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Funded Projects Query Form
14 matches

Program: Historic Places: Planning*
Date range: 2018-2021
Sort order: Award year, descending

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BP-278273-21

Sonoma State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Thomas Whitley (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Updating the Amache Interpretation Plan: Reframing Interpretation at a WWII Japanese Incarceration Site

Development of a master interpretive plan for exhibitions, site interpretation, and public programs for the Granada Relocation Center National Historic Landmark, known as Amache, and the Amache Museum.

This Historic Places project requests Planning grant funding from the National Endowment of the Humanities in the amount of $40,000 in order to revise and update the Amache Interpretation Master Plan. An updated interpretive plan will more fully integrate the needs, perspectives, and voices of a stakeholder community that has substantially grown in the last decade and consider the new and continued ways in which this community interacts with the site. New advancements in technology and the opportunities they present now and for the future will also be updated. In addition, the interpretive themes that provided the thematic structure of the 2007 Plan need to be contextualized in today’s reality, reframed to address the relevancy, urgency, and necessity of sharing the lessons that Japanese incarceration can offer to the social and political climate of today.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 4/30/2023


BP-278283-21

North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources (Edenton, NC 27932-1903)
Michelle Lanier (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
The Power of Place: Interpreting a Freedom House

Planning for a historical interpretation of the home of civil rights activist Golden Frinks (1920–2004) in Edenton, North Carolina.

The Edenton State Historic Site, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, seeks a $74,415.00 Public Humanities planning grant to develop a thorough approach for a successful interpretive project that discusses the Civil Rights Movement at the home of activist Golden Frinks (1920-2004) in Edenton, North Carolina. The resulting exhibition plan will have multiple layers of diverse audiences, careful and respectful attention to detail, and using a variety of exhibition formats blended with a traditional furnishing plan featuring artifacts, images, and documents from Frinks’ life and work. We are planning to host several community listening sessions to seek input and information from veterans of the Civil Rights Movement as well as the resident community to create a plan to interpret the house in the most sensitive, forthright, and honest way possible. Project work will include consultation with an exhibit design firm and staff training.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$74,415 (approved)
$74,415 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 8/30/2022


BP-278361-21

Esperanza Peace and Justice Center (San Antonio, TX 78212-4642)
Mia Kang (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Historias del Westside: Museo del Westside Inaugural Exhibition

Planning a permanent exhibition?for the?Museo?del Westside?and tours?of the eleven-building complex comprising the Mexican-American historic district on?San Antonio’s Westside.

The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center seeks $75,000 in Historic Places funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support planning Historias del Westside, the inaugural exhibition and walking tour at the Museo del Westside. This exhibition will interpret and serve as the formal launch of the Rinconcito de Esperanza, an eleven-building historic complex on San Antonio’s Westside. Housed in the historic Ruben’s Ice House building, the Museo del Westside will be the first museum to focus on the rich Mexican-American history of the Westside neighborhood.

Project fields:
American Studies; Latino History; Urban Studies

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2021 – 1/31/2022


BP-269670-20

Carpenters Company of City and County of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2708)
Michael L. Norris (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
Planning a New Exhibition for Carpenters’ Hall

Planning of a new permanent exhibition for Carpenter’s Hall, the site at which the First Continental Congress met.

In advance of the Carpenters’ Company of Philadelphia’s 300th anniversary and the 250th anniversary of the First Continental Congress, both of which will occur in 2024, the Company is planning a new core exhibition in its headquarters, Carpenters’ Hall. This project seeks to update the interpretation of the events that occured in the Hall by prioritizing an inclusive social history that draws on recent scholarship and appeals to a broad audience. This grant will help the Company refine the themes and content of the new exhibition through testing and consultation; determine the best use of the physical space; and develop interactive and immersive strategies for interpretation.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 9/30/2021


BP-269699-20

Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Linnea Grim (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
New Interpretative Plan for Monticello

Planning a new exhibition and three new tours exploring the lasting impact of the Declaration of Independence and its founding principles of freedom and equality.

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation (TJF), which owns and operates Monticello, Jefferson’s plantation home and UNESCO World Heritage Site, seeks a $75,000 Historic Places Planning Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support the development of a new, innovative interpretative plan for the visitor experience at Monticello - centered on the themes of freedom and equality enshrined in the Declaration of Independence - to mark the nation’s 250th anniversary in 2026.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 5/31/2021


BP-271466-20

Clinton Church Restoration, Inc. (Great Barrington, MA 01230-6075)
Frances Jones-Sneed (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Interpretive Exhibit Design for a New African American Visitor and Cultural Center at the Historic Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church in Great Barrington, MA

Development of an exhibition and interpretive center focused on the role of Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church and the African American experience in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as well as the impact of the Clinton Church on W.E.B. Du Bois.

Clinton Church Restoration (CCR) is requesting a Public Humanities Projects Planning Grant in the Historic Places category to design interpretive exhibits for an African American heritage site and cultural center. The project is part of CCR’s initiative to preserve, restore, and adaptively reuse the historic Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church in Great Barrington, a town in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts that was the hometown of civil rights pioneer W.E.B. Du Bois.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


BP-271514-20

Retreat Farm, Ltd. (Brattleboro, VT 05301-4801)
Jan Albers (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
The Retreat Farm Story Paths and Landscape Learning Center

Development of five walking path tours and an educational visitor center to interpret the historical relationship between people and the environment in Vermont.

The Retreat Farm, in Brattleboro, Vermont, is developing a new outdoor museum employing a humanities approach to connect, teach and enrich public understanding of Vermont’s iconic landscape as a microcosm of our human place on the earth. Five thematic walking paths will tell stories of landscape change on this ground over time, while a culminating landscape learning center extracts the lessons of environmental degradation and redemption. This historic and strategic site is exceptionally rich in stories of indigenous peoples, international warfare, New England settlement, natural healing, and agricultural history. Our plan is to use the power of the humanities to instill a deeper understanding of the worlds we build around us.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 4/30/2022


BP-264596-19

LancasterHistory.org (Lancaster, PA 17603-3125)
Thomas Robert Ryan (Project Director: August 2018 to present)
The Thaddeus Stevens & Lydia Hamilton Smith Historic Site

Development of a site interpretive plan exploring the impact of Thaddeus Stevens and Lydia Hamilton Smith on the Underground Railroad in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and the Reconstruction Amendments.

To celebrate the significant contributions of Congressman Thaddeus Stevens, LancasterHistory.org (formerly known as the Lancaster County Historical Society) will undertake a project to restore the home and law office of Congressman Stevens as well as to create an adjacent interpretive museum that will celebrate the legacy of Lydia Hamilton Smith, confidante to Mr. Stevens, and tell the extensive story of the Underground Railroad in Lancaster County. The overall site will situate Mr. Stevens' political and personal contributions, including his dedication to the causes of emancipation, education, and civil rights, within the broader context of 19th-century America and the unique situation of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A planning grant will provide resources for us to carefully construct an interpretive plan that will share the legacy of Mr. Stevens with the world while engaging citizens of and visitors to Lancaster in meaningful dialogue about issues of civil rights and civic literacy.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


BP-264708-19

Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park (Oakland, CA 94601-0172)
Holly L. Alonso (Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Origins of Oakland: Land, Labor, Home, and Native Presence

Planning the interpretation of the archaeological remains of the original structures at Peralta Hacienda to uncover the story of Native American influence on site.

Peralta Hacienda Historical Park, six-acre open space and humanities hub in a Latinx and Native community in Oakland, California, winner of the 2017 National Museum Medal, was once the headquarters of the 45,000-acre Spanish/Mexican era rancho that covered the land of seven modern cities including all of Oakland and Berkeley. The project requests funds to plan experiential programs and multi-sensory exhibits to reveal and interpret the site's oldest features: the footprint of land grant family's 1821 adobe house, which Native Americans built and lived in first; a rich archaeological deposit in the adjacent adobe-making pit; and an underground well from the rancho. The project will recover the Native American story of the site and the community, offer understanding of a new labor system akin to slavery that transformed the landscape, and delve into the nature of 'home' and the process that forms history from the archives.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; Geography

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


BP-266365-19

Trustees of Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Brooke M. Steinhauser (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Emily Dickinson Museum Comprehensive Interpretive Planning

Planning for a new interpretive plan and public programs at the home of poet Emily Dickinson (1830–86).

The Emily Dickinson Museum (EDM) seeks funding of $63,025 through the NEH public humanities projects grant for historic places at the planning level. Having achieved major master plan goals in its 15-year history, the EDM is now focused on uniting its historic spaces, collections, and narratives to serve a growing contemporary audience. A new mission, completed infrastructure work, and past and impending restoration all highlight the stark need for an interpretive plan. The planning process will incorporate current scholarship to revise the EDM interpretation goals, themes, and methods. This grant will result in a written plan that considers multiple approaches and methods and takes an inclusive approach to audience engagement.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$63,025 (approved)
$63,025 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


BP-256285-18

Trigg-C.M. Russell Foundation, Inc. (Great Falls, MT 59401-1426)
Emily Wilson (Project Director: January 2017 to June 2019)
C.M. Russell Museum House and Studio Interpretation Plan

Development of an interpretive plan for the historic house and studio of western artist Charles M. Russell (1864–1926).

The C.M. Russell Museum requests a $40,000 Historic Places Planning Grant to develop an interpretive plan for the Charles M. Russell House and Studio. The structures, occupied from 1900 to 1926 by famed artist of the American West Charles Marion Russell and his wife and business manager Nancy Russell, are undergoing conservation, with the studio to be finished by March 2017 and work on the house to begin immediately after. The grant would fund consultation with prominent historians of art, the American West, and Plains Indians, and the testing of interpretive content and formats before all conservation work is completed in 2018. The Russell story will be presented in the broader context of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a period of dynamic change that saw the passing of the Old West. Multiple formats and approaches to the site interpretation will be considered, including ways to create immersive environments in which visitors step into history as active participants.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


BP-259247-18

Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30303-1906)
Fred Yalouris (Project Director: August 2017 to September 2018)
Lena Carstens (Project Director: September 2018 to present)
Once Divided, Reunited: Atlanta BeltLine Transforms Historic Railroad Barriers to Modern-Day Connectors

Planning for historic site interpretation of Atlanta’s railroad corridor, including exhibitions, public programs, and trail signage.

The Atlanta BeltLine, a network of trails and parks built along a historic 22-mile railroad corridor that once circled downtown, is one of the most transformative urban redevelopment programs in the country. Linking neighborhoods once divided by physical barriers of track, bunkers and trenches, and equally formidable social barriers of class and race, the BeltLine is transforming public life. With art exhibits, festivals, volunteer events, and novel opportunities to walk or cycle through the city’s backyards, the BeltLine has become a new “public square.” Once Divided, Reunited brings Atlanta’s past to that public square, using a unique historic space to revisit histories of people who lived and worked on the railroad corridor. Coordinating efforts of scholars, civic advocates, residents, and educational institutions, the project will produce an on-site exhibition and related public programming, interpretive historical signs, and a public, digital archive of additional resources.

Project fields:
Urban History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$52,532 (approved)
$52,532 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021


BP-261032-18

Old Sturbridge Village (Sturbridge, MA 01566-1138)
Rhys Simmons (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Old Sturbridge Village Interpretive and Educational Plan

Development of a new interpretive plan and educational materials for Old Sturbridge Village to mark the site’s seventy-fifth anniversary in 2021.

Old Sturbridge Village respectfully requests a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the development of a new Interpretation and Education Plan. Old Sturbridge Village, located in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, is one of the nation’s oldest living history museums and has depicted 19th century rural New England life through costumed interpreters, historic homes, curatorial exhibitions, and educational offerings to an audience of more than 21 million visitors since opening in 1946. The Village’s training and resource materials have not been comprehensively reviewed or significantly revised since the 1970s. Throughout this project the Village will work with scholars, consultants, and partnering institutions to develop a new Interpretation and Education Plan that creates impactful visitor experiences, connects with a modern audience, and better reflects the diversity of our community both past and present.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


BP-261152-18

Friends of the Cabildo, Inc. (New Orleans, LA 70116-3205)
Karen Leathem (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Madame John’s Legacy: Exploring the History of the French Quarter

Planning of the reinterpretation of Madame John’s Legacy, an eighteenth-century French colonial style house in New Orleans.

This project will plan the reinterpretation of Madame John’s Legacy, an extraordinary house in New Orleans’s French Quarter. Built in 1788, following a devastating fire that destroyed 80% of the city, it was constructed in the French colonial style that prevailed before the disaster. With property records dating back to 1721, the residence offers a unique opportunity to experience nearly three centuries of life. Part of the Louisiana State Museum system since 1947, the house represents a microcosm of New Orleans history. Former residents include a pirate’s family, a Spanish military officer, a wealthy Creole family, enslaved servants, Italian immigrants, and 20th-century artists. This project will utilize front-end evaluation to engage scholars, consultants, and community members to ensure that the final product can be implemented safely and responsibly within the historic space in a manner that is relevant, based on current scholarship, and highly engaging for diverse audiences.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Historic Places: Planning

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/30/2019