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Funded Projects Query Form
489 matches

Division or office: Digital Humanities*
Only grants with white papers
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UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Marissa Katherine Lopez (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Kelley Arlene Kreitz (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)

HAA-277190-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

Pursuing the Potential of Digital Mapping in Latinx Studies

A two-day workshop and support network to build capacity in digital mapping methods for scholars in Latinx Studies.

We request a Level 1 grant for a two-day workshop at UCLA on August 12-13, 2021. Latinx Studies is built on understanding how spatial struggles shape racial, ethnic, and national identity. As Latinx Studies scholars increasingly use digital mapping in their research and teaching, we will bring scholars, GIS experts, and public and academic research librarians together to: 1) provide technical training to help participants build skills and advance their individual projects; and 2) plan a support network to facilitate the creation of shared data repositories, partnerships with libraries, training and mentoring opportunities, and an online hub of best practices and teaching materials. The workshop will draw on UCLA’s extensive resources and expertise in GIS research. In line with the “A More Perfect Union” initiative, this project will advance digital mapping as a method of increasing understanding of the enduring presence of people of Latin American descent in the history of our nation.

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Andrew Kissel (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
John Shull (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Krzysztof Rechowicz (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)

HAA-277270-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$85,161 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

Philosophical Thought Experiments in Virtual Reality

The development and testing of virtual reality-based philosophical thought experiments for both classroom teaching and research.

Philosophers present hypothetical scenarios called “thought experiments” to analyze philosophical concepts. This project modifies, extends, and disseminates ongoing work to develop VR scenarios based on the popular “trolley problem” thought experiment, a hypothetical dilemma involving a choice between five deaths and one death. By presenting thought experiments in VR (instead of written presentations), we can address previous concerns that thought experiments are too abstract to be of much use in theorizing, research, and education, and that they do not accurately reflect widespread philosophical beliefs. The scenarios will be disseminated, along with a pilot study data set, via an online and modifiable repository for VR thought experiments. The project will conclude with a symposium to discuss challenges, opportunities, and recommendations for humanities-based research using VR and to promote the use of and ongoing additions to the repository.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
David Mimno (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Melanie Walsh (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

HAA-277275-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$46,074 (approved)
$39,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

BERT for Humanists: Anticipating the Reception of Contemporary NLP in Digital Humanities

The development of an open-source toolkit and workshop series that will begin to address these fundamental barriers to the adoption of BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) by humanities scholars interested in large-scale text analysis.

We propose to study the potential impact of a new paradigm in natural language processing for humanities research. Contextual embedding methods like BERT have become central to contemporary NLP by offering a high-level numeric representation of individual word tokens in their context. We expect that humanists will start to be increasingly interested in using BERT-like methods, but based on our experience with similar waves in topic modeling and word embeddings there is a lot that we don’t yet know. The applications, tools, protocols, and mental models that humanists will find compelling are almost certainly different from those familiar or expected by NLP researcher. We will bring together researchers with experience at the intersection of NLP and humanities to identify both potential use cases as well as potential obstacles. Using these insights we will develop initial case studies, tools, and training materials.

Allegheny College (Meadville, PA 16335-3902)
Xiaoling Shi (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280982-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Media coverage]

Totals:
$48,356 (approved)
$48,355 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

An Engaging Digital Curriculum for Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture

Convening a three-day meeting bringing together Chinese language scholars, instructors, and digital technologists to design a free online curriculum for teaching Chinese language in a cultural context. 

Our proposed curriculum intends to advance a pedagogical shift in language teaching by taking up opportunities afforded by Web 2.0 to explore ways to improve communicative competence and develop critical cultural awareness. Three characteristics are: creating an immersive learning environment by pulling in rich resources from the online world; engaging learners by utilizing online engagement tools/platforms and social media; developing critical cultural awareness by taking advantage of the immersion and engagement created. It will serve as a model for curriculum design not only for other less commonly taught languages, but also for language and culture teaching as a whole. A Level 1 grant will enable Allegheny College to convene a conference to collect comments and feedback on experiments and innovations made in classrooms and revise them accordingly. The project will culminate with a white paper and a website delineating if, why, and how the digital curriculum will achieve its goals.

Unicode Consortium (Mountain View, CA 94043-3941)
Gabrielle Vail (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-268887-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$99,990 (approved)
$99,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2021

Classic Maya Text Repository: An open-access collaborative platform for research and annotation of encoded hieroglyphic texts

The development of an open-access, online collaborative platform and repository of Maya hieroglyphic texts for use by scholars and descendent communities. This project contributes to the longer-term endeavor to expand the international Unicode Standard repertoire to include the Maya script.

Our Level II project seeks to annotate Classic period (ca. 250-900 CE) Maya hieroglyphic texts from the Northern lowlands, Central Peten, and Western regions and make them accessible for study online. Using an open-access online platform for annotating ancient documents (READ), texts from the Postclassic Maya codices (ca. 1250 – 1519 CE) that were digitally rendered during the project’s previous phase will be published in digital form for public use. Concurrently, select Classic period inscriptions will be encoded and annotated using READ, resulting in a repository of digitally encoded Maya hieroglyphic texts. These texts form an important part of the dataset of Maya literature extending from the second century BCE through the colonial, republican, and more recent periods—an almost unbroken record spanning two millennia. Through these tools, online users have the ability to examine, query, manage, edit, annotate, and render Maya texts in ways not previously imaginable.

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Jessica DeSpain (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Emily J. Rau (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Melissa J. Homestead (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

Participating institutions:
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL) - Applicant/Recipient
Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE) - Participating Institution

HAA-268984-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$45,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2022

Society for the Study of American Women Writers Recovery Hub

A series of planning activities to create a network of scholars (or “hub”) to surface works by women writers through digital methods and also provide support, mentorship, and peer-review services for women in the digital humanities.

The project team is seeking a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to plan a digital recovery hub that will operate as a network of scholars grounded in diverse feminist methods under the umbrella of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW). The hub will provide a much-needed resource for project consultation and technical assistance for scholars engaged in the recovery of the works of American women writers from all periods. The hub's broader goals are to: 1) reinvigorate the value of digital scholarship as a recovery method by extending traditional editing projects with network mapping, spatial analysis, and the distant reading of massive datasets; 2) provide support for projects at a variety of levels; 3) act as a feminist peer reviewing body for in-process work; and 4) build a community of use to help recovery projects reach broader audiences by interfacing with SSAWW’s membership and journal Legacy.

Marshall University Research Corporation (Huntington, WV 25701-2218)
David J. Trowbridge (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269019-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$128,559 (approved)
$128,559 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2021

Accessibility in Digital Humanities: Making Clio Available to All

A collaboration between Marshall University and the American Foundation for the Blind to develop enhanced accessibility features and related user documentation for the Clio project, a platform that allows educators and cultural institutions to design mobile tours for exploring local history and culture.

Our team of humanities scholars and developers will work with the American Foundation for the Blind to make Clio accessible. The team will share lessons learned and hopes to become a model for other public-facing digital humanities projects.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Heather Marie Richards-Rissetto (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Karin Michelle Dalziel (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269061-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021

Revitalizing and Enhancing the Open Source 3D WebGIS of the MayaArch3D Project

Planning for the revitalization of the MayaArch3D project and documentation for using 3D WebGIS data in digital scholarship.

This level I project revitalizes and enhances the 3D WebGIS component of the MayaArch3D Project, which integrates 3D models of cities, terrain, and objects with associated, geo-referenced data for humanities scholarship. First, we will review the existing code of the 3D WebGIS. Second, we will define concrete steps to (1) make the system more customizable and extensible (2) add functionality for dynamic interchange of 3D models (3) develop a friendlier UX (User Experience), and (4) revamp the infrastructure to store and call up 3D models from an open source repository. Broader project outcomes enhance the humanities in several ways: (1) documentation for a customizable open source 3D WebGIS (2) 3D WebGIS for data management and preservation for cultural heritage, (3) 3D WebGIS to foster scholarly collaboration , and (4) contribute to 3D digital data preservation and access by designing infrastructure in collaboration with libraries.

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115-2214)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: January 2020 to September 2020)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Erin Bell (Co Project Director: May 2020 to present)

HAA-271574-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$79,568 (approved)
$79,510 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022

PlacePress: A WordPress Plugin for Publishing Location-based Tours and Stories

The development, testing, and release of PlacePress, a plugin for WordPress, for designing and launching digital public humanities projects. 

We seek a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to develop PlacePress, a WordPress plugin that enables humanities scholars, content experts, or organizations to create and share interpretive location-based tours and stories easily, affordably, and sustainably using the world's most ubiquitous content management system. The project will generate three use cases in collaboration with institutional partners in support of ongoing public humanities initiatives, as well as usability testing with a focus group drawn from identified target users.

East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
Thomas Leslie Herron (Project Director: January 2020 to present)

HAA-271718-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$93,121 (approved)
$86,740 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022

Castle to Classrooms: Developing an Irish Castle in Virtual Reality

The design and testing of teaching modules built in virtual reality for an existing 3-D digital model of Kilcolman Castle, Ireland, home of English poet, Edmund Spencer.

This Level II "Prototype" grant will adapt into Virtual Reality a digital 3-D model of an Irish castle for teaching purposes. Kilcolman Castle, now in ruins, was the adopted home of the early modern English poet and administrator Edmond Spenser (1552-1559). Spencer's career and famous writings, which often focus in controversial ways on his life as a plantation settler in Ireland, make the castle a fascinating subject of study. This grant will focus on Spenser's castle and writings through innovative undergraduate and high school teaching modules in history, architecture, archaeology, Irish studies and English literature. These modules with VR applications will highlight the artistic accomplishments of Spenser as well as the cultural diversity of the castle and its surroundings. Spenser's activity in Ireland is a crucial element in our understanding of the historic impact of colonial imperialism. The project will educate and appeal to both students and the general public alike.

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
Viviana L Grieco (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Praveen Rao (Co Project Director: May 2020 to present)

HAA-271747-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$85,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021

A Knowledge Graph for Managing and Analyzing Spanish American Notary Records

The development of methods to make it easier for scholars to research historical records, with a focus on 17th century notary records from Argentina. 

We propose to develop a software tool that will enable scholars to expeditiously read and analyze seventeenth century Spanish American notary records and quickly find relevant content in these document collections. Since these records were written in a type of script that was intentionally cryptic, it takes years of training in Spanish American paleography to become proficient in reading and analyzing them. Digital collections contain large amounts of information that can be modeled as a knowledge graph by applying deep learning and knowledge management techniques. The development of such a tool will make notarial scripts accessible to a larger community of researchers without requiring extensive paleography training. By modeling the content in the notary records as a knowledge graph, graph queries will facilitate the identification of legal formulae that characterize types of notarized documents and allow researchers to more efficiently mine the information relevant to their projects.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Eleni Hasaki (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Diane Harris Cline (Co Project Director: May 2020 to present)

HAA-271803-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$49,946 (approved)
$43,743 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021

Social Networks of Athenian Potters (SNAP): Networks, Tradition and Innovation in Communities of Artists

The development of methods to study communities of potters in Ancient Greece to better understand the role that individuals played and how artistic ideas were transmitted over space and time.  

With a NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Level I Grant, our team will produce a network-based model for studying communities of potters in ancient Greece. Our project, Social Networks of Athenian Potters (SNAP), employs Social Network Analysis (SNA) to map for the first time in a relational database the ties among potters in Archaic and Classical Athens (600-400 BCE). The social network graphs (sociograms) and their digital platform offer an innovative approach to explore artists’ roles based on their position and how communities of potters are structured in periods of traditional practice versus experimentation. Our goals for the 12-month grant period are to: 1) complete all data collection to populate existing database and data formatting for Social Network Analysis for the Athenian potters; 2) disseminate our preliminary results through a project website, a workshop, and an open-access publication; and 3) plan its digital platform for our relational database.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Lynn S. Dodd (Project Director: January 2020 to May 2022)
Sabina Zonno (Co Project Director: May 2020 to May 2022)

HAA-271827-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$45,069 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 9/30/2021

Using Virtual Reality to Explore 15th Century Illuminated Manuscripts

The creation of a virtual reality experience of a 15th-century illuminated manuscript to allow users to engage with the content of the manuscript and also gain an appreciation for handling rare materials.

In this Level I proposal, we will build a virtual experience of a 15th century illuminated manuscript that is held in USC's Special Collections and place the model in a virtual version of a convent room similar to that in which it was originally used. This unique experience will allow participants to not only explore the manuscript by holding it rather than viewing it in a glass case, but also have the opportunity to learn about the consequences physical use of an object may have for its preservation. Additionally, the virtual version provides an opportunity for the participant to see the details and textures of the manuscript, the parchment, the binding, the ink, the gilding, and the painting at an extraordinary level of detail that cannot be achieved except in the virtual realm.

University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)
Rebecca Salzer (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

HAA-263773-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$49,142 (approved)
$43,933 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Creating National Access to Digital Dance Resources

A three-day workshop for dance scholars, archivists, librarians, and media specialists on approaches to researching and teaching with digitized collections of dance resources.

Film and video technologies have revolutionized dance education and scholarship by serving as a text for what has historically been an oral tradition; allowing preservation and analysis of dance work. While digital video makes recording dance easier, archives of recorded dance have not been made available online for education and research, and dance scholars face significant geographical and financial barriers to access. Our project brings together dance scholars, archivists, and educators for a three-day symposium during which attendees will explore expansion and aggregation of existing online dance resources along with design of a new pilot resource. The symposium’s results will be disseminated and support for its blueprint actively sought through publication of a white paper, presentations at national conferences, and at open sharing events throughout the United States.

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA 30602-1589)
Steven Soper (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Barry Godfrey (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)
Heather Ann Thompson (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

HAA-263774-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$39,219 (approved)
$39,219 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Historical Profiles of American Incarceration

A project to research and assess the state of archival records of American incarceration before 1970, leading to a two-day workshop for historians and data experts to plan for the creation of a digital archive to facilitate new scholarship across numerous humanities disciplines.

The digitization of American prison records now makes it possible to conduct large-scale analysis of incarceration in the United States, from the early nineteenth century to the present. This opportunity could not be timelier: for the past decade, scholars and policymakers have debated the causes and consequences of the phenomenon of “mass incarceration” in the United States. A new digital history of incarceration in the US before the 1970s, by revealing broad geographical and sociological patterns, the impact of historical contingencies, and the human face of individual prisoners’ lives, can make a significant contribution to our understanding of this issue. For this Level I application, we will employ a research assistant to assess existing digital sources on the history of criminal justice in the United States, and then gather for a two-day workshop to plan the creation of a new database and website.

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Karen Desmond (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

HAA-263800-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$46,799 (approved)
$42,479 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Measuring Polyphony: An Online Music Editor for Late Medieval Polyphony

The development of a prototype of an online music editor to help scholars and students analyze medieval music manuscripts. The project would also convene a workshop for medieval studies scholars, musicologists, and technical specialists to evaluate the prototype.

The development of an online music editor will allow a variety of modern readers (students and experts, musicologists, music theorists, those interested in the history of music notation, counterpoint, medieval palaeography and/or manuscript studies) to access and contribute transcriptions of music directly linked to digital images of the medieval manuscripts, and to learn about the original notation. A two-day workshop will bring together the leading experts in music encoding and medieval musicology to evaluate the prototype editor and to devise plans for its further development and rollout. This tool will offer new possibilities for the analysis and interpretation of late medieval music. In a broader humanities context, the project investigates how modeling the meanings of notational signs can lead to new understandings of the interaction between the sign and the signified, and of the relationship between notational style and changes in musical style across time and place.

University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2009)
J.B. Shank (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Benjamin Wiggins (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

HAA-263807-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$95,220 (approved)
$95,220 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Building a Digital Portal for Exploring Bernard and Picart’s Religious Ceremonies and Customs of the World

The development of an online, open-access portal bringing together the multiple editions of The Religious Ceremonies and Customs of All the Peoples of the World, an important Enlightenment volume about world religions and customs.

The project team will build an open-source online portal to facilitate the study of the transformative Enlightenment blockbuster, The Religious Ceremonies and Customs of All the Peoples of the World. Despite the massive influence of its numerous and variable lavishly illustrated editions, its unstable print history has deterred scholarly study of the work, not least because its many variants are strewn all over the globe. Our portal will allow digitized copies of diverse editions from disparate repositories to be accessed in a single virtual space, permitting searching and comparative inter-textual study of word and image across multiple versions and in conjunction with other books from the era. It will also serve as a model for other comparative projects based on curated aggregations of texts, images, and collections in a way that avoids copyright problems and prohibitive costs.

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA 30602-1589)
Scott Nesbit (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Alisea Williams McLeod (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA) - Applicant/Recipient
Rust College (Holly Springs, MS) - Participating Institution

HAA-263818-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$39,021 (approved)
$28,376 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

Freedom's Movement: Mapping African American Space in War and Reconstruction

The planning for future integration of three independent digital projects focused on African Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction through convening a meeting of scholars, genealogists, and technical experts to create a blueprint for next stages of collaboration.

“Freedom’s Movements” brings together three extant projects--(1) Visualizing Emancipation, (2) African American Civil War Soldiers, and (3) Last Road to Freedom. Project Directors for this grant began collaborations in 2015, each project director providing feedback and their expertise in extending the work of the other projects, driven by the complementary nature of their work. By 2017, it became clear that a partnership between these projects could be beneficial. This Level I proposal is the first fruit of that more robust partnership.

Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Samantha Blickhan (Project Director: June 2018 to May 2022)
Laura Trouille (Co Project Director: November 2018 to May 2022)

HAA-263825-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$178,961 (approved)
$178,103 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Advancing Access to Transcribed Text in Citizen Humanities

Extending Zooniverse.org’s online platform to allow individual crowdsourcing project teams to review, compare, and edit transcriptions, and to work directly with raw text data generated from community transcription projects.

Advancing Access to Transcribed Text in Citizen Humanities will build off of existing methods used by Zooniverse.org for online crowdsourced transcription of handwritten documents. The Zooniverse team has noted that humanities researchers frequently require additional support when working with the results of text-transcription crowdsourcing projects, particularly for review and analysis of data. In this proposal, we request a Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant, which will facilitate the creation of an online viewer and editor which will allow researchers to work with the raw and aggregated text data from Zooniverse transcription projects (including the ability to review and edit transcriptions) before uploading them into their Content Management Systems to be presented to the public.

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA 30314-3776)
Aaron Michael Carter-Enyi (Project Director: June 2018 to October 2022)

HAA-263831-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$129,873 (approved)
$129,856 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Algorithmic Thinking, Analysis and Visualization in Music (ATAVizM)

The creation of an improved, open source method for visualizing patterns and themes in music and the development of course modules for undergraduate students at HBCUs.

Innovations in music visualization render new possibilities for understanding music. One example is Wattenberg’s Shape of Song, a defunct web app. The arc diagram visualization technique for Shape of Song is brilliant, but ultimately the project did not live up to its potential because of a poor understanding of how composers develop musical themes, a central object of inquiry for music theorists. Algorithmic Thinking, Analysis and Visualization in Music (ATAVizM), identifies and implements major improvements over Shape of Song: (1) pattern recognition based on heuristics from music theory, (2) theme identification by users integrated into the application, and (3) visualization enhancements that make arc diagrams utilitarian for research and teaching. The team will also design and implement a course module at Emory, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, Spelman College and the University of Georgia.

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Mary Furlong Minkoff (Project Director: June 2018 to February 2022)
Elizabeth Ladner (Co Project Director: November 2018 to February 2022)

HAA-263835-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$39,968 (approved)
$37,555 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

Montpelier Digital Collections Project

The planning of an online collections platform that will aggregate four distinct collections held by James Madison’s Montpelier, the historic house and surrounding area administered by The Montpelier Foundation. The project team will convene a three-day workshop of leading digital cultural heritage professionals, scholars in American history and culture, and descendants of Montpelier’s enslaved families.

This project will bring together leading humanities scholars, museum professionals, digital heritage experts, and members of the public in a 2 ½-day workshop to design an online, publicly accessible digital library that integrates four collections: architecture/historic preservation, archaeology, archives, and decorative arts. The digital library will be created for the collections at James Madison’s Montpelier in partnership with Michigan State University’s MATRIX: The Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences, and designed to be easily adapted by other institutions. The workshop will consist of 1½ days of presentations by leaders in the digital humanities, followed by a day of of breakout sessions and group discussions. The workshop will result in a white paper synthesizing the findings and recommendations of participants that will be shared on multiple websites and by social media.

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
David Smith (Project Director: June 2018 to October 2022)

HAA-263837-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,224 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Improving Optical Character Recognition and Tracking Reader Annotations in Printed Books by Collating and Transcribing Multiple Exemplars

Further research in enhanced optical character recognition techniques for historical print books and automatic discoverability of handwritten marginalia drawing upon the collections of the Internet Archive.

Most past digitization projects have focused on transcribing documents individually. With the availability of library-scale digital collections, we propose a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant (Level II) to develop computational image and language models to discover multiple copies and editions of similar texts and to correct each text using these comparable witnesses. We provide evidence that this collational transcription system can significantly improve optical character recognition on historical books. We also propose to use these collated editions to discover annotated passages in large digitized book collections. This approach will therefore not only mitigate the errors that reader annotations introduce into the OCR process but will also produce the first automatically generated database of handwritten annotations, Ichneumon. Methods and software developed by this project will thus benefit future research on automatic collation, book history, and historical reading practices.

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
John McLeod (Project Director: September 2018 to present)

HZ-265135-19
Humanities Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$130,472 (approved)
$95,633 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Recovering an Important Body of Work in German Studies: Reissuing the UNC Studies in Germanic Languages & Literatures Series

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 123 books in German Studies from the UNC Studies in Germanic Languages and Literatures series.

In 1953, UNC Press and the UNC Department of Germanic & Slavic Languages and Literatures started the UNC Studies in Germanic Languages and Literatures series. Over the next fifty years, the series published 127 monographs, anthologies, and critical editions. The series strove for breadth in its coverage of scholarship in the Germanic languages, covering an array of topics including medieval and modern literature, theater, linguistics, philology, onomastics, and the history of ideas. Despite the impact the books made in the field, the series was discontinued in 2004. With this project, these two partners, joined by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, will reissue the series in print and open access digital editions, making these books discoverable and accessible to a new generation of German studies scholars and students.

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
James John Connolly (Project Director: January 2019 to June 2022)

HAA-266457-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$49,900 (approved)
$29,941 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Library Circulation Histories Workshop

A workshop on Library Circulation Histories to be hosted by Ball State University's Center for Middletown Studies. The workshop will bring together representatives from eleven library and reading history digital projects along with additional scholars and digital humanities developers to investigate making historical library circulation data more accessible for humanities research.

Ball State University's (BSU) Center for Middletown Studies, in conjunction with BSU's Digital Scholarship Lab, seeks a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to support the Library Circulation Histories Workshop, to be held March 6-7, 2020. The project period will run from September 1, 2019 to August 31, 2020. The aim of the Workshop is to make historical library circulation data more accessible and more analytically powerful. The Workshop assembles scholars and developers representing eleven (or more) library and reading history projects to share insights and develop new strategies or increasing the value for these already powerful research tools. Topics addressed will include the use of computational text analysis, network analysis, ethical issues, and data aggregation. The Workshop will result in published articles in a special issue/section of one or more journals, an online video recording of the conference, and a white paper on best practices.

North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
David R. Ambaras (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Kate Linette McDonald (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)

HAA-266465-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$99,995 (approved)
$99,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Using Scalar to Deep-Map Modern East Asian History

The further development of the Bodies and Structures series on East Asian history and geospatial studies. As part of the project, the Scalar publishing platform would be improved to allow for the incorporation of additional spatial visualizations.

Cartographic maps visualize only a small part of the historical relationships and experiences that constitute spatial history. Yet they remain the mainstay of digital spatial history projects. Bodies and Structures captures the multivocality of spatial history. Built in the open-source platform Scalar, the site enables scholars and students to analyze the historical, multivocal nature of space and place in East Asia and beyond. We are applying for a Level II grant for September 2019-August 2021 to greatly enhance the site’s utility for teaching and research in modern East Asian history and the spatial humanities. During this period, we will enhance Scalar’s capacity for analytical visualizations and user-directed engagement; add twelve modules to expand the project’s geo-historical scope and provide new disciplinary perspectives; and use the new Scalar tools to design new maps and visualizations that locate the modules in the site’s new spatial historical environment.

University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)
Christopher Michael Church (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Katherine Hepworth (Co Project Director: April 2019 to present)

HAA-266490-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$49,581 (approved)
$49,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020

Ethical Visualization in the Age of Big Data: Contemporary Cultural Implications of Pre- Twentieth-Century French Texts

A two-day workshop and follow up activities on approaches to developing ethical data visualization techniques and interactive cartographic interfaces with a particular focus on text mining colonial-era French newspapers.

This project advances work toward generating ethical visualizations of historical corpora comprising the European cultural imagination prior to the twentieth century without reproducing ethnocentrism. Visually representing the historical place of misrepresented peoples and locales throughout the world requires interdisciplinary collaboration focused equally on critical theory, data visualization, ethics, machine learning, and text analysis. We seek $49,851 of level-1 funding for a workshop that unites top experts in the fields of information design, computational linguistics, and history to address the conceptual and logistical challenges in realizing this goal. This project will address two key issues: 1) how to create ethical data visualizations--and their underlying forms of training and analysis--that grapple with inherent source biases; and 2) how to computationally process non-modern, non-English languages for humanities research in a critically engaged way.

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Robert Morrissey (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

HAA-266518-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$99,497 (approved)
$99,497 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Intertextual Bridges: Search and Navigation across Heterogeneous Collections

The development of a prototype platform that will allow scholars to combine distant and close reading methods to discover relationships between texts and identify texts in collections for further study.

We seek Level II funding for a pilot project to develop a model that will allow scholars to bridge the gap between distant and close reading when conducting research on large, heterogeneous digital text collections. We propose to create a language agnostic environment—called the Intertextual Hub—in which the conceptual relationships among texts discovered by text-mining algorithms can fruitfully guide close reading in dialectical interaction with distant reading. Fundamentally, we are contending that the core of scholarly reading in the digital age should be the discovery and navigation of intertextual relationships. The Intertextual Hub will be a powerful hermeneutical device allowing users to navigate between individual texts and larger corpora that are related through shared themes, ideas, and passages. Focusing on the French Revolutionary period, we will test this model by applying it to the extensive and diverse 18th-century French collections of UChicago’s ARTFL Project.

Shift Design, Inc. (New Orleans, LA 70117-6726)
Hali Elizabeth Dardar (Project Director: January 2019 to February 2020)
Alexandra Dolan-Mescal (Project Director: February 2020 to present)

HAA-266562-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$49,824 (approved)
$49,824 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020

Redesigning Historypin for Open-Source Digital Humanities

The planning for a revitalization of the community-sourced history mapping platform Historypin.org and to migrate its underlying code to an open-source framework.

Shift Design, Inc requests $49,824 to support a 12-month plan for the revitalization of their existing Historypin.org web platform. Historypin.org is a free, user-friendly, and accessible platform for crowdsourcing history open to scholars, community groups, digital humanities classrooms, and the general public. The site has over 98,000 users around the world, over 4,000 of which are cultural heritage organizations. Although widely used, the Historypin platform is in need of revitalization. The project objectives are to 1) better understand the digital humanities scholars’ current use of Historypin, 2) document the general needs of a digital humanities scholar from a user-interaction (UX)/ user-interface (UI) perspective, 3) develop a revised and simplified design for the Historypin website, and 4) draft a plan for a transition to an open-source codebase. Completing this project would position Historypin to begin developing a platform tailored to assist digital humanities research.

Stone Soup Productions, Inc. (Washington, DC 20036-2504)
Andrea R. Kalin (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

HAA-266565-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2022

Project Maestro

The further development of a platform for middle and high school humanities teachers to incorporate content-based games into their classrooms.

Project Maestro empowers educators and students with limited computer access to make digital humanities games. Created from The Search for Harmony, a web game about the rich, forgotten historical legacy of classical musicians of African descent, this WordPress-based plugin transforms art and text on paper into digital assets for a prebuilt minigame, enabling new versions to be developed without requiring programming skill. This grant’s primary tasks are to build a set of minigames, design activity guides for instructors, and partner with education groups to refine the platform through workshops. The end product will be a website where instructors can publish work as playable games. The producers of this project seek $100,000 for platform development, adviser consultation, game design and documentation. This tool will allow educators and others in the humanities to use digital games as a means of creating engaging, informative experiences for students.

Rhizome Communications, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-1218)
Michael J. Connor (Project Director: January 2019 to March 2021)

HAA-266568-19
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$45,722 (approved)
$45,722 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 5/31/2020

Early Online Communities in Context

The development of a context-rich, interactive reconstruction of “The Thing,” a significant early online community, and support scholarship based on this reconstruction.

The Thing was a Bulletin Board System initiated in New York by Wolfgang Staehle in 1991, a short time before the rise of the public web. As a testing ground for forms of experimental writing, and one of the earliest online communities to host in-depth discussion of contemporary art, the platform’s content has unique value for humanities scholars. This content and the community that formed around it is best understood in relation to its BBS infrastructure—slow, mostly local connections; a growing accumulation of posts; the absence of surveillance and metrics. This project involves an effort to reconstruct a legible archive of The Thing from a partial copy created by one of its users, to make this available on the web in emulation, and to convene scholars for a discussion of The Thing as an exemplar of early posting practices.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rachael Samberg (Project Director: March 2019 to January 2022)

HT-267259-19
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$165,034 (approved)
$110,106 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 8/31/2021

Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining

A four-day summer workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, and follow-up activities for thirty-two participants on the ethical and legal issues around data mining of large scale textual collections for humanities research.

Digital humanities (DH) scholars, and professionals who support them, often perceive a barrier to utilizing text data mining (TDM) techniques: the law. Uncertainty about the breadth of TDM rights can impede the scope of DH research questions, or unnecessarily expose scholars to risk. Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM), hosted by UC Berkeley from June 23-26, 2020, will equip DH TDM researchers, librarians, and professionals with foundational skills to: 1) confidently navigate law, policy, ethics, and risk within DH TDM projects; 2) integrate workflows for DH TDM research and professional support; 3) practice sharing these new tools through authentic consultation exercises; 4) prototype plans for broadly disseminating their knowledge; and 5) develop communities of practice to promote cross-institutional outreach about the DH TDM legal landscape. Instructional materials will be shared publicly as a CC0 (Creative Commons Zero waiver) open educational resource.

University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Anastasia Salter (Project Director: March 2019 to May 2021)

HT-267268-19
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$129,102 (approved)
$114,377 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020

Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research

A five-day institute for twenty-five participants organized by and hosted at the University of Central Florida for using digital methods to research digital culture.

There has been growing awareness of the need for humanist inquiry into the internet platforms and communities driving contemporary culture. From fan communities and discourse about works of literature to meme-makers skewering cultural objects, online spaces enable readership, creation, circulation, and transformation of humanist texts—and the active making and remaking of public history. However, much internet research is driven by computational approaches without also being rigorously grounded in theories of culture and textual production. Navigating this space can be particularly daunting to early-career humanities scholars. This is where we seek to intervene. Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research will foster a transdisciplinary humanities institute to provide resources, training, and a community of collaborators to engage both computational network and data analysis tools and the ethics and best practices of using the web as a site of research.

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Abigail Mullen (Project Director: March 2019 to October 2022)

HT-267282-19
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$126,947 (approved)
$73,807 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021

Digital Methods for Military History: An Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

A two-week long institute that will teach participants how to create datasets, visualize data, and create maps, with the overarching goal of creating a cohort of military historians who are able to use digital tools and methods to examine issues at the intersection of war and society.

As historians have begun to accept and adopt digital methods for historical analysis, the field of military history has been slow to follow suit. For a field that is rich with data and unconventional sources for analysis, this lack of adoption is somewhat surprising. Both structural barriers and lack of training contribute to the relative paucity of compelling digital projects that focus on military history. To address these barriers and provide hands-on training in digital methods of particular interest to the military history community, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University requests funding for Digital Methods for Military History, an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities.

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Jonathan D. Amith (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

HAA-258602-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$74,875 (approved)
$74,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020

Documenting the Ethnobiology of Mexico and Central America: A Digital Portal for Collaborative Research

The further development of a database and web portal that would aggregate indigenous linguistic information relevant to Mesoamerican flora and fauna.

This project will develop a web portal, Documenting the Ethnobiology of Mexico and Central America, designed to forge an innovative web-based environment for multidisciplinary and multiethnic collaboration among anthropologists and linguists studying traditional ecological knowledge; biologists interested in collections mostly from poorly explored areas; and Indigenous communities and scholars who want to document and preserve traditional knowledge of local flora and fauna. This project will expand Symbiota, a widely used open source content management system for curating specimen- and observation-based biodiversity data, for use by humanities scholars and professionals by developing standards for tagging ethnobiological data, data that crosses thresholds separating the humanities, social science and natural science. By making available research on native nomenclature, classification, and use of flora and fauna, it will disseminate material key to understanding the cultural history of Indigenous Mexican populations.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Bryan E. Wagner (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

HAA-258706-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020

Applying Named Entity Recognition to Explore Louisiana Slave Conspiracies

Frameworks for linking and analyzing documents dealing with slave conspiracies (defined as planned or actual insurrections against slave owners) to help resolve questions and uncertainties in historical accounts.

We are a multidisciplinary research project dedicated to preserving, digitizing, transcribing, translating, publishing, and analyzing manuscripts from three Louisiana slave conspiracies. We are presenting these manuscripts, with original transcription and translation, alongside interactive, data-driven maps in an effort to address essential but still unresolved questions about the organization of social relations and the circulation of ideas in these conspiracies.

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Kathryn Starkey (Project Director: June 2017 to October 2022)

HAA-258712-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$74,393 (approved)
$74,393 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 8/31/2020

The Global Medieval Sourcebook

The further development of the Global Medieval Sourcebook, an open-source resource for transcriptions, translations, and contextual information about digitized medieval texts from Europe, North Africa, and Asia. This project adds new content, expands the available languages, integrates TEI markup, and develops new pedagogical features.

The Global Medieval Sourcebook, a teaching and research resource, will present transcriptions of original medieval texts and their translations in an accessible, user-friendly, downloadable, open-source format. It will include information about each text, including a scholarly and user-friendly commentary on the text and translation. Links to online manuscripts and other relevant materials will enable scholars to use the site as a research portal and will provide essential context to students and teachers. Texts will be searchable by genre, author, date, language, keywords, and themes. Additionally, with teachers and students in mind, we will create and upload audio files of specialists reading the texts in their original language. Currently we are able to cover the following languages: Middle High German, Old French, Old and Middle English, and Medieval Chinese, Arabic, and Persian. In the next two years, we will expand to include medieval Spanish and Italian, with Slavic languages anticipated for addition in the next phase.

Utah State University (Logan, UT 84322-1400)
Mattie Burkert (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)
Katie Dana (Co Project Director: March 2018 to May 2019)

HAA-258717-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$74,970 (approved)
$64,654 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

The London Stage Database

The recovery and revitalization of a unique and important database, supported by NEH and other funders in the 1970s, containing information on theater and popular culture in London in the long eighteenth century (1660-1800).

Obsolescence is a serious issue facing the digital humanities today. Projects can take years to complete, by which time the data and software are out of step with current platforms and file formats. We propose to recover an NEH-funded humanities computing project completed in the 1970s: the London Stage Information Bank. In addition to revitalizing and making available a database of great interest to scholars of eighteenth-century British culture, this project will address three broader goals: (1) model best practices for recovering obsolete digital projects; (2) make visible the Information Bank’s underlying assumptions about the nature of the data itself, fostering awareness of the theoretical underpinnings of humanities databases used today that were begun in the early decades of humanities computing; and (3) create a platform that can interface with other digitization and data collection projects now underway, enabling the future growth of a network of related databases and tools.

Baylor University (Waco, TX 76798-7284)
Elise King (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2021)
King-Ip (David) Lin (Co Project Director: August 2017 to June 2021)

HAA-258763-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$72,390 (approved)
$59,457 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 1/31/2020

Digital Floor Plan Database: A New Method for Analyzing Architecture

The continued development of a prototype of an analytical tool and database to allow humanities scholars and students to comparatively study architectural floor plans. The test case would be a collection of floor plans by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright from the Alexander Architectural Archives at the University of Texas, Austin.

Currently, those who design and study the built environment are hindered by an inability to examine large datasets of architectural drawings. Despite advancements in image recognition, no integrated system is capable of storing, reading, and analyzing floor plans. To solve this problem, this project is developing the Building Database & Analytics System (BuDAS) to partially automate the process of floor plan analysis. This project is seeking funding to expand the prototype into an integrated open source system with image recognition software for automatic floor plan detection, a database for the storage and management of data, and advanced query and graphing tools. BuDAS will allow users to compare thousands of plans to discover common design elements, examine spatial relationships over time, and mine for patterns across datasets. These findings will allow for a deeper understanding of the trends and patterns of space usage and the relationship between buildings and human experience.

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Walter J. Scheirer (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Neil Coffee (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Participating institutions:
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN) - Applicant/Recipient
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY) - Participating Institution

HAA-258767-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$279,609 (approved)
$279,609 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 7/31/2020

Tesserae Intertext Service: Intertextual Search Access to Digital Collections in the Humanities

The further development of the Tesserae search engine to be used with additional online collections to enhance research into intertextuality.

From its inception in 2008, with support of an NEH ODH Start-Up Grant in 2012-2013, the Tesserae Project has developed a uniquely successful approach to tracing literary, linguistic, and intellectual history in ancient Greek and Roman literature, as well as a selection of English texts. The Tesserae web tool (http://tesserae.caset.buffalo.edu/) allows users to automatically find instances where one author quotes or alludes to another, or employs similar concepts. This project will support the creation of the Tesserae Intertext Service (TIS). TIS will make the Tesserae search capability available as a new and sophisticated way of accessing the many existing humanities texts that have been digitized, showing all the similarities between the works selected by a user. TIS opens the door for scholars, students, and the general public to answer fundamental questions about the human condition that require traversing languages, genres, and histories in expansive digital collections.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
John O'Brien (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2021)
Tonya Howe (Co Project Director: August 2017 to June 2021)
Christine Ruotolo (Co Project Director: November 2017 to June 2021)

HAA-258768-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$72,542 (approved)
$66,780 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019

Literature in Context: An Open Anthology

Development of a working prototype for an open-access, curated, and classroom-sourced digital anthology of British and American literature in English (1650-1800).

Literature in Context is a TEI-encoded digital anthology of British and American literature in English (1650-1800) designed for use by students, teachers, and the general public. The project will innovate by taking full advantage of the affordances of digitization to create an Open Educational Resource that incorporates annotation, interactivity, digitized page images of original editions, and other contextual media materials. It also develops templates, assignments, and resources to help instructors at the college level engage students in the task of editing and annotating literary texts that can be added to the collection. Literature in Context provides a mechanism for the thoughtful, collaborative dissemination of our shared humanistic heritage. By including students in the production of the anthology, the project will foreground how the public construction of knowledge is essential to understanding the modern world.

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Patrick Murray-John (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2021)

HAA-258779-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$39,076 (approved)
$34,072 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018

Omeka S ORCID Integration

The development of modules for the Omeka-S publishing platform to allow integration with the ORCID system of persistent researcher identifiers. The project would increase the number of humanities scholars in the United States using this system for reliably identifying humanities research publications.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media proposes an integration between Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and Omeka S, a widely-used platform for publishing humanities content online. Omeka S puts special emphasis on the needs of small- to medium-sized institutions and integration with other systems and Linked Open Data (LOD). ORCID provides a global, standardized mechanism for reliably identifying scholars and researchers and for providing metadata about them via unique identifiers. ORCID data, however, is currently overwhelmingly tilted toward researchers in the sciences. This integration will encourage humanists to register an identifier with ORCID, fostering new connections between humanists' research. Thus, Omeka S would both augment ORCID's goal of "enabl[ing] transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions, and affiliations" within the humanities, and it would expand the utility of Omeka S for users and data aggregators. 

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Neil Kanwar Harish Verma (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2021)
Marit MacArthur (Co Project Director: August 2017 to June 2021)

HAA-258799-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Tools for Listening to Texts-in-Performance

The development of tools to allow humanistic researchers to analyze recorded literary and cultural materials ranging from poems, radio plays, and books to political speeches and sermons.

Audio archives provide tremendous resources for studying texts-in-performance, performance styles, and media history and formats. Such research requires tools that work well on low-quality, noisy audio common in humanities research, e.g., poetry readings, radio plays, and talking books, the datasets for this project. The proposed project will develop, provide access to, and support humanistic research using two state-of-the-art, open-source, user-friendly tools, Gentle and Drift. Drawing on advanced speech recognition and signal processing algorithms, Gentle and Drift visualize and quantify prosodic, expressive features of speech, including pitch range, intonation patterns, intensity, and rhythm. The project will also train a network of scholars in using these tools, and solicit and apply their feedback to develop new features to fit their needs. In so doing, the project will provide practical tools, broaden the community of users and develop new digital humanities research on sound.

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus (San Juan, PR 00931)
Nadjah Rios-Villarini (Project Director: June 2017 to February 2021)
Mirerza Gonzalez (Co Project Director: August 2017 to February 2021)

HAA-258807-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020

Caribbean Diaspora: Panorama of Carnival Practices

Early planning for a project to explore migration and the Caribbean diaspora through the lens of cultural practices related to Carnival. Coordinated through a series of meetings and drawing on multiple archival collections, the project will produce a website for public audiences and a white paper.

This project aims to initiate new approaches to inquiries on migration at the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras (UPR-RP) that can be digitally shared with a broader audience, particularly those of the Caribbean and its diasporas. Project activities and outcomes will be: (1) to hold a series of discussion-based meetings between external digital humanities specialists and local librarian and Caribbean scholars to design an interactive, general audience website on Caribbean mobility as evidenced in Carnival; (2) to generate a preliminary webpage that includes curated content using existing digital audiovisual materials and artifacts related to Caribbean Carnivals in the UPR archives, the Puerto Rico Foundation for the Humanities, the original Project Diaspora website, University of Florida’s Digital Library of the Caribbean, and other sources; and (3) to produce a final white paper documenting the development process with implications so that digital humanities scholars can benefit.

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Jason Colman (Project Director: September 2017 to August 2019)
Christopher Dreyer (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Christopher Dreyer (Co Project Director: March 2018 to August 2019)
Terri Geitgey (Co Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Bryan Birchmeier (Co Project Director: March 2018 to present)

HZ-259485-18
Humanities Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$199,042 (approved)
$199,042 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 6/30/2020

Michigan Asian Studies Open Access Books Collection

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 100 classic humanities texts from the University of Michigan in the areas of Japanese, Chinese, South Asian, and South East Asian Studies.

University of Michigan Press (UMP) will collaborate with the Asia Library and Centers for Japanese, Chinese, South Asian and Southeast Asian Studies to create freely available ebook versions of significant books about Asia published at U-M over the last 50 years. An advisory group of scholars, librarians, and publishers will select 100 titles from the Centers’ back lists that are out-of-print or hard-to-find and make them available in multiple ebook formats and POD. These free-to-read, high quality works about the history and culture of Asian countries will be actively marketed to promote public understanding of the region at a time when this is especially important. The project will also advance campus collaboration and catalyze a reinvigorated Asian studies front list publishing program. Based on usage tracking and advisory group input select titles will be further enhanced through creation of new editions and multimedia enrichment on the next-gen Fulcrum publishing platform.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: September 2017 to present)

HZ-259514-18
Humanities Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$92,673 (approved)
$92,673 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2019

Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University III

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 25 classic humanities texts from Cornell University Press in the areas of Classics, Medieval Studies, and Science Education.

Cornell University Press seeks $92,673 in funding for 1-year to make 25 more works of outstanding scholarship in foundational disciplines openly accessible to the world. The Press will use the funding to 1) continue its methodology for selecting titles by working with library selectors and scholars to incorporate out-of-print titles in Classics, Medieval Studies, and Science Education; 2) engage faculty and scholars through a global network of libraries to encourage course use; 3) focus resources on the rights clearance process for science education titles published in the early 1900s; and 4) drive the usage of NEH Humanities Open Book titles across multiple platforms to explore trends in data suggesting course use. Enlistment of global library consortia to market titles and making EPUB versions available on Amazon has accelerated the uptake of NEH OA program titles. A new grant will enable the Press to expand upon these outstanding outcomes and conduct more analyses on title usage.

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Gregory M. Britton (Project Director: September 2017 to October 2022)

HZ-259515-18
Humanities Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$210,000 (approved)
$210,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2020

Humanities Open Book Program

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 200 classic humanities texts from Johns Hopkins University Press in the areas of American history, European history, literary criticism, and philosophy.  

The Johns Hopkins University Press, in collaboration with Project MUSE and the Johns Hopkins Sheridan libraries, seeks $200,000 in funding support for an eighteen-month effort to make up to two hundred outstanding works of Humanities scholarship accessible to the world. As a leading scholarly publisher with substantial intellectual property assets and digital distribution capabilities, we are well positioned to solve key problems in contemporary scholarly communications. We will use the funding to select important out-of-print Hopkins books, secure new licenses for them, republish, market, and distribute them in both Open Access and conventional print and ebook formats. Further, what we learn from this project will inform the design and business model for a new strategic publishing program, Hopkins Open Publishing.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Samuel Scott Graham (Project Director: January 2018 to June 2021)

HAA-261070-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$80,649 (approved)
$78,055 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/29/2020

Transparency to Visibility (T2V): Network Visualization in Humanities Research

The development of a set of tools to automatically extract and visualize relationships in large textual corpora, with a focus on making “hidden” relationships more visible.

Humanities researchers have long studied how power and influence circulate through cultural systems. Advances in network visualization tools support this work, allowing scholars to create graphical representations of complex systems. However, extracting and preparing relational data for visualization can present significant technological challenges when working with the kinds of textual artifacts commonly studied by humanists. This project will develop and test an innovative approach for efficiently curating and visualizing relationships in ways that align with humanities research. Using sample texts from medical research, a digital and medical humanities team will develop, test, and enhance a new toolkit for automatically extracting and visualizing relationships in large textual corpora. The project team will create both a graphical user interface for the toolkit and an open-source code repository to support use by digital humanities scholars.

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Kelly Schrum (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Jessica Otis (Co Project Director: October 2018 to present)

HAA-261101-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

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Totals (outright + matching):
$375,000 (approved)
$375,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021

World History Commons

Digital revitalization and content upgrades for World History Matters, a free-to-use educational web resource for teaching world history.

World History Commons, a Level III grant, will provide an essential digital resource for teaching and research in world and global history, reviving and expanding World History Matters, the award-winning, NEH-funded collection of world history websites now almost twenty years old. Using robust, modular, and extendable open-source software, this Open Educational Resource (OER) will preserve and enhance widely-used resources while introducing new humanities scholarship and pedagogy. World History Commons represents a ground-breaking collaboration between the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, the World History Association, and Monash University (Australia) which runs one of the largest world history programs in the southern hemisphere. World History Commons will provide a free, centralized, digital, world history platform with high quality, peer-reviewed resources for high school and higher education students, teachers, and scholars.

California State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Janet Berry Hess (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

HAA-261214-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

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Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/28/2021

Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories

A prototype digital map of three indigenous American nations that will document their geographic ranges, languages, architectural styles, and cultural practices both before and after contact with European settlers.

This Level I project will create the prototype of a digital map of pre- and post-contact American Indian tribal and national regions, cultural histories, and tribally submitted and approved data that is non-archaeological in nature. The prototype, upon completion, will consist of a national map with general information and dynamic details related to three indigenous nations: the Osage, Modoc, and the consolidated Pomo/Miwok. This map will be available to scholars and the public, and envisions future collaboration with, and a centralized reference site for, existing indigenous maps and digital sites. We intend in this project to connect the study of humanities (specifically, indigenous histories and cultures) to conditions of social and cultural life by enabling the public, around the world, to access current and historical maps, cultural practices, and other data related to the life of indigenous peoples.

Miami University (Oxford, OH 45056-1846)
Daryl W. Baldwin (Project Director: January 2018 to June 2022)
Kara Strass (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Gabriela Perez Baez (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

HAA-261218-18
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$311,641 (approved)
$311,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2022

Breath of Life 2.0: Indigenous Language Revitalization through Enhancement of the Miami-Illinois Digital Archive

The expansion and improvement of an existing digital archive for indigenous languages, the development of software to identify and analyze archival materials, and two training workshops for tribal representatives and scholars engaged in language revitalization efforts.

The Miami-Illinois Digital Archive (MIDA) is critical to the educational development of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma’s language revitalization efforts: it is the only software for the organization, storage, retrieval and analysis of digital surrogates of archival language documentation. The proposed Breath of Life 2.0: Creating a ‘Second Breath’ for Indigenous Language Revitalization (BoL 2.0) project will enhance the proven functionality of MIDA by providing a stable and secure data platform to share this powerful tool with Native American communities engaged in archivally-based research and analysis for language revitalization. The resulting Indigenous Languages Digital Archive will be disseminated in two one-week training workshops for alumni from the National Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages who seek to engage in the type of advanced archivally-based research that has enabled languages such as Miami-Illinois to be spoken again after decades of silence.