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Division or office: Digital Humanities*
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HAA-258779-18

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Patrick Murray-John (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Omeka S ORCID Integration

The development of modules for the Omeka-S publishing platform to allow integration with the ORCID system of persistent researcher identifiers. The project would increase the number of humanities scholars in the United States using this system for reliably identifying humanities research publications.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media proposes an integration between Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and Omeka S, a widely-used platform for publishing humanities content online. Omeka S puts special emphasis on the needs of small- to medium-sized institutions and integration with other systems and Linked Open Data (LOD). ORCID provides a global, standardized mechanism for reliably identifying scholars and researchers and for providing metadata about them via unique identifiers. ORCID data, however, is currently overwhelmingly tilted toward researchers in the sciences. This integration will encourage humanists to register an identifier with ORCID, fostering new connections between humanists' research. Thus, Omeka S would both augment ORCID's goal of "enabl[ing] transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions, and affiliations" within the humanities, and it would expand the utility of Omeka S for users and data aggregators. 

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,076 (approved)
$39,076 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


HZ-254284-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: September 2016 to present)

Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University II

Digitization and creation of freely accessible ebooks for 57 titles published by Cornell University Press, including titles in anthropology, classics, political science, and literary theory.

Cornell University Press seeks $99,553 for 1 year to make 57 outstanding works of scholarship in foundational disciplines openly accessible. The Press will use the funding to (1) continue an established methodology for selecting titles by working with library selectors and scholars to include out-of-print titles in Anthropology, Classics, and Political Science; (2) extend and enhance our existing methodology by including titles in Literary Theory that will be used in courses; (3) accelerate the digitization, delivery, and rights clearance for out-of-print titles and the dissemination of OA monographs in EPUB3.0.1; and (4) promote the titles across multiple platforms (including Cornell Open, JSTOR, Project MUSE, HathiTrust and OAPEN) and assess the impact on a global scale via user surveys from librarians at 1,700 institutions of higher learning in the U.S. and at the member institutions of 180 global consortia.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Literary Criticism; Political Theory

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,553 (approved)
$99,553 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


HZ-254314-17

Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
Frederic Nachbaur (Project Director: September 2016 to present)

The Humanities Open Book Program of Fordham University Press

Digitization and production of 21 freely accessible ebooks initially published by Fordham University Press, with an emphasis on American philosophy.

Fordham University Press (the Press) seeks support to make twenty-one significant books on American philosophy more accessibly available through Open Access models, via institutional digital platforms, and in print formats by way of manufacturing on-demand technology. The Press has published more than 3,000 scholarly books since its founding in 1907 and has long been recognized as a leading American publisher of philosophy scholarship. As such, we seek funding from the Humanities Open Book Program to revitalize and promote a selection of “lost” titles from our American Philosophy series. The twenty-one titles proposed for digitization represent those studies that have stood the test of time but that were released before digital publishing technology had fully matured. With the addition of these twenty-one, the Press’s complete catalog in American Philosophy will be available in high-quality, digital-native publications for the use of scholars into the foreseeable future.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$81,381 (approved)
$81,381 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


HT-251001-16

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Make your edition: models and methods for digital textual scholarship

A three-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for 25 participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The digital scholarly edition is more than a reading text with links and annotations. The digital scholarly edition is an integrated platform for performing research, and digital textual scholarship advances as this platform comes to support new types of inquiry The Institute will train 25 participants who already know how to mark up their texts (in TEI XML or similarly) to participate directly in the technological conceptualization and implementation of their editions, empowering them to undertake philological work that is informed by an understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it. This training responds to the risk of miscommunication or missed opportunity in collaborative situations where no participant in a project understands fully both the textual and the technological issues involved in designing and building a digital scholarly edition.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$156,251 (approved)
$156,251 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-251006-16

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis (EMDA2017)" institute

A two-week summer institute and follow-up workshop for 12 participants to explore network analysis approaches to early modern studies. The institute would be hosted at the Folger Shakespeare Library with a variety of visiting experts.

The Folger Institute proposes to host a two-week institute on “Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis” in summer 2017 (EMDA2017). Under the direction of Professor Jonathan Hope and Dr. Ruth Ahnert, this institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty—computing specialists, social historians, network analysts, literary historians, linguists, and visualization designers—to model best practices for the design and implementation of quantitative network analysis. EMDA2017 will be an opportunity for 12 scholarly practitioners to consider the ways this approach may be shaping the very nature of early modern research through intensive application and analysis.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HD-248450-16

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
James W. Malazita (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Dean Andrew Nieusma (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

3D Printing as Humanistic Inquiry

A set of experiments with 3D printing and a three-day workshop in which scholars explore the philosophical and practical implications of fabrication and “making” in a humanities context.

This project brings together scholars at various stages of their careers from across the Humanities and Digital Humanities to participate in an intensive three-day 3D Making and Critique workshop and follow-on research. The project's goal is to materially brainstorm printed artifacts that serve as critical investigations, while providing time for reflection upon the broader social and environmental contexts of the 3D printing process. The intended results of the project will be to produce and disseminate early-stage critical objects, to generate reflexive theory and critique about 3D printing and making practices, to connect Humanities scholars across both the making and critical bodies of humanistic scholarship, and to create an action plan for collaborative written and made scholarship targeted for publication in open-access presses and exhibitions.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,498 (approved)
$39,498 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HD-248377-16

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04469-0001)
Anne Kelly Knowles (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Visualizing Spatial Experience in the Holocaust

Employing computational linguistics and natural language processing techniques to study how Holocaust survivors use spatial terms to describe their experiences. Testimonies from the University of Southern California’s Shoah Foundation Center collection would provide the sources for the preliminary study.

First-person accounts are central to understanding the Holocaust. Our project will be the first to examine survivors' testimony for the spatiality of individuals' experiences. Drawing on video interviews with survivors, we will analyze the language survivors use in speaking of places, events, movement, relationships, and their perceptions of space and time. We will focus on how their social networks were fragmented and reformed and the spatial characteristics of work places and work relationships experienced by forced laborers in ghettos and labor camps. We will do this through a hybrid methodology that combines close listening with spatial visualization and corpus and computational linguistics methods that we will apply to interview transcripts. The dictionary of spatial and relational terms this will produce, along with our visual conceptualizations of the topologies of experience, will enable us to link survivors to Nazi-controlled spaces represented in our existing GIS datasets.

[White paper]

Project fields:
European History; Geography; Jewish Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$73,168 (approved)
$61,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HK-250641-16

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Christopher Warren (Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon: Reassembling the Early Modern Social Network

Implementation of a web-based platform to enhance research on the social networks of Great Britain in the early modern era, 1500-1700. The project would also make available open-source software to facilitate development of tools for additional regions and time periods.

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon is a digital reconstruction of the early modern British social network that people from all over the world can collaboratively expand and revise. It harnesses digitized texts, natural language processing, network inference methods, and distributed historical expertise to create the broadest, most accessible source of who knew whom in early modern Britain. The beta version of our website, created collaboratively with undergraduate programmers, has received nearly 30,000 hits since going live in September 2015 and is growing daily through the contributions of scholars, students, and citizen humanists. An NEH grant would allow us, first, to transform Six Degrees into an accessible, sustainable, and vital resource that will continue to grow and serve the early modern community for the long term, and, second, to package and distribute our code so that scholars can create similar networks for different eras and regions.

[White paper]

Project fields:
British Literature; European History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$325,000 (approved)
$308,254 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248405-16

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
Edward James Lazzerini (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Historical Demography and Population Behavior among Muslims in Russian Central Eurasia, 1828-1918: The Case of Kazan City

Development of a public database that would enable research into the Muslim community of the Russian Empire from 1828-1918 by converting information found within parish registers from the city of Kazan.

The Central Eurasian Muslim Population Project (CEMPP) will create over time a massive relational database of longitudinal vital statistics and social information gathered from the metrical books (parish registers) compiled for Muslim subjects of the Russian Empire between 1828 and 1918. Funding from NEH will support the first phase of the project whereby, seeking proof-of-concept, we will gather data for approximately 25,000 Muslim inhabitants of Kazan, the third largest city in Russia, as organized around 18 mosques and their parishes. One of our major digital tools will be the open, scalable, and extendable "Intermediate Data Structure" that is becoming the standard for longitudinal databases on historical populations. By means of IDS, our database will join those focused on other regions of Eurasia and contribute to large-scale comparative studies of the life course of Eurasia as a whole.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Nonwestern Religion; Russian History; Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$71,108 (approved)
$71,108 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2018


HZ-233998-16

Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Suzanna Tamminen (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Reissue as free epubs 18 foundational books in dance and theater

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 18 essential texts from Wesleyan University Press on the history of dance and theater.

Wesleyan University Press will digitize eighteen out-of-print titles from its performing arts backlist. These titles fall into two discreet but related areas, dance and theater (specifically stagecraft), and contribute to an understanding of the evolution of modernism in the performing arts. The Press will make the resulting ebooks freely available for the benefit of scholars in dance, theater and performance studies. We will promote the ebooks individually and as a group to scholars and students in dance, theater and performance studies. We will market the ebooks via email, social media, press releases, and on our web site where we will have permanent pages for each ebook as well as a page for the project, including instructions for accessing the free ebook files.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


HZ-234074-16

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 20 classic humanities texts from Cornell University Press in the areas of Slavic Studies, German Studies, and literary criticism.

Cornell University Press seeks $83,635 in funding support for a 12-month effort to make 20 outstanding works of scholarship in foundational disciplines accessible to the world. We will use the funding to: 1) test and refine a methodology for selecting out-of-print titles for the program; 2) gain experience in the digitization, delivery, rights clearance and dissemination of OA monographs in EPUB3.0.1 format; and 3) analyze the results of maximizing the discovery and usage of ebooks across multiple platforms including the Press website, institutional repositories, JSTOR and Project MUSE.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
German Literature; Literary Criticism; Russian History

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$83,635 (approved)
$82,235 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


HD-248511-16

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Worthy N. Martin (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Lilla Kopar (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)
Daniel V. Pitti (Co Project Director: March 2016 to March 2018)
Nancy L. Wicker (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Project Andvari

Pilot implementation of Project Andvari, an online portal to aggregate digital collections of northern European, early medieval art and artifacts from a range of cultural institutions.

The aim of Project Andvari is to provide a free digital portal for integrated access to dispersed collections of northern European art and artifacts of the early medieval period (4th–12th centuries). Funding is requested to support development, testing, and implementation of a pilot platform that will harvest and aggregate existing metadata records and digital surrogates of objects maintained in the collections of three international partner institutions with representative datasets that participate in linked open data initiatives. Ultimately, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in art, archeology, history, and literary and religious studies, allowing users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries. The innovative application of aggregated search methods and enhanced metadata will promote discovery and comparative analyses of artifacts in ways that have not previously been feasible.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,577 (approved)
$74,577 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 10/31/2018


HD-248560-16

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Ty Pierce (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multi-site Museum Networks

The development of a platform that supports the sharing of humanities content through mobile tours in both exterior and interior spaces, building on Curatescape and Wordpress platforms.

While there is no shortage of digital experience options for cultural heritage institutions, the number of realistic options for today’s small-­- and medium-­-sized institutions is unfortunately slim, and museums of all sizes still struggle to deliver engaging mobile experiences. TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multisite Museum Networks will create a digital platform that combines WordPress and Curatescape into a new opportunity for the field. This project builds on previous collaborations between the Ohio History Connection and the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities and leverages their respective expertise to create a new set o