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Funded Projects Query Form
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Program: Historic Places: Implementation*
Date range: 2017-2018
Sort order: Award year, descending

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BR-254081-17

Friends of Alice Austen House, Inc. (Staten Island, NY 10305-2002)
Janice Monger (Project Director: August 2016 to October 2017)
Pam Adamo (Project Director: October 2017 to June 2018)
Victoria Munro (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

New Eyes on Alice Austen: Redesigning the Museum's Permanent Installation

Implementation of a new onsite interpretation and expanded website content for Clear Comfort, the home of early American photographer Alice Austen (1866–1952).

The Alice Austen House (AAH), the only museum dedicated to a woman photographer in the United States, requests $400,000 for a Historic Places implementation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for the project New Eyes on Alice Austen: Redesigning the Museum’s Permanent Installation to better contextualize, expand, and update the presentation of the core story of early American photographer, Alice Austen (1866-1952). Guided by a team of five prominent scholars, AAH will engage a professional exhibition designer to incorporate current scholarship into re-envisioning the permanent installation at the historic house museum to more comprehensively demonstrate Austen’s contributions to photographic, immigration, women’s and LGBTQ history. The new permanent installation would be unveiled to the public in March 2019 during Women’s History Month.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Public History; Women's History

Program:
Historic Places: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2019


BR-253986-17

Plimoth Plantation, Inc. (Plymouth, MA 02362-1620)
Richard Pickering (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Along the Shores of Change

Implementation of a new interpretive plan for Plimoth Plantation to reflect the full spectrum of experiences within the world of 17th-century New England.

Plimoth Plantation requests a Chairman’s Special Award in implementation support for Along the Shores of Change, a multi-year and Museum-wide reinterpretation initiative that transforms the techniques and broadens the stories that Plimoth Plantation uses to communicate Plymouth Colony’s seminal role in shaping America. This new approach explores the Native transnational and pan-European nature of the human landscape in 17th-century New England. With NEH support, the project will organize Plimoth Plantation’s education programs, craft preservation efforts, living history exhibits, and staff training around the Museum’s first comprehensive interpretive plan. Funding would enable the re-installation of galleries and living history sites, development of new multicultural scenarios and hands-on programs, re-examination of educational services, and advancement of a 4-year course of study that transforms staff from interpreters and guides to multi-skilled living history educators.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History; Western Civilization

Program:
Historic Places: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$360,000 (approved)
$310,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


BR-255992-17

Telfair Museum of Art (Savannah, GA 31401-3612)
Shannon Browning-Mullis (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

The Owens-Thomas House: Interpreting the Dynamics of Urban Slavery in the South

Implementation of a new interpretation of the Owens-Thomas House to tell the stories of the free and enslaved people who lived and worked in the house during the 1820s-40s.

Telfair Museums seeks a $400,000 NEH Historic Places implementation grant to reinterpret its Owens-Thomas House and Slave Quarters, transforming this National Historic Landmark through exhibits on the slave economy, gender dynamics, and the impacts of urban slavery in the South. Scheduled to take 1.5 years to complete with a total budget of $872,706, this reinterpretation plan builds on more than 20 years of humanities scholarship, including Telfair’s national-award-winning project Slavery and Freedom in Savannah, which launched one of the country’s first full-scale attempts to tell the story of urban slavery in the South. Through this grant, Telfair will employ hands-on education galleries, interactive exhibits, audio recordings, historical artifacts, and original documents to engage students and families in an honest exploration of how urban slavery informed social, domestic, and economic relationships in the South, and how the legacy of slavery influences the nation today.

Project fields:
African American History; Architecture; Cultural History

Program:
Historic Places: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 12/31/2018