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Funded Projects Query Form
38 matches

Grant programs:Institutes for Higher Education Faculty*
Date range: 2019-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

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St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)
Claire Gilbert (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Charles Henry Parker (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Fabien Montcher (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288009-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$219,641 (approved)
$219,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Global Geographies of Knowledge: Creating, Representing, and Commodifying Ideas Across Early Modern Places, 1400-1800

A four-week residential institute for 30 higher education faculty on knowledge and globalization in the early modern period.

"Global Geographies of Knowledge" enriches scholarship about the complex human, material, and ideological entanglements which characterized the first age of globalization. Drawing on historical geography and sociology; economic, legal, and literary history; and the intersections of the histories of art and science, our institute emphasizes how forms of knowledge conditioned and transformed perceptions of places. This framework reveals the global, polycentric dimension of how ideas were generated, refashioned, and transmitted. New courses and research projects will emerge from this Institute, along with innovative teaching modules on place and the construction of knowledge in world history surveys and upper-level undergraduate courses on empire, religious encounters, trade, travel, migration–coerced and free–and other forms of cultural interaction.

University of Tampa (Tampa, FL 33606-1490)
James Joseph Lopez (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Denis Alberto Rey (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288012-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$234,914 (approved)
$232,749 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

The Immigrant Communities of Florida and José Martí in Cuban Independence and the Dawn of the American Century

A four-week residential institute for 30 higher education faculty on José Martí (1853 - 1895) and the immigrant communities of Florida.

This 4-week Level II Institute will study the rise of the U.S. as a global hegemonic power as a consequence of its military intervention in Cuba’s War of Independence (1898) from the perspective of the Cuban émigré communities of Florida, who, from their late-19th century cigar-manufacturing enclaves in Key West, Ybor City, and West Tampa, played a critical role in the anti-colonial struggle against Spain. These communities constitute an extraordinary chrysalis in which to observe and understand the complex cultural and political evolution of the U.S. at the dawn of what is often referred to as “the American century.” The close study of this seminal period from the perspective of the working class immigrants who organized, financed, and in many cases fought and died for a patriotic ideal that they helped inspire and formulate by their example, will enrich any cross-cultural, multidisciplinary approach to the teaching of U.S. History.

Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)
Christopher Brian Polt (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

Participating institutions:
Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA) - Applicant/Recipient
Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC) - Participating Institution

EH-288036-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$224,081 (approved)
$223,271 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

The Performance of Roman Comedy

A four-week, residential institute for 30 higher education faculty to engage with the scholarship, interpretation, and performance of ancient Roman comedy.

This National Endowment for the Humanities Institute for Higher Education Faculty, “The Performance of Roman Comedy,” will train college faculty and graduate students in the latest developments in the scholarship, interpretation, and stagecraft of the ancient theater of Plautus and Terence. Over the course of four weeks in summer 2023, trainees will, under the instruction of visiting experts representing three generations of scholarly excellence, study ancient evidence for and modern experiments in the performance of these plays; the social, historical, and literary contexts of the plays; and their continuing significance and influence. Trainees will put their instruction to use by rehearsing scenes from Roman comedy in multiple styles, and in both Latin and English, as well as developing pedagogical modules to apply and share what they have learned from the training and instruction. The Institute will conclude by filming the performances of those scenes and preparing post-Institute

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288037-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$189,824 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Visual Culture of the American Civil War and Its Aftermath

A two-week residential institute for 25 higher education faculty on the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. 

The American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center proposes a two-week, residential, Level II summer institute from July 10 to July 21, 2023 for 25 college and university teachers to study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s visual media—including fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments—to examine how information and opinion about the war were recorded and disseminated, and ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Martien Halvorson-Taylor (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Kurtis R. Schaeffer (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

EH-288044-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$207,916 (approved)
$207,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Revisiting Religion and Place in Light of Environmental, Legal and Indigenous Studies

A three-week residential institute for 26 higher education faculty to explore the concept of place in religious studies.

"Revisiting Religion and Place," an NEH Summer Institute with the UVA’s Religion, Race & Democracy Lab, will bring together religious studies faculty and advanced graduate students for an immersive 3-week exploration of critical new perspectives on the theme of "place." Given recent, dramatic advances on the study of place in the environmental humanities, social sciences, legal studies, and indigenous studies, the time is ripe for rethinking place as a fundamental feature of the study of religion. We wish to introduce scholars in religious studies and related fields to this enormously productive re-thinking of the idea of "place" that has occurred across disciplines, to assist scholars in developing a richer and more nuanced understanding of the opportunities and pitfalls that come with using the category of "place" in thinking and teaching about diverse manifestations of human engagement with the world.

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Walter Hawthorne (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Kristina Poznan (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288045-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$234,940 (approved)
$234,939 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Enslaved.org Summer Faculty Institute: Data-Informed Methods in Slavery Studies

The team behind Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade, based at Matrix: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University is applying to host a National Endowment for the Humanities Level II Institute for Higher Education Faculty on data-informed methods in slavery studies. The program, designed for fifteen participants, will run for four weeks in the summer of 2023, with two weeks on-site at Michigan State University followed by two weeks of virtual work. Year one of this two-year project (2022-2024) will focus on preparing for and hosting the institute. During the second year, the project will publish, in the Journal of Slavery and Data Preservation, data articles, datasets, and supporting data documentation created by institute participants.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Melissa J. Homestead (Project Director: February 2022 to present)

Participating institutions:
Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Nebraska, Board of Regents (Lincoln, NE) - Applicant/Recipient
Willa Cather Foundation (Red Cloud, NE) - Participating Institution

EH-288079-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$156,581 (approved)
$156,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Willa Cather: Place and Archive

A two-week residential institute for 25 higher education faculty to explore place-based and archival approaches to the life and works of American novelist Willa Cather (1873-1947).

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln seeks funding to support an institute exploring place-based and archival approaches to the life and works of American novelist Willa Cather. At UNL participants will have access to unparalleled archival holdings of Cather materials and expertise of a leading center for digital humanities, and at the National Willa Cather Center in Red Cloud, they will experience landscapes and buildings represented in Cather’s fiction that function as a kind of archive. The institute will take a critical approach to all three kinds of archives (special collections, digital resources, and place), considering how they are mediated and what is absent. Cather’s fiction celebrated the achievements of recent European immigrants who settled on the Great Plains but ignored the then-recent forced relocations of indigenous people to make way for settlement. Both the European immigrant presence and absence of the Pawnee will receive particular attention.

Ursuline College (Pepper Pike, OH 44124-4398)
Katharine Trostel (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Jacob Waldenmaier (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288086-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$173,680 (approved)
$173,680 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Reading, Writing, and Teaching the Rust Belt: Co-creating Regional Humanities Ecosystems

A two-week, residential institute for 25 higher education faculty members to engage in cross-disciplinary study of the Rust Belt region.

This summer institute for higher education faculty centers on interrogating, defining, teaching, and crafting the story of the Rust Belt region in which we live and teach from the inside out. For too long, the narrative of the Rust Belt has been one of emptiness, decay, decline, and vacancy—and often, our stories are neglected in the national sphere or controlled by cultural outsiders. This seminar would emphasize the power of regionally-based storytelling and the importance of uplifting local voices. Together, the faculty working group would think collectively about what it means to read, teach, and think from a rooted positionality. How do we leverage civically and publicly engaged humanities practices to equip our students to shape the future of the Rust Belt, identify and contribute to social solutions, and to reimagine the role of the humanities within this sphere? How do we read, interpret, and create the texts that define and map our regional experience?

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Marian Moser Jones (Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288087-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Disease, Pandemics, and Public Health in the United States

A three-week combined-format institute for 30 higher education faculty to study disease, public health, and U.S. history from the late nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

This three-week combined institute will immerse educators in gripping historical case studies of disease outbreaks and health crises that shaped American history and led to the development of organized public health. The participants will study in-depth how institutional, political, economic, cultural, and ideological factors have influenced efforts to protect the public’s health and prevent disease in America over the past 250 years. They will produce syllabi, lectures, and interactive pedagogy focused on these case studies and will integrate them into their teaching.

Georgia College and State University (Milledgeville, GA 31061-3375)
Bruce Gentry (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Robert E. Donahoo (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288088-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$235,000 (approved)
$235,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Reconsidering Flannery O'Connor

A four-week residential institute for 25 higher education faculty members to study the works and life of author Flannery O’Connor (1925-1964).

Twenty-five (25) participants will engage in a four-week, Level II, residential program at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, Ga, from June 1 to June 29, 2023 on “Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor.”

Clemson University (Clemson, SC 29634-0001)
Susanna Ashton (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Rhondda Robinson Thomas (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Gregg Alan Hecimovich (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Kaniqua Robinson (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288094-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$198,317 (approved)
$197,797 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Reconstructing the Black Archive: South Carolina as Case Study, 1739-1895

A three-week residential institute for 26 higher education faculty to study ways of reconstructing Black histories, using South Carolina as a case study. 

Reconstructing the Black Archive: South Carolina as Case Study, 1739-1895, based primarily at two institutions located in Upstate South Carolina, aims to uncover ways to understand and reconstruct notions about early Black lives. We will create a community of inquiry allowing us to collaboratively learn analytical strategies from interdisciplinary fields of the visual arts, community-focused research, historical studies, and a swath of other creative fields. Our approach is one of biographical mediation whereby we will take institutional documents, statistics, and seemingly inhumane archival evidence and demonstrate ways that the broad humanities and values can be recognized. We aim to resurrect the hidden narratives of the Black experience in our work.

Pig Iron Theatre Company (Philadelphia, PA 19122-3859)
Gabriel Quinn Bauriedel (Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Allen J. Kuharski (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)

EH-288124-22
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$157,998 (approved)
$157,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 12/31/2023

Preserving and Transmitting American Ensemble-Based Devised Theatre

A two-week residential institute for 25 higher education faculty focused on the study of ensemble-based devised theater and its impact.

Devised theatre is a highly collaborative but uniquely fragile art form that has existed for generations in communities across the United States. Despite its proliferation as a professional and educational training practice, it suffers from limited scholarship, criticism, and academic study. The Institute will address that misalignment with a deep critical examination of company-based devised theatre, past and present. This two-week, residential Institute will foster new collaborations among working artists, conservatory faculty, college and university professors of theatre and performance studies and their students, resulting in improved preservation, innovations in teaching methods, and heightened cultural awareness relating to American ensemble-based devised theatre and its impact over time.

Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and West, Inc. (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Wendi Adamek (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

EH-281175-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$235,000 (approved)
$235,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

Women In Buddhism: Religion, Politics, and the Arts

A four-week, residential institute for 25 higher education faculty to study womens roles in and contributions to Buddhism.

This 4-week, Level II residential institute program for college and university teachers is planned to take place June 6 to July 1, 2022. The Institute will be offered by the Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP), a national initiative of the East-West Center, and is designed to meet the needs of twenty-five educators in community colleges, liberal arts colleges and universities.

Thoreau Society (Concord, MA 01742-2727)
Sandra H. Petrulionis (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

EH-281187-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,228 (approved)
$175,967 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Transcendentalism and Social Reform: Activism and Community Engagement in the Age of Thoreau

A two-week, residential institute for 25 college and university faculty on transcendentalism and social reform.

This program will provide a two-week residential Level II Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers to be held in Concord, Massachusetts from June 26 to July 9, 2022.

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Liesl Marie Olson (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Susan A. Manning (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

EH-281210-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$198,332 (approved)
$161,347 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Making Modernism: Literature, Dance, and Visual Culture in Chicago, 1893-1955

A three-week, residential institute for 25 higher education faculty to study the modernist movement in Chicago.

The Newberry Library seeks Level I support for a residential, three-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty that will explore Chicago’s vital contribution to the modernist movement. From July 18-August 5, 2022, Making Modernism: Literature, Dance, and Visual Culture in Chicago, 1893-1955 proposes to explore the distinct, groundbreaking styles of Chicago modernism as well as the city’s connections to other metropoles. Directed by Dr. Liesl Olson (Director of Chicago Studies, Newberry Library) and Dr. Susan Manning (Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities, Northwestern University), Making Modernism will offer an expansive look at creative expression in Chicago across the arts. Participants will have the opportunity to engage actively and critically with the Newberry’s archival collections in order to understand the networks that contributed to the explosion of cultural styles associated with the modernist period.

Montgomery College (Rockville, MD 20850-1728)
Cinder Cooper Barnes (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Mbye B. Cham (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

EH-281219-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,406 (approved)
$154,802 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Identity and Connections among African, Afro-Caribbean, and African American Communities in the United States

A two-week, residential institute for 25 higher education faculty to consider the diverse nature and experience of the Black diaspora in the United States.

Out of many, one. Charleston, South Carolina recently erected a monument to soldiers from Saint Domingue (Haiti) who traveled to the area in 1799 to make common cause with the American Revolutionary War. Jamaican immigrants contributed to the Harlem Renaissance, the cultural movement that cross-pollinated ideas of African Americans and Afro-Caribbean creatives into a uniquely American flowering. A cause célèbre of Harlem Renaissance was support for Ethiopian resistance to Italian incursions. Decades later, with the end of quotas in 1965, Ethiopians and Nigerians would make up the largest groups of African immigrants. Tapping into Montgomery College, Howard University, and Washington, DC’s wealth of resources, and interrogating the terms “African American,” and “Diaspora,” this institute will feature scholars from a range of disciplines sharing their research with participants who will acquire insights and resource resources to support publication or diversification of their curricula.

Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, CA 91711-5909)
Matthew Bowman (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Daniel Ramirez (Co Project Director: July 2021 to December 2022)

EH-281226-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,410 (approved)
$180,410 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Mormonism and Mexico: A Case Study in Religion and Borderlands

A three-week, hybrid institute for 25 higher education faculty to study religion and borders, with a focus on Mormonism in Mexico.

This three-week Institute will use the history of Mormonism in Mexico as a case study to explore the impact of borders and migration on religious change in the modern world. The concepts of borderlands and migration are central to many fields in the humanities, and the Institute will consider them in terms of religious, political, cultural, and social history. The Institute will proceed in three units: first, considering theoretical work on the topic of borderlands and its relationship to religion, as well as an introduction to the history of Mormonism in Mexico; second, focusing on major themes dealing with Mormonism in Mexico and pursuing projects related to the topic; third, discussing participants' projects and how they engage with the dynamic space of religion on the US-Mexico border. In examining Mormonism in Mexico, the Institute will engage in questions far beyond Mormonism itself, relevant to educators interested in a wide range of topics surrounding migration and borderlands.

College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)
Todd T. Lewis (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

EH-281229-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$142,995 (approved)
$142,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Ritual Arts in Hinduism and Buddhism

A two-week, residential institute for 25 higher education faculty to learn about Hindu and Buddhist ritual practices.

The College of the Holy Cross requests $142,995 from the NEH Institutes for Higher Education Faculty grant program to support a two-week summer institute that will provide an overview of the distinctive rituals and the associated ritual arts of the great world religions found across South and Southeast Asia. To balance the usual college course emphasis on doctrine defining religious traditions, this institute will focus on the distinctive forms of praxis that express and act upon each faith’s central beliefs. Understanding both doctrines and practices is essential in the study of Hinduism and Buddhism and expands traditional pedagogy beyond philosophy or the confines of learning to what the small literate elite did or thought. By highlighting and observing these practices, the institute will provide avenues for participants to convey the full importance of these religions in communities, seeing how Hindu and Buddhist traditions sustain both transcendental and pragmatic human needs.

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
James Downs (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

EH-281232-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$163,054 (approved)
$161,754 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Civil War Archives: A New Social and Cultural History of the Civil War

A three-week, residential institute for 36 higher education faculty to examine Civil War and Reconstruction history through the lens of the archival turn.

This two-week residential institute for higher education faculty places Civil War and Reconstruction history within the context of the “the archival turn,” a scholarly intervention that explores how ideology, politics, bias, and history itself shapes the contents of archives. While scholars from Asian to European history have examined this question in relation to their fields, few Civil War and Reconstruction historians have probed this question, despite the overwhelming abundance of Civil War archives throughout the country. This institute provides an opportunity for 36 historians to investigate how the archival turn can generate new ways of looking at old documents in an effort to breathe new life into the social and cultural history of the Civil War Era, which spans 1830-1877.

San Diego State University Foundation (San Diego, CA 92182-1931)
Erika Robb Larkins (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Kathryn Margaret Sanchez (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

EH-281233-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$214,999 (approved)
$214,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

The Making of Modern Brazil: Marginal Spaces, Race, and Urban Life

A three-week, hybrid institute for 25 higher education faculty to study modern Brazil.

This Institute will introduce scholars to the social, racial and cultural diversity of Brazil. We will discuss the aftermath of colonization and slavery in the Americas, the emergence of racial ideologies and contrasting images of urban and rural spaces. Through an exploration of scholarly sources like films, music, ethnographic texts, fiction and historical images and documents, we will examine topics such as modernity, racial politics, and urban spaces, along with social and cultural marginality, gender, class, and ethnicity. Participants will learn to include Brazil in their own courses and research by producing a module/syllabus or draft research project reflecting the themes and issues discussed. Beyond expanding and deepening the scholars' knowledge and understanding of Brazil, the Institute will enable colleagues to develop new insights for interdisciplinary teaching extending beyond Latin America, as many themes are applicable to developing areas of the world and the U.S.

Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)
Adrian Finucane (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Victoria Thur (Co Project Director: July 2021 to December 2022)

EH-281241-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$141,929 (approved)
$141,929 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

The Revolution in Books

A three-week, residential institute for 25 college and university faculty on the history of the book in the American Revolution.

Florida Atlantic University proposes hosting an interdisciplinary institute on the history of the book in the American Revolution. Printed material played a crucial role in circulating the ideals of the Revolution. The institute combines readings and discussions on theoretical aspects of book history with hands-on experience with rare books and workshops that allow participants to create their own paper, use a historic printing press, and construct a book. This practice will provide a deep understanding of the book as not only a collection of text but also a historical object produced by the labor of a diverse group of Americans who were key actors in the history of this country. While learning about the history of the creation and use of books, we will develop ideas about how the physicality of these objects and their place in history can be explained and represented in classroom teaching even when an institution does not have access to a rare book collection.

Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Andrea Roberts (Project Director: March 2021 to present)
Thaïsa Way (Co Project Director: July 2021 to present)

EH-281243-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$198,289 (approved)
$198,289 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Toward a People's History of Landscape: Black and Indigenous Histories of the Nation's Capital

A three-week, residential institute for 25 college and university faculty on social and landscape history in Washington, DC, focusing on African American and Indigenous contributions.

An NEH Summer Institute for twenty-five higher education faculty to convene at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington DC from June 12 to July 1, 2022, led by Dr. Roberts (Texas A&M) and Dr. Way (Harvard). The Institute brings together humanist scholars to explore new approaches to the scholarship and teaching of landscape histories, centering Black and Indigenous historical narratives in the founding of the United States and the District of Columbia. Participants will develop a web-based repository of teaching modules focused on Washington DC and eight selected sites across the nation. While seminars organize the program, field trips contribute to stewarding a landscape scholarship of integration for educators and researchers. Participants will detect new ways and disciplinary frames for understanding and teaching place meaning, experience and significance as they collectively create a model for a peoples history of landscapes of the United States.

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Michele Reid-Vazquez (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

EH-281254-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$175,000 (approved)
$175,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Transnational Dialogues in Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies

A two-week institute for 25 higher education faculty that would bring a transnational perspective to Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx cultures in the United States.

The Transnational Dialogues in Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Institute will explore transregional, transnational, and interdisciplinary scholarship and curricula addressing the African diaspora in Latin America and its diasporic populations in the U.S. Organized into three parts - Historical Dialogues, Cultural Dialogues, and Afrolatinidad Futurities - this two-week program is proposed for June 6-17, 2022. It will support 25 higher education faculty who seek a deeper scholarly engagement at the intersections of Africana, American, Latin American, and Latinx studies. Participants’ intellectual and pedagogical growth will be facilitated through presentations, discussions of texts and primary sources, mentoring opportunities, workshops, and excursions. All sessions will be available in a residential-hybrid format.

Coast Community College District (Costa Mesa, CA 92626-5429)
Marilyn Virginia Brock (Project Director: March 2021 to present)

EH-281261-21
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$132,747 (approved)
$130,642 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Fifty Years Later: The Vietnam War Through the Eyes of Veterans, Vietnamese, and Southeast Asian Refugees

A two-week, hybrid institute for 36 higher education faculty to study varying perspectives on the Vietnam War.

Coastline College's project will enhance undergraduate teaching and learning about the intricacies and complexities of the Vietnam War. The Institute program is designed to meet educator needs in community colleges and universities who are introducing students to culturally relevant curriculum and providing veterans and Southeast Asian students more access to meaningful content. The program will focus on sources from experienced writers, veterans, researchers, historians, and artists on new and multifaceted perspectives on the Vietnam War, including deep and context-rich engagement with key themes, research, reflection, and primary texts. It will engage such themes as war, diaspora, narrative and narratology, cultural pluralism, and international relations. This program will build connections with higher education professionals locally, nationally, and internationally. This project supports the NEH “Standing Together: The Humanities and the Experience of War” area of interest.

Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5200)
Jana Kate Schulman (Project Director: February 2020 to June 2022)
Robert F. Berkhofer (Co Project Director: August 2020 to June 2022)

EH-272420-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$186,927 (approved)
$159,524 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021

Law and Culture in Medieval England

A four-week institute for 25 higher education faculty on law in medieval England as represented in legal, literary, and historical texts.

This institute focuses on law in medieval England (600-1300), showing how laws were embedded into medieval culture by studying literary works and historical sources. The literary and historical materials will provide contexts for and illustration of medieval thinking about right and wrong, rule and justice, and the negotiation of disputes. By analyzing law codes, literature, and documents, participants will learn how to deploy legal texts in their teaching and research.

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Akerman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Lia Markey (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

EH-272453-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$218,363 (approved)
$218,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022

Mapping the Early Modern World

A four-week institute for 25 higher education faculty to study early modern cartography. 

The Newberry Library requests $218,363.49 to support a Level I summer institute for higher education faculty titled “Mapping the Early Modern World.” The four-week institute will be co-organized by James Akerman, Director of the Newberry’s Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography, and Lia Markey, director of the Newberry’s Center for Renaissance Studies. The institute’s 25 participants will pursue a program of seminars and workshops, discussion, and research exploring interdisciplinary approaches to the study of maps in connection with the global intellectual, cultural, and geographical transformations of the world between 1400 and 1700. The course of reading and discussion will consider five major “theaters” in which the production, use, and interpretation of maps operated: the world, the city, the land, the sea, and the skies.

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Rex A. Koontz (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Mari Carmen Ramirez (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Roberto J. Tejada (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Arden Decker (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)

EH-272469-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,477 (approved)
$136,477 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022

Engaging Latinx Art: Methodological And Pedagogical Approaches

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty to study Latinx art history in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

The University of Houston (UH) in partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) and its International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA) request funding for a Level 1 NEH Summer Institute for higher education faculty. The institute would provide the intellectual environment for twenty-five university and college teachers to explore the full range of Latinx art history. The two-week institute will be held June 7-21, 2021.

Long Island University (Greenvale, NY 11548-1300)
Deborah Mutnick (Project Director: March 2020 to October 2022)
Shannon Carter (Co Project Director: October 2020 to October 2022)
Sara Rutkowski (Co Project Director: January 2022 to October 2022)

EH-272497-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$224,235 (approved)
$177,660 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021

The New Deal Era's Federal Writers' Project: History, Politics, and Legacy

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty to study the history, accomplishments, and cultural legacy of the Federal Writers’ Project.

LIU-Brooklyn proposes a 4-week summer institute for 25 college and university faculty to study the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), part of the federally funded unemployment relief agency known as the Works Projects Administration under FDR during the Great Depression. The institute will focus on the FWP’s history, accomplishments, and literary legacy as our country’s first government-sponsored public history project, particularly with respect to its mission to document underrepresented stories about everyday American life and its impact on American literature. Given the extraordinary impact former FWP writers had on American literature, participants will also study creative works by former FWP writers like Zora Neale Hurston, Dorothy West, Richard Wright, and Meridel Le Seuer, alongside archival materials these same writers generated for the FWP. We invite applicants from diverse backgrounds and will reserve space for at least five non-tenure track or adjunct faculty.

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Jason Robert (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Erica O'Neil (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

EH-272526-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$192,145 (approved)
$183,646 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2023

Our SHARED Future: Science, Humanities, Arts, Research Ethics, and Deliberation

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty, to introduce humanists to the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of bioengineering.

With the development of genome editing, tissue engineering, stem cell research, and neural interface design, bioengineering is dramatically influencing, and potentially fundamentally altering, what it means to be human. Humanists must take a leadership role in guiding the development and use of novel technologies by educating their students to engage in critical discussions and societal deliberations about our conceptions of ourselves, the shape of human society, and the nature of our shared future. Over the course of four weeks, participants will deliberate on these topics through the lenses of ethics, history, philosophy, literature, and film, while experiencing first-hand what it’s like to do science, from editing the bacterial genome using a do-it-yourself CRISPR kit to peering into the inner workings of a non-human primate research laboratory.

Reed College (Portland, OR 97202-8199)
Tamara Metz (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Elizabeth Brake (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)

EH-272535-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$168,877 (approved)
$168,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022

Philosophical Perspectives on Giving, Receiving, and Conceiving Care

A three-week institute for 22 college and university faculty and three advanced graduate students, on giving and receiving care, and their philosophical implications.

The Summer Institute will introduce recent work on care and caregiving in Anglophone moral and political philosophy and foster development of related pedagogical and research projects. Our investigation will be guided by three goals. The first is to explore the distinct questions which arise when caregiving is taken as central in moral and political philosophy. The second is to build on existing research to address new questions posed by recent economic and technological changes. The third is to nurture teaching and research attentive to different perspectives on care - those of caregivers and care recipients - and sensitive to the complexities of age, disability, race, class, and gender.

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Ayesha K. Hardison (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Maryemma Graham (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

EH-272538-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 6/30/2022

Hurston on the Horizon: Past, Present, and Future

A three-week institute for 25 higher education faculty on the life and works of author Zora Neale Hurston.

This 3-week Institute for Higher Education Professionals focuses on author Zora Neale Hurston's diverse body of work, and its unwaning impact on American literature and culture. A novelist, folklorist, anthropologist, journalist, and precursor to the applied humanities, Hurston is the most prolific African American woman writer of the early 20th century. Her oeuvre, including an autobiography, novels, essays, and folklore collections published at the height of her career, is still expanding, as her previously unpublished work, namely short stories, plays, and ethnography, appear recurringly in print. "Hurston on the Horizon: Past, Present, and Future" is inspired by this as well as the enduring popularity of Hurston's seminal novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The Institute will enable 25 participants to develop new perspectives and deeper appreciation of Hurston's texts in order to place her in 21st century contexts and foster new directions for teaching and research.

Bradley University (Peoria, IL 61625-0001)
Jason Zaborowski (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Pieternella A. van Doorn-Harder (Co Project Director: August 2020 to present)

EH-272549-20
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,661 (approved)
$170,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2022

Middle Eastern Christianity: A Historic and Living Tradition

A summer institute for college faculty on the history and culture of Middle Eastern Christians in the Middle East and American society.

*Middle Eastern Christianity: A Historic and Living Tradition* prepares educators to integrate the topic of Middle Eastern Christianity into various courses relevant to Middle Eastern Christians, both in the Middle East, and in their immigrant roles in American society.

Adelphi University (Garden City, NY 11530-4213)
Laraine Anne Fletcher (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
George L. Scheper (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

EH-266984-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$154,309 (approved)
$152,959 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

Worlds in Collision: Nahua and Spanish Pictorial Histories and Annals in 16th-Century Mexico

A three-week institute for 26 college and university faculty on the visual culture and history of 16th-century Mexico.

Funding is requested for a Summer Institute for 26 higher education Summer Scholars entitled "Worlds in Collision: Pictorial Histories and Annals of Nahua and Spanish in 16th Century Mexico" to be held on the campus of Adelphi University, Garden City, N.Y. Eleven visiting scholars will present research on the “New Conquest History,” exploring the newly accessible archives concerning 16th century Mexico, which include multiple forms (maps, pictorial histories and annals), many by indigenous and mestizo authors. Three weeks of daily seminars, enhanced by frequent roundtable discussions, will explore the ways in which these newly translated and interpreted documents can be integrated into existing and/or new curricula involving the encounter of cultures in 16th century Mexico. We will make a special outreach to seek applicants from community colleges, including adjunct faculty and qualified graduate students.

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Pennee Bender (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

EH-267026-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$182,659 (approved)
$181,689 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the visual culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath.

This two-week institute in July 2020 will study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of three institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Mark James Noonan (Project Director: February 2019 to September 2021)

EH-267110-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$162,750 (approved)
$161,924 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

City of Print: New York and the Periodical Press

A two-week summer institute for 25 higher education faculty on the 19th- and 20th-century periodical press in New York City.

Two week summer institute for college faculty offering a comprehensive view of the shifting cultural politics of the city during the 19th and 20th centuries as told through disparate voices of New York's periodical press. Twenty-five participants will be selected to take part in discussions led by cultural historians, archivists and experts in the field of American literature, art and urban history, and periodical studies. They will participate in hands-on sessions in New York Historical Society's periodicals collection and visit sites significant in the rise of New York's periodical press.

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Liza Weinstein (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Serena Parekh (Co Project Director: September 2019 to present)
Cameron Blevins (Co Project Director: September 2019 to April 2022)
Angel David Nieves (Co Project Director: April 2022 to present)

EH-267121-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$176,020 (approved)
$173,316 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

Engaging Geography in the Humanities

A three-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on geography and the humanities.

The Humanities Center at Northeastern University in Boston requests funds to host a three-week Summer Institute on the theme “Engaging Geography in the Humanities” in the summer of 2020. The three-week summer institute, to be held from July 6 through July 24, 2020, will explore the possibilities and productive tensions at the intersection of geography and the humanities. Through engagement with readings, lectures, discussions, workshops, and field visits, the Institute will introduce university and college faculty from the humanities and related disciplines to concepts and methods from geography, as participants and faculty collectively think through how these approaches can enhance their own research and teaching.

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
William Stone Waldron (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Karin L. Meyers (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)

EH-267165-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$163,835 (approved)
$163,350 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in Buddhism

A two-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the role of imagination in Buddhist traditions and beyond.

Mangalam Research Center (MRC) proposes to host a two-week Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on "The Imagination and Imaginal Worlds in the Mirror of Buddhism," to be held June 14-26, 2020. The co-directors are William Waldron, PhD and Karin Meyers, PhD. We are requesting a grant of $146,217 from the NEH.

Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Angela M. Coventry (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)

EH-267168-19
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$193,073 (approved)
$193,073 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

David Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on the Scottish thinker David Hume.

Hume in the 21st Century: Perpetuating the Enlightenment This Institute is designed to pursue intensive study of multidisciplinary perspectives on the work of eighteenth-century Enlightenment giant David Hume. In his time, Hume was an innovator in his application of the experimental method to many disciplines. This Institute will feature a rotating faculty of eminent scholars. While they will explore Hume’s impact in epistemology, ethics, history, and economics, a notable feature of this Institute is a treatment of the implication of Hume’s thought in non-traditional areas. Faculty will address Hume’s approach in relation to Eastern thought, the status of women (including early modern woman philosophers' responses to Hume), race, the status of animals, and the environment. Participants will come away with an expansive context and diverse resources to facilitate their own teaching and research projects on these themes. The Institute will also offer them a sample of the engagement of a