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Funded Projects Query Form
244 matches

Program: Preservation Assistance Grants*
Date range: 2018-2021
Sort order: Award year, descending

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PG-271348-20

Nebraska Historical Society (Lincoln, NE 68508-1651)
Paul J. Eisloeffel (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Archival Moving Image Film Storage

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse 2,300 moving image reels documenting the history and culture of Nebraska from 1923 to 1980. Film highlights include a 39-part series produced in 1954, documenting the history, pre-history, and natural history of the Great Plains states; a documentary about the racial integration of two Lutheran churches in Omaha in the early 1960s; a training film on hunting ethics produced in 1976; early home movies of the St. Augustine Mission School for Native Americans, dating from the late 1920s and early 1930s; amateur footage of Nebraska’s 134th Infantry Regiment in action in Europe during World War II; and a biography of Nebraskan U.S. Poet Laureate John G. Neihardt.

Studies have shown that archival motion picture films can benefit from proper storage in vented cans made of inert plastic. This project is designed to provide such storage to approximately 2300 archival 16mm moving image reels now stored in substandard containers.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 3/31/2021


PG-271359-20

Northwestern Michigan College (Traverse City, MI 49686-3061)
Craig Ray Hadley (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Environmental Preservation Equipment for Enhanced Collections Care at the Dennos Museum Center

The purchase of supplies to aid the Dennos Museum Center in environmental monitoring of its storage and display spaces. This was recommended in a 2010 preservation assessment. The museum has one of the country’s largest collections of contemporary Inuit art, numbering 1,600 works, in addition to works by artists of regional note, and contemporary Chinese and Japanese ceramics and glass. The museum welcomes over 62,000 visitors annually, serving as an art museum for the community college as well as local and regional audiences of all ages.

The Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College respectfully requests $9,062 to purchase environmental dataloggers, a UV light meter, and a HEPA vacuum cleaner to enhance preservation efforts. These tools will support the professionalization of collections care following a leadership transition in 2019, which has led to a renewed focus on preservation and access. According to a 2010 General Conservation Assessment conducted by conservator Barbara Heller (Detroit Institute of Arts), the Dennos was strongly encouraged to acquire these critical preservation tools. The new equipment will enable the Dennos to properly care for its nearly 3,000 works of art, with core holdings in 20th century Inuit works on paper and hardstone carvings, along with regional modern and contemporary artists. The collection directly supports teaching and programming initiatives at Northwestern Michigan College, along with exhibitions and programs for over 62,000 general visitors each year.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,062 (approved)
$9,062 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 4/30/2021


PG-271387-20

Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (Harbor Springs, MI 49740-9692)
Eric Hemenway (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
LTBB Archives Historic Records Preservation

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse two archival collections, and the development of a long-term plan for rehousing the remainder of the tribe’s collections. The Archives Department cares for nine collections consisting of 160,000 documents, 3,000 images, and 250 artifacts that document the history and culture of the Odawa Indians. The research archive of ethnohistorian James McClurken and the Shawnibin collection, containing personal correspondence and photographs from the late-nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries, would be prioritized for this project. The archives are used for education and outreach, exhibits, and research.

The LTBB Archives Department (Archives) maintains collections that critical resources for public uses including articles, presentations and exhibits. LTBB was awarded an FY 2016 Preservation Assistance Grant that provided funds to hire a consultant to review our archives, develop a long-range preservation plan and develop a moving/rehousing plan. The result of this project, an assessment report, will guide the next phase of preservation effort. The goal of this project is to improve long-term sustainability of the historic and archival materials within the Archives for the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians. By the end of the 18-month project period, Archives will have adequate preservation supplies to rehouse two significant collections in acid-free materials that will provide more safe and secure storage and an updated plan for the quantity of additional materials needed to preserve the remainder of the current collections.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271390-20

Good Will Home Association (Hinckley, ME 04944-0159)
Deborah W. Staber (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Phase 6: Developing Storage Space and Housing Significant Humanities Collections

The purchase of preservation furniture and supplies and the hiring of a consultant to offer training in collections care in partnership with Maine Archives and Museums for regional museum staff. The L.C. Bates Museum cares for a collection of artworks and artifacts related to the daily life of children living in Good Will-Hinckley Homes, childcare centers and orphanages that operated in Maine in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collections include farming and ice-cutting tools used by the boys, and fabric arts and rug-making equipment used by the girls, which help to show the work skills taught to those under the care of the Good Will centers. The collections are used for research, exhibits, and educational programs on the history of childcare and orphan life.

The L.C. Bates Museum’s project goal is to improve collection’s care and preservation by completing phase 6 of Developing Storage Spaces and Housing Significant Historic Objects in the museum’s 2 floor storage space. The stored collections are relevant to the national history of childcare and its study as exemplified by Good Will-Hinckley Homes (GWH) and/or Maine history. This storage project, a prioritized collections care goal of the Museum’s 2018-22 Strategic Plan, follows the recommendations of our 2008 RE-CAP, 2012 MAP Collections Stewardship and Ron Harvey’s 2000 Collection Survey and 2010-19 climate monitoring reports. The project is designed to turn an unused space on the second floor into an appropriate and used long-term storage space for humanities objects and provide collections care training through working with the conservator and a preservation workshop presented in colaboration with Maine archives and Museums by the project conservator Ron Harvey.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,844 (approved)
$5,844 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 1/31/2022


PG-271408-20

City of Manitowoc (Manitowoc, WI 54220-4543)
Diana Jean Bolander (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preserving and Protecting the Rahr-West Art Museum Collection

The purchase of storage furniture, equipment, and preservation supplies, as well as implementation of an integrated pest management policy, installation of water detection alarms, rehousing of sculpture, and preventative care for object storage. The museum houses primarily two-dimensional works of art from the nineteenth through twenty-first century, with an emphasis on American and Wisconsin artists. Informed by a 2019 Collections Assessment for Preservation, the proposed project would allow the applicant to address several key recommendations in Phase II of its five-year plan, which endeavors to maintain a safe and clean environment for the museum’s collections.

This grant project addresses the Rahr-West Art Museum’s need to provide safe and accessible environments for its collections by addressing several key recommendations from the 2019 Collections Assessment (CAP) done through the IMLS-funded and FAIC administered Collections Assessment Program.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271424-20

Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC 29303-3663)
Youmi Efurd (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Assessment of the works of Julia Elizabeth Tolbert

An item-level conservation survey of 139 works of art on paper by Julia Elizabeth Tolbert (1911–1978), a twentieth-century artist of note in the Southeast. Wofford’s Richardson Family Art Museum has nearly 300 works of art by Tolbert, the most complete collection of her work. This comprises a substantial portion of the museum’s 1,400 object permanent collection, which is made accessible for research and cross-disciplinary teaching. This project builds on recommendations from a 2019 preservation assessment.

Wofford College’s Richardson Family Art Museum (RFAM) requests a grant of $6,942 from the NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions program. The grant will support an item-by-item survey of 139 works on paper by Julia Elizabeth Tolbert. The assessment will evaluate the conditions and general management of its collection. The consultants’ visit and evaluation will result in a written assessment report with the following recommendations: 1) recommendations for planning and prioritizing immediate and long-term conservation treatment needs of items; 2) recommendations for proper handling and management, including storage and display; 3) recommendations for development of strategies to improve current collections care practices for works on paper. The goals of the project are derived from recommendations based on the Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) Program participation in 2019.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,942 (approved)
$6,942 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271573-20

St. Lawrence University (Canton, NY 13617-1501)
Catherine Tedford (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
St. Lawrence University Brush Gallery Preservation Needs Assessment

An assessment of preservation needs and development of recommendations for use of building space at the Brush Art Gallery. Within the wide-ranging collection of over 7,000 objects, photography is a particular strength. These images  range from works by American masters to those by amateurs in a series on American G.I.’s and nurses during the Vietnam War. The photography collection was begun by Michael Hoffman, founder of the Aperture Foundation and a graduate of St. Lawrence University.

The Richard F. Brush Art Gallery (Gallery) at St. Lawrence University (SLU) seeks a specialist to provide a Preservation Needs Assessment and Space Specifications Report in order to update previous assessment reports, comply with current best practices, and lay the groundwork for future facilities planning.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,082 (approved)
$9,082 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2021


PG-271577-20

YMCA of the Rockies (Estes Park, CO 80511-9500)
Karen Jane Lloyd D'Onofrio (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
YMCA of the Rockies Photograph Archives Collection Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment for a collection of 45,000 photographs and the purchase of supplies for their rehousing. The collection includes images dating from the late nineteenth century to the present that document the people, events, and environment of the YMCA camps near Estes Park, Colorado, and the history of tourism and recreation in the Rocky Mountain region, even prior to the establishment of Rocky Mountain National Park. The collections are frequently drawn upon for museum exhibits and are also available for research requests and used in YMCA publications.

The preservation assessment of the YMCA of the Rockies photograph archives collection will provide the institution with detailed process steps to preserve our most vulnerable collections, and will include: recommendations on re-housing and organization of the collection; and digitization for preservation of and access to the collection. The collection spans the 20th century and documents the history of the organization and the people who attended the camp over a period of more than one hundred more years. The collection provides us with a snapshot of life at a YMCA camp and the local area during a time of rapid growth in tourism in the U.S. West.

Project fields:
Architecture; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,488 (approved)
$8,488 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271581-20

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art (Hartford, CT 06103-2911)
Amy Kilkenny (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
General Preservation Assessment of the Auerbach Art Library and Wadsworth Atheneum Archives

A preservation assessment of the Atheneum’s library and archives, which contain 50,000 bound volumes, 3,000 linear feet of archival material, and 200 periodical titles that date from the seventeenth century to the present. The Wadsworth Atheneum is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States. Its library and archives house materials that document its history, are relevant to its collection, and support art historical research more broadly for staff, docents, and visiting scholars. Collection highlights include the museum’s first published Catalogue of Paintings from 1844, artists’ books donated by Sol Le Witt, a manuscript collection that documents the business and family of Rhode Island merchant Benjamin Fowler (1937–1818), and records of the Connecticut Historical Society and Hartford Public Library, which were housed within the Atheneum until the 1950s.

The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art respectfully requests a grant of $7,521 from the NEH Preservation Assistance Grant program to undertake a general preservation assessment of the Auerbach Art Library and Wadsworth Atheneum Archives, a collection spanning more than 50,000 bound volumes, 3,000 linear feet of archival materials, and 200 periodical titles. Conducted by a consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC), the assessment will evaluate the building and environment as they relate to the preservation needs of the materials; examine current policies, storage, and handling procedures; and assess the general condition of a representative sample of the collections. Observations and recommendations will be presented in a written report that will identify short-, medium-, and long-term preservation priorities. The general preservation assessment will be a vital step in the development of a long-range preservation plan for the Library and Archives.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$7,521 (approved)
$7,521 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271583-20

Shaker Heritage Society (Albany, NY 12211-1004)
Johanna Grace Batman (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Environmental Assessment Program

A preservation assessment by the Landmark Facilities Group to recommend improved environmental control for the main collection storage area of the Shaker Meeting House, a clapboard structure dating from 1848, along with the purchase and installation of dataloggers. The collection encompasses 600 to 700 objects (furniture, textiles, archival material, and household objects and workshop tools), postcards, ephemera associated with the Watervliet community from the mid-nineteenth century through the 1930’s, organization records, and historical photographs. The project would significantly improve problematic storage conditions, allow staff to reorganize the entire collection in a more stable environment, and make it more accessible to themselves, members, visitors, researchers, and educators.

Shaker Heritage is requesting PAG support to hire a consultant to conduct a two-part evaluation. The first phase will encompass an onsite visit and evaluation of our HVAC system, thermal envelope, and associated pipes and ductwork on the third floor adjacent to our collections storage space to identify deficiencies and develop a prioritized list of recommendations for implementation. The second phase will involve the purchase and programming of dataloggers for installation throughout the historic building to allow us to monitor conditions. The work will conclude with an annual report prepared by the consultant that charts and summarizes temperature and humidity trends.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,870 (approved)
$6,870 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 10/31/2021


PG-271599-20

Florida Historical Society (Cocoa, FL 32922-7901)
Ben Dibiase (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
General Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of the historical society’s Library of Florida to determine needs for storage and environmental controls. The materials range from sixteenth-century Spanish rare books to nineteenth-century cotton plantation account books. The Florida Historical Society has made its collections accessible both through cataloging and digitization, as well as by outreach activities that include radio programs, educational opportunities, and scholarly publications.

A general preservation assessment of the Florida Historical Society's Library of Florida History holdings by a professional preservation consultant.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,000 (approved)
$8,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-271608-20

Wiregrass Museum of Art, Inc. (Dothan, AL 36303-4802)
Dana-Marie Lemmer (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Supplies

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment, as recommended by a 2018 preservation assessment. These include storage supplies as well as equipment for collecting data and monitoring light levels, temperature, and humidity. The Wiregrass Museum of Art, a small contemporary art museum in the Wiregrass region of southeast Alabama, maintains a collection of over 1,100 objects in its Permanent Collection, Education Collection, and objects on long-term loan. This project would help the museum apply best practices in collections care and support its long-term goal of national accreditation.

Wiregrass Museum of Art (WMA) will fulfill strategic objectives outlined in its CAP Report, to operate in best practices and work toward its goal of national accreditation. This project will purchase preservation supplies for care of objects in the museum's care, including collections and objects on long term loan.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,987 (approved)
$9,987 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 9/30/2021


PG-271609-20

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Lynne Swanson (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Michigan State University Museum Siyazama Collection Rehousing and Photography Project

The purchase of storage equipment for the Siyazama Project collection, which is housed at the university’s museum and consists of 66 traditional craft works created by South African women as part of an organized art and health initiative during the HIV/AIDS crisis. The collection is the most representative of this initiative located in any museum; smaller collections of Siyazama Project works can be found at the British Museum, the Fowler Museum at UCLA, and other institutions. Acquired in 2014, the collection has been incorporated into on-site and touring exhibitions, student-focused programs, and in scholarly publications.

Michigan State University Museum is the recent recipient of a collection of 66 objects made in South Africa by women as part of the Siyazama Project. The specific goal of this project is to appropriately house this collection in museum-quality cabinetry, using appropriate storage materials and methods. The materials were donated in late 2014, have been cleaned, cataloged, photographed and numbered. New cabinetry is necessary to provide safe and permanently housing. The goal of the project is to provide this protection to promote the preservation of the collection over time. The Siyazama [Zulu for "we are trying"] Project is an art and health initiative in South Africa (KwaZulu Natal Province )begun in the late 1990s. The project worked with rural traditional women artists on arts-based strategies to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS and strengthen opportunities for craft-based economic development. MSU Museum's holdings are the best representation of the project in the world.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,901 (approved)
$9,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271620-20

Western Kentucky University (Bowling Green, KY 42101-1000)
Sandra L. Staebell (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Protecting the Mrs. A. H. Taylor Collection

The purchase of a cabinet and preservation supplies to rehouse a collection of 19 articles of clothing designed and made by Mrs. A. H. Taylor, owner of a Bowling Green, Kentucky, clothing factory that made garments from 1880 to 1917, primarily for the American South and Southwest. The collection helps to demonstrate female entrepreneurship at the turn of the twentieth century and is currently used in both exhibitions and classroom settings. The applicant would also engage the assistance of a textile conservator to give recommendations for rehousing the Taylor collection and to conduct a general preservation assessment of the rest of the university’s textile collection.

This project supports purchase of storage supplies and engagement of a consulting conservator to rehouse the nationally significant Mrs. A. H. Taylor Costume Collection. Sewn between 1880 and 1917, these fashions are associated with a Bowling Green, KY., clothing factory owner who went from a small-town dressmaker to a business entrepreneur whose client-base extended throughout the American South and Southwest. The Collection is particularly useful in examining the ways in which Victorian and Edwardian women participated in business on a local, regional, and national scale. By rehousing this collection, the Kentucky Museum ensures its continued care and accessibility for research, teaching, and creative projects, such as an upcoming exhibit on Mrs. A. H. Taylor’s life and work and their use in Fashion Merchandising classes at WKU.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271621-20

Filson Historical Society (Louisville, KY 40203-2218)
Danielle Spalenka (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Improving Preservation and Disaster Practices at The Filson Historical Society

A preservation needs and disaster preparedness assessment to improve the care of over two million items documenting the history of Kentucky and the Ohio Valley Region. Most notably, the collection includes original materials related to the Lewis and Clarke expedition, including sources pertaining to the life of the enslaved man whom William Clarke brought on their journey. The award would also provide four data loggers to monitor environmental conditions in a new storage space, as well as the historical society’s exhibition area.

The Filson Historical Society seeks funds to contract an independent consultant to conduct a general preservation needs assessment and for disaster preparedness training for staff and area archivists. In addition, funds would be used to improve preservation practices with the purchase of HOBO data loggers to be used in the new collection storage spaces. The assessment will evaluate the Filson’s special collections, which consist of paper-based materials, photographs, oversized collections, and audio-visual collections. The assessment will result in a written report that will provide preservation priorities and will serve as the map for preservation planning and goals for the Filson. The ability to purchase additional HOBO data loggers would expand the environmental monitoring practices to all collection storage areas.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,580 (approved)
$8,580 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271622-20

Mark Twain House (Hartford, CT 06105-6400)
Mallory Howard (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Conservation Assessment of Certain Mark Twain Belongings from the Collections of The Mark Twain House & Museum

An assessment by conservators from the Williamstown Art Conservation Center of the conservation treatment needs of nine priority items, all of which were owned by Samuel Clemens (“Mark Twain”). They include a travel trunk and case, a lithograph, and the six pockets of a billiard table. The project would allow the museum to prioritize the work that needs to be done and provide the detail it needs in order to budget, and seek funding, for the recommended treatment of these nine items that facilitate interpretation of the period and of Twain’s life. The proposed work was recommended in a broader assessment of the museum’s collections, supported by a 2019 Preservation Assistance Grant.

The Mark Twain House & Museum will engage a professional conservator to assess the conservation treatment needs of nine objects in the museum’s collections, all of which were personal belongings of Samuel Clemens (“Mark Twain”). The objects are irreplaceable artifacts of America’s literary history and culture, which provide unique and valuable insight into Mark Twain, his work, his era, and his enduring legacy. The project will provide the museum with the information needed to set conservation priorities, and to budget and fundraise for conservation work that will improve the condition of the objects. The project’s ultimate goal is to ensure the preservation of the objects so that they will continue to be available for display in the historic Mark Twain House, which is a National Historic Landmark, and in exhibitions at the museum and at other cultural institutions, as well as for research by museum staff, scholars, and others.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$2,690 (approved)
$2,690 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271629-20

Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities (Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724-1403)
Lauren Holly Brincat (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Long Island Emergency Preparedness and Response Program

The hiring of a consultant from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts to develop an Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan for the five properties that house Preservation Long Island’s humanities collections, as well as the purchase of emergency supplies for each site. The project would protect a collection of 3,000 objects made or used on Long Island from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, which range from an eighteenth-century silk gown and shoes to the original 1930s road signs for Robert Moses’s Northern State Parkway. The proposed plan would also safeguard the holdings of the archives: one hundred maps; thousands of twentieth-century images; tourism guidebooks, planning reports, and real estate brochures; and personal papers from prominent Long Island families.

Preservation Long Island seeks a Preservation Assistance Grant from the NEH to support the development of a comprehensive Emergency Preparedness and Response Program for PLI's three historic houses, collections storage facility, and headquarters and exhibition gallery that house and display its historic collections, consisting of over 3,000 objects and 185 cubic feet of archival materials that reveal four centuries of life on Long Island. Funding will be used to hire a consultant from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts to visit PLI's properties and to work with PLI's curator to write and compile an Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan tailored to PLI's sites and needs, and to purchase emergency supplies for each property. Stewardship is a key element of PLI’s mission. The development of a new Emergency Preparedness and Response Program will allow PLI to safeguard its collections and strengthen its commitment to their care and preservation.

Project fields:
Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2021


PG-271633-20

Town of Brimfield (Brimfield, MA 01010-7705)
Rebecca Wells (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Historical Room: Comprehensive Needs Assessment

A preservation assessment, a preservation workshop for staff, and the purchase of supplies to rehouse a collection of glass-plate negatives in the Brimfield Public Library. These photographic negatives depict life in Brimfield from the late 1800s to early 1900s and document the changes to and growth of the community, including buildings and landscape that no longer exist. In addition to a local early American history collection, the town’s library holds clippings and ephemera that trace the 50-year history of the Brimfield Flea Market, which, with over one million visitors three times a year, is the largest outdoor market in the United States.

The Brimfield Public Library houses a significant collection of photographs, glass plate negatives, oral histories, and documents, dating back to the 1700s, on the history of Brimfield, MA. Many are one-of-a-kind, which contributes to their importance and necessitates their proper care. This collection provides insight into the religious, political and daily life of a small New England town, records the accomplishments of town residents who achieved national fame, and documents the families, buildings and events that fostered the town’s growth. These records are accessed on a regular basis by genealogists, historians, authors, and town residents. The grant would provide funding for a professional preservation consultant to carry out a comprehensive needs assessment to assist the Library in developing industry standard methodologies for inventorying, preserving and storing these items in a format that still allows the contents’ availability to researchers and library patrons.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$9,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271637-20

Town of Concord (Concord, MA 01742-1826)
Nathanial Smith (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Town of Concord Archives - Preservation Needs Assessment with NEDCC

A preservation assessment for bound and unbound official records of the Town of Concord government from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. The resulting plan would help the town to preserve a collection currently housed in multiple locations. The materials are used by professional and amateur historians alike, and with the recent hiring of a Curator of Special Collections, Concord would share and disseminate the collection more broadly.

The Town of Concord will engage consultants from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) to review the holdings of the Town of Concord Archives located at the Town House and the Concord Free Public Library. NEDCC will complete a General Preservation Assessment Report which will guide future preservation planning activities and budgeting. In addition, the Town of Concord Archives is seeking funding for supplies to re-house collections.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,405 (approved)
$8,405 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 3/31/2021


PG-271639-20

County of Charleston (North Charleston, SC 29405-7464)
Haley Doty Vaden (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Archival Training and Preservation of Historical Records at the Charleston County Records Center: 250th Anniversary of America Initiative

Education and training to enhance staff knowledge of metadata assessment, object description, and best practices in digitization. This work is a first step in developing finding aids and digital collections in preparation for the 250th anniversary of American independence in 2026. The County of Charleston collections include probate records dating back to the incorporation of the town in the early eighteenth century and document the transition from British rule to independence.

The goal of the Preservation Assistance Grant project is to support preservation and training for public access to historical records at the Charleston County Records Center (CCRC). An emphasis will be placed on “A More Perfect Union,” the 250th Anniversary of the United States. One goal of the project will be archival training to catalog and describe historical collections pertaining to American History. Another goal of the project will be to continue an ongoing re-housing program for records with a permanent retention. Two previously funded Preservation Assistance Grants have helped support the CCRC preservation program. The historic records include Probate Court books and files from the 1730s – 1970s and Clerk of Court case files from the early 1800s – 1899. The Preservation Assistance Grant will benefit CCRC by training staff in best practices for providing digital access to records of historical value and improve the storage environment of these records, to reduce risks.

Project fields:
American Government; Legal History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271641-20

County of Erie (Erie, PA 16501-1011)
Anitra Gates (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation assessment of local history collections for Erie County Public Library

A preservation assessment of the Erie County Library Public Library local history collections, which consist of 18,500 items, including a microfilm collection, art and other three-dimensional objects, maps, genealogical records, and monographs. Students, genealogists, regional historians, and community partners frequently use these collections. Among the highlights from the repository’s artifacts are Civil War battle flags from two regiments of Pennsylvania volunteers.

A professional preservation assessment of the Erie County Public Library’s local history collection. The local history collection contains about 20,000 monographs, about 2,000 of which are housed in a rare book vault. The collection also contains maps, artwork, Civil War artifacts and battle flags, and an extensive microfilm collection of newspapers with regional significance. This publicly accessible collection is extensively used by genealogists and local historians. To ensure the longevity and proper stewardship of this collection, the Library seeks funding to hire Dyani Feige from the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts to conduct a preservation assessment. The assessment will include evaluation of the building and environment, security and emergency preparedness, collection storage and treatment, and preservation planning. The resulting report will be used as a guide for creating meaningful, prioritized short-term and long-term preservation projects.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,700 (approved)
$6,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 4/30/2021


PG-271642-20

Southwest Florida Military Museum & Library, Inc. (Cape Coral, FL 33904-9151)
Sonia Raymond (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Strategic Plan priorities; Environmental Assessments; Improved Storage Plan; Development of a new Emergency Plan

A general preservation assessment and a building assessment, and development of a disaster and emergency response plan to help preserve a collection that documents military life and service for Florida veterans from all branches of military service. Serving a broad public, the museum and library care for art, artifacts, photographs, audiovisual recordings, books, manuscripts, and correspondence that tell the history of war and military service from the Revolutionary War to the present. The museum and library serve researchers, and offer exhibits and educational programs.

Draft A New Disaster Plan, covering prioritized needs and the appropriate order in which to address various improvements. Aspects will include; Collection Inventory and codition assessment; Environmental monitoring; Integrated Pest Control; Storage Furniture and storage design; Mechanical assessement and renovation planning

Project fields:
Military History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 3/31/2021


PG-271645-20

Jefferson County Public Library (Madison, IN 47250-3717)
Camille B. Fife (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
New Ideas for a Two Century Place: Jefferson County Public Library History Collection Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment and purchase of preservation supplies for monographs, microfilm, maps, and archival collections. The microfilm contains long runs of local newspapers, including the Madison Courier, which is not available elsewhere in Indiana. The archives include a collection of 10,000 photographs that document people, schools, homes, businesses, landmark sites, and Ohio River steamboats from the first decades of the twentieth century. A number of scholars have consulted these collections for research on the anti-slavery movement in the nineteenth-century. The collections are also widely used by genealogists and local historians.

A preservation assessment of the library's history collection, including 10,000 photographic images, nearly 7,000 books, 3,500 microfilms and many other documents will help the library create a long-term preservation program. In addition, the grant request includes funds for archival materials needed on a short-term basis to assure preservation of existing documents. The Jefferson County Public Library is located in Madison, Indiana, a small rural town with a long and distinguished history. The library celebrated its 200th year in 2018. Madison has been honored as an icon of American values, and by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of three Main Street pilot sites in the 1970s. It is one of the largest National Historic Landmark Districts in the country, designated in 2006 and it is documented by HABS and HAER with over 36 listings. The Jefferson County Public Library has been an important part of the humanistic research required by all of these distinctions.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,462 (approved)
$9,462 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 1/31/2022


PG-271646-20

International Arts and Artists, Inc. (Washington, DC 20008-1930)
Edward Hayes (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Assessment of works from the Hechinger Collection

A preservation assessment of 58 objects from International Art and Artists’ (IA&A) Hechinger Collection, which includes almost 400 works of art primarily from the post-World War II era, including prints, drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Selected works have been included in popular traveling exhibitions around the United States for the past 18 years. The assessment outcomes would ultimately enable the IA&A to continue developing new traveling exhibitions and increasing public access to the collection.

An NEH Preservation Assistance Grant would support International Art and Artists’ (IA&A) engagement of Williamstown Art Conservation Center to perform a three-day preservation assessment of 58 items from IA&A’s historically significant Hechinger Collection. The Hechinger Collection, featuring nearly 400 works of art, was donated to IA&A in 2003 by hardware-industry pioneer John Hechinger, Sr. The collection’s contemporary prints, drawings, paintings, and sculptures represent a wealth of 20th-century art that incorporates tools and hardware by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Arman, Jim Dine, Walker Evans, Jacob Lawrence, Fernand Léger, and Claes Oldenburg, among many others. The Hechinger Collection promotes the exploration of how hardware stores have served American society and how the cultural and societal needs of American communities have shaped hardware stores.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


PG-271656-20

County of Spartanburg (Spartanburg, SC 29306-3241)
N. Harrison Gage (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Spartanburg Co. Public Libraries, Emancipation Parade Flag conservation and purchase of environmental monitoring equipment.

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, as recommended in a previous Preservation Assistance Grant and the conservation treatment of a flag created in 1865 for an Emancipation parade . The Spartanburg County Public Library special collections hold 40,000 drawings and prints from several Southern textile firms from the 1880s to the 1950s, as well as African American photograph collections from civil rights era protests. The fourteen data loggers requested would enable the monitoring of temperature and relative humidity for the entire archival collection.

Grant funds will be used for the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for the entire archival collection and to hire a textile specialist to apply conservation treatments to an Emancipation parade flag created in 1865. This hand-sewn flag was created by a newly freed African American woman in Spartanburg, South Carolina during the enforcement of emancipation by Union Soldiers at the end of the civil war, shortly after the Confederacy dissolved. Spartanburg County Public Libraries is dedicated to preserving the full history of Spartanburg County, with an emphasis on prioritizing preservation efforts for our collections that focus on our under-represented communities which directly addresses the call for “A More Perfect Union” initiative.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,911 (approved)
$4,911 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-271671-20

Smoki Museum (Prescott, AZ 86301-3184)
Cynthia Gresser (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment and development of a disaster plan to ensure the preservation of a collection of historical and cultural objects associated with the Smoki People, a non-Native group from Arizona who appropriated Native American art and culture from the 1920s to the 1990s, especially through ceremony re-enactment. The collection is made up of objects representing Native American groups from the Southwest (textiles, ceramics, jewelry, baskets, kachinas, and artwork), approximately 10,000 documents, 15,000 photographic prints and negatives, and 800 cellulose nitrate reels of public performances from the 1930s. While the group is now defunct, the museum preserves objects, photographs, audiovisual recordings, and ephemera, which are used by scholars and the public to explore the controversial past of the Smoki People.

The Smoki Museum seeks $8194 to cover travels costs and fees to contract preservation specialist Randy Silverman to assess the museum's collections and collection housing.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Cultural History; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,194 (approved)
$8,194 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-271672-20

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD 21218-2625)
Lori Finkelstein (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Improving Storage of Evergreen Museum and Library's Works on Paper Collection

A preservation assessment and purchase of storage furniture and supplies for a collection of 906 works of art on paper in the collection of the Evergreen Museum. The historic house museum interprets two generations of the Garrett family, who lived in the building from 1876 to 1952 and were noted Baltimore philanthropists and collectors of fine and decorative art. The print collection includes a number of engravings after Peter Paul Rubens and works by modern masters such as Leon Bakst, Raoul Dufy, Edgar Degas, and Amedeo Modigliani.

This project will improve the preventive conservation efforts of Evergreen Museum & Library located in Baltimore, Md. The historic house museum, once home to two generations of Maryland's Garrett Family, seeks to improve storage of its works on paper collection, which consists of approximately 900 items by artists dating to the late-19th through mid-20th centuries, including artists Bakst, Modigliani, Dufy, Rodin, and Zuloaga, among others. If awarded, NEH funding would support an overall condition assessment of the collection by a paper conservator, and purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies to implement conservator re-housing recommendations.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271673-20

Laurel Historical Society, Inc. (Laurel, MD 20707-3429)
Ann Bennett (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Laurel Historical Society Emergency Preparedness Plan

The creation of a disaster management plan and the purchase of disaster supplies to help preserve a collection of historical objects, photographs, and newspapers that document life and culture in rural Maryland, in an area situated between Baltimore and Washington, DC, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The disaster management plan was recommended as part of a recent assessment. The collections are used for research, education, and public programming.

The Laurel Historical Society seeks funds to establish an emergency preparedness plan. The proposed project would allow for the creation of a Disaster and Emergency Preparedness Plan written by an emergency management professional and also the purchase of supplies for disaster mitigation and emergency preparedness. The Laurel Historical Society does not have an emergency management plan. The Laurel Historical Society is located inside a 180-year-old former millworkers’ house and the lower edge of the property is adjacent to the Patuxent River. While the Society has not suffered major damage from age-related issues or natural disasters, we simply are not prepared to respond to a disaster that would affect our community collections. The proposed project would result in a disaster management plan representing best practices for emergency preparedness and response. The purchase of emergency supplies would allow us to mitigate damage to the collection from disasters.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 7/31/2021


PG-271678-20

Our Lady of the Lake University (San Antonio, TX 78207-4689)
Jason Bourgeois (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation of OLLU special collections on the Spanish colonial and Mexican American heritage of San Antonio and Texas

A preservation assessment and workshop on best practices for the care and handling of rare books, archival materials, and digitized special collections, as well as the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and preservation supplies to rehouse materials in three collecting units.  The Center for Mexican American Studies and Research holds 300 linear feet of archival materials, including microfilm documenting the five colonial Spanish missions of San Antonio. In addition, the Sueltenfuss Library has more than 100 rare books on Texas history, as well as rare serials and ephemera.  The University Archives holds 700 linear feet documenting the school’s history since its founding in 1895 by the Sisters of Divine Providence.  The assessment of the storage environment for these materials would provide a road-map for their long-term preservation, thereby ensuring their ongoing research and educational use.

This project will support a preservation assessment of special collections materials on the Spanish colonial and Mexican American heritage and history of San Antonio and surrounding areas throughout the past three centuries. These collections include the Center for Mexican American Studies and Research special collections, the Sueltenfuss Library special collections, and the University Archives. Among the highlights of these collections are the only preservation copies in the U.S. of 18th century archival documents of San Antonio’s Spanish missions, which have been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Our Lady of the Lake University has a global responsibility to protect this cultural heritage by ensuring the preservation, promotion, and use of these collections by the community, faculty, students, and national and international researchers.

Project fields:
Hispanic American Studies; Latino History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,915 (approved)
$9,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271689-20

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Lauren Elizabeth Fuka (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Emergency Preparedness Preservation Supplies for Collections of the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology

The purchase of preservation supplies for the development of emergency preparedness carts for the museum, which cares for archaeological, ethnographic, and osteological collections, as well as archives documenting cultures of the American Southwest. The purchase of emergency supplies follows recommendations from recent assessments and would enable museum staff to respond to fires, leaks, and other incidents, and to protect the collections from damage.

This proposal requests support to acquire preservation supplies to assist with emergency preparedness, which will enable museum staff to respond to leaks, floods, and other incidents quickly, and to protect the valuable collections and records from damage. For the Maxwell Museum, water has been a long-term issue throughout most of the below-ground collection storage areas. In the event of a museum emergency staff need to be able to respond rapidly if collections are threatened. The Maxwell Museum curates irreplaceable archaeological, ethnographic, osteological, and archival collections that constitute a critical resource for humanities scholarship on the indigenous people of the American Southwest. Our collections support teaching, research, and public engagement on the global human story from 2 million years ago until the present. Here, we request funding to purchase materials that will improve our ability to preserve and protect these collections in the event of an emergency.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; Cultural Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,363 (approved)
$9,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271695-20

Chicago Film Archives, NFP (Chicago, IL 60616-1120)
Yasmin Desouki (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Refrigeration for at-risk films

The purchase of a storage freezer for nitrate films and a refrigerator for films suffering from vinegar syndrome. The Chicago Film Archives holds over 160 collections and more than 30,000 film items documenting the Midwest, including documentaries; avant-garde and experimental films; industrial, corporate and advertising films; educational films; and home movies. This project would support some of the most fragile audiovisual assets, including rare nitrate prints of 1929 news films from the Chicago Daily News Television Service, Mayor Edward J. Kelly, the 1933 World’s Fair, dancer Ruth Page, the original Hiawatha pageant performed by an Ojibwa community in Ontario, Canada, and a 1921 film about damage to a cathedral in Rheims, France, sustained during World War I.

CFA would like to purchase a refrigerator/freezer tor for nitrate films from its collections and a refrigerator for films that have vinegar syndrome.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; History, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


PG-271696-20

Friends of the Knox County Public Library (Knoxville, TN 37902-2505)
Eric Dawson (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Purchase of Audio and Film Preservation Supplies for the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound Film Collection

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse audiovisual materials in the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound at the Calvin C. McClung Historical Collection in Knoxville. The collection contains more than 10,000 reels of film and videotapes of documentaries, feature films, commercials, home movies, and news film relating to East Tennessee and the Southern Appalachian region from 1915 to 2000. In addition, an audio collection of over 700 unique acetate and transcription discs document the region’s musicians and radio history from the 1940s through the 1960s. Among the sub-collections that would be the focus of this project are silent home movies filmed by American soldier Alex T. Langston in France and Germany during the days following the end of World War II, home movies and travelogues by Tennessee Valley Authority employee and photographer Paul Moore, demo recordings by local country music and jazz musicians, and films produced by the Tennessee School for The Deaf.

The purchase of archival film cans, film cores, molecular sieves, record envelopes, and boxes for the preservation of many of TAMIS's most in-peril collections.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$6,115 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-271697-20

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Steven High (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Assessment of The Ringling Archives Audiovisuals and Storage Vault.

A preservation assessment of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art’s audiovisual storage area. The audiovisual collection documents the history, organization, and programs of the Museum and the life of John and Mable Ringling, as well as the history of the circus, Wild West shows, and other arts entertainment. Highlights of the collection include two 1926 films shot at the Ringling house and museum and the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus lot; candid footage of performers and animals preparing for circus performances; side show and banner line scenes featuring marvels such as the bearded lady and strong man; and the King Charles troupe, who were the first African American performers with the Circus.

Assessment of The Ringling Archives Audiovisual collection and storage vault, which will a formalized report that will include onsite observations, a preservation plan for the collection, the anticipated cost for implementing the plan and supporting documentation.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,629 (approved)
$9,629 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2021


PG-271700-20

Arthurdale Heritage, Inc. (Arthurdale, WV 26520)
Meredith Dreistadt (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Arthurdale Archives Preservation Plan

The purchase of preservation supplies necessary to implement recommendations offered in an assessment completed in 2018, supported by a previous Preservation Assistance Grant. Arthurdale Heritage, Inc. is dedicated to public outreach, education, and documenting the legacy of Arthurdale, a subsistence homestead community created in the early years of the New Deal. Its archives include letters from Eleanor Roosevelt, encouraging the community’s activities, as well as documentation regarding the establishment of the coal mining industry in the area, which is actively consulted by environmental historians.

Arthurdale Heritage Inc.’s overarching goal is to best serve the community and visitors by preserving the life and quality of the collections entrusted to the organization, as outlined in AHI’s mission. With the funds from the NEH, AHI will purchase storage containers, environment control-methods, and object-specific care to preserve our unique collection.

Project fields:
Public History; Rural Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271704-20

Appalachian Mountain Club (Boston, MA 02129-3740)
Rebecca Maxwell Fullerton (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
History in Those Hills: Upgrading Storage for the Appalachian Mountain Club's Historic Outdoor Recreation and Conservation Archives

The purchase of high-density shelving that would store 224 cubic feet of records within the club’s library and archives, thereby completing the organization’s installation of compact shelving and eliminating the need for temporary and offsite storage. The collection, which documents the history of outdoor recreation in the Northeast from the 1870s to the present, informs both internal and external research and publications. Highlights include 100 years of log books; 20,000 images of travel, people, landscapes, and events in this outdoor community; and diaries, scrapbooks, and maps of club excursions. This project builds on a preservation assessment from 2010.

The project will focus on the Appalachian Mountain Club’s (AMC’s) Library & Archives Special Collections and Institutional Records. These materials range from outdoor photography from the 1870s onward, manuscript collections of outdoorspeople of the 19th through the 21st centuries, and complete business records of America’s oldest outdoor recreation and conservation organization. Our primary and secondary source materials document over 140 years of the wilderness experience in the United States through the lens of history, writing, visual arts and culture. Our specific goal within this project is to complete an upgrade to our storage facilities to meet modern standards of preservation by incorporating high-density shelving. The project is a culmination of improvements following a move of our Library & Archives from our organization’s headquarters in Boston at the end of 2018 to the heart of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$7,300 (approved)
$7,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


PG-271705-20

University of Colorado (Boulder, CO 80303-1058)
Samantha Fladd (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
The Yellow Jacket Archive: Preservation Planning and Rehousing

Hiring an archivist to assist the museum in planning for the preservation of and access to archaeological documentation associated with the Yellow Jacket site, part of the Mesa Verde cultural complex located in southwestern Colorado. The site was excavated from 1954-1991 and yielded 300,000 artifacts and 28 linear feet of field notes, maps, plans, and photographs. The museum’s anthropology and archaeology collections are used by academic researchers, teachers and students, and by Native American tribes and descendant communities. The request is in response to “A More Perfect Union,” and would be used to plan for improved access to collections that document the history of cultures in the American. Southwest.

The proposed project requests funding to employ an archivist to develop and implement a processing plan for a collection of original field documentation and research from 21 seasons of archaeological excavations at the Yellow Jacket complex in Southwest Colorado. Over 300,000 artifacts were collected during the field seasons. This vast cultural legacy is underutilized however, due to the state of the associated archival material: papers are stored in binders without hierarchical arrangement and folders bear incomplete or misleading labels. The current storage of the collection is causing papers to slump, tear, or stick to the binders. This project would increase access to the collection by providing an arrangement that meets professional archival standards, improving storage conditions, and paving the way for digitization. These improvements will result in greater interest in the history of this important series of sites occupied by the Mesa Verde branch of Ancestral Puebloan culture.

Project fields:
Archaeology; History of Science; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271716-20

Academy of American Poets (New York, NY 10128-2226)
Jennifer Benka (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Academy of American Poets Archive

A preservation assessment of the archives of the Academy of American Poets, founded in 1934 and with members in all 50 states. The assessment would enable the organization to prioritize collection care and access in advance of its 90th anniversary in 2024. The collection of over 500 linear feet dates from its establishment to the present and includes writings and correspondence of notable American poets, such as E. E. Cummings, Lucille Clifton, Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, and Sylvia Plath, as well as issues of the organization’s magazine, American Poets, photographs of poets, and audio recordings of poetry readings.

The Academy of American Poets seeks $10,000 to support our hiring a consultant to assess our unique collection so we might ensure its preservation and prepare to make it available to the public.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 9/30/2021


PG-271721-20

University of Northern Colorado (Greeley, CO 80639-6900)
Andrew Theodore Creekmore (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Condition assessment and toxic object identification for a collection of Native American artifacts.

The work of two consultants, one to undertake a preservation assessment of fragile objects, the other to test for toxic preservatives, in a collection of 3,000 objects, including pottery, basketry, leather goods, and stone tools, that document Native American cultures of the West and Southwest from 10,000 BCE to the twentieth century. The consultants would also offer workshops to faculty, students, museum staff, and community members on using x-ray fluorescence, conducting condition assessments, and safe handling of collections. The collections are used for academic research, in university classes, and for public programming.

The anthropology department at the UNC curates a collection of 3000 prehistoric and historic Native American artifacts including pottery, basketry, leather goods, and stone tools. These date from 10,000 B.C.E. to the 20th century, spanning important developments in Native American culture. The collection is used in undergraduate education and shared with the public through exhibitions. This project will support a consultant to assess the condition of fragile artifacts and recommend how to preserve them. A second specialist will conduct X-ray fluorescence testing to identify toxic preservatives, such as arsenic, that may have been applied to the organic artifacts in the past, and will seal objects that test positive for toxins to protect students and researchers from harmful exposure. Both consultants will be assisted by an undergraduate and graduate student, and offer public workshops in conjunction with their work to train others in their specialty.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,964 (approved)
$9,964 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


PG-271725-20

Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Robert Schimelpfenig (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Washington State School for the Blind’s Donald Donaldson Museum and Archives Collections Care

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies, as well as a training workshop for staff and volunteers in the care and handling of collections that document the history of the Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB).  Founded in 1886 as part of a larger organization, the WSSB established its independence in 1911 and continues to operate today as the region’s oldest school for blind and visually impaired youth.  Building on an existing partnership between the Washington State University Vancouver Library and WSSB, the project would help staff and student volunteers from both schools to care for the unique collections, which include over 400 objects, such as older recording technology and braille machines, as well as 230 linear feet of braille maps and books, school records, memorabilia, slides, and photographs.  WSSB faculty plan to integrate the materials into their curriculum, and the preservation workshop would be open to the staff of neighboring historical organizations.

The Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB) Museum and Archives documents a history of the school and its students. These histories are encapsulated through a series of print and braille collections, scrapbooks, photographs and an assortment of bygone technologies and mediums that have aided in the learning of the visually impaired from the time the school was established 130 years ago. With limited staff and no formal archival foundation, these collections have remained inaccessible. Following a 2019 preservation pre-assessment, WSSB with the help of the WSUV Library have drafted policies and procedures, recruited volunteers and secured funding for one part-time archives position. To further this project, we propose hosting preservation training workshops and purchasing storage supplies to help implement preservation standards and support employees as they begin the first phase of managing collections.

Project fields:
History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,776 (approved)
$9,776 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271727-20

Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Inc. (Indianapolis, IN 46204-2707)
Rebekah Ryan (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Detailed Condition Survey of 48 Great Lakes American Indian Textiles from the Eiteljorg Museum's Great Lakes Collection

A conservation assessment of 48 Great Lakes American Indian textiles recently acquired from the collection of Richard Pohrt Jr., dating from the 1800s to the present. Included in the collection are rare objects, such as blankets made of wool and silk ornamented with ribbon-work that is appliqued, and finger-woven fiber bags with depictions of cosmological figures important to the Great Lakes tribes, which include the Ojibwe, Ho-Chunk, Potawatomi, Delaware, Miami, Omaha, and Choctaw, among many others. The textiles are made available for research to the originating tribes as well as to scholars and are also used in exhibitions and educational programming.

This is an item-by-item condition survey, a conservation priority identified in the museum’s long-range conservation plan. Starting in June of 2021, Beth Szuhay, a highly-trained and experienced conservator, will work with an intern assistant with a background in collections care to spend 6 days systematically surveying the collection. The conservator and apprentice will do the following for each object: provide a detailed condition assessment, assign the item a condition ranking, make recommendations about an ideal exhibition parameters and preservation storage formats, and when deemed necessary, prepare a treatment proposal for immediate stabilization. These items will be included in a report, which will direct all future conservation treatments, as well as storage and exhibition decisions. This information will be input by staff into The Museum System (TMS) conservation module.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,913 (approved)
$9,913 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271734-20

Heurich House Foundation (Washington, DC 20036-1531)
Allison Anne LaCroix (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Developing a Heritage Reinvestment Assessment Model

The development of a model for a Heritage Building Reinvestment Assessment, using an established planning and accounting method for commercial buildings known as an Asset Lifecycle Model for Total Cost of Ownership Management. The project would enable an architect or building engineer to estimate the long-term cost needed to keep a cultural heritage building in an acceptable state. This approach to preserving historic sites adds a critical financial planning tool to more traditional building assessments, and the applicant would share its results with the public. The collection of the Heurich House Museum, one of the most intact historic homes in Washington, DC, contains 2,000 artifacts: furniture, nearly 30 Oriental and Persian rugs, numerous sculptures and vases, 200 textiles, and more than 1,000 objects related to the owner’s historic brewery. The archives hold more than 600 items that include letters, journals and diaries, expense ledgers, and more than 1,000 photographs.

The Heurich House Museum requests a $2,625 Preservation Assistance Grant, which it will use together with $2,700 in cost sharing from a National Trust for Historic Preservation grant award, to hire architect/engineer Michael Henry to develop a “model” for undertaking a Heritage Building Reinvestment Assessment. The model, which will serve as a blueprint for an architect or building engineer to perform a lifecycle cost analysis on a historic property, will provide the methodology, scope of work, and prototype templates. The Museum will provide the completed model to an architect or engineer so it can serve as their template to undertake an Assessment of our historic buildings and grounds. We will also disseminate the model to scholars and other historic sites that may want to undertake an Assessment.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$2,625 (approved)
$2,625 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


PG-271743-20

McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center Corporation (Concord, NH 03301-7400)
Mirka Zapletal (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Assistance for McAuliffe-Shepard Special Collections

A preservation assessment for the archives of the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, which serves as a living memorial to the first American in space, Alan Shepard, and the teacher who died in the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster, Christa McAuliffe. The archival collection consisting of 14,000 cubic feet of photographs, letters, scrapbooks, artworks, and other ephemera relates to the life and career of Shepard, the national outpouring of response to the Challenger disaster, and other stories of the space age. These materials are used by the center for research and exhibitions chronicling this era of science and engineering in American history, highlighting themes of discovery, pushing boundaries, tragedy, and resilience.

The McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center will engage a conservation and preservation specialist from the Northeast Document Conservation Center to provide a general preservation assessment of our special collections. As their specialist has noted in her letter of commitment, this assessment will cover: “possible risks to collections from building- and environment-related problems; fire protection and security concerns, including emergency preparedness; institutional policies and procedures as they apply to preservation; recommendations for improving storage and handling practices; and the general condition of a representative sample of paper-based materials, media, and photographs from the collections.” The assessment will also identify preservation priorities for MSDC and provide references and tools to enable us to make the most of the resources we already possess, as well as those we will acquire in the future.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271745-20

Florida State College at Jacksonville (Jacksonville, FL 32246-6624)
Shannon Leigh Dew (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation and Access to Threatened Humanities (PATH)

A preservation assessment and half-day workshop on collections preservation, handling, and storage best practices.  The award would also support the purchase of storage furniture to protect records that document several academic publication series produced by the college since its founding in 1968.  Among them are various literary magazines, such as Kalliope: A Journal of Women's Literature & Art, founded in 1978 and featuring writers such as Alice Walker, E.L. Konigsburg, Marge Piercy, and Elisavietta Ritchie, as well as two interview series, Writer to Writer and Worth Quoting, both of which ran for over a decade.  The collection includes the administrative files, letters, photographs, recordings, and publications for these journals and series.  Over the last few years, the college has begun to digitize and make the materials available for research online.  This grant would provide the applicant with a first-time assessment of their Archives and Special Collections unit to help staff establish preservation priorities and policies.

Provide the first step in archival planning and preservation activities for important humanities publications as well as hundreds of hours of original audio and video recordings by influential authors and public figures over the last three decades.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271746-20

Noah Webster Foundation and Historical Society of West Hartford, Inc. (West Hartford, CT 06107-3430)
Sheila Daley (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Planning for enhanced educator access to digitized collections

The creation of a digitization plan for materials in the applicants’ collections, to enhance access for educators and students to support national, state, and local history, geography, and civics education related to the themes of the NEH initiative, “A More Perfect Union.” Proposed activities include holding focus groups with local teachers and curriculum specialists, evaluation of appropriateness for primary source kits or lesson plans, prioritization of materials for digitization, and digital reformatting of select test-bed materials for creation of teacher resources. Holdings available from the Noah Webster Collection comprise more than 200 original editions of Webster’s books and 25 original documents, including legal records, correspondence, and ephemera, dated 1778-1845. Object collections include approximately 400 items of town residents’ memorabilia and approximately 600 pieces of clothing and accessories, as well as pottery, archaeological artifacts, and such items as a slave’s headstone. Additionally, the historical society’s Butler Family Collection comprises six linear feet of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century correspondence, legal documents, land deeds, financial records, estate inventories for Revolutionary War soldiers, receipts, and ephemera.

The Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society is located in the birthplace and childhood home of Noah Webster, a nationally registered historic landmark. The museum offers award-winning programming to thousands of students and visitors each year, and holds manuscript and 3d object collections related to Noah Webster and to the local community spanning the 17th through the 21st century. We request funds for planning and pilot activities related to the NEH special initiative, "A More Perfect Union." We are seeking to consult with an historian and an archivist to undertake digitization planning and pilot work informed by input from local teachers and curriculum specialists, to support use of collections for primary source classroom instruction and in commemorative activities for the 2026 Anniversary of American independence.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 9/30/2021


PG-271750-20

Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University (New York, NY 10065-4805)
George J. Makari (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Rehousing psychiatry collections at the Oskar Diethelm Library.

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse 612 feet of archival materials, which are part of the library’s 1,500 linear feet of archives documenting the history of psychiatry. Materials include the papers of influential figures, such as Thomas Salmon and Clifford and Clara Beers, as well as the records of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene (1909-1966), which are consulted regularly by historians, especially around the topic of World War I veterans.  Other collections include items from mental health advocates, Dorothea Dix, Thomas Kirkbride, and Isaac Ray, as well as from Donald Winnicott, the British physician who was internationally recognized for his work in pediatric psychiatry and invented the term “transitional object” (e.g. blanket or teddy bear).  Rehousing the materials would be done in tandem with ongoing efforts to update the related finding aids, which would make the collections easier to discover by the many students, scholars, and physicians who conduct research at the library.

The project will support the preservation of historically significant materials from the processed collections at the Oskar Diethelm Library at Weill Cornell Medical College''s DeWitt Wallace Institute for the History of Psychiatry. The majority of the collections that have been described were processed over 30 years ago and primarily stored in cardboard boxes even after processing. Because of this, new boxes and folders are needed for the processed collections, which would be covered by the requested funds from this grant. The current boxes are mostly cardboard, not acid-free, and not properly filled, which has caused serious damage through bending and tearing of materials. In addition, the folders are either not acid-free or have deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. The grant would cover the purchase of acid-free boxes and folders to rehouse these collections.

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$9,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271757-20

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center (Hartford, CT 06105-3243)
Elizabeth Giard Burgess (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Updating Manuscript Collection Housing Part II

The purchase of preservation supplies as the second phase of rehousing the Stowe Center’s manuscript collections, following a 2019 Preservation Assistance Grant. Collections currently stored without folders and/or separated by enclosures would be rehoused, and those with damaged or unstable boxes replaced. Overall, the collections consist of 195,000 items dating from c. 1500 to the present and comprise forty-nine individual collections for a total of 316 linear feet. This stage of the project would focus on the Foote Collection, twenty-two boxes of Stowe’s maternal family manuscripts; the Katharine Seymour Day Collection, 166 boxes of the historic preservationist’s personal correspondence, notes, financial papers, family materials, and other documents; the 15 boxes of the Saturday Morning Club Collection, with meeting agendas, invitations, programs, minutes, and membership lists of the Hartford Women’s Literary Club; and 11 boxes of the papers of architect George Keller. Together, these collections illuminate such topics as the material culture and history of anti-slavery, the history of slavery in the United States, women’s roles, the history of stage and screen, and historic preservation in Hartford.

The project centers on the second part of rehousing the manuscript collection at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center; part one is also supported by a NEH preservation grant. The project follows protocols laid out by the Northeast Document Conservation Center conservators. The rehousing process consists of purchasing new chemically stable archival preservation supplies and transferring the collection items to these new containers.

Project fields:
History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


PG-271759-20

Washington County Museum of Fine Arts (Hagerstown, MD 21740-6495)
Kay Palmateer (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Replacement and Reconfiguration of Housing Furniture in Painting and Paper Vault

The purchase of preservation supplies and furniture to improve the storage conditions in the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts’ Painting and Paper Vault (PPV), replacing poorly constructed cabinets with quality shelving and other materials for unframed works and objects and adding storage to underutilized areas. These measures would ensure that each object has adequate space to avoid potential damage, as well as allow for greater access and movement in the vault. The collection of over 6,800 objects includes American and European paintings, works on paper, textiles, glass, and sculptures. The project is based on several preceding assessments and aligns with the museum’s goal of ensuring the long term care of its collections.

Washington County Museum of Fine Arts is working to improve the storage conditions in its Painting and Paper Vault, focusing on preventive conservation of works on paper as well as other collection materials. This project will replace poorly constructed cabinets that are not configured for the Museum’s collections, add additional shelving units to house boxes containing unframed works on paper, add a bin unit to store larger framed works on paper, and reconfigure existing shelving to expand storage for larger boxes. Preventive conservation strategies include ensuring that each object has enough space so as not to be mechanically damaged in situ; is not chemically damaged by poor quality storage materials including rusting shelving, unsealed plywood, and unknown paints; and can be removed from storage without risk of damage.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,755 (approved)
$9,755 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


PG-271776-20

Friends of Alice Austen House, Inc. (Staten Island, NY 10305-2002)
Victoria Munro (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Improving Storage Capacity for Collections Preservation

The purchase of equipment to improve climate control in the upstairs storage room, creation of additional space for storage, Preservation 101 training for staff provided by the Northeast Document Conservation Center, and implementation of inventory management practices identified in consultation with the Historic House Trust. The Alice Austen House holds a collection of objects, letters, photographs, and audio recordings related to the life and work of Alice Austen, part of the first generation of women photographers in America; Gertrude Tate, her partner of 53 years; and their friends and family. The collection consists of correspondence, objects, photographs, and oral history recordings: 15 archival boxes of letters, one binder of calling cards, household objects, photographs, and 25 cassette tapes of oral history recordings. These offer a unique window into Victorian social norms, New York City history, LGBTQ history, and early twentieth-century life.

Friends of Alice Austen House requests funding to support improvements to storage capacity in its second floor collections room in order to house more objects, prioritizing accessioned items found in the inventory of our basement collections room. To ensure that collections best practices are in effect as the project is implemented and after, this proposal includes training in preservation basics for the Alice Austen House Collections Associate.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,145 (approved)
$9,145 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271779-20

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Megan Marie McCullen (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Assessing Preservation and Storage of the Detroit Archaeological Collections at Wayne State

A preservation assessment and planning project to improve access to the museum’s archaeological collections that document the history of Detroit from the Revolutionary War era through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collections illustrate the military, social and economic history of the region and the transition of Detroit from a fur-trading center to a state capital. Materials from Fort Lernoult would be used by the museum as part of its preparation for the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution, in response to the grant program’s encouragement associated with “A More Perfect Union.”

This project evaluates the preservation and accessibility of Detroit Archaeological Collections (DAC) at Wayne State University’s Museum of Anthropology, as part of the NEH program A More Perfect Union. These collections highlight the development of Detroit and we will improve access to these collections for use within our University and Museum, and for our community partners. Our museum houses the bulk of archaeological materials excavated within Detroit, and includes major collections from the British (1760-1796) and American (1796-present) periods of the city, with more limited materials from earlier French and Indigenous periods. These collections reflect a shift from a small fur trade community into a thriving agricultural region, and then an industrial metropolis. Of particular significance as we prepare to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution are the well preserved architectural materials from Fort Lernoult, built by the British in Detroit in 1779.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$14,682 (approved)
$14,682 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


PG-271780-20

Missouri Botanical Garden (St. Louis, MO 63166-0299)
Andrew Colligan (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Missouri Botanical Garden Archives: Addressing Light Issues

The installation of ultraviolet light-filtering window film to protect over 3,000 linear feet of material in the botanical garden’s archives. This preservation measure was recommended in a 2014 assessment. Founded in 1859, the Missouri Botanical Garden is one of the oldest natural history institutions in the country. Its archives, which are consulted for internal and external exhibits and publications, document the history of the garden and also include related collections, such as the papers of Henry Shaw, a prominent local businessman who founded the botanical garden, and the papers of George Engelmann, which include correspondence with leading scientific thinkers of the nineteenth century and some of the earliest attempts to document the flora and fauna of the western frontier.

At MBG we are dedicated to preserving our archival materials and passing them on in good condition to future generations, and in furtherance of that goal we want to provide them with the best possible environmental conditions. Deficiencies in the current archives facility have begun to threaten the sustainability of the archive, in particular harmful UV sunlight that enters from unfiltered windows that make up one of the walls in the space. We seek funds to hire an outside vendor to treat these west facing windows of the archive with UV filter film to improve archival conditions and ensure the long term protection of the collections.

Project fields:
History of Science; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,860 (approved)
$4,860 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 1/31/2021


PG-271800-20

Henry Gallery Association, Inc. (Seattle, WA 98195-1410)
Sylvia Wolf (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Purchase and installation of deck, ramp, and rail for preservation.

The purchase of storage equipment for the gallery’s Founders Collection and for large-scale framed contemporary photographs and works on paper, which was recommended in a 2019 preservation assessment. The Henry Gallery at the University of Washington stewards a teaching collection that serves the campus and wider community. Collection highlights include paintings by Winslow Homer and Childe Hassam; a robust array of photographs including works by Richard Avedon, William Eggleston, and Nan Goldin; and prints that range from old masters to post-war works, by artists such as Albrecht Dürer, William Hogarth, Jim Dine, and Kiki Smith. The storage racks would be purchased at a discounted rate from the Seattle Art Institute, which no longer needs them following a recent renovation.

This proposal supports a long-term commitment to reconfigure and expand storage capacity at the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington (UW) to improve care and preservation of our historical and contemporary collections. It outlines the purchase and installation of durable and permanent equipment and supplies for an auxiliary collection storage space within the museum. Our plans are to install deck and rails for racks specifically to fit the needs of our Founder’s Collection and large-scale framed contemporary photographs and works on paper.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271802-20

Whaling Museum Society, Inc. (Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724-1438)
Elizabeth Marriott (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Improving the Storage Conditions for the Collections

The purchase of shelving, preservation supplies, and environmental monitoring equipment, recommended from a recent assessment, that would help to preserve a collection of 6,000 objects documenting the nineteenth-century whaling industry and history of Cold Spring Harbor’s growth as a maritime port, one of the three whaling ports on Long Island. The collections include whaling weapons and tools, photographs, correspondence, journals, ship logs, crew lists, and navigational aids, all of which help to tell the story of whaling to an audience that includes researchers, teachers, students, and the public.

The Whaling Museum & Education Center seeks an NEH Preservation Grant to support the purchase of necessary preservation supplies and storage furniture to rehouse at-risk and overcrowded artifacts and archives in the museum’s collection. The goals of this conservation project were derived from recommendations in a 2017 Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) and will improve the museum’s preservation efforts.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 7/31/2021


PG-271805-20

Trumbull County Historical Society (Warren, OH 44483-4812)
Meghan Reed (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Trumbull County, Ohio Treasures: Telling Our Stories

The hiring of two consultants to undertake planning across ten small and rural institutions and historic sites in northeast Ohio in response to NEH’s “A More Perfect Union” initiative. The consultants would perform assessments and offer training to build capacity at the participating institutions, in anticipation of celebrating the founding of the United States. The lead historical society holds collections that document the history of Trumbull County from the late eighteenth century, while participating institutions maintain materials related to Ohio’s Amish population, an all-black commune, known as the “Trumbull Phalanx” that operated in the mid-nineteenth century, as well as the development of craft and industry in this region.

Trumbull County, Ohio Treasures will transform ten of the county’s small and remote museums from isolated repositories of objects on display to venues that tell the story of the local, state and nationally significant Ohio treasures. This project is a grass-roots effort to increase capacity of small and rural collecting institutions to be prepared with a vision, plan and supporting documents to participate in fundraising efforts and grant writing proposals for implementing local projects for the 250th Anniversary. The Trumbull County Historical Society will partner with ten history-based organizations within Trumbull County to identify 5 items each that shed light on our national identity, purchase supplies to properly organize these collections for future research, provide training by a professional conservator to ensure the items are cared for using best practices in the museum field, and develop plans for exhibits and programs to showcase these items to the public.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Public History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271806-20

Miami Tribe of Oklahoma (Miami, OK 74355-1326)
Meghan Dorey (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Myaamia Heritage Museum Archive Assessment and Technical Assistance

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a preservation assessment and provide training to staff, and the purchase of preservation supplies for a collection on the history, language, and culture of the Miami people. The archival collections measure approximately 375 feet and are grouped into Tribal Records, Historical Reference Materials, Manuscript and Family Papers, and Museum Objects. They document the tribal community that was removed to Kansas in1846, with sources pertaining to genealogy, art, music, language, and culture, and twentieth-century tribal government, among other topics, and are used by the tribal community, the public, researchers, and students, and teachers.

The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma would like to complete an assessment of the Myaamia Heritage and Archive and receive techincal assistance for building storage boxes for oddly shaped artifacts and collection items.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$7,025 (approved)
$7,025 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271807-20

Highland Community College (Highland, KS 66035-4165)
Cindy Lee Davis (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Highland Archive Preservation 2020

Professional training for staff in artifact handling and storage, integrated pest management, and the use of environmental monitoring equipment.  Funds would also support the purchase of equipment and preservation supplies for cleaning and rehousing the college’s 420 linear feet of archival materials documenting the history of the college, which was founded in 1858 by Samuel Irvin.  Irvin had established a Presbyterian mission in the area some years earlier, and because the college was built on land ceded by the Ioway Nation, its early records are important to the history of the region, as well as to the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska and the Sac and Fox Tribe.  The college has prioritized public access to the records dated from 1858 to 1889, and the application responds to NEH’s “More Perfect Union” initiative with plans to preserve foundational documents in United States history, such as the college’s 1859 land grant signed by President James Buchanan.

The goal of this project is to preserve historical documents relating to Highland Community College (HCC), the community of Northeast Kansas, and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska. Artifacts have been “lost” for decades, deteriorating. Finding the 1859 Land Grant, which mentions the Iowa Tribe, led HCC to contact Alan Kelley of the Iowa Tribe. Conversations with Alan, then Executive Committee Vice-Chair of the Tribe, and Lance Foster current Executive Committee Vice-Chair led to the insight of the interconnections of the Iowa Tribe, the Highland Mission, and HCC. Both parties realize the historical documents need preserving for future generations. This project will enable HCC to purchase archival storage systems, equipment, and supplies to properly protect and preserve this archive of historical documents.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$14,994 (approved)
$14,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 11/30/2021


PG-271812-20

Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ 85004-1323)
Mario Nick Klimiades (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Heard Museum Library and Archives - Collections Preservation Assessment Project

A preservation assessment of a library and archive collection dedicated to Native American art and cultures, covering topics such as Native American fine art, literature, anthropology, and museum studies. The library is home to 434,000 resources, consisting of books and journals, while the archives contain 300,000 photographs, 2,500 audiovisual recordings of Native music, lectures, interviews, and film-making, along with nearly 480 research collections. A cornerstone of the library is the Native American Artists Resource Collection, which brings together biographical information on 27,000 Native artists. The library and archives are used by scholars from around the world for public and educational programming, by students and faculty at local universities, and by the Heard Museum’s curatorial staff for exhibit development.

The Heard Museum’s Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives houses one of the world’s most unique and important collections of Native American materials, books, artist documentation, and archival collections. In the last decade, the Heard's Library and Archives have experienced rapid expansion and requires an assessment of current holdings and a long-range plan for the collections' preservation and accessibility. To achieve this goal, the Heard will retain the services of a preservation specialist to conduct a on-site visit to develop an assessment report with recommendations for future projects and planning.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,622 (approved)
$4,622 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 1/31/2021


PG-271815-20

National Cambodian Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial (Chicago, IL 60625-3619)
Kaoru Watanabe (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Building Collections & Conservation Program Infrastructure and Professional Capacity, Phase II

The purchase of archival shelving and preservation supplies to rehouse a collection of paintings, ceramics, sculptures, photographs, instruments, textiles, and domestic materials that demonstrate life for Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge, as refugees, and in their newfound homes in the United States. Funds would also support the services of a collections manager and a conservator, who would serve as a consultant. The collections are used in exhibitions, classes, public programing and performances, and by researchers. Museum staff would also receive on-site training from the consulting conservator, as well as online training in preservation basics from the Northeast Document Conservation Center.

The proposed project aims to build the collections and preservation infrastructure and staff capacity at the National Cambodian Heritage Museum & Killing Fields Memorial (NCHM) for 18 months starting in September 2020. Specifically, we will purchase and install archival shelving, purchase archival supplies for proper housing of the collections, and build the museum staff capacity through the on-the-job training and NEDCC webinar. The project is Phase II of the development of the Collections and Conservation Program at NCHM. During the past three months, Andrew Leith (Conservation and Collections Program Manager, Chicago Cultural Alliance [CCA]) conducted the collections inventory and assessment, provided on-the-job training to the museum staff and intern, and began cataloging. The proposed project will be built upon the working relationship that we have established with CCA and upon the collections and conservation strategic planning that we developed with CCA.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Immigration History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271818-20

Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, Inc. (Chicago, IL 60605-1290)
Nick Tigue (Project Director: January 2020 to August 2020)
Richard B. Regan (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Storage Equipment for Auditorium Theatre Archive Holdings

The purchase of storage furniture for the Auditorium Theatre’s institutional archives, an action recommended in a 2018 preservation assessment. This collection of over 86 cubic feet of material encompasses performance, business, and renovation records, which are incorporated into articles and historic theatre tours. The theatre, which opened in 1889, is considered an early masterpiece of architects Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler and is a National Historic Landmark.

The Auditorium Theatre, a National Historic Landmark located in downtown Chicago, Illinois, respectfully requests $10,000 from National Endowment for the Humanities through the Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions to purchase storage equipment as we work to relocate our archival materials to a dedicated space within the theatre venue.

Project fields:
Architecture; U.S. History; Urban Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 1/31/2021


PG-271819-20

Boise Art Museum (Boise, ID 83702-7646)
Nicole Herden (Project Director: January 2020 to October 2020)
Alison Foudy (Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Boise Art Museum Permanent Collection Rehousing Project

The purchase of storage furniture for new collections and for preservation supplies for reorganizing and rehousing portions of the Boise Art Museum’s permanent collection, the initial step in a Collections Storage plan developed in 2019. The permanent collection consists of American, Native American, Asian, and European art, and ethnographic collections. The applicant would use secure storage areas and improve long-term preservation and accessibility of the collection, which has grown substantially since a building expansion in 1997. The proposed work would increase storage space for the museum’s two-dimensional framed works by 270.5 cubic feet and three-dimensional objects by 388.2 cubic feet.

Boise Art Museum requests support for a project to reorganize and rehouse portions of its Permanent Collection. This project is the initial step in the implementation of a new Collection Storage Plan, developed to better utilize secure storage areas, to improve the long-term preservation and accessibility of the collection, and ultimately to facilitate the critical programming BAM provides to the community. A reorganization process and the purchase of storage furniture is needed in order to properly store and protect all artwork. The project specifically addresses the secure storage of recent additions to the collection, the Carley Collection of ceramics and textiles from the American Southwest. BAM regularly organizes and presents exhibitions from the Permanent Collection to reflect our diverse heritage, traditions, and history. The Carley Collection represents an ongoing curatorial thread at BAM, the exploration of contemporary and historic artworks by Native American artists.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,992 (approved)
$9,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 4/30/2021


PG-271823-20

Kitchen Sisters Productions (San Francisco, CA 94133-5107)
Nikki Christine Silva (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
The Kitchen Sisters Archive

A preservation assessment and the purchase of preservation supplies for a collection of over 7,000 hours of audio footage recorded by producers Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as The Kitchen Sisters. Material from the collection was gathered for award-winning series such as “Lost & Found Sound,” “The Sonic Memorial,” and “Hidden Kitchens.” Among the everyday voices captured include Mohawk iron workers in New York, Vietnamese immigrant women working in nail shops in California, raw milk dairy farmers in Indiana, Lebanese immigrants in the Mississippi Delta, and barbecue pit masters in Kentucky. Documentary series have covered the immediate impact on the World Trade Center neighborhood following 9/11, hunger and poverty in America, and a coming-of-age ceremony for girls on the Yankton Sioux Reservation in South Dakota. The award would also support an audio preservation workshop for staff and independent audio producers.

The Kitchen Sisters, have created hundreds of stories for NPR and public broadcast since they began working together in 1979. In gathering recordings for these stories they have amassed over 7000 hours of audio documenting the lives, histories, rites, rituals and traditions of people, well known and seldom heard. Stories rich in all aspects of the humanities featuring interviews, oral histories, the context and perspectives of scholars, music, field recordings, archival audio—collected over four decades in nearly every state in the nation. WE are applying for NEH funding to 1) Purchase storage supplies to properly rehouse and preserve at risk media in our archive as recommended in our preservation assessment. 2) Contract with a paper conservator to prepare a preservation assessment of our paper collection. 3) Contract with an audio archivist to offer a workshop for our staff, interns, and open to other independent audio producers, focusing on audio preservation.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271826-20

Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians (Coachella, CA 92236-2031)
Sarah Bliss (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Assessment for the Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians

A preservation assessment of collections and storage space, and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and other preservation supplies, for Native American cultural objects that document the history of the tribe in southern California. The collection includes archaeological materials, utilitarian objects, basketry, ceramics, and ceremonial items. The project would also entail long-term planning for preservation and management of collections, for which the tribe is requesting support in response to the grant program’s encouragement associated with “A More Perfect Union.”

Conduct a preservation assessment for the collections preserved by the Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians

Project fields:
Anthropology; Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$14,975 (approved)
$14,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2021


PG-271842-20

Preservation Hall Foundation, Inc. (New Orleans, LA 70116-3115)
Ashley Shabankareh (Project Director: January 2020 to August 2020)
Greg Lucas (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Improvement of Preservation Quality for the Preservation Hall Archives

A preservation assessment and the purchase and installation of preservation equipment and shelving for the Preservation Hall Archives, documenting the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and containing print media, audiovisual recordings, instruments, fine art, photography, and memorabilia dating from the 1960s through the 1990s. For nearly six decades, Preservation Hall has been an essential venue in New Orleans for perpetuating traditional New Orleans jazz through nearly daily live performance. The mixed collection contains original audio recordings of performances and interviews of musicians associated with Preservation Hall, such as Jelly Roll Morton, Willie Humphrey, and Sweet Emma Barrett; thousands of rare jazz memorabilia; candid photographs of musicians, including the band’s first international tour to Japan in 1963; and glass slide negatives and prints from photographer Joseph Woodson “Pops” Whitsell, who concentrated on portraiture of local debutantes, Mardi Gras royalty, and wedding parties.

The Preservation Hall Foundation seeks support for its "Improvement of Preservation Quality for the Preservation Hall Archives" project. Currently housed in the New Orleans Warehouse District and on-site at Preservation Hall, the Preservation Hall Archives are the personal collection of Preservation Hall founders Sandra and Allan Jaffe. While the Archives represent some of the most vital collections of jazz music history in the entire country, the current conditions in which they are being stored are deeply inadequate due to PHF budgetary limitations. The project will improve the quality of preservation for PHF's archive materials through the creation of a General Preservation Assessment with a 5-year work plan, and the purchase and installation of proper preservation equipment and shelving.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 11/30/2021


PG-271845-20

Hyde Collection Trust (Glens Falls, NY 12801-4520)
Jonathan P. Canning (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Collection preservation

The purchase of preservation supplies, including shelf lining, file folders, and storage boxes for sculptures, prints, and photographs. In addition, the applicant would replace lighting in historic Hyde House with LED lights and install ultraviolet light sleeves in art storage to help reduce exposure. The restored historic house, located in a relatively remote region of greater northeastern New York, was constructed in 1912 and exhibits portions of the original Hyde family collection of European and American art in all media as well as special, traveling exhibitions. Following the recommendations of a 2019 preservation assessment, this project would support preparations for the institution’s 2022 reaccreditation as well as its sixtieth anniversary in 2023.

The Hyde Collection requests funding to purchase supplies to rehouse and reorganization works of art from the Museum's more than 5,000-item collection, as recommended by a Collections Assessment for Preservation report.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$9,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2021


PG-271846-20

Appalshop, Inc. (Whitesburg, KY 41858-0743)
Caroline Rubens (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Safeguarding Appalshop's Moving Image and Paper Collections

The purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies for improving long-term care of Appalshop’s institutional paper collections and an estimated 1.8 million feet of film footage recorded between 1969 and 2000, by Appalshop filmmakers. Appalshop’s audiovisual holdings consist largely of first-person accounts and direct documentation of events and activities in Appalachia, such as religious services, coal mining, folk artists at work, rural health care delivery, local politics, and traditional music. Included among the paper collections are the records of the Mountain Eagle, an influential East Kentucky weekly newspaper published from 1957 to 2005.

Appalshop Archive is requesting funds to improve storage of our collections that document central Appalachian history, culture and social issues, as well as the institution’s 50-year history. This project will significantly improve housing and storage conditions for our 1.8 million feet of 16mm film film materials and will expand our macrostorage and workspace capacity for processing and conserving our paper records and other collections.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271851-20

Harriet U. Allyn Testamentary Trust (New London, CT 06320-4130)
Jane LeGrow (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Preservation Grant to Support the Purchase of Archival Flat Files

The purchase of three archival-quality flat file units for the storage of works of art on paper in the Lyman Allyn Art Museum’s permanent collection. This furniture would accommodate an estimated 300-350 drawings, prints, photographs, and other works on paper, removing them from current inefficient and deleterious storage situations. Highlights of the collection include over 17,000 objects from antiquity to the present, including approximately 3,300 works on paper from American and European artists, with particular strengths in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition to alleviating overcrowding in collections storage, the project would allow staff to respond more effectively to requests for use of these collection items by students, scholars, and authors, for teaching, research, and publication purposes.

The Lyman Allyn Art Museum (New London, CT) requests $8986.62 to support the purchase of three archival-quality flat-drawer cabinet units for the long-term storage of photographs, prints, drawings and other works on paper in the permanent collection. A significant proportion of the Museum's approximately 3300 works on paper are currently stored in inefficient, potentially harmful plywood units, in acidic matting, or on rolling storage racks that could better be used to store oil paintings and oversized works. The collection includes works by 18th and 19th century American and European artists, as well as European Old Master drawings, works by American Modernists and WPA-artists, and a large collection of contemporary photography. These cabinets would rehouse between 300-350 works, stored flat in Melinex sleeves, archival folders or in acid-free mats. Support of this project would greatly assist the Museum's ongoing efforts to improve its collections care, capacity and accessibility.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,986 (approved)
$8,986 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


PG-271868-20

Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (San Juan, PR 00902-4184)
Pedro Roig (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
General Archive of Puerto Rico

A conservation assessment and purchase of preservation supplies for 84 bound volumes of compiled manuscripts recording the proceedings of the municipal council meetings of the City of San Juan, 1730-1900. These volumes are part of the General Archives of Puerto Rico (GAPR), which experienced severe damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Documenting the social, economic, and political life in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century San Juan, these books are widely used: in 2019, one in five research requests sought records from this series. As San Juan prepares to mark the 500th anniversary of its establishment as Puerto Rico’s capital in 2021, the research demands on these collections are expected to increase.

A project to safeguard the historic collection, The Proceedings from the Council Meeting from the Municipality of San Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$9,932 (approved)
$9,932 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-271869-20

Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (San Juan, PR 00902-4184)
Hector Davila (Project Director: January 2020 to August 2020)
Hilda Teresa Ayala-Gonzalez (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Enhancing Environmental Conditions for the National Library of Puerto Rico

A preservation assessment and the purchase of environmental monitors for a diverse collection of books on the history and culture of Puerto Rico, including significant sixteenth-century volumes. Located in an area declared a disaster zone after Hurricane Maria in 2017, the collection suffered considerably from inconsistent electricity and climate control in the aftermath of the storm. Conservation work has since mitigated the mold damage, but reliable environmental monitors and dehumidifiers have yet to be installed.

Enhancing Environmental Conditions for the National Library of Puerto Rico

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PG-262071-19

DePauw University (Greencastle, IN 46135-1736)
Craig Ray Hadley (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Enhanced Preservation and Access for DePauw University's Oversize Works of Art

The purchase of storage furniture to rehouse 24 oversize paintings and works on paper, including works by Indiana artists, former faculty members such as Reid Winsey, and national artists such as Robert Rauschenburg.  The collection is used in both staff and student curated exhibitions, as well as in the classroom setting, to support courses in art and art history, anthropology, Asian studies, chemistry and biochemistry, classical studies, English, religious studies, and women’s studies.  This project would be the second and final phase of a project to rehouse the University’s 2D collection and fits into the University’s larger collections management plans.

DePauw University respectfully requests $6,000 to purchase 12 powder coated art storage racks to support rehousing efforts. These new art storage racks will house approximately 24 oversize paintings and works on paper from the permanent collection, ranging from a late 19th century Hoosier Impressionist painting by Indiana native Walter Hixon Isnogle to a series of paintings and oversize prints by DePauw University faculty and former students. The objects directly support a variety of teaching and research needs at DePauw University, including undergraduate projects, faculty use, and public exhibitions. Per a 2014 Museum Assessment Program site visit, the external reviewer recommended the replacement of substandard wooden painting bins with museum-quality storage furniture. This project is part of a larger collections consolidation project and is included in the board approved 2015-2020 gallery strategic plan.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


PG-262235-19

Bridgton Historical Society (Bridgton, ME 04009-0044)
Edward Allen (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Collections Storage Upgrade

The purchase of shelving and preservation supplies to store a diverse collection of historical objects, furniture, textiles, photographs, town and business records, and other items related to the history of Bridgton.  Founded originally as an agricultural community in the 1760s, Bridgton later became a transportation center and today serves as a popular tourist destination in southern Maine.  Highlights of the collection include 220 glass plate negatives, 100 tools and household items from a local farmhouse inhabited by the same family for more than two centuries, and firearms and edged weapons dating to the Civil War era or earlier.

Bridgton Historical Society proposes to purchase and install storage racks and re-house collections in the basement storage area, following recommendations by conservator Ronald Harvey, who conducted a NEH grant-funded conservation assessment in 2017. The collections that this project will benefit include business and municipal records, glass plate negatives, household artifacts, agricultural and manufacturing tools and equipment, textiles, military artifacts, and other items used or produced in Bridgton or by Bridgton residents. The collections are used by researchers and for exhibitions, programs, and publications; many are available on-line. The project will replace an old plywood rack, purchase a mix of fixed and rolling open metal racks, and re-house materials in appropriate, acid-free archival storage containers. In addition to improving storage conditions, this project will more than double the amount of storage shelving in this space and make the collections more accessible.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,140 (approved)
$5,140 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-262249-19

Appalachian Mountain Club (Boston, MA 02129-3740)
Rebecca Maxwell Fullerton (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Historic Outdoors: A Preservation Initiative

The purchase of high density shelving units for the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Library and Archives collections, which offer a rich history of mountaineering from the 19th century to the present.  A 10,000 photographic slide collection visually documents the club’s early history, recreation gear, trails, as well as wilderness camps, cabins, and alpine mountain huts in the White Mountain region of New Hampshire.  Additional collections include the writings, correspondence, and scrapbooks of Thelma Bonney Hall Towle, a journalist and rock climber who chronicled her experiences in the 1930s and 40s.  Institutional records dating from the club’s founding in 1876 document hiking trails, such as the 230-mile Bay Circuit Trail circumnavigating Boston, programmatic and education programs, and partnerships with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and Northern Forest Alliance.

The project will focus on Appalachian Mountain Club’s (AMC’s) Library & Archives Special Collections and Institutional Records. These materials range from outdoor photography from 1870s, manuscript collections of outdoorspeople of the 19th through the 21st centuries, and complete business records of the nation’s oldest outdoor recreation and conservation organization. Our primary and secondary source materials document over 140 years of the wilderness experience in this country through the lens of history, writing, visual arts and culture. Our specific goal within this project to is to upgrade our storage capabilities to meet modern standards of preservation by incorporating high density shelving into our new Archives location.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263396-19

Good Will Home Association (Hinckley, ME 04944-0159)
Deborah W. Staber (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Phase 4 of Developing Storage and Housing Spaces for Humanities Collections relating to Good Will Orphanage History

The purchase of shelving and acid-free housing to store the collections of the Good Will-Hinckley Homes, which include over 10,000 archaeological artifacts, 2,400 shelf feet of archives, 4,000 cultural objects, 4,500 art or decorative arts objects, “numerous” natural history materials, and 5,500 historical objects. The latter include items used in the domestic life of orphans, such as farm equipment and looms, illuminating the social history of childcare and orphanages in the 19th and 20th centuries. Partnering with Maine Archives and Museums, the museum would also engage a conservator to present a collections care workshop on storage methods, designed for regional museum staff.

The goal of the L.C. Bates Museum’s Phase 4: Developing Storage Space and Housing Significant Humanities Collections project is to work with conservator Ron Harvey to improve collection’s care by completing the final phase of the second floor north storage space. The project would purchase shelving and acid free housing to store humanities collections. The project collections are relevant to the national history of childcare and its study as exemplified by Good Will-Hinckley Homes and Maine history. This storage project, a prioritized collections care goal of the Museum’s 2018-22 Strategic Plan, follows the recommendations of our 2008 RE-CAP, 2012 MAP Collections Stewardship and Ron Harvey’s 2000 Collection Survey and 2010 climate monitoring report. Partnering with Maine Archives and Museums, the Museum will engage the conservator to present a collections care workshop. The workshop, designed for regional museum staff, will use the project activities to exemplify storage methods.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, Other; Urban History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,926 (approved)
$5,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


PG-263398-19

Eastern Shore Public Library Foundation (Accomac, VA 23301-0554)
Cara Jane Burton (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Preservation of Eastern Shore Public Library Archives

A preservation needs assessment for more than 1,000 volumes, 500 rolls of microfilm, and 350 linear feet of manuscripts, published materials, and photographs documenting the history of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, and preservation training for area cultural heritage organizations.  The collection includes manuscript records of antebellum yeoman farmers, important area businesses, and an 1885 railroad-adjacent planned community; photographs of Eastern Shore scenes in the 1890s; a dozen local newspapers continuously collected since the 19th century; and a comprehensive collection of books written about the area.  Recent bequests augment the library’s collections on local and African American history and genealogy.  The planned assessment would assist the applicant in planning a new library and heritage center.

Eastern Shore Public Library Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, financially supports the mission of the Eastern Shore Public Library. The Eastern Shore Public Library (ESPL), which serves Accomack and Northampton Counties on Virginia’s Eastern Shore peninsula, has a unique local history and archives collection frequently used by historians, authors, and genealogists. ESPL proposes to hire a preservation consultant from LYRASIS to conduct a preservation needs assessment of collections and conduct training on their care and handling. ESPL’s archives include documents detailing the Shore’s rich history from its Native Americans’ European contact in the 17th century to the present, including documents about the “culture of manumission” unique to this area. ESPL’s goal through this project is to assess the collection, create plans for its preservation, and train staff and volunteers to ensure they are available to students, humanities scholars, and the community in then care and handling.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263403-19

Precita Eyes Muralists Association, Inc. (San Francisco, CA 94110-4133)
Julio Enrique Badel (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Precita Eyes Muralists Preservation Implentation

Precita Eyes Muralists Association, Inc. received an NEH Preservation Assistance Grant in 2016 for an assessment of its unique collection of narrative materials, drawings and photographs, documenting over forty years of mural art in San Francisco. Our consultant, Dr. Cornelia Bleul-Gohlke, reviewed the documentation of 540 Precita murals and many others, primarily from the heavily Hispanic Mission District. Over 15,000 individual documents were sorted and partially cataloged. She also reviewed space in our building and the actions needed to house and preserve these materials, including the types of archival storage we would need. We are now requesting funding for shelving and archival storage materials. We are also requesting funding for a consultant to train and work with our staff in determining the ideal storage for existing and future mural documents and methods of inventory for access by scholars. This project will commence January 1, 2019 and run through December 31, 2019.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other; History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263410-19

International Tennis Hall of Fame, Inc. (Newport, RI 02840-3515)
Douglas Andrew Stark (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
International Tennis Hall of Fame Spatial Analysis Project

A preservation assessment of a museum collection of approximately 30,000 artifacts housed in the historic Newport Casino, site of the first U.S. National Lawn Tennis Championship in 1881.  Highlights include a variety of fine and decorative art works, jewelry, trophies, clothing, and memorabilia relating to the history of tennis from its origins during the Renaissance to the present. In addition, the museum maintains 300,000 photographs and slides and 8,500 books, periodicals, and audiovisual records associated with the history of tennis.

The International Tennis Hall of Fame seeks to hire a consultant to work jointly with the museum staff to conduct a spatial and needs assessment of the collections storage and work areas. The consultant’s report will address the current collections storage area, the library, conference room, and staff work areas, focusing on storage spatial requirements, equipment and housings, environmental management and monitoring, and access. This report will assist in revising our Strategic Plan and Collections Plan. Our facility interprets the history of tennis and its impact on our culture, as well as the building which is representative of the Gilded Age in Newport, Rhode Island and is a National Historic Landmark.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263440-19

Waynesburg University (Waynesburg, PA 15370-1258)
Courtney Dennis (Project Director: April 2018 to March 2020)
Rea Andrew Redd (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Paul R. Stewart Museum Collection Preservation

The purchase of preservation storage supplies for the college’s archives, comprising 300 linear feet of documents, photographs, campus newspapers, and other materials.  Sources date back to the 1850s and chronicle the school’s history as an early enrollee of African American and Native American students and one of the nation’s first higher education institutions to grant full degrees to women.  Highlights include personal papers of A. B. Miller, who served as president of the college from 1859 to 1899, and issues of the Cumberland Presbyterian, a periodical published by Waynesburg’s parent church, dating from 1869 to 1885.

The Paul R. Stewart Museum (PRSM) at Waynesburg University has a diverse collection that represents the humanities, arts, and sciences. The university was founded by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1849, and its significant tradition of educational and social progressiveness is such that two of its campus buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. This project will focus on preserving the archival materials in the collection that pertain to the university’s institutional history. Grant funds would support replacing archival-grade containers and materials in this collection that are losing efficacy and purchasing archival-grade containers and materials for the items in this collection that are not currently housed using accepted archival practices or are not housed at all. The PRSM receives 60 requests annually from researchers wishing to utilize these materials. By preserving them, the PRSM can continue to share them with the public and the campus community.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263447-19

Missouri Botanical Garden (St. Louis, MO 63166-0299)
Susie Cobbledidck (Project Director: April 2018 to August 2019)
Improving Environmental Conditions in the Peter H Raven Library by Eliminating UV and Some Visible Light Using Window Film and Shades

The purchase and installation of UV filter film and shades to protect special collection materials located in the Missouri Botanical Garden Library’s reading room and cataloging processing room.  The 10,500 books in Special Collections include more than 1,000 volumes published between 1474 and 1753, predating the publication of Carl Linnaeus’s Species Plantarum, which used binomial nomenclature for the first time.  Other collection highlights include 960 botanical volumes by and about Linnaeus, a first edition of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, a first octavo edition of Audubon’s Birds of America, and an edition of 738 engravings made from 18th-century copper plates that record the botanical discoveries made on Captain James Cook’s first voyage.

The Peter H Raven Library specializes in botany, but it also contains works of biography, natural history, exploration, anthropology, garden design, illustration and art. The Library holds about 240,000 monographs and journals in its General Collection and 10,500 books in Special Collections, the earliest dating from 1474. Our Collections contain illustrated volumes of interest to artists and art historians, many original bindings to support the work of bibliographers, and pre-Linnaean works of natural history whose contents reveal pre-scientific cosmologies. We are tasked with caring for these materials and passing them on in good condition to future generations, so we want to provide them with the best possible environmental conditions. Acting on the recommendation of the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, we are requesting grant support to mitigate light exposure in our Reading Room and cataloging area via the installation of UV filter film and shades.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Philosophy, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263455-19

Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008)
Britt Benjamin (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Preserving Kansas City's Fashion History at Johnson County Community College

The hiring of a consultant to undertake a preservation assessment of a historic fashion collection and a workshop for faculty, students, and staff to ensure improved care of the collection. The collection contains more than 1,500 items that document the history of fashion in Kansas City and that date from the late 19th through the late 20th century.  Included are pieces by the fashion sportswear designer Claire McCardell, and other designers such as Pierre Cardin and Oscar de la Renta, as well as the Kansas City-based designer Nelly Don.  The collection is used extensively by students and faculty in a wide range of university courses, for scholarly research, and for the public through exhibitions and a searchable online database.

Johnson County Community College (JCCC) requests $5,905 through a National Endowment for the Humanities Small Institutions Preservation Assistance grant to fund a textile preservationist to perform a general needs assessment of the College’s fashion collection.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,905 (approved)
$5,905 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


PG-263469-19

Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Robert Schimelpfenig (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Washington State School for the Blind, a preservation pre-assessment of archives

A preservation assessment of archival records and artifacts maintained by the Washington State School for the Blind, established in 1886, along with two in-house workshops on preservation methods. Comprising 250 linear feet of archival sources and 400 objects, the collection includes correspondence and books in braille, audio recordings in multiple formats, photographs and scrapbooks, newsletters, campus maps for the blind, Dictaphones, an Edison cylinder phonograph, braille machines, and other sources documenting the school’s history as well as the history of technologies used for educating the blind.

The Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB) Archives documents the 130-year history of the school and the students who lived there. These histories are preserved in scrapbooks, news clippings, photographs and student records. The evolution of technologies is documented through antique sound equipment, volumes of braille, and Talking Books on vinyl. With limited staff, the collections from one of the oldest schools for the blind in the Western United States remains hidden. We propose a preservation pre-assessment of WSSB’s collections. After that the WSUV Library Archivist, in consultation with WSSB employees, will develop a 5-year plan to begin making the history of WSSB visible for its students and the public.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-263471-19

Illinois Institute of Technology (Chicago, IL 60616-3732)
Adam Strohm (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Environmental Monitoring of UASC 2018

The purchase and installation of environmental monitoring equipment and the analysis of temperature and relative humidity conditions for the university’s archives and special collections.  Consisting of 1,000 individual collections totaling 4,400 linear feet, the holdings include institutional records, correspondence, maps, minutes, reports, audio recordings, and student newspapers documenting the history of the Institute and its alumni and faculty, as well as the Near South Side and “Bronzeville” neighborhoods of Chicago.  Among the personal papers of former faculty members are transcripts of some of the earliest interviews conducted with Holocaust survivors by David Pablo Boder, author of the book, I Did Not Interview the Dead (Urbana: Univers