015 to June 2019)
Black Book Interactive Project

Preliminary steps toward developing a metadata schema that accounts for race in order to increase scholarly access to archival materials.

The negligible number of African American (AA) literary texts digitally available for scholars working in the field of digital humanities remains a persistent problem. The Black Book Interactive Project (BBIP) responds to this critical digital invisibility by proposing to create a metadata schema that accounts for race, to make these archives more discoverable for scholarship. Using 75 novels from the Project on the History of Black Writing digital archive, we will produce a demonstration project that increases access to little known AA texts, encourages and enables text mining as a digital practice, and bridges the current gaps in computational research in literary studies. Our goal is to expand the community of users and practitioners and to make this schema a standard for the interactive exploration of similar digitized collections.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African Literature; American Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


HD-248610-16

Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA 24450-2116)
Rebecca R. Benefiel (Project Director: September 2015 to March 2022)
Sara Sprenkle (Co Project Director: March 2016 to March 2022)
Ancient Graffiti Project: Tools for Analyzing Personal Communication

Prototype development of a web-based resource documenting handwritten inscriptions found within the ruins of the early Roman Empire, with a focus on the town of Herculaneum as a pilot case.

We propose to develop tools to study and analyze handwritten, informal, ancient inscriptions (graffiti) for the Ancient Graffiti Project. Thousands of these messages from Herculaneum and Pompeii convey voices at every level of ancient society. Handwritten inscriptions differ from inscriptions on stone. First, since graffiti are found in situ, original geospatial and contextual data are available. Graffiti also include drawings, which are difficult to locate in text-based search engines. Consider how to search for a dog attacking a stag. These tools include 1) representation of graffiti in their spatial context at multiple granularities, 2) a system of controlled vocabularies and filters to make figural graffiti (drawings) searchable and retrievable, and 3) a schema of medium-specific metadata for handwritten inscriptions. With these tools, users will be able to study both inscribed texts and images, as well as research questions specific to ancient graffiti.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,592 (approved)
$74,592 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 11/30/2018


FT-248676-16

Stefan Fiol
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Dialects of Dhol-Damaun: Drumming as Historiography in the Uttarakhand Himalayas

Research leading to the publication of a book with accompanying maps and musical notation documenting the role of ceremonial drumming in preserving the social and religious history of the central Himalayas.

This study investigates drumming as the performance of history in the central Himalayas of North India. Although drummers do not often think of themselves as historians, their rhythmic patterns carry information about the historical movements of populations and their cultural and religious practices. This research foregrounds the role of marginalized, lower-caste hereditary drummers in shaping local histories through the embodied processes of learning, remembering, organizing, transmitting, and adapting diverse sets of rhythmic patterns. By applying theoretical and methodological insights from music cognition, socio-linguistics, human geography, and collective memory studies, this study charts an innovative approach to historiography through the analysis and comparison of drumming patterns.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


FT-248791-16

Amy Rebecca Gansell
St. John's University, New York (Queens, NY 11439-9000)
Feminine Beauty in the Neo-Assyrian Royal Court at Nimrud, c. 883-612 BCE

A book-length study of the depiction of women in the art and artifacts at the Assyrian Northwest Palace at Nimrud.

My book invites readers inside the first-millennium BCE Neo-Assyrian Northwest Palace at Nimrud, an ancient Iraqi site that can never again be physically accessed. In March 2015, terrorists obliterated Nimrud’s excavated remains. It is therefore more imperative than ever that we interpret and publish the site’s rich history. With a narrative that aims to reconstruct the ancient human experience at Nimrud, I illuminate the bedecked bodies, images, artifacts, and identities of the queens who once lived and were buried here. As emblems of empire and fecundity, I propose that adorned queens and female imagery complemented the king’s potency and played a vital role in ideological conceptions of the empire and cosmos. Putting a story of people back into the palace at Nimrud, I hope that my book will inspire researchers, faculty, students, and interested members of the public around the globe to cherish and protect our world heritage of human history.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Art History and Criticism; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248848-16

Febe Dalipe Pamonag
Western Illinois University (Macomb, IL 61455-1390)
Patients' Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s

A book-length study of the leper colony on Culion Island, the Philippines, during the period of American governance, 1898-1950

This project will advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients' engagement with American colonial officials, an understudied theme in the literature on empire and public health policy, and U.S. occupation of the Philippines. In 1905, American health authorities established a leper colony in Culion, an isolated island in Palawan. Suspected lepers were forcibly removed from their homes and relocated to Culion. Most scholarship on Culion highlights its role as a laboratory for civic experimentation and how it was embroiled in major political issues of the day. In this project, I consider the views and practices of leprosy patients to show their resistance, as well as adaptation and accommodation of certain regulations in order to improve their daily lives on the island. This project also addresses such issues as the criminalization of disease and the degree to which individual rights may be compromised in the name of public health, all of which have contemporary resonance.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Other; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-248894-16

Rachel Judith Weil
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Prisoners and Gaolers in Early Modern England

A book-length project pertaining to imprisonment and detention in England, 1600-1800.

I seek funding to complete archival research in the United Kingdom on conflicts between prisoners and gaolers in Early Modern England, and to write up the results. Prisoner-goaler conflict sheds light on relations of power and notions of freedom and rights as they played out in the early modern English prison. My analysis of these conflicts forms a section of a longer manuscript in progress which explores the phenomenon of custodial (as opposed to punitive) detention from approximately 1600-1800. The larger project asks what "mere detention" that was not intended as punishment looked like, and what it meant for English society to hold in custody people who were not in any formal sense "guilty."

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British History; European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249000-16

Julie Hubbert
University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Music in New Hollywood Film

Archival research leading to publication of a book on the history of cinematic sound and sound technology in Hollywood film of the 1960s and 1970s.

The 1960s and 70s has long been valued as an important moment in the history of Hollywood studio filmmaking, a period of intense experimentation known as “New Hollywood.” In describing the “new” of New Hollywood, most scholars have focused on the visual and thematic aspects of style and genre that surfaced during the period. Little has been said, however, about the equally extraordinary revolution happening in film sound. This book corrects this gap by focusing on the most transgressive element in the New Hollywood soundtrack: music. By uniquely rooting this soundtrack revolution in the “high-fidelity” movement of the 1950s and 60s, this book considers the degree to which new technical and aesthetic standards of recorded sound also shaped film sound. It examines the new preference for recorded music, the striking stylistic range of musical repertoire that surfaced in these films, and the radical collapse of cinematic space the new high fidelity aesthetic encouraged.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249114-16

Gregory Zinman
Georgia Tech (Atlanta, GA 30332-0001)
The Moving Image Without Photography

Writing and website development leading to publication of a book on the 19th- and 20th-century history of moving images created without cameras and an online supplement presenting related essays and videos.

Handmade: The Moving Image Without Photography reveals a new history of the moving image, told through its engagement with other media and art forms. Think of a Jackson Pollock painting that moves, or a hand-drawn score that produces music when read by a film projector, or a hand-crafted machine that fractures light and bends time without a camera. Through a traditional scholarly monograph complemented by a custom-designed digital companion, Handmade provides a historical and theoretical framework for understanding these artisanal moving-image works and the technologies that make them. Handmade moves from film to performance to video, crossing from the Americas to Asia, so as to demonstrate the global, cross-disciplinary impact of this seemingly anomalous subset of experimental films and practices. In doing so, Handmade also illuminates the intersection of global cinema with other arts, and fundamentally reorients our understanding of the moving image’s past, present, and future.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249124-16

Jennifer K. Ladino
University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)
Affect and Environment at American Memory Sites

Research for a book on the impact of affect and memory on national memorial sites and their landscapes.

I seek support for Memorials Matter, a scholarly monograph that investigates how landscapes, built structures, and written texts at national memorial sites in the American West contribute to emotions about historical conflict and national identity. Working at the confluence of ecocriticism and affect theory, I ask: What emotions (such as nostalgia, shame, grief, and anger) do particular memorial sites promote? What roles do landscapes and built structures play in shaping public memory of, and emotions about, war and other conflicts? What new (often mixed) emotions emerge when we consider not just the written texts but also the physical environment at a memorial? The book features six memorials across a range of landscapes, a comparative approach that highlights the history of violence faced by multiethnic inhabitants of the West and suggests a better understanding of affect will help gauge how effective memorials are at healing a fractured nation and promoting cultural pluralism.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249221-16

Rebecca Ann Tuuri
University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001)
The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

A book-length study of the National Council of Negro Women. 

This is the first full-length scholarly monograph on the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), the largest black women’s organization in the United States at the height of the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Era. Whereas recent studies of militant and visible civil rights efforts seek to retrieve and analyze a radical model of social change, this story examines how the middle class black women of the NCNW used their respectability, moderate reputation, and national network to gain access to and money from powerful political and business leaders from the late 1950s through the 1970s. Their private, non-governmental, self-help approach even appealed to conservative leaders. However, NCNW also funneled financial resources and support to projects and individuals deemed too controversial by mainstream America to gain funding on their own, thus challenging clear-cut boundaries between radicals and moderates, leftists and liberals.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249230-16

Jessica L. Ghilani
University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg Campus (Greensburg, PA 15601)
Advertising for US Army Volunteers since 1914

Research and manuscript revisions leading to publication of a book on the history of twentieth-century recruitment advertising by the U.S. Army.

"Selling Soldiering: Advertising for US Army Volunteers since 1914" is a book publication under contract with University of Iowa Press. In it I argue that the origins of volunteer military recruitment strategies and sales pitches can be detected deep into the history of 20th century conscription, before the draft's overturn in 1973. I reveal that recruiting appeals made to women as well as to other targeted demographic groups depended more on the surrounding social and political contexts than the recruitment model used to fill military ranks. Advertisements for army service served significant public relations purposes beyond just that of filling ranks. I examine the cultural influence of army advertisements on the civilian public's perceptions, the recruited soldiers' expectations, and the enlisted soldiers' experiences of military service. Such representations deeply inform public opinions, assumptions, and notions of civic obligation over time.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; Communications; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


RQ-249830-16

Academic Studies Press (Brighton, MA 02135-2515)
Igor V. Nemirovsky (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Contemporary Ukrainian Literature in English Translation

Preparation for publication in print and open access digital format of two volumes of contemporary Ukrainian poetry, fiction, and essays, edited and translated into English.

This project will bring together for the first time English translations of some of the most important Ukrainian literature produced following the collapse of the Soviet Union, organized into two volumes. The first volume showcases an expertly curated selection of Ukrainian poetry, fiction, and essays published in the post-Soviet years, setting the literary and cultural stage for the second volume, which brings together for the first time in any language a collection of Ukrainian poetry about the current war in the Donbas region of Ukraine.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Slavic Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$73,500 (approved)
$73,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


RQ-249842-16

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Pamela H. Smith (Project Director: December 2015 to March 2022)
Marc Smith (Co Project Director: February 2016 to March 2022)
Craft Techniques and Knowledge Systems in a 16th-Century Artist's Manuscript: An Open-Access Critical Edition and Translation

Preparation of an online open-access critical edition and translation of a 16th-century manuscript of an artist's recipes for painting and metalworking techniques and observations on scientific processes. See website at http://www.makingandknowing.org/.

The transcription, English translation, and open-access digital critical edition of a late 16th-century manuscript containing techniques, recipes, and experimental notes, written in French (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, Ms. Fr. 640). This exceptionally detailed and self-reflective how-to text includes unprecedented information on techniques, materials, and observations from an artisan's workshop. It sheds light on the day-to-day creative process of the 16th-century craftsperson, and the acquisition and transmission of skilled practice. The edition’s critical commentary will demonstrate the continuity between the craft workshop and scientific laboratory at a pivotal moment in European history when artists began to write down their practices, and their methods provided models for the emerging experimental culture of a new philosophy—the nascent modern science. How-to texts like this manuscript gave rise to the culture of practical knowledge that underpinned the Scientific Revolution.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
History of Science; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Renaissance History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$320,000 (approved)
$319,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2020


RQ-249881-16

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Ernest Frithiof Freeberg (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Correspondence of James K. Polk

Preparation for print and digital publication of volume 14 of the correspondence of James K. Polk (1795-1849), member of Congress, governor of Tennessee, and eleventh president of the United States. See website at http://polkproject.utk.edu/.

The James K. Polk Project produces an annotated edition of letters by and to the eleventh U.S. president. So far it has published twelve volumes of the Correspondence of James K. Polk, covering up to July 1847, halfway through his presidency. These make important primary-source documents accessible to scholars and students. The final two volumes will feature letters from the second half of Polk’s presidency and his brief retirement. During this time the United States annexed the Southwest, gold-seekers entered California, the United States recognized France’s revolutionary government, and Americans debated slavery. Polk corresponded with diplomats, reformers, novelists, scientists, clergymen, educators, and Native American chiefs. The letters will nourish scholarship on politics, international relations, African American studies, Native American studies, literature, religion, education, and the history of science. Volumes will be available in both hardcover and free digital editions.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$204,785 (approved)
$204,785 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2020


RZ-249888-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Stephen Railton (Project Director: December 2015 to March 2022)
Worthy N. Martin (Co Project Director: February 2016 to March 2022)
Implementing Digital Yoknapatawpha

Continued development of the website http://faulkner.iath.virginia.edu/ that will map Yoknapatawpha County, the fictional setting of novels by William Faulkner, with links to places, characters, and events in the novels, as a resource for scholars, teachers, and students.

Underway since 2011, Digital Yoknapatawpha is a collaboration of 35 Faulkner scholars from 34 colleges and universities with a highly experienced digital humanities team at the University of Virginia. During the 3-year grant period this team will: complete the analysis of every location, character and event in Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha fictions—14 novels and 54 stories; enhance the project’s display and search capabilities; and publish its scholarly results online, in print and through conference presentations. As both resource and publication, the project will create transformative pathways into and yield new critical insights about one of the nation’s central imaginative accomplishments. Faulkner’s quest to create modern art out of American history, his long engagement with major social issues like slavery and race, and with challenging experimental forms of narrating time and space provide a perfect site for constructing new modes of scholarly interpretation.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$286,000 (approved)
$286,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2020


RQ-249901-16

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Ed Folsom (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)
Unearthing The "Buried Masterpiece" of American Literature: A Digital Variorum of the 1855 Leaves of Grass

Preparation for online publication of 19th-century American author Walt Whitman's first edition of Leaves of Grass, as part of an existing digital archive devoted to Whitman. See website at http://www.whitmanarchive.org.

The Walt Whitman Archive seeks NEH support to edit the first edition of Leaves of Grass and the constellation of draft documents that contributed to it by developing a digital variorum of this edition of Leaves from manuscript and notebook beginnings through its many variations in print. Whitman wrote the poetry, designed the book, and set some of the type, and his first Leaves was stunning both as verse and as a material object. This project will entail careful work on at least ninety-nine manuscripts contributing to the volume. Our goals are to advance understanding of this paradigm-shifting book and to enable future scholarship by drawing on some of the opportunities for representation unique to digital editing.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


RQ-249905-16

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Garry Sparks (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
The Theologia Indorum: A Critical Translation of Friar Domingo de Vico's Theology for and of the Maya, Volume I

Preparation of a critical edition and English translation of the 16th-century Theologia Indorum (Theology of the Indians) composed in Maya, the first work of Christian theology written in an indigenous American language.

The Theologia Indorum (“Theology for the Indians” or “Theology of the Indians”) by Spanish Dominican friar Domingo de Vico is the first original Christian theology written in either North or South America and remains to this day the longest single text ever written in any Native American language. And yet, since its composition in the central Maya highlands of Guatemala in the 1550s the Theologia Indorum has never been translated into any non-Mayan language, apart from some sporadic sections periodically by various scholars since the 1980s. Whereas most of the scholarship on the early colonial Maya has focused on their now famous writings—such as the Popol Wuj, Xajil Chronicles (or Annals of the Kaqchikel), the nine Books of Chilam Balam, et cetera—which consist of the earliest post-contact literature by indigenous American peoples, critical studies of the specific influences of Catholicism in these Maya texts has only recently been begun within the past decade.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Participating institutions:
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
American Philosophical Society (Philadelphia, PA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
History of Religion

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2022


RQ-249929-16

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Paul Joseph Grant-Costa (Project Director: December 2015 to May 2021)
The New England Indian Papers Series: The Massachusetts Collection, First Contact to 1869

Preparation for digital publication of a scholarly critical edition of primary source materials about Native Americans in Massachusetts from 1649 to 1869. See website at http://yipp.yale.edu/.

The project will consist of the first three years of the editorial preparation and electronic publication of a portion of the second state series, The Massachusetts Collection. This effort will begin the creation of a fundamental base of historical documentation assembled from primary source materials on the Native Americans who lived within the geographical limits of the colonies of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay, their history, culture, and long interactions with Euro-Americans in what is now the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Editors propose to transcribe, annotate, and publish 900 recently digitized primary source materials dating from 1649 to 1869 from the Indian collections within several different archives.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$305,000 (approved)
$300,316 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


PD-250041-16

Endangered Language Fund, Inc. (New Haven, CT 06511-6660)
Bruce E. Nevin (Project Director: September 2015 to March 2021)
Achumawi (Pit River; acv) Linguistic Database

The completion of a linguistic database for the nearly extinct language Achumawi, a heritage language of the Pit River tribe in Northern California.

(edited by staff) The primary aim of this project is to complete a linguistic database (DB) for the critically endangered Achumawi language, integrating and normalizing archival data from diverse locations.  The poor quality of published data has hampered researchers, and the substantial archival data will be essentially useless forever to the Tribe and to researchers unless this work is done. The PI is uniquely qualified to do this, having 45 years experience working with the language and people, support from tribal organizations and individuals, and possession of the original and archival field records, audio recordings, and transcriptions. The result will be completion of a single consistent, cross-checked, searchable resource that is freely available to researchers and members of the Tribe. The PI is training tribe members to participate in identifying and extracting pedagogically useful material from the database and from the correlated audio recordings, and in eliciting and recording material from the very few elders who retain even limited command of the language.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2019


FZ-250287-16

Charles E. King
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
The Humanity Lab: A Story of Race, Culture, and the Promise of an American Idea

A book on anthropologist Franz Boas (1848-1942) and the role of his jazz-age New York circle in developing the revolutionary view of social customs in "foreign" cultures that came to be known as cultural relativism. The project addresses the resulting transformation in popular attitudes about race, sexuality, and gender over the last century.

The Humanity Lab is a work of intellectual and social history centered on a small band of contrarian social scientists working in jazz-age New York. Led by pioneering anthropologist Franz Boas and including such critical figures as Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict, this group pioneered a way of seeing the world that is only now coming into broad acceptance. Together, they were puzzling through the details of the theory they would come to call “cultural relativism.” The starting point was the idea that no social customs were advanced or retrograde, higher or lower. Each was, instead, a locally specific solution to some common human problem--an insight that stands alongside many of the great scientific advances of the 20th century. The project addresses the transformation in popular attitudes about race, sexuality, gender, and "foreign" customs over the last century and will result in a single-author book published by a commercial press and aimed at the serious general reader.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$40,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FZ-250440-16

Julia Flynn Siler
Unaffiliated independent scholar
The White Devil's Daughters: The Women Who Fought Slavery in San Francisco's Chinatown

Focusing on the relationship between a white social reformer and a Chinese immigrant forced into slavery as a young girl, the book chronicles human trafficking in San Francisco's Chinatown as well as the broader history of Chinese immigration and exclusion in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Daughters of Joy is a narrative history of a struggle against sexual slavery in turn-of-the-century San Francisco. Set in the underworld of San Francisco's Chinatown, this book will reveal the grim details and the evolution of this criminal practice. The story is told through a decades-long partnership between two women, Tien Wu, a Chinese woman who was sold into domestic servitude as a child, and Dolly Cameron, who came from a prominent Scottish family. This unlikely pair ran a rescue home in San Francisco called the Occidental Mission Home for Girls where they saved thousands of young Asian women from slavery, more than anyone else in late nineteenth and early twentieth century America. Based on extensive archival research, this book will explore a little-known aspect of the American experience and is intended for general readers. It will directly connect humanities scholarship, in the form of narrative history, to a contemporary issue: the modern fight against human trafficking.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 9/30/2017


HK-250616-16

St. Mary's University of San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78228-5433)
Todd Russell Hanneken (Project Director: February 2016 to November 2021)
The Jubilees Palimpsest Project: Spectral RTI Technology for the Recovery of Erased Manuscripts from Antiquity

Digitization of the Jubilees Palimpsest, a manuscript containing multiple texts relevant to the history of Judaism and early Christianity, using advanced imaging techniques. The project would result in online publication of the manuscript and release of open-source software to support image processing in future work.

This full-scale project phase will refine for widespread adoption the Spectral RTI technology tested in the start-up phase. Spectral RTI recovers text from erased manuscripts (palimpsests) by integrating spectral imaging’s ability to recover illegible markings with the ability of Reflectance Transformation Imaging to capture texture as fine as the corrosion of parchment where acidic ink had once been. The project will create a showcase of the technology using illegible artifacts with high humanities significance from the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan. It will be published in a standards-compliant open repository. The artifacts will include at minimum the one-of-a-kind erased texts of Latin Jubilees, the Testament of Moses, and the Arian Commentary on Luke, each of which casts light on lost forms of Judaism and Christianity from 2100–1500 years ago. The project will streamline the procedure and publish instructions and user-friendly software to help future teams apply the technology.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient Literature; Archaeology; History of Religion

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2019


HK-250720-16

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Jane Gilmer Landers (Project Director: February 2016 to August 2022)
Revitalizing the Ecclesiastical and Secular Sources for Slave Societies Digital Archive

Implementation of robust systems for preserving and accessing a longstanding digital resource on the history of African and Afro-descended people. The project would also conduct outreach to scholarly communities, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and the general public to encourage further awareness and use of these collections.

In 2002 the Ecclesiastical and Secular Sources for Slave Societies Digital Archive was launched with NEH support. Since that time international teams of historians trained in languages and paleography, IT specialists, bibliographer and archivists have collaborated to preserve over 400,000 unique images dating from the 16th-19th centuries, documenting the history of four to six million African and Afro-descended individuals. Having outgrown our dated technology and platform, we seek support to revitalize this archive, transfer these data to SOBEK and create metadata and transcriptions that will enhance both use and long-term preservation. At project’s end, we will also host an international conference of our collaborative network of digital humanities scholars and a post-conference workshop to share digital preservation expertise with institutions in the region that have limited cyberinfrastructure.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$225,000 (approved)
$199,922 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2019


BH-250771-16

Ohio History Connection (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Elizabeth Hedler (Project Director: February 2016 to March 2021)
Following in Ancient Footsteps: The Hopewell in Ohio

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two schoolteachers on the ancient Hopewell Indian culture of eastern North America.

The Creative Learning Factory at the Ohio History Connection seeks support in the amount of $179,596.05 for a Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop entitled "Following in Ancient Footsteps: The Hopewell in Ohio." The goal of the program is to increase Summer Scholars’ knowledge and understanding of the cultural heritage of American Indians by introducing them to noteworthy Ancient American sites in Ohio: the Newark Earthworks, Fort Ancient, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, and Serpent Mound. By visiting these internationally-significant sites in connection with scholarly discussions, Summer Scholars will gain an appreciation for the complexity of ancient American Indian culture and gain expertise in the use and interpretation of historic sites.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,596 (approved)
$165,587 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/30/2017


HC-250974-16

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Sally L. Kitch (Project Director: March 2016 to June 2019)
The Humanities Laboratory: Discussions of New Campus Models

A conference, organized by Arizona State University's Institute for Humanities Research, to be called "The Humanities Laboratory: Discussions of New Campus Models.”

A conference, organized by Arizona State University's Institute for Humanities Research, to be called "The Humanities Laboratory: Discussions of New Campus Models.” This conference will be led by the director of ASU’s Institute for Humanities Research, Sally Kitch, as well as ASU’s University Librarian, Jim O’Donnell. It will also include speakers from Michigan State, the University of Michigan, the University of Pennsylvania, the New School, and Stanford University. ASU will also invite grant funders from not only the NEH, but the NSF, NIH, DOD, ACLS, Carnegie, and Mellon to participate in the discussion.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$29,517 (approved)
$19,274 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2017