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Funded Projects Query Form
782 matches

Division or office: Digital Humanities*
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Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: April 2022 to present)

DR-288439-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 11/30/2023

Hawai’i Is My Haven: Race and Ingenuity in the Black Pacific

Hawai’i Is My Haven maps the context and contours of Black life in the Hawaiian Islands. This ethnography emerges from a decade of fieldwork with both Hawai’i-raised Black locals and Black transplants who moved to the Islands from North America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Nitasha Tamar Sharma highlights the paradox of Hawai’i as a multiracial paradise and site of unacknowledged anti-Black racism. While Black culture is ubiquitous here, African-descended people seem invisible. In this formerly sovereign nation structured neither by the US Black/White binary nor the one-drop rule, non-White multiracials, including Black Hawaiians and Black Koreans, illustrate the coarticulation and limits of race and the native/settler divide. Despite erasure and racism, nonmilitary Black residents consider Hawai’i their haven, describing it as a place to “breathe” that offers the possibility of becoming local.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: April 2022 to present)

DR-288671-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 11/30/2023

Infamous Bodies: Early Black Women's Celebrity and the Afterlives of Rights

The countless retellings and reimaginings of the private and public lives of Phillis Wheatley, Sally Hemings, Sarah Baartman, Mary Seacole, and Sarah Forbes Bonetta have transformed them into difficult cultural and black feminist icons. In Infamous Bodies, Samantha Pinto explores how histories of these black women and their ongoing fame generate new ways of imagining black feminist futures. Drawing on a variety of media, cultural, legal, and critical sources, Pinto shows how the narratives surrounding these eighteenth- and nineteenth-century celebrities shape key political concepts such as freedom, consent, contract, citizenship, and sovereignty. Whether analyzing Wheatley's fame in relation to conceptions of race and freedom, notions of consent in Hemings's relationship with Thomas Jefferson, or Baartman's ability to enter into legal contracts, Pinto reveals the centrality of race, gender, and sexuality in the formation of political rights.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Mark Simpson-Vos (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290429-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open Access Edition of Game of Privilege: An African American History of Golf by Lane Demas

This project will publish the book Game of Privilege: An African American History of Golf, written by NEH Fellow Lane Demas (Federal Award Identification Number FT-61703-14), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Mark Simpson-Vos (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290430-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open Access Edition of Half in Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Nellie Y. McKay by Shanna Greene Benjamin

This project will publish the book Half in Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Nellie Y. McKay, written by NEH Fellow Shanna Greene Benjamin (Federal Award Identification Number FT-58636-11), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Mark Simpson-Vos (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290431-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open Access Edition of Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil by Eve E. Buckley

This project will publish the book Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil, written by NEH Fellow Eve E. Buckley (Federal Award Identification Number FT-62004-14), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Mark Simpson-Vos (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290432-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open Access Edition of Medicine, Science, and Making Race in Civil War America by Leslie A. Schwalm

This project will publish the book Medicine, Science, and Making Race in Civil War America, written by NEH Fellow Leslie A. Schwalm (Federal Award Identification Number FT-60490-13), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Gianna Mosser (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290440-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 3/31/2023

Open-Access Edition of Manifold Destiny: Arabs at an American Crossroads of Exceptional Rule

This project will result in the publishing of the electronic open-access version of the book Manifold Destiny: Arabs at an American Crossroads of Exceptional Rule, authored by NEH Fellow John Tofik Karam (NEH grant number FT-248802-16). The open-access format will be published under a Creative Commons license, rendering it free for download and distribution. With the release of the eBook, John Tofik Karam will receive at least $500 in royalty payment.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290452-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR by Adeeb Khalid

In Making Uzbekistan, Adeeb Khalid chronicles the tumultuous history of Central Asia in the age of the Russian revolution. He explores the complex interaction between Uzbek intellectuals, local Bolsheviks, and Moscow to sketch out the flux of the situation in early-Soviet Central Asia. His focus on the Uzbek intelligentsia allows him to recast our understanding of Soviet nationalities policies. Uzbekistan, he argues, was not a creation of Soviet policies, but a project of the Muslim intelligentsia that emerged in the Soviet context through the interstices of the complex politics of the period. Making Uzbekistan introduces key texts from this period and argues that what the decade witnessed was nothing short of a cultural revolution.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290453-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Unbuttoning America: A Biography of "Peyton Place" by Ardis Cameron

Published in 1956, Peyton Place became a bestseller and a cultural phenomenon, its lurid story of murder consumed as avidly by readers as it was condemned by critics and the clergy. In Unbuttoning America, Ardis Cameron mines extensive interviews, fan letters, and archival materials to tell how the true story of a patricide in a small New England village circulated over time and was transformed into a literary sensation. She argues that Peyton Place, with its frank discussions of poverty, sexuality, class and ethnic discrimination, and small-town hypocrisy, was more than a tawdry potboiler: It was part of a larger postwar struggle over belonging and recognition, surfacing the hidden conversations and secret rebellions of a generation no longer willing to ignore the disparities and constraints of Cold War America.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290456-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of An Academy at the Court of the Tsars: Greek Scholars and Jesuit Education in Early Modern Russia by Nikolaos A. Chrissidis

The first formally organized educational institution in Russia, the Slavo-Greco-Latin Academy, was established in 1685 by Greek monks trained in the Jesuitical tradition. When they created their school in Moscow, the founders emulated the structures, methods, and program of studies of their Jesuit prototypes. As Nikolaos A. Chrissidis shows in An Academy at the Court of the Tsars, this academy had a profound and lasting impact on Russian and Eastern Orthodox intellectual practices, Russian-Greek cultural relations, and contact between seventeenth-century Russia and Western Europe. By uncovering the origins of higher education in Tsarist Russia, this book details how the arrival of European pedagogy worked to eventually bring Russia into the modern intellectual mainstream.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290457-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Incidental Archaeologists: French Officers and the Rediscovery of Roman North Africa by Bonnie Effros

In Incidental Archaeologists, Bonnie Effros examines the archaeological contributions of nineteenth-century French military officers, who, raised on classical accounts of warfare and often trained as cartographers, developed an interest in the Roman remains they encountered when commissioned in the colony of Algeria. By linking the study of the Roman past to French triumphant narratives of the conquest and occupation of the Maghreb, Effros demonstrates how Roman archaeology in the forty years following the conquest of the Ottoman Regencies of Algiers and Constantine in the 1830s helped lay the groundwork for the creation of a new identity for French military and civilian settlers. Effros uses France’s violent colonial war, its efforts to document the ancient Roman past, and its brutal treatment of the region’s Arab and Berber inhabitants to underline the close entanglement of knowledge production, the professionalization of archaeology, and European imperialism.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290458-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Suspect Saints and Holy Heretics: Disputed Sanctity and Communal Identity in Late Medieval Italy by Janine Larmon Peterson

In Suspect Saints and Holy Heretics, Janine Larmon Peterson investigates regional saints whose holiness was contested. She scrutinizes the papacy's toleration of unofficial saints' cults and its response when their devotees challenged church authority about a cult's merits or the saint's orthodoxy. As she demonstrates, communities that venerated saints increasingly clashed with popes and inquisitors determined to erode any local claims of religious authority. The case studies she presents detail how the political climate of the Italian peninsula allowed Italian communities to use saints' cults as a tool to negotiate religious and political autonomy in opposition to growing papal bureaucratization.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290459-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca by Eileen Kane

In the late nineteenth century, as a consequence of imperial conquest and a mobility revolution, Russia became a crossroads of the hajj, the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca. The first book in any language on the hajj under tsarist and Soviet rule, Russian Hajj tells the story of how tsarist officials struggled to control and co-opt Russia's mass hajj traffic, seeing it as not only a liability but also an opportunity. To support the hajj as a matter of state surveillance and control was controversial, given the preeminent position of the Orthodox Church. But nor could the hajj be ignored, or banned, due to Russia's policy of toleration of Islam. As a cross-border, migratory phenomenon, the hajj stoked officials' fears of infectious disease, Islamic revolt, and interethnic conflict, but Eileen Kane innovatively argues that it also generated new thinking within the government about the utility of the empire's Muslims and their global networks.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Mahinder Singh Kingra (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

DR-290460-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Open-access edition of Invisible Weapons: Liturgy and the Making of Crusade Ideology by M. Cecilia Gaposchkin

Throughout the history of the Crusades, liturgical prayer, masses, and alms were all marshaled in the fight against Muslim armies. In Invisible Weapons, M. Cecilia Gaposchkin focuses on the ways in which Latin Christians communicated their ideas and aspirations for crusade to God through liturgy, how public worship was deployed, and how prayers and masses absorbed the ideals and priorities of crusading. Placing religious texts and practices within the larger narrative of crusading, Gaposchkin reveals an aspect of crusading that is too easily forgotten—the practice of prayer and its dynamic relationship with the practice of arms—and urges us to remember that medieval Latin Christians were as serious about their faith as they were about their warfare.

Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

HC-290491-22
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Shared Horizons II: Data, Health and the Digital Humanities (DH2)

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, working in cooperation with the Office of Digital Humanities at the NEH and the National Library of Medicine at the NIH, propose a symposium, workshop, and edited volume on the intersections of data, health, and the digital humanities.

Shared Horizons II will enhance the humanities by building further bridges into medicine and data based on ever expanding research located at the intersection of data, health, and the digital humanities, which asks how records of human experience in the history of medicine include numerical representations requiring rigorous examination by scholars and students trained in both humanities inquiry and data analytics. Through the involvement of participants drawn from a variety of areas in biomedicine and the humanities, Shared Horizons II will focus on themes and topics intersecting the digital humanities and health data, including transnational studies, data and health before the modern period, health and data experts from underrepresented populations, experiences of marginalized communities. The workshop will result in the publication of an edited volume of original research contributions.

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Elizabeth Sneller (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284835-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,908 (approved)
$99,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Building and Disseminating an App for Ethnographic Remote Audio Recording

The development and testing with humanities scholars of an open source mobile recording app for collecting “audio diaries” for use in research and public engagement. 

This project builds on the success of an existing prototype for a remote recording mobile app used to collect "audio diaries" in 2020-2021. We aim to redevelop the code for the front end of the app and refactor the code for the back end, resulting in a shareable app infrastructure that may be adopted by researchers at any number of institutions. We will bring together a user community of beta testing researchers across the humanities who may benefit from a remote recording app, which we hope to expand during the second year of funding into a broad user community and support system. The code and user manual will be published on a public GitLab repository, enabling future improvements by the user community.

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Ellen Cushman (Project Director: June 2021 to September 2023)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: September 2023 to December 2023)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Benjamin Elliott Frey (Co Project Director: September 2023 to December 2023)

HAA-284836-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,957 (approved)
$99,957 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Translating Cherokee Manuscripts: Creating a Writing Environment for DAILP

The further development of user interfaces for collective translation of the collections in the Digital Archive for American Indian Languages Preservation and Perseverance (DAILP), a digital archive of Cherokee-language manuscripts and lexical resources.

Cherokee language documents are a ready source of valuable insight into the cultural, linguistic, and historical legacy of the Cherokee people. With an online environment to facilitate translation, Cherokee language experts and scholars could translate these documents collectively with Cherokee language learners of all ages who are found in online classes, immersion schools, university classrooms, and communities. And their translation work could be supported with ready access to the lexical datasets found in dictionaries, wordlists, and grammars. The Digital Archive for American Indian Languages Preservation and Perseverance (DAILP) seeks to address these needs by creating a digital archive of Cherokee-language manuscripts and lexical resources to support the collective translation of American Indian language manuscripts, and to advance indigenous language learning, translation, and documentation.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Markus Eberl (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284842-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,289 (approved)
$41,515 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Changing Communities of Ancient Builders: Machine Learning-based Analysis of Mortars from Caesarea Maritima (Israel)

The creation of machine learning methods to identify microartifacts from archaeological sites. 

Mortars are ubiquitous and essential parts of construction. Ancient builders prepared them as members of changing communities of practice. We ask to what degree interactions among contemporaries led to standardized mortars and whether builders learnt from culturally different predecessors. These issues require studying a large data set objectively. Our Level 1 project proposes to analyze 1000 mortar samples and ~1 billion particles with a dynamic image particle analyzer. We train machine learning algorithms to identify experimentally reproduced mortar constituents in archaeological samples. The latter come from the ancient port city of Caesarea Maritima that Roman, Jewish, Byzantine, Abassid-Fatimid Muslim, and Crusader builders constructed between 22 B.C.E. and 1265 C.E. Our approach – dynamic image analysis, experimental archaeology, and machine learning – can be extended to other parts of the ancient Mediterranean as well as to other microartifacts.

Lindenwood University (Saint Charles, MO 63301-1693)
Geremy Carnes (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Margaret Smith (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284844-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,938 (approved)
$49,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Expanding Access to the Digital Humanities in St. Louis

Developing a workshop and building a network for supporting and disseminating methods in digital humanities pedagogy for secondary and post-secondary institutions in the St. Louis, Missouri region.

“Expanding Access to the Digital Humanities in St. Louis” will build a digital humanities network for the greater St. Louis metropolitan area, linking faculty, students, and community members across the region’s educational and cultural institutions in a community of pedagogy and practice. This network will bridge the K-12-college divide and emphasize active advancement of digital humanities pedagogy and access for underserved populations. Rather than focusing on faculty research, this network will center student learning, particularly at the often neglected secondary and undergraduate levels. At a workshop held in September 2022, network members will establish processes that will allow secondary and post-secondary students throughout the region to participate remotely in digital humanities projects headquartered at participating institutions. They will also identify other collaborative goals for the network to pursue toward improving digital humanities pedagogy in St. Louis.

St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)
Daniel Nickolai (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Kathleen Llewellyn (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Amy Wright (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Sarah Bauer (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Christina Garcia (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)

HAA-284849-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$275,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

iSpraak: A web-based application for second language pronunciation instruction, assessment, and research

Scaling up development and dissemination of the iSpraak application as a free and open source language pronunciation instruction and learning tool. 

This NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant proposal outlines the plan to enhance, scale, and provide free access to the web application iSpraak. This digital platform equips educators and scholars with an innovative tool for second language pronunciation instruction, assessment, and research. Originally developed for internal use at Saint Louis University in 2014, iSpraak has now been used by tens of thousands of students and instructors across the globe. NEH funding is currently sought in order to continue development, remove cost barriers to access, and to make the platform fully open and accessible to all interested parties.

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
John Anthony Walsh (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
J. Stephen Downie (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284850-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Tools for Open Research and Computation with HathiTrust: Leveraging Intelligent Text Extraction (TORCHLITE)

The development of web-based tools and documentation to allow both novice and expert users to interact with data from the HathiTrust Digital Library.

The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) seeks $325,000 in funding for a period of 2 years, through the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants program, Level III, for the development of next-generation web-based, interactive visualization and analytical tool dashboard that consume existing data from our one-of-a-kind, fully open Extracted Features dataset, along with a well-documented API to allow our user community to develop its own tools for interacting with data from the 17.5-million-volume HathiTrust Digital Library. We will develop and promote these tools and API through a robust community outreach program that includes a public event and hack-a-thon focused on tool building.

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Lauren Tilton (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Taylor Arnold (Co Project Director: October 2021 to present)

HAA-284853-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,693 (approved)
$324,693 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

PGVis: Digital Public Humanities Software for Visualizing Image Collections

The creation of software to easily allow non-programmers to develop interactive public humanities digital projects.

The Photogrammar Visualization Software (PGVis) is an open-source tool for the visualization and exploration of image collections. PGVis will allow anyone with a collection of digital images and associated metadata to create, with no prior programming experience, their own digital public humanities projects in the form of public websites. In addition to the software, the project will produce six case studies that will model and highlight how the software can be used in a variety of different domains, data sizes, and types of institutions.

Association of University Presses, Inc. (New York, NY 10018-9228)
John E. Sherer (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Erich van Rijn (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284855-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,680 (approved)
$49,680 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Understanding the Impact on Print Revenue When University Press Books are Open Access

A survey of scholarly presses and the preparation of a report on revenue models for open access publishing.

The project seeks to understand empirically whether the availability of Open Access (OA) editions of scholarly books has a quantifiable effect on the sales performance of print editions. University presses publish an estimated 4000 monographs annually. While many university presses have pursued experiments with OA publishing, sustainable financing of all publishing operations is a significant concern. This study will gather sales data on a significant number of both OA and traditionally published titles across multiple disciplines from a wide array of non-profit scholarly publishers in order to answer one of the biggest questions in humanities book publishing: does an OA option decrease sales, increase sales via greater discovery, or have no discernible effect? The research will be essential to inform future OA book programs and models, pointing the way to expanding sustainable open publishing operations.

Boise State University (Boise, ID 83725-0001)
Kelly Arispe (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284870-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Evaluating the Practices and Impact of Digital Scholarship on World Language Pedagogy in K-12 Urban and Rural Contexts

An evaluative study on the impact of teaching world languages using Open Educational Resources (OERs) in K-12 classrooms across Idaho.

This Level II proposal addresses the third program priority to implement an evaluative study on the practices and impact of digital scholarship on pedagogy to enhance teaching and learning in the humanities. Our project, Pathways, is an Open Educational Resource (OER) that is a repository of more than 700 high-quality, editable digital materials (activities) that supports standards-based pedagogy centered on human inquiry for ten world languages and cultures. This project is innovative because we evaluate K-12 urban and rural pedagogy impacted over time as we explicitly train teachers to use Pathways and other digital humanities materials aligned to world languages and cultures. The findings from this evaluative study will provide new opportunities to communicate the impact of digital scholarship on pedagogy by characterizing the beliefs, perceptions, interests, and teacher practices of urban and rural K-12 humanities teachers, a profoundly under investigated population.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Tega Brain (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Elaine Ayers (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Ahmed Ansari (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284880-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/28/2024

Inverting the Wunderkammer: Rethinking the Digital Humanities through Botanic Histories and Archives

Convening of a series of participatory design workshops to enhance discovery and use of the Mitten Collection of moss for humanities research.  

This submission to the NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant requests support for a Level I project titled Inverting the Wunderkammer: Rethinking the Digital Humanities through Botanic Histories and Archives, to be hosted by New York University (NYU) in partnership with the New York Botanical Gardens (NYBG). Building and expanding on histories of botany and responding to the ongoing violences of colonial collecting, preservation, and display at work in western cultural institutions, our project tackles the digital representation of a perhaps surprising plant that travels the globe in unusual ways at multiple scales: moss. Moss, in all of its miniscule, microscopic mundanity, might initially seem an odd choice of subject for a humanities-based project, especially after an arduous year of existential, ecological, and political challenges.

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Christopher Warren (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Matthew Lincoln (Co Project Director: October 2021 to April 2022)
Samuel Lemley (Co Project Director: October 2021 to present)
Max G'Sell (Co Project Director: October 2021 to April 2022)

HAA-284882-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$324,931 (approved)
$324,931 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Freedom and the Press before Freedom of the Press: Tools, Data, and Methods for Researching Secret Printing

The scaling up of tools and methods to allow scholars to identify and decipher illicit printing in documents predating and associated with the First Amendment. 

In response to the NEH's “More Perfect Union" initiative, this application contends that some of the most fascinating stories of the First Amendment’s prehistory are yet to be told – and that they can only be discovered with tools, data, and methods developed in digital humanities. Evidence for clandestine printing often lies below the threshold of human attention – in minute typographical details, recurring pieces of damaged type, similar or divergent paper stocks, or tiny variations in print shop practices, observable only at scale. At the same time, it takes sophisticated information architecture for researchers to move effectively from minute physical details to broader, more consequential patterns. Freedom and the Press before Freedom of the Press will ameliorate persistent challenges in studying clandestine printing by scaling up an established suite of tools, data, and machine learning methods developed to help researchers discover hidden information in letterpress print.

Montclair State University (Montclair, NJ 07043-1624)
John Soboslai (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284888-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$39,176 (approved)
$39,176 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Seeing What Takes Place: Exploring Immersive Experiences of Religious Rituals

Convening a group of religious studies scholars and technologists to research best practices and evaluate the appropriateness of recording and interpreting religious rituals in extended reality (XR) for teaching religion.

This project seeks to convene a meeting of religious studies scholars and experts in XR modalities to explore the creation of immersive videos analyzing and explaining religious rituals. The proposed two-day advisory meeting will evaluate the best practices for creating stereoscopic (360 degrees) videos combined with documentary style analysis and discussion into resources aimed at teaching about religion. The meeting will consist of presentations by scholars of various religious traditions and experts in educational immersive technologies, paired with brainstorming sessions considering appropriate representations of diverse religious traditions, suitable methods regarding the filming and dissemination of such videos, and concerns around maintaining connections between practices and the living communities that hold them sacred. Information generated by our collaboration will be made publicly available and serve as the backbone for a blueprint towards the creation phase of the project.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Bayard Miller (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
James P. McClure (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284893-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$44,570 (approved)
$44,570 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Planning a Federated Early North American Weather Records Digital Resource

A series of meetings to develop a prototype for a federated digital resource on North American weather and climate data collected during the 18th- and 19th-centuries.

The proposed project is a collaborative effort between the Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton University, the Center for Digital Editing at the University of Virginia, and the Center for Digital Scholarship at the American Philosophical Society. The project is seeking level one funding to support planning meetings, a workshop, drafting of technical specifications, and the development of a prototype for federated weather and climate records digital resource. Planning and experimentation work during this grant period will lay the groundwork for the future development of a federated weather and climate records platform. This platform will support both the editorial preparation (broadly conceived) and publication of weather and climate records. Planning and development work will ultimately result in the publication of the Federated Early North American Weather Records Digital Resource.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA 02139-4307)
Cagri Hakan Zaman (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Caroline Ann Jones (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284908-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Latent Archive: Immersive Storytelling Platform for Examining Spatial History

Prototype development of a new digital tool that will allow users to identify and study objects and landscapes appearing in moving image scenes.

We seek Level I funding for planning and early prototype development of the Latent Archive tool, conceived as an immersive media platform for studying moving image archives. The project has been developed in collaboration with MIT Transmedia Storytelling Initiative (TSI) and MIT Virtual Experience Design Lab (VxD).

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Jennifer Lei Jenkins (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284912-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals:
$324,573 (approved)
$324,573 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Tribesourcing Southwest Film: Digital Repatriation

A series of workshops in Arizona, New Mexico, and California and the development of a digital curriculum on the creation of culturally-appropriate descriptive metadata and narration for Native American films based on the Tribesourcing Southwest Film website.

Tribesourcing Southwest Film digitally repurposes a collection of midcentury educational and sponsored films about Native peoples of the Southwestern U.S., reclaiming visual content through recording culturally-informed alternate audio tracks voiced by Native narrators from within the cultures represented. This process, which we have termed “tribesourcing,” has the double benefit of repatriating historic images and decolonizing these archival films, visible at Tribesourcingfilm.com. In this proposal, we seek to extend the project by: recording additional narrations in Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico; developing a digital curriculum for workshops; and to begin decentralizing the project through a series of workshops to help communities who wish to do their own tribesourcing with their own archived audio-visual materials.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Mark Simpson-Vos (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-284952-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of Race Characters: Ethnic Literature and the Figure of the American Dream by Swati Rana

This project will publish the book Race Characters: Ethnic Literature and the Figure of the American Dream, written by NEH Fellow Swati Rana (NEH grant number FEL-XXXX), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY 82071-2000)
Isadora Helfgott (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Paul Flesher (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY) - Applicant/Recipient
Cardiff University (Cardiff, Wales) - Participating Institution

HND-284954-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 10/31/2024

Finding a place: advancing digital methods to unlock the use of digitized book illustrations in cultural institutions

A research project on identifying and analyzing patterns in book illustration (c 1750 – 1940) using digitized books from collections in Wyoming, Wales, and England. The UK partner, Cardiff University, is requesting £245,912 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Book illustrations span centuries and represent ideas about identities of people and place from Wales to Wyoming. They foreground complexities of local and foreign, indigeneity, colonized and displaced subjects. Material objects that circulated globally, illustrations were easily accessible and expressed key ideas and subtexts not always conveyed in text. They contain cultural information about the beliefs of those who created and encountered them that can be revealed through digital methods, which expand possibilities for the scope and depth of comparative analysis. Opening this material to new analysis can shape cultural institutions’ strategies for display and interpretation across collections. This research is humanities-driven: it identifies humanities materials neglected by cultural institutions and develops digital methods for identifying and analysing them that reveal marginalized and hidden histories and global connections.

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Theodore Mills Kelly (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Deepthi Murali (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh) - Participating Institution

HND-284964-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,999 (approved)
$49,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 4/30/2023

Subaltern Histories of Global Textiles : Connecting Collections, Expanding Engagement

Data collection, analysis, and construction of a prototype website to explore the use of Indian-style textiles in the African diaspora in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The UK partner, the University of Edinburgh, is requesting £58,271 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. 

We propose a born-digital project on the use of Indian and Indian-imitation textiles by the African diaspora in the Americas in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Knitting together material from three collections--Victoria and Albert Museum, London, University of Glasgow Archives & Special Collections, and Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, New York--the project re-centers the locus of global textile trade from White Euro-American markets to African diaspora markets and contributes to decolonization in the humanities while highlighting contributions of under-represented communities to global cultures of fashion. For the exploratory level grant we will produce a design document and proof-of-concept prototype including a stand-alone website with interactive data visualizations, annotated narratives, and dynamic maps built on a networked metadata collection that links partnering institutions.

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Audrey G. Bennett (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Westminster (London) - Participating Institution

HND-284966-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$49,116 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 11/30/2023

'I don't see what you mean': Broadening participation through co-created inclusive digital museum audio

The development and testing of a one-day workshop for museum practitioners that will use the Inclusive Co-Created Audio Description model to change how museum workers understand and implement digital accessibility for blind, partially blind, and sighted audiences. The UK partner, the University of Westminster, is requesting £58,525 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project sits within the NEH/AHRC theme: Evolving institutions to face the 21st Century, and aims to develop and rigorously evaluate a 1-day Workshop for Inclusive Co-created Audio Description (WICAD) model, working with diverse blind, partially-blind, and sighted audiences in the UK and US to: 1) Provide museum practitioners with a robust model through which they can enrich and extend their digital provision to engage traditionally marginalized audiences. 2) Improve visitor-facing experiences of online access to a diverse range of artworks for all museum visitors to foster digitally-enabled equitable participation To achieve these goals, we will compare the experiences of experienced and novice museum-goers to address these central questions: 1. What level of guidance do co-creation groups need to produce a draft audio description (AD) within a 1-day workshop? 2. How do groups choose to incorporate different voices, positionality, and identities within a co-created AD?

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Carla Klehm (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Angelia Payne (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Malcolm Williamson (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Christopher Angel (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR) - Applicant/Recipient
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (Cambridge) - Participating Institution

HND-284967-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$49,999 (approved)
$49,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2023

Digital Storytelling on African Urbanisms: A Model to Empower Education Initiatives Across the Global South

The assessment and expansion of the metsemegolgolo digital archive for use in teaching digital storytelling to K-12 and college students in Southern Africa and across the Global South. The UK partner, the University of Cambridge, is requesting £59,948 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project explores how to best empower secondary school and university educators based in the Global South to explore cultural heritage through a digital archive called metsemegologolo, ‘ancient towns’ in Setswana. Metsemegolgolo, co-directed?by Cambridge and based at three South African institutions, is an open source prototype database containing archaeological data, heritage objects, historical maps, oral histories and poetry about precolonial African urbanisms. This project develops a complementary UK-US collaboration among the metsemegologolo developers, digital heritage experts, and southern African educators with the purpose of exploring digital storytelling in low-resourced educational environments across the Global South. Increasing digital representations of marginalised histories is part of the ongoing process of decolonizing the digital humanities and further deepens connections to, and preservation of, cultural heritage sites.

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Daniel Barros Domingues da Silva (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
William Marsh Rice University (Houston, TX) - Applicant/Recipient
Lancaster University (Lancaster) - Participating Institution

HND-284968-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,995 (approved)
$149,489 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

Towards a Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades: Unlocking the Records of the South Sea Company

The development of the Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades, an open-access resource that will digitize, transcribe, translate, and semantically link manuscript materials documenting the South Sea Company and its contribution to the trans-Atlantic and intra-American slave trades. The UK partner, Lancaster University, is requesting £249,788 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The outcry for racial justice has spurred a growing demand for accessible information on the Atlantic slave trades’ difficult history. This project meets that demand through the creation of the Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades (DAAST), a new open-access digital platform that will democratize access to the archives of the Atlantic slave trade. This resource will leverage innovative methods—including AI, machine learning, and research description framework—to digitize, transcribe, translate, and semantically link manuscript materials. DAAST’s foundations will be built by processing the voluminous papers of the South Sea Company (SSC), one of the largest slave trading companies in history. The resulting archive will offer new insights on the Atlantic slave trades’ histories—especially the experiences of the enslaved. This project will thus revolutionize how the archives of the trade are accessed, and transform how cultural institutions display materials related to the traffic.

Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
Diane Katherine Jakacki (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Newcastle University (Newcastle upon Tyne) - Participating Institution

HND-284973-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$43,875 (approved)
$43,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Evolving Hands: Building Workflows and Scalable Practices for Handwriting

The development and publication of training materials and documentation for the automatic transcription of historical manuscripts, based on three case studies from the Gertrude Bell Archive, the Records of Early English Drama, and archival collections held at Bucknell University. The UK partner, Newcastle University, is requesting £53,344 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Transcription has evolved dramatically in the 21st century. Originally volunteer-driven, this required pre-existing understanding of terms, subjects, and spellings within digitized collections. Two tools changing this model within digital curation are Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR). OCR is ubiquitous in mass digitisation but has substantial limitations, while HTR is still unfamiliar in cultural institutions. Evolving Hands undertakes 3 case studies ranging across document forms to demonstrate how these tools can be used in curation: handwritten and printed letters, diaries, ethnographies, financial accounts and pedagogical documents from multiple centuries and languages. By covering a wide variety of periods and document forms the project can foster responsible, responsive support for cultural institutions, and establish more effective workflows that fill the gap between digitization, semantic-oriented encoding, and data discoverability.

SUNY Research Foundation, Farmingdale State (Farmingdale, NY 11735-1006)
Mary P. Caulfield (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
SUNY Research Foundation, Farmingdale State (Farmingdale, NY) - Applicant/Recipient
Brunel University London (Uxbridge, Middlesex) - Participating Institution

HND-284975-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024

Designing Mixed Reality Heritage Performances to Support Decolonisation of Heritage Sites

The creation of research-based performances and toolkits about the 18th century slave trade in Deerfield, Massachusetts and London for cultural heritage sites in the US and UK. The lead UK partner, Brunel University London, is requesting £247,572 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.?? 

The project asks how digital heritage performance, using in particular Mixed Reality technologies, can aid heritage sites in their endeavour to attract new audiences while critically engaging the public with under-represented voices and viewpoints of troubled European and colonial histories. To achieve this goal, the project will design and develop two innovative immersive heritage experiences combining Mixed Reality, in the form of smart glasses, and live performance at heritage sites in the UK and US focusing on under-represented stories from the 18th-century slave trade in London and Deerfield, Massachusetts. The research will further future transatlantic industry innovation by providing heritage workers, and their creative industry partners, with two toolkits to assist the design, implementation, and staff training for the use of MR immersive heritage experiences.

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Peter Leonard (Project Director: July 2021 to September 2022)
Kayla Shipp (Project Director: September 2022 to present)
Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Yer Vang-Cohen (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
Yale University (New Haven, CT) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh) - Participating Institution

HND-284978-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$146,971 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024

Enriching Exhibition Scholarship: Reconciling Knowledge Graphs and Social Media from Newspaper Articles to Twitter

The development of methodologies and workflows to create structured metadata about art exhibitions and objects from catalogs, historic newspapers, and social media. The UK partner, the University of Edinburgh, is requesting £249,999 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Artwork exhibitions bring diverse cultures together, exposing artists, scholars and the public to new experiences. These interactions affect stylistic trends, art markets, and cultural perceptions, yet are very difficult to study as we lack holistic, structured data about participation of audiences and objects. This project brings together an international and interdisciplinary team of experts in the fields of linked open data (LOD), exhibitions, art history, and AI to create or enhance machine accessible exhibition descriptions. This will be done by combining LOD graphs and cutting edge natural language processing applied to newspaper archives and current day social media. We will extract object identification and audience reactions from social texts across time. We will explore national and international exhibitions using open data from the domain, and detailed knowledge from university art galleries, including engagement with a contemporary Ashmolean exhibition via social media.

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Robert D. Goulding (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Scott Weingart (Co Project Director: January 2022 to September 2022)

Participating institutions:
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN) - Applicant/Recipient
Oxford University (Oxford) - Participating Institution

HND-284991-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Unlocking Digital Texts: Towards an interoperable text framework

The development of a proof of concept for an Interoperable Text Framework which will standardize the format of digital texts to make them easier to present, analyze, and reuse. The lead UK partner, the University of Oxford, is requesting £248,433 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Unlocking Digital Texts (UDT) aims to lay the foundation for the creation of the Interoperable Text Framework (ITF). Just as the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) enables users to present, annotate and reuse digital images easily without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure, ITF will empower users to create a richer and more layered approach to the presentation, analysis and reuse of textual resources. Freed from costly technical concerns, users will be able to use the web to construct persistent online narratives that span any number of documents from around the world simply by referencing them appropriately.

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Anuradha Vedantham (Project Director: July 2021 to December 2021)
Christina Lee (Project Director: December 2021 to February 2022)
Anuradha Vedantham (Project Director: February 2022 to March 2022)
Christina Lee (Project Director: March 2022 to present)
Anuradha Vedantham (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Christina Lee (Co Project Director: February 2022 to March 2022)

Participating institutions:
Trustees of Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) - Applicant/Recipient
University of London (London, United Kingdom) - Participating Institution

HND-284995-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$147,399 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

A Digital Repatriation of a Lost archive of the Spanish Pacific: The Library of The Convent of San Pablo (Manila, 1762)

A project to digitize a collection of more than 1500 rare manuscripts, maps, and early printed materials that were taken in the 18th century from the Convent of San Pablo in Manila, Philippines, and dispersed throughout the Philippines, United States, and United Kingdom. The UK partner, SOAS University of London, is requesting £230,982 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project seeks to repatriate books and manuscripts seized from the archives of the Convent of San Pablo during the British occupation of Manila, 1762 to 1764. Using the original index of the archives, and subsequent records related to the sale and dispersal of its contents, the project envisions a virtual reconstruction of the library’s materials, ca. 1762. Beyond the digital reconstitution of the archival corpus, the “return” of the library to its original site, the project reconceptualizes the library’s original systems of knowledge production, modes of access, and use. The project serves as an entry point to the study of Spanish colonialism in the Pacific and the experience of affected communities, especially in the Philippines. Using digital technologies, the regenerated library will include spaces for transcribing, translating and annotating materials. This project envisions creative spaces that produce a more broadly based and participatory scholarly product.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Tao Leigh Goffe (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - Applicant/Recipient
University of London (London, United Kingdom) - Participating Institution

HND-284998-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2024

Towards an Integrated Colonial Archive: Humanities, Law and British Indentureship

The creation of an interactive website that brings together collections in the United States and United Kingdom to facilitate scholarship on colonialism and indentureship. The lead UK partner, Birkbeck College, is requesting £58,709 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council

Towards an Integrated Colonial Archive' aims to provide proof-of-concept for the development of an integrated humanities, law and social science archive. By creating a carefully curated, interactive digital website, it aims to increase public engagement with specialist research, generate new interdisciplinary scholarship on colonialism, and provide a method for cultural institutions to frame specialist collections to increase public interest and use of the collections. This project curates various digital and physical holdings of the University of London and Cornell University library systems, in collaboration with public archives and galleries, and aims to demonstrate that, by overlapping and digitally integrating holdings on the indentureship period that would not typically be read or viewed alongside one another--such as maps, statutes, court judgments, land registers, ship logs, indenture contracts, novels, music, studies in linguistics, and oral histories.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Jennifer Lei Jenkins (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Kent (Canterbury) - Participating Institution

HND-285001-22
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$47,884 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2023

Indigenous Knowledges: a Digital Residency Exchange and Best Practices Pilot

The development of a reciprocal, consultative model for collaborative digital decolonizing of Indigenous materials between a US tribal college library (Kinyaa’áanii Charlie Benally Library at Diné College) and a UK cultural heritage collecting institution (Wellcome Collection). The UK partner, the University of Kent, is requesting £59,745 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

A collaborative team from Diné College Special Collections and Kinyaa’áanii Charlie Benally Library (Navajo Nation) and working with museum, library and archive professionals from the Wellcome Collection (UK) and supported by scholars from University of Arizona Southwest Center (US), and University of Kent Centre for Indigenous and Settler Colonial Studies, propose to develop a reciprocal, consultative model for collaborative digital decolonizing of indigenous materials. This model pairs a UK cultural heritage collecting institution with a US tribal college library that fulfills plural functions as library, museum, archive, and cultural heritage institution in its community. Kinyaa’áanii Library and Wellcome Collection will exchange three-week residencies on location, followed by digital residencies for the remaining period of the grant, using the open-source content management system Local Contexts Hub.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285044-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of The World Refugees Made: Decolonization and the Foundation of Postwar Italy by Pamela Ballinger

This project will publish the book The World Refugees Made, written by NEH Fellow Pamela Ballinger (NEH grant number FB-54933-10), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285045-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of The Medieval Economy of Salvation: Charity, Commerce, and the Rise of the Hospital by Adam J. Davis

This project will publish the book The Medieval Economy of Salvation, written by NEH Fellow Adam J. Davis (NEH grant number FB-56852-13), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285046-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of Life is Elsewhere: Symbolic Geography in the Russian Provinces, 1800–1917 by Anne Lounsbery

This project will publish the book Life is Elsewhere, written by NEH Fellow Anne Lounsbery (NEH grant number FA-55428-10), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285047-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of Unfelt: The Language of Affect in the British Enlightenment by James Noggle

This project will publish the book Unfelt, written by NEH Fellow James Noggle (NEH grant number FB-57539-14), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285048-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of Gateway Imperialism: Colonial Taiwan and Japanese Expansion in South China and Southeast Asia, 1895-1945 by Seiji Shirane

This project will publish the book Gateway Imperialism, written by NEH Fellow Seiji Shirane (NEH grant number FO-268646-20), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Jane Frances Bunker (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285049-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Open Access Edition of Haunted Empire: Gothic and the Russian Imperial Uncanny by Valeria Sobol

This project will publish the book Haunted Empire, written by NEH Fellow Valeria Sobol (NEH grant number FA-58372-15), in an electronic open access format under the Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Eric Brandt (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

DR-285176-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2021 – 5/31/2022

Open Access edition of The Quebec Connection by Julie-Francoise Tolliver

This project will publish the book The Quebec Connection: A Poetics of Solidarity in Global Francophone Literatures, written by NEH Fellow Julie-Françoise Tolliver (NEH grant number FA-252195-17), in an electronic open access format under a Creative Commons license, making it available for free download and distribution. The author will be paid a royalty of at least $500 upon release of the open access ebook.