NEH banner

[light] [dark]

Funded Projects Query Form
41 matches

Grant programs:Preservation and Access Education and Training*
Date range: 2018-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.016 sec

Export results to Excel
Save this query

PE-284340-22

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Narayan Khandekar (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Pre-Program Conservation Junior Fellowship

A continuing education and training program to prepare three post-baccalaureate students, one fellow per year for three years, for application to graduate training programs in conservation of cultural heritage. Selected students, as junior fellows, would pursue required coursework and work closely with the faculty and collections of the Harvard Art Museums.

The Harvard Art Museums respectfully requests consideration by the National Endowment for the Humanities for a Preservation and Access Education and Training grant to launch a pre-program continuing education and training program, which aims to increase access, diversity, and inclusive excellence in the field of art conservation. This type of post-baccalaureate, paid junior fellowship will be one of the first among very few such emerging professional development opportunities in the country and will provide focused, intensive 1:1 learning, resulting in an opportunity to prepare a successful application for recognized graduate training programs in conservation of cultural heritage. Building on the Harvard Art Museums’ extensive graduate and post-graduate training programs, the proposed program will host one post-bacc junior fellow per year for the first three years.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,340 (approved)
$348,340 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2025


PE-284344-22

Midwest Art Conservation Center, Inc. (Minneapolis, MN 55404-3506)
Colin D. Turner (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Regional Preservation Field Services Program

A regional preservation field service program that strengthens preservation practices and the care of humanities collections at hundreds of museums, historical organizations, libraries, and archives in five states of the Upper Midwest. The award would additionally support training for two Native American conservation fellows as part of its Native American Collections Care Fellowship Program, which began in 2018.

The Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC) requests continued funding for its Regional Preservation Field Service Program (Preventive Conservation). This program strengthens the preservation practices and collections care at cultural repositories in the Upper Midwest, resulting in increased public access. During the proposed NEH grant period (3/2022-2/2024), the Preventive Conservation program will improve the preservation practices at hundreds of institutions by providing: collections care and preservation related workshops; disaster planning, training and response services; preservation surveys and plans; collections care information; grant preparation assistance; and other related collection care improvement services. The program has demonstrated successful outcomes and measurable results, keeps its programming accessible to even the smallest institutions in the region, is staffed by knowledgeable conservators and preservation experts, and is devoted to this region’s collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$350,000 (approved)
$330,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024


PE-283538-22

Denver Public Library (Denver, CO 80204-2731)
Rachel Vagts (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Bridging the Gap: Post-Baccalaureate Apprenticeships for Underrepresented Populations in Archives (Bridging the Gap)

Hiring two pre-professional, post-baccalaureate apprentices from communities underrepresented in the archives and preservation professions to work in the Special Collections and Digital Archives Department of the Denver Public Library for two years.

Denver Public Library (DPL) proposes Bridging the Gap: Post-Baccalaureate Apprenticeships for Underrepresented Populations in Archives (Bridging the Gap), which will recruit and hire two pre-professional, post-baccalaureate apprentices.  We will prioritize underrepresented populations in archives and preservation professions for this program. We encourage those who identify as Black, Indigenous and/or people of color (BIPOC) and/or those who are first generation college graduates to apply. Over their two-year apprenticeship, they will have exposure to core archival and preservation functions and decision-making to advance the discovery, access and use of archival records included in historically important humanities collections in DPL’s Special Collections and Digital Archives Department. Through this project, apprentices will learn to process (i.e., perform collections assessment, arranging and describing of) collections for which they have a personal affinity; apply basic preservation treatments; and create finding aids (metadata) for digitized materials. To ensure that other libraries and archival institutions can learn from this project, DPL will partner with the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to disseminate a report about how DPL implemented the project, as well as the project’s evaluation outcomes related to apprentices’ professional skill development and the impact of the project on access to the humanities collections that will be improved through Bridging the Gap.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General; Latino History

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$266,467 (approved)
$266,467 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/28/2025


PE-284349-22

Northeast Document Conservation Center, Inc. (Andover, MA 01810-1438)
Ann Marie Willer (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Preservation Training, Resources, and Assessments to Ensure the Persistence of Humanities Collections

A wide range of preservation and access activities, including addressing preservation emergencies through continuation of a 24/7 Collections Emergency Hotline and workshops on disaster planning and response, producing reference materials and updating the website, and building training webinars and online courses.

As a respected preservation and conservation resource for organizations of all sizes, the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) will continue to transform its preservation field services with the goal of increasing the knowledge and skills of collections care professionals—at all levels—in the long-term care and stewardship of paper-based and photographic collections, audiovisual materials, and digital objects. Through this project, NEDCC will provide free of charge: 8 one-day hands-on disaster preparedness workshops in disaster areas along the Atlantic coast; 8 general preservation pre-assessments; “Ask NEDCC” reference service; 24/7 collections emergency hotline; and supply kits for 2 hands-on webinars. Funding will support staff time to update the free Preservation Leaflets, maintain free online resources and textbooks, and develop 4 new webinars. The project will also fund student rates for webinars, workshops, and web courses and contract authors for 2 Leaflet revisions.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024


PE-284368-22

Cultural Heritage Imaging (San Francisco, CA 94102-5867)
Carla Schroer (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Advanced Imaging and Archiving Skills for Indigenous Communities

The creation of two five-day training sessions at three sites, with follow-up sessions and consulting both online and in person to capture cultural heritage materials with two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging. The participating Indigenous groups from Alaska, Hawaii, and Maine would learn how to prepare their photographic data, their 3D work products, the contextual metadata that describes how these digital assets were acquired and built, and how to make a standards compliant submission to an archival preservation system.

This project provides a program of in-depth, hands-on training in advanced computational photography 2D and 3D documentary and archival technologies. It is a collaboration between Cultural Heritage Imaging and three indigenous community organizations: The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, serving the Unangax^ (Aleut) people; Huliauapa’a, serving Hawai’i’s native people; and the Passamaquoddy Tribal Government in Maine. The training sessions will build a sustainable core of culture bearers in each community to digitally document their material culture and heritage sites. A scientific imaging work flow and tools that simplify metadata management give the generated digital representations reliability and reusability. Tools supporting archival submission of the digital documentary materials help ensure the long-term preservation of each community’s digital collections. The project will help each community perpetuate their heritage and take control of their cultural narrative.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History, Other; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,984 (approved)
$347,184 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/28/2024


PE-284404-22

Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
Jaime Schumacher (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Digital POWRR Professional Development Institutes for Digital Preservation

Five Preserving digital Objects With Restricted Resources (POWRR) Program training sessions on the standards, processes, and tools used to curate and preserve digital objects using open-source software. The 150 participants would largely come from grassroots cultural heritage organizations responsible for the curation and preservation of materials of historically marginalized groups, including Native Americans, African Americans, and members of the Latinx community.

The proposed project will provide librarians, archivists, and museum professionals with new skills to be used in the preservation of humanities materials in digital formats. It will hold five events, each of 2.5 days in length and serving 30 practitioners, reaching a total of 150 practitioners. The program will provide financial assistance to be used for travel to and from project events to practitioners whose organizations cannot afford to support their travel in full. Program leaders will work with organizations representing practitioners responsible for Native American, African American, and Latinx materials to recruit participants and design curriculum and evaluation materials.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,900 (approved)
$348,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 9/30/2025


PE-284454-22

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Ellen Pearlstein (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Preservation of Indigenous Collections: Training for Tribal Materials and Museums

A continuing education program for collections stewards that would include six online courses, two in-person regional workshops, and follow-up mentoring to support sustained application of lessons learned, targeted to Native Americans working with tribal materials at museums and cultural centers across the country.

UCLA/Getty respectfully requests $310,632 for: 1) six online courses, 2) two in-person regional workshops, and 3) follow-up mentoring designed to support sustained application of lessons learned, all targeted to reach Native Americans working with tribal materials at museums and cultural centers. The proposal builds on a successful UCLA/Getty history of working with Indigenous communities and will reach up to 136 participants and an equal number of mentees. Increased emergence of American Indian museums and cultural centers speaks to the importance of humanities collections in the preservation and even revitalization of cultural practices, and to the sovereignty behind self-representation. Humanities tribal collections serve to educate tribal youth, provide heritage in support of language learning, and instill pride in intergenerational heritage accomplishments of a community. Tribal museums reach non-tribal visitors and scholars as well, offering a crucial humanities perspective.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$310,362 (approved)
$310,362 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2025


PE-284461-22

Myriad Consulting and Training Incorporated (Gainesville, FL 32601-5636)
Annie Peterson (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Open Sources: Training Communities of Practice for Complex Born-Digital Collections

The development and implementation of curricula, resources, workshops, and community events tailored to smaller cultural heritage institutions focused on preservation of and access to born-digital materials.

Myriad requests support to produce and present an innovative, multi-channel, collaborative born-digital preservation and access training program. The training program will combine past successful digital preservation training approaches with a new expansion of existing curricula to specifically address complex born-digital creative works, such as video and audio works, illustration, design works, software-based art, and installation art. It will specifically target smaller cultural heritage institutions and independent creators who have not had access to tailored, practical advice or communities of practice to support their preservation efforts in the past. If this funding request is awarded, Myriad will develop and present hybrid remote/in-person workshops and community building events in 6 regions throughout the United States, produce a Field Guide and Workbook for preserving digital creative works, design and print a Zine for digital artists and creators, and publish a white paper

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$347,587 (approved)
$347,587 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024


PE-277136-21

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Margaret Holben Ellis (Project Director: June 2020 to October 2021)
Michele D'Arcy Marincola (Project Director: October 2021 to present)
Managing Change: Developing New Teaching and Learning Modalities in Conservation Education

Online and in-person training for up to 24 students studying archaeological and preventive conservation, including student stipends and summer work placement support.

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, respectfully requests $350,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a three-year project to enhance our capacity to teach graduate-level, art and artifact conservation remotely and in-person. The project will allow for the development of new teaching and learning modalities through three components: NEH Guest Lecturers to enhance the curriculum through remote and in-person instruction; NEH Student Fellowships that build student capacity to assess, communicate, and create learning content; and NEH Summer Work Placements that solidify theoretical concepts through placements in US cultural institutions and archaeological sites abroad.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$250,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 12/31/2023


PE-277137-21

Utah Arts Council (Salt Lake City, UT 84102-1101)
Jennifer Ortiz (Project Director: June 2020 to March 2021)
Emily Johnson (Project Director: March 2021 to June 2021)
Marie D. Desrochers (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Utah Community Preservation Program (UCPP)

Establishment of the Utah Community Preservation Program, which would train professionals across the state who manage humanities collections. One conservator would be hired to coordinate the program and serve as lead instructor for a series of twenty-four online and eight in-person trainings and workshops over the course of two years; the program would also train seven cultural heritage professionals, geographically distributed throughout the state of Utah, to act as an ongoing Community Preservation Team.

Utah Field Services seeks a NEH Preservation and Access Education and Training grant to establish a new Utah Community Preservation Program (UCPP). This project will develop, implement and test a comprehensive set of virtual and on-site, culturally appropriate, training and mentorship activities, designed to elevate the preservation literacy (knowledge and skills) of museum/collections stewards across Utah through more than 1,000 engagements.After the three-year project period ends in early 2024, Utah Field Services (UFS) will sustain UCPP.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$347,604 (approved)
$347,604 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/28/2024


PE-277138-21

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Rebecca Fraimow (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
PBCore Audiovisual Metadata Training Project

Two webinar series plus three in-person workshops to train preservation practitioners in PBCore, a metadata schema designed to organize and provide access to audiovisual collections.  The applicant would also translate the PBCore website into Spanish, which would broaden use of the metadata schema to include Spanish-speaking heritage institutions in the United States and abroad.

The PBCore Audiovisual Metadata Training Project will provide in-person and virtual continuing education opportunities focused on the PBCore metadata standard for archivists and media professionals tasked with the stewardship of audiovisual material. The Project will support a webinar series aimed at introducing small cultural heritage institutions to key concepts of audiovisual metadata; three in-person workshops targeted, respectively, at archivists, media/production professionals, and others who can demonstrate a need for PBCore training; a Spanish-language translation of the PBCore website and educational materials; and a series of Spanish-language webinars introducing the use of PBCore for archivists working with Spanish-language collections.

Project fields:
Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$186,917 (approved)
$186,917 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 11/30/2022


PE-277140-21

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (Richmond, VA 23220-4007)
Debbie Linn (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Preservation Training Initiative

A three-year Preservation Training Initiative in conservation and archives, offered to students at different levels (nine undergraduate interns, one master’s intern, and three post-graduate fellows in conservation), as well as four continuing education workshops, for 30 participants each, for museum professionals from across the state of Virginia focusing on collections care and archival management.

VMFA requests funding for a 36-month program, Preservation Training Initiative, which will provide training and professional development across the continuum, from college students considering careers in heritage preservation to emerging professionals in the fields of preservation, conservation, and archives to established museum and library professionals throughout Virginia. The project will support paid training for students at key touch points in their academic careers: 1) three postgraduate students to serve as advanced fellows in conservation (one per year); 2) one part-time, nine-month master’s-level intern in Library Sciences to gain practical experience in the museum’s archives; and, 3) nine pre-program undergraduate students to serve as 10-week, paid summer interns in the museum’s conservation labs (three per year). In addition, the initiative will allow for the development of two statewide preservation workshops.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$345,815 (approved)
$345,815 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2024


PE-277142-21

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Glenn Wharton (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Ellen Pearlstein (Co Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Community, Collaboration, And Cultural Heritage Conservation Project

Three years of community collaboration training, internship support, and student stipends for three incoming graduate students to the UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials.

The UCLA/Getty Conservation Program seeks $250,000 to support a project in which three Master's graduate students will focus on the specialized practices of collaborative conservation. Over the course of three years, the designated "NEH fellows" will develop capacity as conservators while working closely with community stewards to enhance collections care practices within their cultural context. This project will enable the Program to refine the pioneering model it has developed for collaborative work with tribal museums and extend it to other important, yet underserved collections and sites with a wider range of stakeholders. Requested funds include partial stipends to support fellows during the first two years of the program and on two summer internships; thesis research and a nine-month internship in the third year; a senior conservator who will provide summer internship supervision when in-house staff is not available; and, a modest sum for supplies and materials.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2024


PE-277145-21

Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Tiffani Emig (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Training for Emergency Preparation and Response for Humanities Collections

The establishment of new Alliance for Response (AFR) networks in Chicago, Illinois and Charleston, South Carolina; development of response team training courses for Minnesota-based and nationally-distributed individuals; creation of continuing education webinars on emergency preparation; and the building of online resources to support these efforts and increase sharing of expertise among the 32 existing AFR networks throughout the United States.

The project will support training to establish two new Alliance for Response networks, in Chicago and Charleston, SC. Response team training will be offered in collaboration with the Twin Cities Alliance for Response (MN), and nationally for the National Heritage Responders. Webinars, web-based resources, and small project grants will support existing Alliance for Response networks.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$217,359 (approved)
$204,033 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PE-277148-21

CCAHA (Philadelphia, PA 19103-5530)
Dyani Feige (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
CCAHA Preservation Field Services: Capacity Building for Small to Medium Size Organizations

A preservation field service program that would build capacity for collection stewardship at small and medium-sized collecting institutions through three main activities: 1) Preservation Planning, 2) the Regional Heritage Stewardship Program, and 3) Education and Training Programs.

The Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) requests three-year funding support to continue and broaden the reach of activities of CCAHA's preservation field services programs through preservation planning activities, the Regional Heritage Stewardship Program, and educational programs. Goals for preservation field services activities in 2019-20 include: To competitively offer NEH-subsidized preservation needs assessments, emergency plans, and digital preservation assessments to 12 small to mid-sized institutions; to sustain the work of the Regional Heritage Stewardship Program in the Deep South and Appalachia; to provide one national conferences on sustainability and collections care, as well as a first-time Collections Care Boot Camp, a first-time educational collaboration with ICA Art Conservation, and a series of mid-level education programs.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,217 (approved)
$349,037 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/29/2024


PE-277017-21

University of Hawaii Systems (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
Noelle Maile Kaluhea Yayoi Kahanu (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Weaving a Net(work) of Care for Oceanic Collections: A Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Museum Summer Institute

A six-week summer institute to provide education and training to 20 early to mid-career Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders working in museum and heritage centers throughout the Pacific, including Hawai'i and United States Island Areas. The institute would focus on museum management and collections care for institutions, professionals, and communities that care for Oceanic collections.

This collaborative proposal by the University of Hawai'i (lead applicant) and East-West Center seeks $350,000 to provide education and training to twenty early to mid-career Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders working in museum and heritage centers throughout the Pacific, including Hawai'i and US Island Areas. Taking place for six weeks in the summer of 2021, this intensive institute will be designed and implemented through an extensive network of local, national and regional organizations. It will include lectures, presentations and hands-on workshops at Honolulu-based museums by more than 30 field experts in the areas of Collections Care, Exhibitions, and Conservation. Because Oceanic humanities collections tell important stories about Pacific peoples and their contributions to the US and the world, this institute and its cohort of Pacific professionals will strengthen their network of care, ensuring the preservation of and access to these collections for future generations.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


PE-277022-21

Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Daryl W. Baldwin (Project Director: June 2020 to November 2021)
Kara Strass (Project Director: November 2021 to present)
Capacity Building for the National Breath of Life Native American Philology Model

A continuing education training program in archival methods for community-directed language revitalization that would contribute to capacity-building efforts for access to language archives. Activities include training that combines distance-learning with direct technology support from the National Breath of Life archives team; support for five apprentices; and opportunities to network with other community archivists.

The mission of the National Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages is to work with Community Archivists from endangered language communities to build capacity around methods in archives-based research for community-directed revitalization efforts. With this mission in mind, the National Breath of Life has developed a model for Native American philology. Since 2011, National Breath of Life has expanded the model to increase the depth and breadth of training for Native American Community Archivists who are responsible for building and maintaining a wide range of language archive activities and research specific to the revitalization of their community languages. As part of this process, National Breath of Life provides state-of-the-art software and best practices to advance their work. The proposed project builds capacity for the National Breath of Life in two strategic areas. First, is the development to provide ongoing technical training and outreach by creating

Project fields:
History, General; Languages, Other; Linguistic Anthropology

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,442 (approved)
$291,211 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/29/2024


PE-277041-21

Wisconsin Library Services (Madison, WI 53715-1255)
Erin F.H. Hughes (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Curating Indigenous Digital Collections

The development of partnerships with six tribal institutions to advance digital preservation and curation learning opportunities, which would include three one-year fellowships at partner institutions, workshops and discussions for 25 tribal cultural workers to develop a community of practice, and service-learning projects for 15 graduate students.

Wisconsin Library Services (WiLS), in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Information School and tribal community partners, will offer applied learning opportunities in digital preservation and curation for tribal cultural workers, early-career preservation professionals, and graduate students in archives and information science programs, while advancing the ongoing work of tribal libraries, archives, and museums to collect, preserve, and provide appropriate access to cultural patrimony. Curating Indigenous Digital Collections will support three one-year Fellows placed with six tribal Partners. Fellows will support Partners in developing and implementing digital projects using Mukurtu CMS, a content management system designed to meet the unique needs of Indigenous communities. As Native Nations face massive losses of knowledge and knowledge keepers, this project provides critical support to build local capacities and protect tribal identity and sovereignty.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$342,740 (approved)
$330,212 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2021 – 2/29/2024


PE-277074-21

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Jeanet (Juana) Suarez (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Media Archiving and Preservation: Education and Professional Training

Scholarships for 32 internships as part of New York University’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) program. Twenty semester-long scholarships of $7,000 each would place students in New York City cultural heritage institutions, while another twelve summer scholarships at $10,000 each would place them at institutions across the country.

Over the course of their studies for their master's degree in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP), students engage in experiential learning through course projects and three internships that aid their professional development while improving the condition and accessibility of unique, often vulnerable, media collections in archives, libraries, museums, public broadcast stations, non-profit organizations, and other settings. By helping to assess, catalog, and preserve audiovisual recordings that document diverse histories, cultures, arts, and communities, MIAP interns facilitate the longevity of primary source materials that are vital for scholarship, teaching, and public programming in the humanities. Funding for our "Media Archiving and Preservation: Education and Professional Training" project, would facilitate 32 internships serving media-rich humanities collections, between September 2021 and August 2023.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$341,806 (approved)
$274,206 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PE-268864-20

Indianapolis Museum of Art, Inc. (Indianapolis, IN 46208-3326)
Greg Smith (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Project MUSE: Museum Sabbatical Experience for Faculty Teaching at the Arts-Science Interface

Research stipends for four college and university professors who teach classes on the “Chemistry of Art,” to spend summer leave or sabbatical time in the conservation lab at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, working on projects connected to objects in the collection.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) proposes a grant from the NEH to continue its established program Project MUSE. Project Muse allows college and university professors who teach courses at the interface of art and science to participate in important research and technical studies of artwork in a modern conservation science laboratory at a major museum during their sabbatical or summer leaves from teaching. The purpose of the experience is to conduct cutting-edge research at the IMA that benefits the Museum's research and conservation efforts and also enters into science curricula around the country leading to increased interest in the arts and sciences among academic faculty and undergraduate students. Intended results include new conservation science curriculum developed for university classes, presentations and publications on new research for the field of conservation science, and inspiring a new generation of scholars interested in entering the field of conservation science.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2023


PE-268865-20

BAVC (San Francisco, CA 94110-1472)
Morgan Oscar Morel (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Community-Based Preservation Education and Training

The development of online training modules, two onsite two-day training programs, and a one-year fellowship, all of which are focused on educating diverse practitioners in audiovisual preservation skills, techniques, and practices.

A community-based three-year training program focused on educating a broad range of arts and cultural heritage practitioners in audiovisual preservation skills, techniques and practices. The program will provide online and in-person training, and a one-year fellowship for an information science postgraduate with a desire to pursue a career in community-based arts and cultural heritage.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$291,661 (approved)
$288,752 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2023


PE-268722-20

Midwest Art Conservation Center, Inc. (Minneapolis, MN 55404-3506)
Colin D. Turner (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Regional Preservation Field Services Program

A regional preservation field service program that strengthens preservation practices and the care of humanities collections at hundreds of museums, historical organizations, libraries, and archives in five states of the Upper Midwest. Activities include training workshops, disaster response services, preservation needs assessments and surveys, the loan of environmental monitoring equipment, and information and outreach services. In all, the project would support more than twenty workshops reaching hundreds of staff members at over 400 cultural heritage institutions in the Midwest. The award would additionally support training for two Native American conservation fellows as part of its Native American Collections Care Fellowship Program, which began in 2018.

The Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC) requests continued funding for its Regional Preservation Field Service Program (Preventive Conservation). This program strengthens the preservation practices and collections care at cultural repositories in the Upper Midwest resulting in increased public access. During the proposed NEH grant period (3/2020-2/2022), the Preventive Conservation program will improve the preservation practices at hundreds of institutions by providing: collections care and preservation related workshops; disaster planning, training and response services; preservation surveys and plans; collections care information; grant preparation assistance; and other related collection care improvement services. The program has demonstrated successful outcomes and measurable results, keeps its programming accessible to even the smallest institutions in the region, is staffed by knowledgeable conservators and preservation experts, and is devoted to this region’s collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PE-268726-20

Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Eric Pourchot (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Professional Development for Conservation Professionals

Mid-career professional development workshops offered around the country for conservation professionals responsible for the care of humanities collections. Thirteen presentations of ten courses would be held over the two-year grant period, reaching an estimated 267 conservators and allied professionals. Twenty travel stipends would be awarded to participants in need of assistance and from underserved areas.

The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) seeks funding to support 13 presentations of 10 courses over a 2-year period. This initiative is part of of FAIC's program of professional development for conservators of cultural heritage and builds on the success and lessons learned from previous programs. An estimated 267 conservators and allied professionals will participate. 20 scholarships will increase access for conservation professionals in under-served regions through travel stipends. Workshop will take place in 9 states.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2023


PE-268729-20

Northeast Document Conservation Center, Inc. (Andover, MA 01810-1438)
Ann Marie Willer (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Meeting the Preservation Needs of Humanities Collections by Transforming Services

A preservation field service program that provides assessments, workshops and seminars (in-person and online), technical consultations, and disaster assistance to libraries, archives, and other cultural heritage repositories, predominantly in the Northeast.

With a respected history as a preservation and conservation resource for organizations of all sizes, the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) effectively increases the knowledge and skills of collections care professionals—at all levels—in the long-term care and stewardship of paper-based and photographic collections, audiovisual materials, and digital objects. Through workshops, webinars, in-person conferences, reference services, disaster assistance, print and online resources, assessments, and consultations, NEDCC helps institutions better understand and address their preservation challenges so that their vital humanities collections remain accessible into the future. NEDCC’s basic field services programs remain the staple of our work and will continue unabated. As our clients’ needs change, NEDCC expands its expertise and services. With this grant, we propose to continue to transform our services with both the design of new services and the improvement of existing ones.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$349,805 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PE-268736-20

SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Patrick Ravines (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Fellowships for Graduate Students in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage for the 2020-2022 Period at Buffalo State College’s Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department

Partial fellowship stipends for 17 graduate students enrolled in the State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) program in art conservation. Students to receive funding would include nine students in the class of 2021 and eight in the class of 2022.

The preservation of our cultural heritage is a never-ending process involving cultural heritage institutions ranging from major libraries, museums, and archives to local historical societies, and professionals from diverse fields such as historians, librarians, archivists, curators, computer scientists, physical scientists, and conservators. A critical portion of preservation is in the hands of conservators. Conservators intimately interact with the works of cultural heritage or art to restore them to functional use by today’s scholars and historians. They return works to appropriate aesthetic levels for exhibition and preserve them for future generations to learn from and appreciate. The education and training of conservators is an essential component of all preservation efforts and the Garman Art Conservation Department at the State University of New York College at Buffalo is fully committed to this goal and we are in need of NEH support to continue with our important mission.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


PE-268745-20

Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives, and Museums (Juneau, AK 99811-0571)
Anjuli Grantham (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Preparing Alaska's Cultural Organizations for Emergencies

Three five-month emergency preparedness training programs located across Alaska and targeting predominantly small, rural, heritage institutions.

This program will guide three cohorts of regional humanities practitioners through a comprehensive emergency preparedness and response training program. Each cohort will take part in a 5 month program that includes two in person workshops and an online course. At the end of the program, participants will have relationships with local and regional first responders and emergency managers, completed a comprehensive written disaster plan, conducted risk assessments at their institutions, and practiced salvaging collections materials damaged by fire, flood, and earthquake. The program is attuned to the realities and needs of small collecting institutions in the remote corners of Alaska and is planned to ensure both the participation and success of humanities practitioners from across the breadth of Alaska, the nation's most disaster prone state.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$270,752 (approved)
$270,082 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2023


PE-268772-20

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Debra H. Norris (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
NEH Preservation & Access Education & Training

Six stipends per year for three years to support students in the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation.  For each academic year, two stipends each will be distributed to first, second, and third-year “NEH Fellows,” a title that carries additional outreach and community engagement responsibilities.

WUDPAC is a three-year Master-level program sponsored jointly by the University of Delaware and Winterthur Museum, Garden, & Library. Founded in 1974, WUDPAC embodies both institutions' commitment to humanities education and the integration of conservation, science, and practical research. We are committed to exposing our students to broad issues in the field, providing practical experiences in ethics, multiculturalism, documentation, analysis, treatment and preventive care, and above all, collaboration and respect for the humanities.  This proposal seeks $350,000 to help sustain the education and training of our 30 Master-level students from July 1, 2020, to June 30, 2023. Grant funds will be allocated to six "NEH Fellows" annually, making possible total stipend coverage for all WUDPAC students.  The commitment of our 404 graduates to-date is exemplified by their active engagement and contribution to evolving professional standards, and their advocacy worldwide.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 6/30/2023


PE-268832-20

AMIA (Hollywood, CA 90028-8107)
Laura Rooney (Project Director: May 2019 to February 2020)
Moriah Ulinskas (Project Director: February 2020 to present)
Audiovisual Collections Care in Tribal Archives

A continuing education program in preservation of audiovisual collections for tribal archives, libraries, and museums that includes establishment of five regional hubs (across the continental United States, Alaska, and Hawaii), delivery of six regional workshops for approximately 140 participants, development of preservation plans for select audiovisual collections, and development of educational resources, such as toolkits, guides, protocols, and templates for film inspection and digitization.

The Community Archiving Workshop, a project of the Association of Moving Image Archivists, proposes to address the widespread threat to a/v (film, video, audio) holdings in humanities collections through a series of regional workshops for tribal archives, libraries and museums (TALMs). In a 2012 survey, 60% of responding TALMs stated that they are stewards of important a/v recordings. In partnership with the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries and Museums, CAW proposes to support efforts to preserve and improve access to these collections by training tribal archivists and librarians to inventory and assess their collections, and to prioritize and prepare them for digitization. Each workshop involves group webinars, the delivery of online training models, and onsite workshops in which participants learn to identify different media formats and risk factors, establish controlled vocabulary for description of a/v collections, and document and prioritize collections for preservation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$271,584 (approved)
$271,584 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2023


PE-263506-19

RIT (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Christopher M. Cameron (Project Director: April 2018 to January 2022)
Jennifer Jae Gutierrez (Co Project Director: February 2019 to January 2022)
Kelly Krish (Co Project Director: March 2019 to January 2022)
Training Sustainable Environmental Management Teams for Cultural Institutions

Eight three-day workshops and five 60-minute webinars for staff of museums, libraries, and archives about managing collection environments in sustainable ways. An estimated 2,650 participants would learn to assess the preservation quality of environmental conditions and the needs of collections, and to understand the impact of local climate and the basics of HVAC operations. The curriculum would also include strategies for reducing energy cost and consumption in cultural repositories while maintaining the preservation quality of collection environments.

The Image Permanence Institute, a preservation research laboratory, is applying for funding to support a two-year project focused on improving and increasing the capacity of humanities collections professionals to independently establish and maintain sustainable environmental management programs. In cultural institutions an environmental management team that includes both collections and facilities staff creates a structure in which the insights gained from environmental monitoring are actively used to inform environmental management. Webinars and workshops will provide essential knowledge and skills necessary for small, mid-size, and large institutions working to balance the preservation quality of collections environments with responsible building management and lower energy costs. This project has the potential to simultaneously improve the long-term preservation of humanities collections across the US while reducing the long-term costs associated with preserving those collections.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$199,801 (approved)
$199,801 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


PE-263509-19

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Margaret Holben Ellis (Project Director: April 2018 to present)
Preserving Material Memory through Conservation Education and Training

Graduate education in the conservation of art and material culture collections. Stipends would support at least eight student fellowships over the course of a two year period.

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, requests funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the amount of $200,000 for the period of January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2020 to support Preserving Material Memory through Conservation Education and Training. This award will support at least eight student fellowships (four per year) over the course of a two year period.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PE-263541-19

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Juana Suarez (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Education and Fieldwork in Media Archiving and Preservation

Scholarships for 24 internships as part of New York University’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) Program.  Fourteen scholarships of $7,000 each would place students in New York City cultural heritage institutions for a semester, while another ten scholarships at $10,000 each would place them at institutions across the country for a summer.

Media collections carry distinctive value for the humanities, but they are also vulnerable to displacement, deterioration, and loss. NYU's Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) Program teaches students to assess, repair, catalog, and preserve both analog and digital media in a range of formats. Internships provide practical training and professional development that complement students' classroom learning. Interns also improve the condition and accessibility of audiovisual collections that serve as primary source materials in the humanities. Support from NEH for our Education and Fieldwork in Media Archiving and Preservation project will help MIAP sustain and expand its internship program by facilitating 24 additional internships in media-rich humanities collections over a two-year period. Of the requested funds, 96% would go toward stipends for student interns and 4% to archival consultants supporting internships at sites that lack an archival supervisor on staff.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


PE-263553-19

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Jane E. Anderson (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Local Contexts: Collaborative Curation Training and Education for Indigenous collections

Development of a curriculum for collaborative curation of Native American cultural heritage collections, training of 50-70 staff in six institutions across the United States, assessment and evaluation of the training, testing of two new Traditional Knowledge Labels, and creation of a Collaborative Curation Center for online sharing of the curriculum and resources.

We are applying for an NEH Education and Training Grant (Continuing Education) to increase knowledge and skills for the ongoing preservation, access and curation of Indigenous cultural heritage materials. This grant would allow the Local Contexts team at NYU to build out a specialized "Intellectual Property, Rights and Native American Collections" curriculum that provides specialized training on: IP and Digitization for Native American collections; advanced training in the collaborative preservation and curation digital tools that we have developed - the TK Labels and Mukurtu CMS; and technical training in developing collaborative curation workflows that can accommodate IP and Indigenous cultural rights.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Law and Jurisprudence; Native American Studies

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


PE-263609-19

CCAHA (Philadelphia, PA 19103-5530)
Dyani Feige (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
CCAHA Preservation Field Services: Making Collections Care Accessible

A preservation field service program that would offer training, colloquia, and webinars for 650 cultural heritage professionals; conduct 25 preservation surveys; and provide technical consultations and educational materials to thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations nationwide. Outreach services would especially focus on collecting institutions in the Gulf Coast, Appalachia, and Intermountain West regions. The grant would also support a one-year fellowship in preventive conservation.

The Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) requests two-year funding support to continue and broaden the reach of activities of CCAHA's preservation field services programs through preservation planning activities, the Regional Heritage Stewardship Program, educational programs, and outreach services. Goals for preservation field services activities in 2019-20 include: To competitively offer NEH-subsidized preservation needs assessments, emergency plans, and digital preservation assessments to 15 mid-sized institutions; to sustain the work of the Regional Heritage Stewardship Program in the Deep South and Appalachia, and launch a new regional program in the Intermountain West Region centered in Utah; to provide two national conferences on balancing accessibility with collections care and two national colloquia on diversity and inclusion; to offer a one-year preventive conservation fellowship; and to continue to provide a range of ongoing support services.

Project fields:
Arts, Other; History, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$392,918 (approved)
$392,918 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 3/31/2021


PE-263611-19

Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Jessica Unger (Project Director: May 2018 to April 2020)
Elaina Gregg (Project Director: April 2020 to present)
Training for Emergency Preparation and Response for Humanities Collections

The establishment of a new Alliance for Response (AFR) network in Oklahoma City; the delivery of training for a regional response team associated with AFR’s existing network in Georgia; the creation of continuing education webinars on emergency preparation and response for 27 existing AFR networks; and the building of web-based resources to include a new Forum Planning Guide and other key tools.

The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) proposes to improve emergency preparation and response for humanities collections by creating a new Alliance for Response network of cultural leaders and emergency managers in Oklahoma, training a regional volunteer response team for cultural collections in Georgia, and providing nation-wide training and resources for existing Alliance for Response networks. A large portion of the existing Heritage Emergency response team training, now conducted primarily through face-to-face instruction, would be adapted for online delivery, resulting in lower costs and less travel time for participants, and making the training more easily reproducible for other locations in the future.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


PE-258309-18

Midwest Art Conservation Center, Inc. (Minneapolis, MN 55404-3506)
Colin D. Turner (Project Director: April 2017 to present)
Regional Preservation Field Services Program

A regional preservation field service program that strengthens preservation practices and the care of humanities collections at hundreds of museums, historical organizations, libraries, and archives in five states of the Upper Midwest. Activities include training workshops, disaster response services, preservation needs assessments and surveys, the loan of environmental monitoring equipment, and information and outreach services. In all, the project would support more than twenty workshops reaching nearly 400 cultural heritage professionals in the Midwest. The award would additionally initiate a Native American Fellowship program that would support two conservators in training.

The Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC) requests continued funding for its Regional Preservation Field Service Program (Preservation Services). This program strengthens the preservation practices and collections care at cultural repositories in the Upper Midwest, resulting in increased public access. During the proposed NEH grant period (2018-2019), MACC's Preservation Services program will improve the preservation practices at hundreds of institutions by providing: collections care and preservation related workshops; disaster planning, training and response services; preservation surveys and plans; collections care information; grant preparation assistance; and other related collection care improvement services. The program has demonstrated very successful outcomes and measurable results, keeps its programming accessible to even the smallest institutions in the region, is staffed by knowledgeable conservators and preservation experts, and is devoted to this region’s collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$375,180 (approved)
$375,180 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 2/29/2020


PE-258312-18

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Hannelore Roemich (Project Director: April 2017 to August 2019)
Educating Future Preservation Professionals to Steward Humanities Collections

Graduate education in the conservation of art and material culture collections, with stipends for three students for two years and salaries for four adjunct professors and five guest lecturers.

We seek $200,000 from the NEH to: 1) Offer assistance to three (3) student fellowships per year; and 2) Provide adjunct faculty and guest lecturers who will lead courses and present on a variety of topics relevant to current practices and topical issues, often open to a larger community.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$100,000 (approved)
$99,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


PE-258364-18

Northeast Document Conservation Center, Inc. (Andover, MA 01810-1438)
Ann Marie Willer (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Reaching New Frontiers: Bringing Preservation Services to New Regions and Collections

A preservation field service program that provides assessments, workshops and seminars (in-person and online), technical consultations, and disaster assistance to libraries, archives, and other cultural heritage repositories, predominantly in the Northeast.

In 2018-2019 NEDCC will integrate new and expanded services and programs into its preservation field services, and continue to deliver comprehensive preservation information to small- and mid-sized organizations. Programs will include a special focus on delivering preservation training, consultations, and resources to underserved and NEH-named incentive areas across the country, while reducing costs and impact of travel by employing specialists in distributed locations. NEDCC will continue to expand training programs and services around preservation of audiovisual and digital collections. Through a varied program of workshops, webinars, online courses, conferences, consultations, assessments, reference services, and disaster assistance, NEDCC will continue to help organizations improve preservation practices and provide a level of expert knowledge to institutions that is not readily available at the state or local level.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


PE-258371-18

SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Patrick Ravines (Project Director: May 2017 to May 2021)
Meredeth Lavelle (Co Project Director: February 2018 to May 2021)
Education and Training Fellowships in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage and Humanities Collections

Partial stipends for the 30 graduate students enrolled in the SUNY/Buffalo State program in art conservation. Remaining stipend support comes from endowment funds, other federal and private grants, and university cost-share.

The preservation of our cultural heritage and humanities collections is a constant concern for our nation’s libraries, archives, and museums no matter their size or stature.  To ensure that our cultural heritage is soundly preserved, it is imperative that these graduate programs be maintained and supported by their respective universities in addition to national funding agencies.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$175,000 (approved)
$171,209 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 8/31/2020


PE-258388-18

RIT (Rochester, NY 14623-5698)
Daniel Burge (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Digital Print Preservation: Education and Training for Cultural Heritage Professionals

Nine workshops to train approximately 450 cultural heritage professionals in the identification, handling, and care of digital prints held in humanities collections.

Image Permanence Institute at Rochester Institute of Technology is seeking an NEH Preservation and Access Education and Training grant to educate and train cultural heritage professionals in the humanities on the proper identification and long-term care of modern digitally-printed materials. This project will have a wide and substantial impact on the field. Hundreds of attendees will benefit from a program of nine workshops offered over three days, along with short sessions at each location that will allow additional attendees a half-day overview covering foundational knowledge on digital print processes and materials, a new descriptive language to assure accurate communication, and the basics of best care for these objects. The experience will be groundbreaking for attendees. Most have little or no experience in this area and this will be the first educational experience on the topic they have ever received.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$195,049 (approved)
$195,049 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


PE-258419-18

University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Debra H. Norris (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Preservation and Access Education and Training Grants

Graduate education in the conservation of humanities collections. Support would be provided for partial stipends to ten students over two years as well as honoraria for special guest lecturers.

This proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities seeks $200,000 to support the education and training of ten Master-level students over a two-year period. Grant funds will provide stipends for fellows in the disciplines of objects, paper, photographs, or textiles, and include sub-specialties such as modern and contemporary art, time-based media, and preventive conservation.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$175,000 (approved)
$175,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


PE-258421-18

Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Eric Pourchot (Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Professional Development for Conservators: Providing Preservation and Access for the Humanities

Mid-career professional development through workshops offered around the country for conservation professionals responsible for the care of humanities collections. Eleven presentations of nine courses would be held over the two-year grant period, reaching an estimated 287 conservators and allied professionals. Twenty travel stipends would be awarded to participants from underserved areas.

The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) seeks funding to support 11 presentations of 9 courses over a two-year period. This initiative is part of FAIC's program of professional development for conservators of cultural heritage, and builds on the successes and lessons learned from previous programs. An estimated 287 conservators and allied professionals will participate. 20 scholarships will increase access for conservators in under-served regions through travel stipends. Workshops will take place in # states and the District of Columbia.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Education and Training

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$208,000 (approved)
$208,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019