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Funded Projects Query Form
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Grant programs:Preservation Assistance Grants*
Date range: 2018-2021
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PG-280603-21

St. Olaf College (Northfield, MN 55057-1574)
Gordon Marino (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
A Conservation Plan for 100 Rare Books in the Hong Kierkegaard Library

A conservation treatment assessment for 100 rare books published prior to 1856 that are housed in the rare book room of St. Olaf College’s Hong Kierkegaard Library (HKL). The HKL, a special collection, is the official repository for books by Søren Kierkegaard and authors whom he influenced or who influenced him. The HKL has informed the work of nearly 95 percent of the world’s prominent Kierkegaard scholars. The library offers programming and courses to encourage the study of Kierkegaard among domestic and international scholars as well as St. Olaf students and faculty. This project would focus on the collection’s rarest books most in need of repair, informing HKL’s future efforts to fundraise for conservation treatment, most notably at the HKL’s 2022 International Kierkegaard Conference.

Conservator Bailey Kinsky will undertake a conservation treatment assessment for 100 rare books published prior to 1856 that are housed in the Rare Book Room of the St. Olaf College Hong Kierkegaard Library (HKL). Both a Special Collection and a renowned Center for Research and Publication, the HKL has informed the work of nearly 95% of the world’s prominent Kierkegaard scholars. This proposal prioritizes conservation documentation for 100 of the collection’s rarest books most in need of repair, enabling HKL staff to fundraise for conservation, most notably at the HKL’s 2022 International Kierkegaard Conference. Kinsky’s documentation will include a full examination pertaining to the binding, media, and current condition issues of each book and a treatment proposal. Two undergraduate student academic interns will assist; one helping Kinsky as she documents the rare books, and the other publicizing the project to fuel fundraising efforts for conservation.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy; Phenomenology Existentialism; Philosophy of Religion

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022


PG-280605-21

Rhode Island College (Providence, RI 02908-1940)
Molly Bruce Patterson (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
General Preservation Assessment of Adams Library Special Collections at Rhode Island College

A general preservation assessment and training for staff to care for 4,000 cubic feet of materials, including rare books, archival records and manuscripts, photographs, audiovisual materials, objects, and ephemera documenting the history of Rhode Island from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Highlights of the collection include records from the college’s founding in 1854 as the state’s first teacher training school, as well as the personal papers of Nancy Elizabeth Prophet (1890–1960), a renowned American sculptor of African-American and Native American descent, and Dr. Carl Russell Gross (1888–1970), an African-American physician in Providence who chronicled the accomplishments of Rhode Island’s Black professionals in the fields of law, medicine, education, and the arts. The assessment and training in emergency preparedness and environmental monitoring for collections storage would provide the college a roadmap for the long-term preservation of the materials, thereby ensuring their ongoing research and educational use.

General Preservation Assessment of Adams Library Special Collections at Rhode Island College

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,906 (approved)
$9,906 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280611-21

New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Kristin Otto (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Purchase of Furniture and Supplies to Rehouse Native Three-Dimensional Object Collections at the NMSU University Museum

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and storage cabinets for a collection of three-dimensional Native American material culture at the University Museum of New Mexico State University (NMSU). The museum’s permanent collection includes material from archaeological digs in the Southwest U.S. and comprises archaeological, ethnographic, and historical objects (numbering approximately 170,000, 5,000, and 10,000 objects respectively). Of the 5,000 objects in the museum’s ethnographic collection, approximately 400 items of Native material culture require rehousing in enclosed cabinetry to ensure future preservation, stability, and use. The Native American materials that need to be rehoused include approximately 100 katsina dolls by Hopi artists, 150 examples of three-dimensional basketry, 50 beaded buckskin bags and belts, 50 objects related to public ceremonies and rituals, and 50 pieces made for tourists or made by contemporary artists. The university museum has used and will continue to use these collections in partnerships with Indigenous communities, thus ensuring collaborative production of knowledge and the collections’ active use.

This grant would support the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and storage cabinets to replace the open shelving currently used to store the collection of three-dimensional Native American material culture at the University Museum of New Mexico State University (NMSU). Although staff moved the collection to a new storage room at the recommendation of a past collections assessment, the room used to house these objects is still currently vulnerable to pests and environmental changes. The diverse organic materials that compose many of these objects are also particularly vulnerable. Finally, the collections management policy of the University Museum takes into consideration Indigenous-informed storage conditions and alterations. Acquiring storage cabinets and environmental monitoring equipment would better preserve the selected collection long-term, as well as facilitate further access by Indigenous collaborators in the museum.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,649 (approved)
$9,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 5/31/2022


PG-280620-21

Good Will-Hinckley (Hinckley, ME 04944-0159)
Deborah W. Staber (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
– Phase 7: Developing Storage Space and Housing Significant Humanities Collections

The work of a conservator to implement recommendations made through the Museum Assessment Program in 2012 and 2020, as well as the purchase of shelving and housing materials, staff training, and a workshop that would bring together local museum professionals to learn about best practices for safe storage. The collection consists of fine and decorative art, archaeological artifacts, natural history artifacts, and historical objects that document the history of childcare as well as local Maine history. This project would build on six previous phases that completed monitoring, climate, and light condition improvements and would turn an unused space on the second floor of the facility into an appropriate long-term storage space for humanities objects, making them more accessible for education and research.

Complete phase 7 of the archival housing and storage of historic Good Will-Hinckley materials that document the history of childcare and life in rural Maine. Consult with conservator Ron Harvey on the project work and for a workshop for volunteers and local Maine museums staff.

Project fields:
Public History; Sociology; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,762 (approved)
$4,762 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 1/30/2023


PG-280627-21

St. Louis Media History Foundation (Saint Louis, MO 63104-2924)
Kerry Manderbach (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
St. Louis Media History Foundation - Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment for a collection of 10,000 items including historic publications, radio and television broadcasts, photographs, and advertisements documenting media history in the St. Louis metropolitan area from the 1800s to the present, as well as training for staff that manages it. Highlights of the collection include 2,000 early radio broadcasts such as the earliest surviving St. Louis broadcast from 1928 and jazz and blues broadcasts on “race radio,” as well as 1,600 print ads of regional industries and manufacturers of shoes, stoves, medicines, and beer. The collection has been used for scholarly publications, local universities’ media history courses, and a forthcoming exhibit at the Missouri Historical Society.

A comprehensive preservation assessment of the Foundation's collections by a consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) and a half-day workshop ("Fundamentals of AV Preservation") for staff and volunteers.

Project fields:
Media Studies; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,275 (approved)
$9,275 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 7/31/2022


PG-280631-21

Southwest Minnesota State University (Marshall, MN 56258-3306)
Pam Gladis (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
SMSU Archives & Special Collections: Assessing & Planning for the Future

A general preservation assessment to help Southwest Minnesota State University (SMSU) determine the next steps needed to ensure the longevity of its archives and special collections. SMSU was founded in 1963 and opened in 1967 as one of the state universities of the Minnesota State System and was the first campus to be nearly barrier free to accommodate students with disabilities. The university has never had a collections preservation assessment completed. In addition to the consultant’s visit and report, the grant would support the purchase of data loggers to assist in the environmental evaluation of the spaces holding the collections. The project director would also attend an initial training session on disaster planning, as preparation for developing preservation and disaster plans. The collection of over 550 linear feet contains materials such as theater posters and playbills; university charters; architectural plans; art, music, and other fine arts posters; pictures and negatives documenting university life; and student newspapers. These are primarily used for research by constituents including university faculty, staff, administrators, students, scholars, and community members.

A preservation consultant will be hired to assess the management of SMSU's archival collections. The assessment would include studying light levels, developing plans for improving storage, assessing the conservation treatment needs of certain items, and providing advice and input on developing preservation and disaster preparedness plans.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,093 (approved)
$9,093 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PG-280636-21

Huna Heritage Foundation (Juneau, AK 99801-9380)
Amelia Wilson (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Collections Care Guidance and Support

A preservation needs assessment and community training workshop focusing on a collection of 250 books, 200 documents, 2,500 audiovisual assets, and more than 800 photographs documenting Tlingit culture, history, and language. Examples of the collection include recordings of ku.eex, a Tlingit potlatch and traditional ceremony that serves as a memorial for clan members; Tlingit language and song; veterans’ histories; cultural protocols and ways of knowing; and guidance on traditional hunting and gathering. The Huna Heritage Foundation uses its archival collection to partner with local, regional, and state organizations, produce short films, and conduct educational programming for students, conferences, Hoonah community members, and the public.

The “Collections Care Guidance and Support” project will result in a preservation needs assessment for the Huna Heritage Foundation (HHF) collections. The assessment will include documenting the physical state of the entire collection (AV, digital, print, objects, etc.) and provide recommendations for its care. A report documenting the current state of the collections, site visit findings, and making recommendations for improved preservation practices for the collections will be provided after the visit. In addition to the on-site assessment, grant funds will support a half-day community workshop, entitled “Introduction to Audiovisual Preservation” at the Alaska State Library Archives and Museums. This workshop will be free and open to their staff as well as staff at local collecting institutions such as the Juneau City Museum and Sealaska Heritage Institute. This will ensure the learning opportunity has a wider reach than our small team. Funds will also provide for archival boxes.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280642-21

Hagerstown Junior College (Hagerstown, MD 21742-6514)
Sarah L. Conrad (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Documenting Voices of the Past - Preservation Needs Assessment

The completion of a general preservation assessment of the archives at Hagerstown Community College, which is Maryland’s first community college. The archive was established in 2019 and hired an archivist to organize the collections and establish policies and procedures for archival management. The archive consists of the historical records and materials documenting the history of Maryland’s first community college, from its establishment as a junior college in the late 1940s through to the present. These records and materials include a variety of collections from college faculty, staff, and student organizations, as well as offices and departments on campus. Faculty and staff are the primary patrons of this institutional archive. A preservation assessment would provide the archivist with support and resources to facilitate better care of the collections currently in the repository as well as future acquisitions.

An assessment of preservation needs, including equipment purchase in support of the 75-year archival history at Hagerstown Community College (HCC), Maryland’s first community college founded in 1946. With approximately 100 linear feet of materials including a collection of over 500 photos, slides and negatives, videos and audio recordings, as well as HCC publications and significant humanities contributions, Hagerstown Community College seeks a specialist to provide a Preservation Needs Assessment in order to provide a blueprint for archival establishment, and comply with current best practices, and lay the groundwork for future facilities planning.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,814 (approved)
$8,814 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


PG-280643-21

University of North Florida (Jacksonville, FL 32224-7699)
Susan Swiatosz (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Preservation Needs Assessment for Special Collections and University Archives in the Thomas G. Carpenter Library at University of North Florida

A general preservation assessment for the special collections and archives held at the University of North Florida, which document the school’s history as well as the history of Jacksonville and northeast Florida. Highlights include the personal and business correspondence, documents, notes, memorabilia, printed materials, ephemera, and photographs of Eartha M.M. White (1876–1974), a Jacksonville native who sang with the Oriental-American Opera Company, owned a number of small businesses, headed the Negro Republican Women Voters, and established a variety of community services through the Clara White Mission and the Eartha M.M. White Nursing Home. The rare book collection includes the Northeast Florida Literary Heritage Collection, with works by local authors and narratives that are set in the area or highlight important local events. The assessment would allow the library unit, which has a two-person staff, the opportunity to work with a preservation expert on setting priorities for collections care that would ensure the availability of the materials to future generations of researchers.

Special Collections and University Archives at the University of North Florida (UNF) requests funding to provide a preservation needs assessment to serve as the foundation on which to base future preservation planning. Using the grant UNF will engage The Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts to perform a preservation needs assessment, the first step in developing a preservation plan for the collections. The assessment will serve as the foundation on which to base future planning, outline best practices, and aid in prioritizing future projects. The collections focus on Northeast Florida and document local political development, civil rights, race relations, education, literature, urban planning, visual and performing arts, archaeology, and social welfare. General themes include social development of the Jacksonville community, civic development and local politics, and local and military history, all of which enhance UNF’s humanities curricula.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,990 (approved)
$9,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280647-21

Appalachian College Association, Inc. (Lexington, KY 40517-2062)
Heather Tompkins (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Assessment of the Digital Library of Appalachia

The Digital Library of Appalachia (DLA), a 23-year-old digital library concerning the region, in its engagement of a digital preservation consultant to draft a new collections policy and assess long-term sustainability for the DLA to inform the addition of new items to the collection and new Appalachian College Association (ACA) member institutions to the DLA, as well as identify planning necessary for digital preservation. The DLA provides online access to archival and historical materials related to the culture of the southern and central Appalachian region, with contents drawn from the special collections of 23 of the 35 ACA member libraries. The collection contains over 30,000 digital objects. These include digitized music, photographs, memorabilia, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, and documents. ACA staff, in collaboration with archives staff at member institutions, would finalize the collections policy and develop more concrete plans for maintaining and sustaining this regional resource. In addition, the consultant would work with ACA staff and archives staff at member institutions to provide a framework and guidance for staff to develop online training modules to help faculty, staff, and students at member institutions digitize items and load them to the DLA.

This project will engage a consultant to support the ACA's assessment of the current state of the Digital Library of Appalachia (DLA). The consultant will draft a collections policy for the DLA that will then be finalized by ACA staff and archives staff at member institutions. In addition, the consultant will identify planning necessary for digital preservation, and a framework and guidance for staff to develop online training modules to assist member institutions' efforts to add materials to the DLA. and recommend strategies for training archives staff at member institutions. ACA and member institution staff will utilize the consultant's work to develop plans for maintaining and sustaining this important resource on the history and culture of Appalachia. This project responds to the NEH "A More Perfect Union" initiative in that it provides access to important resources for deepening public understanding of this often-misunderstood region.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$14,451 (approved)
$14,451 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 3/31/2023


PG-280649-21

Boise Art Museum (Boise, ID 83702-7646)
Melanie Fales (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Boise Art Museum Permanent Collection Rehousing Project

The purchase of archival supplies to rehouse a portion of the Boise Art Museum’s permanent collection, with a focus on ceramics, sculptures, and textiles by contemporary Native American artists. The collection includes 67 artworks by Apache, Choctaw, Hopi, Navajo, Pueblo, Tohono O’odham, and Wyandot artists, and pueblo pottery from the pueblos northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The techniques for making pueblo pottery date from nearly 1,000 years ago and continue to be passed down to younger generations. The works comprise a fundamental component of the museum’s public educational programs, special lectures, and ongoing research on contemporary Native American artwork. As the only art museum in a 300-mile radius, the museum conducts extensive educational outreach through offerings such as docent-guided tours for rural schools, a distance learning program, and a digital app that collectively reach more than 16,000 Idaho students annually.

Boise Art Museum requests support for a project to rehouse significant humanities objects in its Permanent Collection, as identified in the Collection Storage Plan. This project is the next step in the implementation of the Collection Storage Plan, developed with the help of a qualified consultant in 2019 to better utilize secure storage areas, to improve the long-term preservation and accessibility of the collection, and ultimately to facilitate the critical programming BAM provides to the community. The purchase of museum-quality enclosures, mounts, and containers, and substantial dedicated staff time, is needed in order to properly store and protect all artwork. BAM regularly organizes and presents exhibitions from the Permanent Collection to reflect our diverse heritage, traditions, and history. This project will improve storage conditions, contribute to the long-term preservation of artwork in the Permanent Collection, and increase ease of access to objects for curatorial staff.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280658-21

Chickasaw Nation (Ada, OK 74821-1548)
Amanda Hudson (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
The Chickasaw Nation's Preservation Assistance for Smaller Institutions

Purchase of preservation supplies and staff training for an archival collection of 626 cubic feet of governors’ papers, newspapers, photographs and negatives, rare books, audiovisual materials, electronic records, and other materials documenting Chickasaw history and culture. Highlights of the collection include the personal papers, diaries, and other documents of former Chickasaw governors, including Cyrus Harris, appointed in 1850 the first governor of the Chickasaw Nation, and Douglas H. Johnston, who in 1906 became the first governor appointed by a U.S. president; correspondence of and oral stories performed by Chickasaw storyteller Te Ata (Mary Frances Thompson); nineteenth-century Chickasaw rolls, chattel mortgages, and census records; and historic maps. The collection has been used to produce books published by the Chickasaw Press; periodicals such as the Ishtannowa (formerly the Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture), Chickasaw Times, and Chokma magazine; public programming; and curricula and research projects representing the Chickasaw Nation.

The Chickasaw Nation is requesting funds through the National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation Assistance Grant. Specifically, these monies will be used to purchase needed supplies to properly house the significant cultural and historical records of the Chickasaw Nation and the Chickasaw people housed in the Archives of the Holisso: Center for Study of Chickasaw History and Culture on the campus of the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma. Grant funds will be used to purchase archival supplies and updated environmental monitoring equipment such as acid-free, archival boxes, folders, sleeves, HOBO dataloggers, gloves and other materials to properly rehouse and preserve the Chickasaw Nation archival collections. Lastly, funds will be used to provide virtual training in the proper preservation and care of archival materials for the staff working with the Chickasaw Nation Archives.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$2,182 (approved)
$2,182 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 11/30/2022


PG-280670-21

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Sarah Carter (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Preservation Supplies for Enhanced Collections Care at the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection

The purchase of preservation supplies and storage hardware recommended by a Collections Assessment for Preservation report developed for the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection (HLATC) in 2017. The collection began with 4,000 textiles collected by Helen Louise Allen, a professor of weaving and textile cultures for more than forty years at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The collection represents 2,600 years of textile history from 108 countries. The oldest objects in HLATC are six ancient Peruvian fragments woven circa the second century BCE, while the newest objects are face masks collected in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The grant would help HLATC reduce or eliminate unnecessary environmental stressors on its delicate textile artifacts and prepare for emergency situations. This includes purchasing UV filters for the research room and classroom, removing and replacing non-archival plywood shelving with new archival storage cabinets, and purchasing supplies for emergency preparedness kits.

This grant would support the purchase of preservation supplies and storage hardware recommended by a Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) report developed for the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection (HLATC) in 2017. The activities outlined in this application will allow HLATC to reduce or eliminate unnecessary environmental stressors on its delicate textile artifacts and prepare for emergency situations.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,417 (approved)
$6,417 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280672-21

J.D.C. (New York, NY 10017-4014)
Abra Cohen (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Preservation Assessment of the JDC Archives Collection of Albums and Scrapbooks

A conservation assessment of approximately 250 albums and scrapbooks containing correspondence, telegrams, cards, certificates, lithographs, prints, ephemera, and photographs documenting life in Jewish communities around the world, such as in Hungary, China, and the Dominican Republic, many of which were locations for resettlements after World War II. The collections are used with in-person and online exhibits and public programming, as well as by scholars and researchers. The project would also include the purchase of preservation supplies for rehousing.

The JDC Archives is the institutional repository of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the world’s leading Jewish humanitarian relief organization, founded in 1914. The JDC Archives requests NEH funds to hire a conservation consultant to help create a plan for improving the storage and stability of the albums and scrapbooks in our Artifacts and Ephemera Collection. This collection offers a remarkable and vital perspective on JDC’s global relief efforts, over the last century, in over 90 countries. The grant would support the review of three types of albums within the collection (1) those containing works of art, (2) scrapbooks of mixed media, and (3) albums that have become detached) and the purchase of preservation supplies in order to implement the recommendations made by the conservation consultant.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; Immigration History; Jewish Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PG-280684-21

Canterbury Shaker Village, Inc. (Canterbury, NH 03224-2728)
Renee E. Fox (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Conservation Assessment of the Elder Henry Blinn Museum Collection at Canterbury Shaker Village

A general preservation assessment of Canterbury Shaker Village’s Elder Henry Blinn Museum Collection, which consists of 300 objects, including natural history specimens, ethnographic materials,?historical items, and Shaker relics. A typical late-nineteenth-century New England “cabinet of curiosities,” the collection reflects the collecting practices of a progressive resident and community Elder in Shaker Village in Canterbury, New Hampshire. These objects fell outside the scope of previous Canterbury Shaker Village assessments, and the collection was inaccessible for many years, but the village has recently made them a priority for assessment and conservation due to their fragility and importance in illuminating Shaker history. NEH funding would support a preservation assessment by Christie Pohl, Associate Objects Conservator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, who would examine this collection in order to write a report and make recommendations for storage and display, as well as future conservation work.

Canterbury Shaker Village requests assistance to support a conservation assessment of approximately 300 objects from the late 19th-century/early 20th-century Elder Henry Blinn Museum Collection. Established in 1860 by a prominent Canterbury Shaker leader, the museum contains natural history specimens, ethnographic materials, items of historical interest, and Shaker relics, including a Zulu spear, clay pipes made by the Canterbury Shakers in the early 19th century, coral, a horned toad, rocks and minerals, a piece of the transatlantic cable, sand from the Holy Land, and the hitching post Shaker founder Mother Ann Lee once used. The materials are disparate and many are fragile. This cabinet of curiosities has been a popular element of CSV interpretation over the past decades, and will be used in new interpretive strategies to examine many themes in Shaker and broader American culture and history.

Project fields:
Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,062 (approved)
$5,062 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 5/31/2022


PG-280686-21

University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Laura Calhoun (Project Director: January 2021 to May 2022)
Kristina Durocher (Project Director: May 2022 to present)
UNH Museum of Art Collection Stewardship and Preservation

The purchase of equipment to monitor temperature and relative humidity in exhibition spaces, shelving for paintings, and equipment and materials to reduce and monitor light levels in exhibition and storage areas. This project would address recommendations from a Collections Assessment for Preservation survey undertaken in 2019. The collection of 2,212 objects was established and developed in 1948 to meet the teaching and research needs of the Department of Art and Art History. The collection emphasizes the work of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century New Hampshire artists, including a small but culturally significant collection of mid-twentieth-century ceramics by Ed and Mary Scheier, as well as genre and figurative art from the Renaissance to the present day.

To address key issues cited in our Collections Assessment for Preservation Survey undertaken September, 2019, we aim to secure funding to address and implement the report’s near-term recommendations and to fulfill our strategic goal for improving collections care, improving environmental conditions, improving storage conditions, and to prepare for accreditation. The NEH Preservation Assistance Grant would allow for the museum to purchase materials needed to measure and monitor temperature and relative humidity data, acquire furniture and materials to re-house objects and improve storage, to reduce and monitor light levels in exhibition and storage areas.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 5/31/2023


PG-280702-21

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Sebastian Hierl (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Digital Preservation Assessment for American Academy in Rome

A digital preservation assessment to review the American Academy in Rome’s (AAR) current digital preservation provisions and provide recommendations to ensure the long-term preservation, searchability, and retrieval of diverse formats. The report would provide guidance on improving long-term access to the Academy’s digital collections. The collection has three main repositories, including administrative files and materials documenting the history of the institution; unique photographic collections ranging from the late nineteenth century to the present; and a collection of 9,000 archaeological artifacts and the documentation of two prominent American excavations in Italy during the twentieth century, the AAR’s excavations at Regia (Roman Forum) and Cosa (Tuscany). Scholars and artists are the primary users of this collection as well as the public, which typically accesses it through exhibitions.

The American Academy in Rome (AAR) is applying for a NEH Preservation Assistance Grant for the purpose of completing a digital preservation assessment by Northeast Document Conservation Center Preservation Specialist, Becky Geller.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$7,150 (approved)
$7,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280709-21

Seward House Museum (Auburn, NY 13021-3929)
Emily Kraft (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Purchase of Furniture to Upgrade Seward House Museum's Collections Storage

The purchase of furniture to upgrade the Seward House Museum’s collections storage from metal, open shelving units to enclosed, temperature-regulated, secure cabinets, in accordance with its institutional preservation and strategic plans. This National Historic Landmark houses political memorabilia, fine and decorative art, photographs, Civil War artifacts, and ethnographic material, much of it associated with the travels of William Henry Seward, one of the foremost politicians of the nineteenth century, in what would eventually become the state of Alaska. These materials are critical to the museum’s narrative about the Seward family as well as programming and research offerings.

The Seward House Museum is seeking NEH Preservation Assistance for Smaller Institutions grant money to upgrade our current storage shelving to museum standard cabinetry. The Museum would like to use the money to purchase three mid-depth museum cabinets with glass doors to rehouse three important sub-collections. The collections are integral to our narrative about the Seward family, along with educational programming and scholarly research requests. The Museum is using industry standards and core documentation at the institution to justify this ask.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


PG-280710-21

Hermitage Museum and Gardens (Norfolk, VA 23505-1730)
Lindsay Neal (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Preservation Assessment of the Hermitage Museum & Gardens Archive & Objects

A preservation assessment by the Northeast Document Conservation Center of the collections of the Hermitage Museum & Gardens, whose collection represents more than thirty global cultures and 5,000 years of world history, from the Neolithic era to the early 1950s. The materials include more than 100 artworks by late-nineteenth and twentieth-century artists, over 500 works on paper, over 200 sculptures and antique cultural objects, several hundred craft objects (including glass, ceramic, metal, wood, and fiber/textiles), the personal effects and works of museum founders William and Florence Sloane, and paper-based materials including photographs, letters, postcards, greeting cards, large-format maps, original architectural blueprint drawings of the Hermitage structure, and limited edition prints and publications by Raymond Duncan.

The Hermitage Museum & Gardens (Norfolk, VA) requests $7,574.25 from the NEH Preservation Assistance Grant to support a general preservation assessment of its collections, with a specific emphasis on its Archival contents. The purpose of the project is to provide guidance for the museum’s short and long-term preservation goals. The assessment will result in a detailed report that takes overall conditions and environmental aspects into account and will provide specialist-level expertise as the basis for museum staff to establish and formalize its own short and long-term preservation plans for the collection.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,366 (approved)
$9,365 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280714-21

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Mary Alice Casto (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Global Textiles Storage Assessment in University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Historic Costume and Textile Collection

An assessment of the storage and general preservation needs of the University of Nebraska’s Historic Costume and Textile Collection (HCTC), as well as training on the care of historic textiles and dress for forty attendees including faculty, staff, and students, as well as staff and volunteers from local museums. The HCTC holds more than 6,000 artifacts. Approximately 4,000 items are primarily nineteenth- and twentieth-century Western dress, documenting the rise of the American textile and garment industry in this time. Global textiles and international dress comprise the approximately 2,000 remaining artifacts and include items from the United States; Europe; East, South, Southeast, and Central Asia; Central and South America; the Indian Subcontinent; the Middle East; and Africa. The collection also includes ephemera and non-textile historic artifacts related to fashion, dress, and textiles, such as primary source periodicals, images, and costumed dolls. Through this collection, the HCTC provides opportunities for study of global textile traditions and cultures.

The grant will fund an expert assessment of the current storage and conservation needs of the Department of Textiles, Merchandising & Fashion Design’s (TMFD) Historic Costume and Textile Collection (HCTC) which serves to preserve, study, and communicate both the ordinary and extraordinary material culture of cloth and clothing through teaching, research and outreach. The assessment will provide recommendations for the layout and remodeling of a separate room for the use and storage of the flat textile portion of the HCTC collection plus advice as to how to best use the space in the current storage area. Funds will also pay for a one-day training workshop proper handling and use of artifacts for teaching, research and exhibitions which will be available for TMFD students and faculty as well as the staff of local museums.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PG-280717-21

Girard College (Philadelphia, PA 19121-4860)
Katherine H. Haas (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Girard College Historical Collections: Bound Manuscript Rehousing

The purchase of custom-fitted archival book boxes to support and protect 725 volumes. The Stephen Girard Papers document the life of Stephen Girard (1750-1831), an American immigrant who, in his fifty-five years in the U.S. (1776-1831), made immense fortunes in shipping, banking, and real estate, reshaping each of those fields and becoming the wealthiest American of his time. At the same time, he held enslaved people in both Philadelphia and Louisiana and traded in goods, such as tobacco and sugar, produced with enslaved labor. At his death, he made the largest private philanthropic gift to that point in American history, surprising his contemporaries by leaving his vast fortune to establish Girard College to educate “poor, white, orphan, boys” between the ages of six and eighteen. Today Girard College is a co-educational, full-scholarship boarding school, grades one through 12, for academically capable students from families of limited financial resources. The Stephen Girard Papers date from 1770 through 1831, and in addition to extensive unbound manuscripts, they include over 1,100 bound manuscript volumes, including letter books, ledgers, receipt books, ships’ logs, and other records. The school history collection begins with Girard’s death in 1831 and continues to the present. This rehousing project would protect the most fragile 40 percent of currently unhoused bound manuscripts.

This grant would support rehousing for the storage and preservation of bound manuscripts in two sections of the Girard College Historical Collections: the Stephen Girard Papers and the school history collection. Overall, these collections include approximately 1900 bound manuscripts. Grant funds will enable the purchase of custom-fitted book boxes to support and protect approximately 725 of the most fragile volumes. These collections are used in scholarly publications, educational activities, exhibits and media programming. They document the life of Stephen Girard (1750-1831), providing insight into a complicated and influential man with an enduring legacy in business, philanthropy, and education and illuminate the world of early national Philadelphia he inhabited. They also chronicle the history of the unprecedented school Girard endowed for disadvantaged youth and provide resources for the broader study of educational, architectural, civil rights, and Philadelphia history.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$7,902 (approved)
$7,902 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PG-280718-21

American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
John Rasmussen (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Sustaining the Heritage of the Corcoran Legacy Collection at American University

A general preservation assessment of 9,000 works of art including paintings, prints, drawings, photography, sculpture, books, decorative arts, and ephemera from antiquity into the twenty-first century that were redistributed to the museum from the now-closed Corcoran Gallery of Art. Of particular note in the collection are paintings by artists from the Washington Color School, such as Sarah Baker, Manon Cleary, and Claudia DeMonte, and a combination of 640 photographs and prints by Washington, D.C. area resident, photojournalist, and World War II war correspondent Constance Stuart Larrabee. The collections are used for exhibition and research, with a focus on artists of the Washington, D.C., area. The project would also include the development of an emergency preparedness plan with assistance from the consultant, as well as training for staff in collections management, object storage, and emergency preparedness.

We are seeking a grant to support three complementary activities: 1) a General Preservation Assessment of the physical collections, to be conducted by a consultant. The resulting report will offer recommendations for collections care, policies and practices, storage and handling, and environmental conditions; 2) Focus on education and training of the collection’s management team. The consultant will spend time with the Acting Registrar and Preparator to administrator trainings in storage best practices, including cost-effective solutions for object rehousing. The grant will also support the purchase of trainings in preservation and care of collections by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works (AIC) and the Association of Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS); 3) Developing an Emergency Preparedness Plan with the consultant.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280721-21

Lawrence University of Wisconsin (Appleton, WI 54911-5798)
Beth Zinsli (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Lawrence University’s Teakwood Room: A Plan for Preservation of a Global Humanities Treasure

A general preservation needs assessment and an item-specific survey of the Alice G. Chapman Teakwood Room, to be completed by the Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC). As the only remaining complete, carved teakwood room created by the designer Lockwood de Forest in the 1890s, the Teakwood Room is a distinctive part of the cultural heritage of Wisconsin, but it has lacked the specialized care and institutional support necessary for the preservation of its delicate and unique materials and objects. The professional assessment would help Lawrence University develop a strategic preservation plan to enable greater access to the room and its objects for research and education. Additionally, the MACC staff would give a presentation about the field of object conservation for Lawrence University museum studies students. Improved access to the Teakwood Room would enable students to gain professional experience without leaving the campus.

Lawrence University is seeking a National Endowment for Humanities Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions to support a General Needs Assessment and Item-Specific Survey of the Alice G. Chapman Teakwood Room, to be completed by the Midwest Art Conservation Center. The Teakwood Room is a University treasure and a distinctive part of Wisconsin’s cultural heritage, but one that has unfortunately lacked the specialized care and institutional direction necessary for the preservation of its delicate and unique materials and objects. Ours is the only remaining, complete, carved Teakwood?Room created?by the designer Lockwood de Forest in the 1890s; it is an extraordinary example of global material culture located in the Midwest. The professional conservation assessment and survey will allow Lawrence University to continue to steward the room and its objects responsibly and expand access to larger and more diverse audiences for research and education.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PG-280722-21

Morris County Park Commission (Morristown, NJ 07960-3161)
Melanie Bump (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Sustainable Management of Collections Environments with Limited Controls, Phase 2

Consultation with preservation professionals from the Image Permanence Institute and the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts, the purchase of preservation supplies and equipment, and hiring an intern to assist in data collection. The project would test out low-cost improvements to collection storage environments in buildings located at the Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Fosterfields Living Historical Farm, Historic Speedwell, and Willowwood Arboretum, cultural sites that are home to library, archival, and artifact collections documenting the history of northern New Jersey. The collections are used in a wide variety of exhibits covering the social, industrial, agricultural, and architectural history of Morris County. The project team would experiment with the range and features of portable dehumidifiers and use protective enclosures and cabinet modifications to create microclimates for collections, among other methods to improve storage conditions. The results would inform a long-range preservation plan for the collections.

Environmental controls (heating, cooling and dehumidification) are vital to collections care. Hot, cold, dry or humid spaces can lead to mold growth, loosen furniture joints, chip paint, fade dyes and corrode metal. Many historic sites store collections in spaces with limited ability to regulate these conditions. This project implements the 2nd phase actions of a 2-phase research partnership with Morris County Park Commission (MCPC), the Image Permanence Institute and Conservation Center of Art & Historic Artifacts. Environmental data collected during Phase 1 (2019-20) activities, supported by NEHPAG, guides Phase 2’s testing of passive and mechanical methods to improve the environment in terms of preservation and sustainability. The goal is to answer how to make low-cost or no cost improvements based on environmental monitoring in spaces with limited or no HVAC control and providing MCPC with analysis to make informed cost-benefit decisions regarding managing a range of structures.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PG-280726-21

Visual Studies Workshop, INC (Rochester, NY 14607-1405)
Jessica Johnston (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Visual Studies Workshop Collection Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment for a multimedia collection that includes 6,000 twentieth- and twenty-first-century artists’ books; 15,000 original photographic or photo-mechanical prints made by 2,200 photographers; 40,000 news agency photographs covering the 1920s and 1930s; thousands of audiovisual materials including educational, industrial, animation, and documentary film; and 60,000 nineteenth- and early twentieth-century glass lantern slides. Since 1969, the Visual Studies Workshop has produced hundreds of exhibitions, provided residencies for researchers, and educated students through workshops in the areas of media and photography studies.

Visual Studies Workshop (VSW) seeks $7200 to fund a preservation assessment of our photography, moving image, audio and book collections.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Film History and Criticism; History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access