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15 matches

Program: Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships*
Date range: 2018-2020
Sort order: Award year, descending

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FN-271111-20

Clarissa Forbes
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Documentation and speech corpus development for Gitksan [git]

Translation and annotation of audio recordings for a community- and scholar-accessible online repository of the Native American Gitksan language spoken in Alaska and British Columbia.

Gitksan is the traditional language of the Gitxsan people of Alaska and the northern interior of British Columbia. It is the easternmost member of the Tsimshianic family and highly endangered, with an estimated 300-500 native speakers in their late 50s, at the youngest. Language shift toward English is well underway, in large part due to the effects of the Canadian residential school policy of the 20th century, making the need for language documentation increasingly urgent. Essentially, all documentary work on Gitksan has been conducted in the last 40 years; existing resources include an unpublished grammar, a few short lessons and stories, and several wordlists and phrasebooks of varying levels of detail. There are many areas yet undocumented.
The project's primary goal is the development of a online text repository with several functions:
1) a community-accessible body of narratives and conversations,
2) a base of sample sentences for an existing community-accessible online dictionary in active
development at the University of British Columbia, and
3) a corpus for linguists working on Gitksan to view long-form narrative or conversational data. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2021


FN-271113-20

Timothy P. Henry-Rodriguez
California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA 92831-3599)
Grammar and Lexicon of Purisimeño [puy]

Research and writing a digital lexicon and grammar of the Native American language Purisimeño, a dormant language of the Chumash family of central coastal California.

The Chumashan languages of Central and Southern coastal California have gone functionally extinct within the last 45 years. However, much tribal cultural knowledge is still alive, and there are several living individuals who have heard the language spoken and can recall words. The available material on Chumashan languages is incomplete: there are few readily-accessible materials on the languages for the public — the major exception being Applegate’s Samala (Ineseño) Chumash dictionary (Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians 2007) and Henry-Rodriguez’s forthcoming dictionary on Ventureño Chumash. The current project for a lexicon and grammar will resolve questions on the nature of Central Chumash, which is a protolanguage and subdivision within the Chumash language family. Outside of a very small lexicon assembled by the Western Institute for Endangered Language Documentation in 2018, there is no Purisimeño data readily available. By completing a grammatical description of Purisimeño and an accompanying full lexicon, questions about Central Chumashan and Southern Chumashan morphosyntax and historical affiliation will be able to be asked and answered. It will also be useful to the layperson and heritage learners of Central Chumashan languages. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


FN-271115-20

Ross Perlin
Endangered Language Alliance (New York, NY 10011-4610)
Creating and Annotating a Seke Language Corpus [skj]

Fieldwork to document and analyze Seke, an endangered language from the southeastern Himalayan region, through audio and video recordings of stories, oral histories, and a range of other narratives reflecting the lives and histories of Seke speakers.

This project aims to build on completed fieldwork to further the documentation of Seke, an endangered and little-documented Tibeto-Burman language of the Tamangic branch, through the creation of a rich, annotated, multi-dialectal corpus of video and audio recordings including stories, oral histories, and a range of other narratives reflecting the lives and stories of Seke speakers. The resulting electronic corpus and outputs will serve both community members and scholars. Seke is one of the least well-known languages of the increasingly well-documented but still relatively little-known Tamangic branch within the Tibeto-Burman language family. Without sustained documentation or virtually any multimedia record, Seke has remained a missing link in our understanding of the branch, being both geographically and typologically at the edge of the Tamangic world and completely surrounded by the Tibetic language Loke. The Seke-speaking area was once considerably larger, and a record of Seke would be significant for our understanding of the cultural, demographic, and natural history of the region. In the context of heavy language contact and outmigration, regional patterns of multilingualism encompassing Seke, Loke, Thakali, Tibetan, Nepali, and now English are shifting rapidly, also a process worthy of study. (Edited by staff)

[Media coverage]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 5/31/2021


FN-271117-20

Kristine S. Stenzel
University of Colorado (Boulder, CO 80303-1058)
Investigating interaction in two endangered East Tukano languages: Kotiria [gvc] and Wa'ikhana [pir]

Analysis, annotation, and archiving of recordings of interactional dialogue among speakers of the Kotiria and Wa'ikhana languages from the northwestern Amazonian region.

This research will advance analysis of the data resulting from the NSF-DEL-funded project Grammar and multilingual practices through the lens of everyday interaction in two endangered languages in the East Tukano family. This successful project has produced an extensive documentary corpus of everyday interaction and a set of sociolinguistic interviews involving members of the Kotiria (or Wanano) and Wa'ikhana (or Piratapuyo) language communities in the multilingual Vaupes region of northwestern Amazonia. This large collection of primary linguistic and sociolinguistic data provides vital empirical input for more detailed investigations of research questions related to (i) multilingual speech practices and language contact phenomena; (ii) grammatical structures; and (iii) universal and language-particular properties of everyday informal conversation. The proposed work during the fellowship will result in enhanced annotation of recordings (including English translations, interlinear grammatical analysis, and interactional features) and collaborative production of detailed transcripts from which collections of pertinent instances of structures and actions can be drawn for a variety of planned publications. The project will additionally enhance the documentation archive, deposited at ELAR, to make it more searchable and accessible, with all archival materials open access. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 4/30/2022


FN-266277-19

Rebecca Wood
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (Colorado Springs, CO 80918-3733)
Textual Analysis of Discourse Patterns in Salish (fla)

Fieldwork to record and analyze conversations in Salish by elders from the Native American Pend d'Oreille community in western Montana.

Salish (also known as Flathead Salish, Montana Salish, or more specifically by the dialects Bitteroot Salish-Seliš and Pend d’Oreille-Qlispé), is the traditional language of the Salish-Pend d’Oreille community of western Montana. The extremely endangered language belongs to the dialect continuum of Spokane-Kalispel-Pend d’Oreille(s)-Flathead within the Southern Interior branch of the Salishan language family. There are fewer than 20 fluent speakers remaining, the majority of whom are elders over the age of 70. This proposed project will analyze ten previously recorded narratives, chosen by the tribe, and will document and analyze approximately four additional stories from different speakers. Through the analysis of oral storytelling, this project seeks to accomplish the following goals: (1) determine the linguistic features that enact these oral dialogues as narratives or traditional stories through the interlinearization process; (2) determine how these narratives further perpetuate cultural knowledge, understanding, and identity; and (3) contribute to the efforts of the Salish- Pend d’Oreille in the documentation and understanding of their traditional language. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 8/31/2020


FN-266278-19

Susan E. Kalt
Roxbury Community College (Roxbury, MA 02120-3400)
Duck and Frog Stories in Chuquisaca Quechua (quh)

The analysis of recordings from Chuquisaca, a dialect of Southern Quechua, an indigenous language spoken in the Andean regions of Bolivia and Peru, as well as linguistic training of local collaborators involved in language revitalization.

The core activity of this project will be to document storytelling and conversations with speakers of Quechua (quh) in rural highlands Chuquisaca, Bolivia. We will create the first digital collection of such narratives from this relatively undocumented variety at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) consisting of 60 interviews of children and 25 of adults video-recorded, transcribed and translated to Spanish with the collaboration of Bolivian researchers in 2016 and 2018. During the fellowship term, we will analyze and publish findings based on these interviews to illuminate theories of how languages are acquired, lost and changed. Chuquisaca lies near the southern extreme of the linguistic area that produced Standard Colonial Quechua (quz/quh). Cuzco Quechua is the prestige variety which has been documented for over 500 years, whereas Bolivian varieties have rarely received attention (Durston 2007, Mannheim 1991). Quechua is now ‘definitely endangered’ in this region as intergenerational transmission is increasingly abandoned in favor of Spanish, even within this rural and relatively well-preserved variety. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$55,000 (approved)
$55,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


FN-266279-19

Sally R. Anderson
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
Analysis and Documentation of Cahto Language (ktw) Texts

Analyzing and digitizing a variety of texts (folktales and other stories, prayers, song lyrics) in Cahto, a Native American language from Northern California.

The goal of Analysis and Documentation of Cahto Language (ktw) Texts is to morphologically and syntactically analyze legacy texts in the Cahto language of Mendocino County, California (Athabaskan-Eyak-Tlingit family). This work will make the texts available to scholars and to the Tribe, and also provide a basis for the future creation of a reference grammar of Cahto. The twelve-month period of the fellowship will allow for analysis of at least fifteen of the Bill Ray/Pliny Earle Goddard longer texts of stories, folktales, description of folk characters and practices, and one full-length prayer (Goddard, 1909; Goddard, 1902, 1906). The applicant will also analyze a number of one- or two-line texts (song lyrics, short prayers, etc.) recorded by other researchers, primarily E. M. Loeb (1932). The applicant will systematically phonemicize the texts into the practical orthography used by the Cahto Tribe and represented in the Applicant's 2018 NEH-funded Cahto Dictionary (DEL #FN-255579-17). The text analysis will be done using the same linguistic database software (SIL's FLex/FieldWorks) that produced the Dictionary, allowing easy interlinking between dictionary entries and text examples. FLex database software is a standard platform among linguists for lexical and text documentation. Fieldwork supported by this Fellowship will link the texts, collected over a century ago, with contemporary knowledge in the community. The Applicant is already aware of versions of the stories still told in English, as well as traditional lifeways and technologies reflected in the texts that are still practiced and passed down. Documenting these connections represents a significant secondary goal of the project.

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 3/31/2021


FN-266285-19

Joshua Birchall
Unknown institution
Documentation and dictionary of Oro Win (orw)

Video recordings and preparation of a multimedia dictionary and associated Android app for Oro Win, an indigenous Amazonian language with currently only six fully fluent speakers

Oro Win is a member of the Chapacuran language family spoken along the headwaters of the Pacaás Novos River in the Brazilian state of Rondônia in southwestern Amazonia. There are currently six elderly native speakers of the Oro Win language and another twelve community members that can be considered semi-speakers from an ethnic population of approximately 120 individuals. There are currently no published dictionaries of any Chapacuran language, and the need for this type of work to be carried out with the community is especially urgent. This project has three primary objectives: (1) to train indigenous researchers so that they have the knowledge and skills to document and study their own language; (2) to develop an extensive and multifaceted documentary corpus of the Oro Win language in close collaboration with native researchers through a participatory community-based model of language documentation; (3) to use this corpus to produce a multimedia dictionary for the indigenous and academic communities that includes examples for lexical entries from actual language use. All materials will be archived at the Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, a Brazilian federal research institute, with a copy deposited at the Archive for Indigenous Languages of Latin America at the University of Texas (AILLA). This project will produce the first published dictionary of a Chapacuran language. Oro Win retains a number of conservative grammatical and phonological features not found in Wari, the last Chapacuran language still being learned by children as a first language. This project is an opportunity to document the natural speech and lexical knowledge of the last generation of Oro Win who learned the language as children and still use it in their daily lives. Increased documentation of the Oro Win language and culture can help expand our knowledge about the regional ethnolinguistic landscape. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2019 – 7/31/2021


FN-266286-19

Alice Taff
University of Alaska Southeast (Ketchikan, AK 99801-8599)
Value-Added Tlingit Conversation Videos (tli)

Preparation of almost fifty hours of video recordings in Tlingit, an endangered language of Coastal Alaska for archiving and online access (transcription, translation, annotation, and post-production).

The vitality of Tlingit, a member of the Na-Dene family, is rated 8a – moribund (Alaska Native Language Center 2007) on the EGIDScale (Lewis and Simmons 2010). Between 2007 and 2013, the Tlingit Conversation Documentation project, NSF-DEL # 0651787 and # 0852788, recorded spontaneous Tlingit conversations. The production exceeded the project’s goals, leaving additional material to be completed. For the fellowship proposed here, the PI, with five or more L1 Tlingit speakers, University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) Tlingit language faculty, and undergraduate students in advanced Tlingit courses will use ELAN software to complete the remaining 27.9 hours of Tlingit transcription, 7.5 hours of English translation, and preparation of a Tlingit/English print version for each of the 96 recordings in the 48.5 hour corpus. We will prepare the remaining 20 hours of bilingual subtitled videos for web posting of the recordings. We will archive all results from this fellowship with the previously recorded material at the Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum and the Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) William L. Paul, Sr. Archive. Because of its broad range of content, this primary source video material from the mouths of L1 Tlingit speakers, with the added value of translation and transcription, will be of use by linguists, ethnographers, archeologists, historians, anthropologists, artists, musicologists, and others. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 3/31/2021


FN-266288-19

Adam Roth Singerman
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Creating a reference grammar with texts for Tupari [tpr], an endangered Tupian Language of the Brazilian Amazon

Fieldwork and analysis to produce a reference grammar and literacy materials to revitalize the endangered indigenous Tupari language of the Amazonian Basin.

This fellowship will contribute to the documentation of Tuparí [tpr], an endangered Amazonian language spoken in the Brazilian state of Rondônia by approximately 350 people. Building upon the field research which I conducted as a PhD student, this fellowship will focus on the completion of a Tuparí reference grammar accompanied by a series of native language texts. This reference grammar will contribute to scholarly understanding of the Tuparí language in particular and to our broader knowledge of the Tupían family as a whole. Although Brazilian languages have seen an upsurge in documentation in recent years, few full reference grammars have been produced for members of the Tupían family. My work on Tuparí will provide badly needed information on an under-documented corner of Amazonian linguistic diversity. The description and analysis in the grammar should prove interesting for theoretical linguists, typologists, and South Americanists. In that the grammar will be accompanied by a series of annotated and translated native language texts, this project has the potential to set a new documentary standard for Tupían studies. All recordings and transcriptions will be archived at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) and in the digital archive of the Linguistics Division of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2021


FN-260668-18

Irene Appelbaum
University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Completing Phase I of Making Kutenai Tales Accessible: Searchable Text, Interlinearized Narratives, and Audio Recordings

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


FN-260670-18

Timothy P. Henry-Rodriguez
California State University, Fullerton Foundation (Fullerton, CA 92831-3547)
Mitsqanaqa'n Ventureno-English Dictionary

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


FN-260672-18

Jason W. Lobel
University of Hawaii at Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2318)
Documentation of Lolak, an Austronesian Language of Sulawesi, Indonesia

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 5/31/2019


FN-260674-18

Timothy J. Thornes
Boise State University (Boise, ID 83725-0001)
Wadateka'a Nadeguyengana: Harney Valley Paiute Stories

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 3/31/2019


FN-260675-18

Rosa Vallejos
University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Noun Categorization and Complex Predication in Secoya, an Amazonian Language

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019