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Funded Projects Query Form
17 matches

Grant programs:Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities*
Division or office: Education Programs*
Date range: 2017-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

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AB-284546-22

Oakwood University (Huntsville, AL 35896-0001)
Denise Shaver (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
"That Dreded Life" Living Museum

A one-year project creating a living history museum based on the life of Dred Scott.

The project entails creating a plantation Living Museum on a Historically Black College and University based on the life of Dred Scott. This would result in the revision of a course and engage and educate the campus and larger community.

Project fields:
African American History; English

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$129,366 (approved)
$129,366 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 12/31/2022


AB-284570-22

North Carolina Central University (Durham, NC 27707-3129)
Rachelle Suzanne Gold (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Kathryn Cole Wymer (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Digital Exploration of North Carolina Central University's History

A two-year project organizing digital humanities workshops for faculty to incorporate digitized materials about campus history.

Faculty and staff from Humanities disciplines within the College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities at North Carolina Central University will form a cohort to participate in a two-year project (2022-2024) that uses the NCCU materials at Digital NC (especially the newspapers and yearbooks) and the materials in the NCCU Archives to develop teaching materials to be implemented in their courses. In the first year, we will coordinate with the Digital Humanities Research Institute at CUNY for workshop materials and instructors who would be willing to run a week of workshops. After the workshop, faculty members will be expected to create and implement course modules using this digital archival material. In the second year, faculty members will participate in a symposium discussing their results and will engage with other faculty members in their disciplines as well as the greater university community and the citizens of Durham, NC.

Project fields:
African American History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,420 (approved)
$89,110 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024


AB-284640-22

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Dana A. Williams (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Jimisha Relerford (Co Project Director: February 2022 to present)
Developing an Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

A two-year project to create a digital humanities graduate certificate.

The proposed project will create an Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities at Howard University.

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,996 (approved)
$148,559 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024


AB-277598-21

Hampton University (Hampton, VA 23668-0001)
Laura Battaglia (Project Director: July 2020 to June 2022)
Ronald J. Kloster (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Beverly Cordova Duane (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Laurie Jean Carter (Co Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Benjamin Garner (Co Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Black History Matters: Documenting the Legacy of Charles H. Williams on the Campus of Hampton University

A two-year initiative to create teaching and archival resources about dance and campus architectural history and to integrate them into the university curriculum.

The “Black History Matters” Architecture and Dance initiative seeks to promote the humanities at Hampton University by creating a digital teaching resource for three programs – the Pre-College/Summer Bridge program, University 101 and ARC314. Inspired by the research conducted by Dr. Mary Ann Laverty in her book, “Charles H. Williams and the Hampton Institute Creative Dance Group and Their Use of African Diasporic Dance 1934-1948,” this resource will provide archival information on dance and campus architectural history at Hampton University during Charles H. Williams’ tenure and its significance to broader issues of race and inclusion at that time.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Architecture; Dance History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,267 (approved)
$117,198 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 3/31/2023


AB-277734-21

Southern University at New Orleans (New Orleans, LA 70126-0002)
Clyde Robertson (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Pontchartrain Park Pioneers: An Oral History of New Orleans’ Civil Rights Era Segregated Black “Suburb in the City”

A one-year curriculum development project integrating local oral histories into six humanities courses.

This project utilizes oral histories of New Orleans African Americans who achieved the “American Dream” of homeownership in the second oldest American all-black “suburb in the city” in the 1950s and early 1960s and the first in New Orleans to tell a larger story. Denied by “redlining” from buying homes in the rest of the city, they formed their own community. The project strengthens the teaching and study of the humanities at SUNO by developing new resources in the form of these oral histories, creating a digital Teaching Module for sharing them in humanities courses, teaching them in humanities courses, and preserving them digitally.

Project fields:
African American History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$46,150 (approved)
$46,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


AB-269178-20

Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL 36088-1923)
Worth Hayes (Project Director: July 2019 to May 2022)
Kwesi Daniels (Co Project Director: October 2019 to May 2022)
Sheena Harris (Co Project Director: October 2019 to May 2022)
John Randolph Tilghman (Co Project Director: October 2019 to May 2022)
Making an Institute: Tuskegee University Virtual Campus Tour

A two-year project to create a digital interactive map of Tuskegee University’s historic campus that would be incorporated into courses at Tuskegee and nearby high schools.

Tuskegee University proposes a project, with assistance from the National Endowment for the Humanities, to develop a web based historic interactive map of Tuskegee’s campus for the purpose of research and pedagogy.

Project fields:
African American History; Architecture; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,921 (approved)
$71,765 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2022


AB-269212-20

Grambling State University (Grambling, LA 71245-2715)
James M. Clawson (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Edward Lawrence Holt (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Creating an Interdisciplinary Minor in Digital Humanities

A three-year curriculum development project that would create a new interdisciplinary minor in digital humanities.

Grambling State University's departments of English and History will design and implement a new interdisciplinary minor in Digital Humanities. Grant funding will go toward bringing outside expertise onto campus to train humanities faculty in interdisciplinary techniques and in pedagogy appropriate to the Digital Humanities during planning stages for the minor.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$92,919 (approved)
$92,919 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023


AB-264116-19

Spelman College (Atlanta, GA 30314-4399)
Gloria Wade Gayles (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
The SIS Oral History Project: Transformative Teaching and Learning in the Humanities

Curricular improvements to an oral history course focused on African American women from the rural and small-town South, as well as archival preservation of interviews with these community elders.

In August of 2002, students at Spelman College were introduced to The SIS Oral History Project, a new course that would: (1) open the lens of age in studies of history and literature; (2) identify oral history as a major methodology for research in the humanities; and (3), through student-conducted interviews, give voice and visibility to African American women elders of the South. That “new course” is, today, a demanding project that transforms teaching and learning in the humanities. The project meets criteria for NEH funding for Humanities Initiatives at HBCUs in the following ways: (1) it strengthens students’ skills in writing, critical thinking, oral articulation, and research across disciplines; (2) through a partnership with AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library Archives Research Center, it insures that project research will be preserved and disseminated for use in humanities courses across the nation; and (3) it produces age-conscious scholars for the twenty-first century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Psychology

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,916 (approved)
$99,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AB-264248-19

Virginia State University (Petersburg, VA 23803-2520)
Merry Lynn Byrd (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Re-visioning Virginia Foremothers through their Lives and Legacies

A three-year program of faculty development, curriculum enhancement, and community engagement focused on eight important Virginia women from the colonial era into the twentieth century.

This literature and history based program will provide faculty enrichment and course development opportunities as well as a bridge immersion program for honors students as we study the lives, legacies, and textual representations of eight Virginians from colonial times to the twentieth century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; American Literature; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,307 (approved)
$99,277 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


AB-264285-19

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Dana A. Williams (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Elsie Scott (Co Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Reviving the Bethel Literary and Historical Association in the 21st Century

A project to digitize the archives of an important early African American literary and cultural society and to carry forward its legacy through interdisciplinary public lectures and forums.

Collaborating with the Howard University Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) and Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church (MAME), the Department of English at Howard University requests funds to support “Bethel 21,” a project that revives and reimagines the Bethel Literary and Historical Association in the 21st century. Like the original society, this project will consist of lectures from scholars and public figures and literary and cultural arts presentations from authors and performers. This iteration of the Bethel, however, as a collaborative project in the humanities between a historical society and a university, will also include critical engagement with the archives of the Bethel Literary and Historical Association’s collection at MRSC and will organize public forums for the community to promote civil, civic discourse as a life skill.

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$68,770 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


AB-264042-19

Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL 36088-1923)
Adaku Tawia Ankumah (Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Rhonda Michelle Collier (Co Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Literary Legacies of Macon County and Tuskegee Institute: Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Albert Murray

A two-year project to produce new curricular materials, digital humanities resources, and community engagement activities focused on the writers Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Albert Murray.

The proposed project seeks to advance humanities education and scholarship at Tuskegee University as our students become acquainted with literary and cultural icons Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Albert Murray, each of whom was connected biographically and artistically to Tuskegee Institute and Macon County, Alabama. In studying the works of these pre-eminent authors of the twentieth century, engaging with scholars knowledgeable about these authors, our students, mainly in the sciences and social sciences, will be able to understand and contextualize twenty-first century challenges in culture and society. The project, through course enhancements, workshops for teachers and faculty, and community engagement activities, also seeks to create a digital humanities site to disseminate and historical documents, teaching materials, and cultural artifacts and to preserve them for future generations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,381 (approved)
$98,751 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


AB-258958-18

Albany State University (Albany, GA 31705-2796)
Charles R. Williams (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Creating a Museum and Heritage Studies Minor

Faculty development workshops leading to the establishment of a Museum and Heritage Studies Minor at Albany State University.  

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Albany State University seeks funding for the development of a multi-disciplinary minor in Museum Studies. The minor serves the common good by promoting diversification of museum fields and providing training for staff and trustees of regional organizations through open workshops with guest lecturers. Additionally, the program has the potential to supplement the regional workforce with student interns during field studies experiences. ASU is the largest HBCU in the state and geographically located to extend these opportunities to a more diverse and underserved population. The need for this initiative is two-fold: to prepare African-American students for fields involving museology, preservation and archiving, and to create career paths for humanities majors while extending opportunities in the humanities to students working in other areas of study. Finally, the Museum Studies minor is part of a larger, ongoing objective to promote the holdings of the university and the cultural institutions in the area.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,980 (approved)
$57,724 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2021


AB-258961-18

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Ofosuwa M. Abiola (Project Director: June 2017 to February 2021)
The Africana Theatre and Dance Collection as a Teaching Resource

Student training in archival methods, cataloguing, and digitization, leading to the establishment of an Africana Theatre and Dance Collection in Howard University’s Founders Library.

This project seeks to establish an Africana Theatre and Dance Collection in Howard University’s Founders Library. The Africana Theatre and Dance Collection will make an extensive number of rich primary sources which are currently uncatalogued and housed in Founders, available for Howard University students, faculty, and staff, area colleges and universities, and the community at large.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,948 (approved)
$98,374 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


AB-258964-18

Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL 36088-1923)
Carla Jackson Bell (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Lisa Bratton (Co Project Director: December 2017 to present)
"Lifting the Veil:" Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities

A two-year faculty and curricular development project at Tuskegee University to integrate humanities study and architectural training and create an interdisciplinary minor in African-American studies.

The“Lifting the Veil” initiative seeks to integrate humanities approaches into the professional training of architects; it also seeks to expand humanities offerings by developing a new minor in African-American studies. The initiative will begin by exploring, both historically and philosophically, African-American education. Booker T. Washington advocated educating the whole individual—the hand, heart, and mind; he also advocated “co-relation,” applying academic study to practical work. Similar questions in our own time probe how to best connect humanities study to the professions. As one of only seven HBCUs currently offering accredited degrees in architecture, Tuskegee University provides an ideal setting to uncover past and current educational theories and philosophies. Tuskegee's Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science (TSACS) will lead this initiative by developing an African-American Studies minor and enriching its architecture history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Architecture

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,673 (approved)
$86,326 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 8/31/2020


AB-253407-17

Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
Dana A. Williams (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)
Inscribing the Institute for the Arts and Humanities' National Black Writers Conference, 1975-1983

A project to digitize, provide critical commentary on, and develop a series of short films about material from the National Black Writers’ Conference, 1975-1983, for use by scholars and teachers.

Between 1974 and 1983, the Howard University Institute for the Arts and Humanities (IAH) sponsored the largest single regular convening of African American writers, artists, critics and culture workers as part of its “National Black Writers Conference” series. As part of the ongoing work of documenting and elevating key moments and figures in contemporary African American arts and letters, especially as they emerged at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, the “Reading the Oral Archive as an Act of Recovery” project, which we refer to throughout as “ROARR,” has three primary objectives: (1) reformatting/digitizing audio/visual recordings of the National Black Writers Conferences to make them available to researchers/scholars in viewable form; (2) creating critical commentary for each major conference and the contexts out of which the conferences and the writers who participated in them emerge; and (3) generating a ROAAR “Preview” video along with six “Fireside Chats.”

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$85,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


AB-253419-17

Bethune-Cookman University (Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3012)
Anthony Dixon (Project Director: June 2016 to March 2021)
Bridging the Gap through Public History

A two-year project that would establish a center for historic preservation at Bethune-Cookman University and that would enhance the program in public history at the institution.

The intent of this program is to bridge the gap between academia and the public through research, publications, presentations, and public programming while training the next generation of historic preservationists. In order to accomplish this goal, this project will assist in the creation of a Historic Preservation Center. This center will provide academic research (which includes preservation practicums) with public programming (which is geared toward community development through historic preservation). The creation of a new Public History academic program completes the foundation necessary to complete the overall task at hand. It will be combined the Swisher Library Archives and the Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation and Museum. However, the creation of a Historic Preservation Center will consolidate the work and efforts of the three entities in a concerted effort.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,897 (approved)
$97,665 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


AB-253450-17

Albany State University (Albany, GA 31705-2796)
Timothy Sweet-Holp (Project Director: June 2016 to August 2019)
"Strength from Adversity": A Reading, Discussion, and Mentorship Program

A two-year program of book discussions, field trips to museums, concerts, and historical sites as well as related creative activities on the theme of strength from adversity for twenty-five General Education Development students paired with twenty-five Albany State University undergraduate adult learners.

The idea of “strength from adversity” is a central theme in the Humanities and it is expressed within great works of literature, art, music, history and philosophy. The underlying theme of our project, reflected in the selected readings and activities, is one of understanding and overcoming adversity. Our project impacts students actively working on earning their General Educational Development (GED) and others that are currently enrolled in college, who have been sidetracked by adversity, such as poverty. By pairing the students, and then introducing them to literature, performing arts, fine arts, and history, our program enhances their capacity to better understand their experiences and how those experiences are often shared by others. In addition, authors that have overcome adversity will share their stories and lead book discussions.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$101,209 (approved)
$64,265 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018