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Division or office: Digital Humanities*
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HAA-258779-18

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Patrick Murray-John (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Omeka S ORCID Integration

The development of modules for the Omeka-S publishing platform to allow integration with the ORCID system of persistent researcher identifiers. The project would increase the number of humanities scholars in the United States using this system for reliably identifying humanities research publications.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media proposes an integration between Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and Omeka S, a widely-used platform for publishing humanities content online. Omeka S puts special emphasis on the needs of small- to medium-sized institutions and integration with other systems and Linked Open Data (LOD). ORCID provides a global, standardized mechanism for reliably identifying scholars and researchers and for providing metadata about them via unique identifiers. ORCID data, however, is currently overwhelmingly tilted toward researchers in the sciences. This integration will encourage humanists to register an identifier with ORCID, fostering new connections between humanists' research. Thus, Omeka S would both augment ORCID's goal of "enabl[ing] transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions, and affiliations" within the humanities, and it would expand the utility of Omeka S for users and data aggregators. 

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,076 (approved)
$39,076 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


HZ-254284-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: September 2016 to present)

Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University II

Digitization and creation of freely accessible ebooks for 57 titles published by Cornell University Press, including titles in anthropology, classics, political science, and literary theory.

Cornell University Press seeks $99,553 for 1 year to make 57 outstanding works of scholarship in foundational disciplines openly accessible. The Press will use the funding to (1) continue an established methodology for selecting titles by working with library selectors and scholars to include out-of-print titles in Anthropology, Classics, and Political Science; (2) extend and enhance our existing methodology by including titles in Literary Theory that will be used in courses; (3) accelerate the digitization, delivery, and rights clearance for out-of-print titles and the dissemination of OA monographs in EPUB3.0.1; and (4) promote the titles across multiple platforms (including Cornell Open, JSTOR, Project MUSE, HathiTrust and OAPEN) and assess the impact on a global scale via user surveys from librarians at 1,700 institutions of higher learning in the U.S. and at the member institutions of 180 global consortia.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Literary Criticism; Political Theory

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,553 (approved)
$99,553 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2018


HZ-254314-17

Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
Frederic Nachbaur (Project Director: September 2016 to present)

The Humanities Open Book Program of Fordham University Press

Digitization and production of 21 freely accessible ebooks initially published by Fordham University Press, with an emphasis on American philosophy.

Fordham University Press (the Press) seeks support to make twenty-one significant books on American philosophy more accessibly available through Open Access models, via institutional digital platforms, and in print formats by way of manufacturing on-demand technology. The Press has published more than 3,000 scholarly books since its founding in 1907 and has long been recognized as a leading American publisher of philosophy scholarship. As such, we seek funding from the Humanities Open Book Program to revitalize and promote a selection of “lost” titles from our American Philosophy series. The twenty-one titles proposed for digitization represent those studies that have stood the test of time but that were released before digital publishing technology had fully matured. With the addition of these twenty-one, the Press’s complete catalog in American Philosophy will be available in high-quality, digital-native publications for the use of scholars into the foreseeable future.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$81,381 (approved)
$81,381 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


HD-248450-16

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
James W. Malazita (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Dean Andrew Nieusma (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

3D Printing as Humanistic Inquiry

A set of experiments with 3D printing and a three-day workshop in which scholars explore the philosophical and practical implications of fabrication and “making” in a humanities context.

This project brings together scholars at various stages of their careers from across the Humanities and Digital Humanities to participate in an intensive three-day 3D Making and Critique workshop and follow-on research. The project's goal is to materially brainstorm printed artifacts that serve as critical investigations, while providing time for reflection upon the broader social and environmental contexts of the 3D printing process. The intended results of the project will be to produce and disseminate early-stage critical objects, to generate reflexive theory and critique about 3D printing and making practices, to connect Humanities scholars across both the making and critical bodies of humanistic scholarship, and to create an action plan for collaborative written and made scholarship targeted for publication in open-access presses and exhibitions.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,498 (approved)
$39,498 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HD-248377-16

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04469-0001)
Anne Kelly Knowles (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Visualizing Spatial Experience in the Holocaust

Employing computational linguistics and natural language processing techniques to study how Holocaust survivors use spatial terms to describe their experiences. Testimonies from the University of Southern California’s Shoah Foundation Center collection would provide the sources for the preliminary study.

First-person accounts are central to understanding the Holocaust. Our project will be the first to examine survivors' testimony for the spatiality of individuals' experiences. Drawing on video interviews with survivors, we will analyze the language survivors use in speaking of places, events, movement, relationships, and their perceptions of space and time. We will focus on how their social networks were fragmented and reformed and the spatial characteristics of work places and work relationships experienced by forced laborers in ghettos and labor camps. We will do this through a hybrid methodology that combines close listening with spatial visualization and corpus and computational linguistics methods that we will apply to interview transcripts. The dictionary of spatial and relational terms this will produce, along with our visual conceptualizations of the topologies of experience, will enable us to link survivors to Nazi-controlled spaces represented in our existing GIS datasets.

[White paper]

Project fields:
European History; Geography; Jewish Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$73,168 (approved)
$61,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248437-16

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

TEI and Humanities Pedagogy: Building TAPAS Classroom

The development of a platform for teaching the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), which would allow for shared instruction materials, collaborative teaching, student evaluation, all built within the NEH-funded TAPAS infrastructure.

Text markup with TEI is a key topic in the digital humanities classroom: it engages students in a close examination of text, discussion of interpretation, and inquiry into textual materiality. But the logistics can be challenging: tools for working with TEI/XML-encoded data require greater technical expertise than humanities faculty possess, and these tools are not designed with classroom needs in mind. TAPAS Classroom will offer instructors a centralized, user-friendly platform for organizing and sharing course materials, with features to support group analysis, display, and commenting on TEI assignments. The platform will enable both quick previewing of TEI files and sustained engagement and analysis. As part of the TAPAS framework, TAPAS Classroom will enable users to share assignments and supporting materials with the entire TEI community, and projects can also be migrated into TAPAS proper. TAPAS Classroom situates TEI pedagogy at the heart of the TEI research community.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,778 (approved)
$74,778 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 10/31/2017


HT-251001-16

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Make your edition: models and methods for digital textual scholarship

A three-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for 25 participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The digital scholarly edition is more than a reading text with links and annotations. The digital scholarly edition is an integrated platform for performing research, and digital textual scholarship advances as this platform comes to support new types of inquiry The Institute will train 25 participants who already know how to mark up their texts (in TEI XML or similarly) to participate directly in the technological conceptualization and implementation of their editions, empowering them to undertake philological work that is informed by an understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it. This training responds to the risk of miscommunication or missed opportunity in collaborative situations where no participant in a project understands fully both the textual and the technological issues involved in designing and building a digital scholarly edition.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$156,251 (approved)
$156,251 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HK-250641-16

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Christopher Warren (Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon: Reassembling the Early Modern Social Network

Implementation of a web-based platform to enhance research on the social networks of Great Britain in the early modern era, 1500-1700. The project would also make available open-source software to facilitate development of tools for additional regions and time periods.

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon is a digital reconstruction of the early modern British social network that people from all over the world can collaboratively expand and revise. It harnesses digitized texts, natural language processing, network inference methods, and distributed historical expertise to create the broadest, most accessible source of who knew whom in early modern Britain. The beta version of our website, created collaboratively with undergraduate programmers, has received nearly 30,000 hits since going live in September 2015 and is growing daily through the contributions of scholars, students, and citizen humanists. An NEH grant would allow us, first, to transform Six Degrees into an accessible, sustainable, and vital resource that will continue to grow and serve the early modern community for the long term, and, second, to package and distribute our code so that scholars can create similar networks for different eras and regions.

[White paper]

Project fields:
British Literature; European History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$325,000 (approved)
$308,254 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248560-16

Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Ty Pierce (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multi-site Museum Networks

The development of a platform that supports the sharing of humanities content through mobile tours in both exterior and interior spaces, building on Curatescape and Wordpress platforms.

While there is no shortage of digital experience options for cultural heritage institutions, the number of realistic options for today’s small-­- and medium-­-sized institutions is unfortunately slim, and museums of all sizes still struggle to deliver engaging mobile experiences. TourSites for WordPress: Digital Tour Experiences for Multisite Museum Networks will create a digital platform that combines WordPress and Curatescape into a new opportunity for the field. This project builds on previous collaborations between the Ohio History Connection and the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities and leverages their respective expertise to create a new set of tools specifically for the WordPress Network environment. The open-­-source platform created by this project will enable any institution to create digital tour experiences across multiple locations, maintain those networks with efficient use of resources and connect the public to stories, people and places in innovative ways.

[White paper]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,943 (approved)
$74,199 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


HD-248519-16

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Diana Saiki (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Valerie Birk (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

3D Modeling for Textile Collections

The development of a prototype web application of three-dimensional models of historic clothing for use by researchers, teachers, and the general public. The test collection would consist of World War II-era American clothing from the Beeman Historic Costume Collection.

The funds from the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Level I will be used to create a working prototype of "Fashion Fusion," a publicly available web-based application. Fashion Fusion will be a catalog of historic clothing, enabling interactive study of a three-dimensional digital image of a historical garment and replication of it with downloadable pattern pieces. The project results will be useful to museum professionals, clothing history researchers and teachers, and designers for theater and re-enacting.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,713 (approved)
$39,713 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


HD-248520-16

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Benjamin Brochstein (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Chad Shaw (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)
Suzanne Kemmer (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)
Erez Lieberman-Aiden (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Genealogy of Texts and Ideas: Looking Back and Forth through Early English Books Online

A two-day workshop and follow-up activities for early modern literature scholars, linguists, and computer scientists to consider how the Bookworm textual analysis tool could be used with the Early English Books Online-Text Creation Partnership corpus.

We propose a workshop on how to extend and customize a graphical user interface (GUI) for Bookworm, the well-established open-source text analysis and visualization tool. Hosted by Rice University's Humanities Research Center, the workshop will focus on applying Bookworm to the Early English Books Online (EEBO) corpus and leverage expertise in various disciplines including history, linguistics, genomics, and bioinformatics to design a powerful, intuitive, open-source text analysis package to allow novice users instant access to the utility and promise of digital text analysis.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics; History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$30,212 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248360-16

Fitchburg State University (Fitchburg, MA 01420-2697)
Catherine Buell (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Ricky Sethi (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)
William P. Seeley (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Scientific Workflows, Image Analysis, and Visual Stylometry in the Digital Analysis of Art

The development of an alpha-level prototype for a tool that would help statistically identify artistic style, and a workshop to discuss the tool’s use and implications in the study of art history.

The goal of the project is to develop a tool for digital image analysis of paintings that is powerful enough to support advanced research in computer science, cognitive science, art history, and the philosophy of art while providing an accessible interface that can be used by researchers or students with little or no computer science background. The tool we envision will implement a broad range of digital image analysis algorithms as scientific workflows using the WINGS semantic workflow system. Scientific workflows allow users to build programs like one would draw a flowchart, dragging shapes representing data sets and image analysis procedures onto the workspace and drawing links between them. The tool can be used to promote computational literacy and data analytic skills among humanities students, introduce science students to research in art and the humanities, and help us understand how viewers perceptually categorize/recognize paintings and otherwise engage with artworks.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Aesthetics; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$36,711 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


HZ-233998-16

Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Suzanna Tamminen (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Reissue as free epubs 18 foundational books in dance and theater

The digitization and creation of freely-accessible ebooks for 18 essential texts from Wesleyan University Press on the history of dance and theater.

Wesleyan University Press will digitize eighteen out-of-print titles from its performing arts backlist. These titles fall into two discreet but related areas, dance and theater (specifically stagecraft), and contribute to an understanding of the evolution of modernism in the performing arts. The Press will make the resulting ebooks freely available for the benefit of scholars in dance, theater and performance studies. We will promote the ebooks individually and as a group to scholars and students in dance, theater and performance studies. We will market the ebooks via email, social media, press releases, and on our web site where we will have permanent pages for each ebook as well as a page for the project, including instructions for accessing the free ebook files.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Dance History and Criticism; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


HD-248607-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Black Book Interactive Project

Preliminary steps toward developing a metadata schema that accounts for race in order to increase scholarly access to archival materials.

The negligible number of African American (AA) literary texts digitally available for scholars working in the field of digital humanities remains a persistent problem. The Black Book Interactive Project (BBIP) responds to this critical digital invisibility by proposing to create a metadata schema that accounts for race, to make these archives more discoverable for scholarship. Using 75 novels from the Project on the History of Black Writing digital archive, we will produce a demonstration project that increases access to little known AA texts, encourages and enables text mining as a digital practice, and bridges the current gaps in computational research in literary studies. Our goal is to expand the community of users and practitioners and to make this schema a standard for the interactive exploration of similar digitized collections.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African Literature; American Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


HD-248577-16

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Doug Reside (Project Director: September 2015 to present)
Gregory P. Lord (Co Project Director: March 2016 to present)

NY Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theater Division - 3D Visualization of Theatrical Lighting Designs

Initial planning and a feasibility study to determine how virtual simulation software could be re-purposed to create representations of historical theater designs based on archival sources.

To emulate theatrical lighting design in a web-based 3D visualization platform that would give humanities scholars a way to see the effects historical lighting designs were meant to create. More specifically, NEH funding would make possible a feasibility study for emulating lighting design using current web-based 3-D technology. Depending on the results of this study, the project team will determine the best way to move forward to build a robust tool for serving emulations of lighting designs in special collection reading rooms.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$35,000 (approved)
$34,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


HD-248622-16

Stone Soup Productions, Inc. (Washington, DC 20036-2504)
Andrea R. Kalin (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

The Search for Harmony: Building a Game Development Tool for WordPress

The development of an educational games module for the WordPress content management system. The prototype game would be associated with an upcoming documentary film on African Americans and classical music.

The process of creating information-rich websites has become more accessible to the public through content management systems (CMSs) like WordPress. New game development tools have also become available to creators for designing engaging experiences. However, there is a need for a tool that can create educational games with the familiarity of a CMS platform already in use in the humanities, rather than require learning a new program. The proposed tool aims to pair a game development framework with WordPress to allow media makers to develop educational games using a simple interface. The Search for Harmony is a case study game concept, about multicultural influence on classical music, that will help provide content to develop and refine the tool. The end product would reduce resources needed to create educational games of a certain type, foster websites that could repurpose game content, and encourage educators and others in the humanities to create engaging experiences for students.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$37,430 (approved)
$37,430 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 5/31/2017


HD-248648-16

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Stephen B. Brier (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Beyond Citation: Critical Thinking About Digital Research

Further development of Beyond Citation, a web-based guide to research databases in the humanities. During this phase, the project would result in thematic guides to databases in fields such as art history, history, and literature, as well as a prototype tool for use by research libraries.

Although humanities scholars widely use academic databases from publishers such as ProQuest or Gale, knowledge of how proprietary databases work is limited because their structures are dynamic and not transparent. Scholars therefore may not be aware of and cannot account for how database structures affect their interpretations of search results or text. Lack of information is an obstacle to scholarly inquiry because databases shape the questions that can be asked and the arguments that can be made through search interfaces and algorithms. Beyond Citation is a research platform that aggregates information about academic databases so that scholars can understand the significance of the material they glean. By making accessible essential information about the structures and content of databases, Beyond Citation takes an important step in updating the scholarly apparatus to encourage critical thinking about academic databases and their impact on research and scholarship.