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Funded Projects Query Form
145 matches

Grant programs:Humanities Collections and Reference Resources*
Date range: 2019-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences (Buffalo, NY 14211-1208)
Rebecca Klie (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-284976-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$70,511 (approved)
$70,322 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Hidden Views: Salvaging Historic Images at the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences

The digitization of 1,933 nitrate negatives from approximately 1920–1940, documenting the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, its research and educational activities, and scenes from the surrounding region.

This project aims to digitize almost 2000 historical nitrate negatives, securing their content and transforming a currently unstable and inaccessible collection of images into an available resource for research, publication, exhibition, and programming. The collection documents the early 20th century through photography, with a wide array of significant subject matter including the Society’s history, the natural history, pattern of development of collection, research, and public education in western New York, and the history of general science, natural life, and culture. We intend to increase intellectual control of these images, create accessibility, and promote scientific inquiry by distributing content through an open access data repository, NYHeritage.org. Digitization offers an opportunity to capture the content of these at-risk negatives, establish accessibility, and restore their usefulness as information resources valuable to the humanities for current and future generations.

University of Hawaii at Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
Janel Quirante (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285011-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2025

20th Century Hawai`i: Moving Images From Territory to Statehood

The digitization of 890 audiovisual assets spanning eight collections that document Hawaiian history and culture from the 1920s to 2000s.

`Ulu`ulu: The Henry Ku`ualoha Moving Image Archive of Hawai`i at the University of Hawai`i - West O`ahu will digitize 890 motion picture film reels and videotapes from its holdings in order to shed light on how the path to statehood took on varying degrees of reactions and repercussions for the Native Hawaiian and Japanese American populations in Hawai`i. The nominated collections for digitization align with NEH's A More Perfect Union initiative, in highlighting the stories of Hawai`i's citizens who witnessed and participated in the road to statehood and the consequences of admission into the union. The materials to be digitized come from eight collections spanning the period of the 1920s to 2000s: Juniroa Productions, 442nd Legacy Center, Katsugo Miho, Samuel P. King, Biographical Research Center, Making Waves Films, Hawaii People's Fund, and Hawaii Council for the Humanities.

College of St. Benedict (St. Joseph, MN 56374-2099)
Theodor Gordon (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285014-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$59,976 (approved)
$58,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Building Protocols for Sharing Native American Boarding School Archival Materials

A Foundations project to assess archival materials, including 3,000 pages and 200 photos, held by the Sisters of the Order of St. Benedict, documenting the Native American boarding school experience at the White Earth Mission School from the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries. Activities include creating an index of archival materials and developing a digitization plan and intellectual property protocols. 

The College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University (CSBSJU), in collaboration with White Earth Nation (WEN) and the Sisters of the Order of Saint Benedict (SOSB), will assess archival materials from SOSB’s White Earth Mission School and develop plans and protocols for digitizing and sharing the materials in consultation with technical and community advisors. The project will make this largely hidden collection of Native American boarding school archival material available to the public, scholars, and Native families, providing greater access to information on the role of government-supported religious institutions in forcing assimilation and repatriating school records to affected Native communities. The project is part of a sustained collaboration between WEN’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office, CSBSJU, and SOSB that seeks to redress historical injustices over the long-term and acknowledges that the work of reconciliation is never finished.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Adrian Wisnicki (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Dino Franco Felluga (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285018-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

COVE: Collaborative Organization for Virtual Education

Development of the Collaborative Organization for Virtual Education (COVE) with three areas of focus: implementation of more robust data standards for long-term use; expansion of content with over 80 titles concentrating especially on non-canonical and global literatures; and enhancements of the COVE website to facilitate pedagogically-focused digital humanities work with literary texts.

The PIs on this grant request NEH funds to preserve and expand a large body of critically-encoded nineteenth-century literary texts and recent, related critical literature. This corpus comprises seven million words of primary texts already encoded, one and a quarter million words of existing critical literature, and an additional one million words of primary texts to be encoded through the proposed project. All of this material has been or will be integrated into COVE (Collaborative Organization for Virtual Education), an open access publishing platform, while that integrated to date (the primary texts already encoded and the critical literature) is already being used by scholars and students from around the world for both teaching and research. Support from the NEH would ensure both technological and programmatic sustainability for the project and its content in the long term, especially the adoption of more robust data standards for the entire collection.

Kennesaw State University Research and Service Foundation, Inc. (Kennesaw, GA 30144-5588)
Tamara Livingston (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285031-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$30,454 (approved)
$30,454 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

The Mountains to Metropolis Oral History Project, Kennesaw State University

The Mountains to Metropolis Oral History Project will lay the foundation for a scholarly resource that documents the intersection of rural Georgia and modern urban development by collating, curating, and enriching oral histories in the Kennesaw State University Archives and Special Collections, which serves as the institutional repository for multiple oral history projects and constitutes a rich, largely underused resource. This proposal seeks to fund a pilot project to enhance access to oral histories in the KSU Oral History Collection. Since the 1970s, the collection has grown to include over 700 individual interviews documenting institutional and local history. Our team will select oral histories covering education; industries; experiences of African Americans; civil rights; politics and government; and rural life. This core collection will be indexed, cataloged, and preserved and made available through a custom portal enhanced with the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer software.

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Marsha L. MacDowell (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Dean Rehberger (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285041-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$346,206 (approved)
$346,206 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

African-American, African, and African Diaspora Quilt Studies Digital Resource

The expansion of the Quilt Index to include nearly 3,900 new quilts, 100 pieces of ephemera, 54 oral histories, and expanded metadata representing African-American, African, and African Diasporic quilt history, as well as the development of up to 18 related resources, such as essays, lesson plans, and exhibits.

The proposed Quilt Index African American, African, and African Diaspora Quilt History Project is an intentional effort towards preserving and making accessible, in the Quilt Index, primary and secondary sources on African American, African, and African Diasporic quilt history drawn from geographically-dispersed public and private collections.

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Virginia Steel (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Dawn Childress (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285050-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Identification and Description of the Syriac and Arabic Manuscripts at St. Catherine’s Monastery of the Sinai. Phase 1: Syriac Parchment Manuscripts

The identification and description of 152 Syriac parchment manuscripts from St. Catherine’s Monastery in the Sinai Peninsula (Egypt), development of a data collection tool, and contribution of content to the Sinai Manuscripts Digital Library. 

The Sinai Manuscripts Digital Library (SMDL) seeks to increase access to the over 1,000 digitized Arabic and Syriac manuscripts of St. Catherine’s Monastery through a multi-phased scholarly description project that will focus on the identification and description of texts and paratexts within the manuscript collections and on documenting codicological and contextual evidence. An NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources (HCRR) Implementation grant will allow the project team to complete Phase 1 of this project: the identification and description of 152 Syriac parchment manuscripts from the collection. Through these activities and the resulting descriptive outputs, the proposed project will contribute to the larger Syriac Studies corpus and community and serve as a major research tool for significant new discoveries related to Syriac history and culture, as well as the history and culture of the Mediterranean, Byzantium, and the Middle East

Library of Virginia Foundation (Richmond, VA 23219-1905)
Kathy Jordan (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285051-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2025

NEH: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources War, remembrance, and the power of records: Digitizing the Library of Virginia’s WWII Separation Notices

The digitization of 250,000 separation notices of WWII-era service members and a crowdsourced transcription project to make them fully text searchable online. The library would also make the information from the notices available as a dataset for research. 

The Library of Virginia Foundation respectfully requests on behalf of the Library of Virginia a $315,000 implementation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to help digitize and make discoverable over a three-year period (2022-2025) an extensive collection of World War II separation notices that has been in its care since 1950, but has remained largely closed to the public until 2022. With a total project cost of more than $715,000, grant funding from NEH will enable the Library to accelerate the accessibility of these WWII separation notices for humanities research and enrich public connections to the stories of WWII. The Virginia WWII Separation Notices collection contains approximately 250,000 separation records for men and women in the Armed Forces during WWII who were discharged between 1942 and 1950 (bulk 1944-1946).

New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Monika Glowacka-Musial (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285052-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,965 (approved)
$345,763 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2025

The Amador Family Correspondence Digitization Project

Digitizing and cataloging approximately 15,000 pages of correspondence from the Amador family papers (1856–1949), which document the family’s personal and business activities in the border region of southern New Mexico and northern Chihuahua, Mexico. The primary sources would be made available through the library’s digital collections website.  

The Amador Family Correspondence Digitization Project

Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Foundation (North Hollywood, CA 91601-3109)
Jennifer Matz (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285053-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Preserving and Enriching Access to Oral Histories of the American Television Industry

The digitization and migration to long-term storage of 932 oral histories comprising over 3,000 hours of first-hand accounts that document the history of the television industry. 

The ?Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation is home to The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Formerly the Archive of American Television, The Interviews is a rare audiovisual collection of 932 recordings comprising over 3,000 hours of video-taped first-hand accounts of the evolving television industry from multiple perspectives. These oral histories, begun in 1996, face a crisis of obsolescence, as affirmed in a recent digital collection and preservation assessment. The Foundation requests NEH funding to support the implementation of a digital preservation and enhanced access strategy to ensure long-term stewardship and ongoing availability of a collection of immense importance to the history of the art and science of television, as well as to the understanding of?the nation’s cultural history more broadly.

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Theodore Mills Kelly (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285066-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2023

Off the Wall: Digital Preservation of Civil War Graffiti Houses

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, in collaboration with Historic Blenheim and the Brandy Station Foundation, are requesting a Foundations grant to facilitate the planning of a digitization project focused on Civil War graffiti houses located in Virginia and elsewhere and to build collaborative workflows between our three organizations. Our project, Off the Wall: Digital Preservation of Civil War Graffiti Houses, will develop a design document for an eventual implementation grant aimed at digitizing and contextualizing the graffiti and associated ancillary documents held by Historic Blenheim and the Brandy Station Foundation related to the graffiti in their two historic house museums. We will also use the Foundations grant funds to reach out to other Civil War graffiti sites to bring them into the larger project as it develops.

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Lauren B. Hewes (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285070-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$338,911 (approved)
$338,911 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Historic Children's Voices, 1799-1899

Cataloging and digitizing 286 child-authored texts from the nineteenth century, ranging from diaries to amateur printed newspapers. The materials would be made available online along with research and curricular guides for the collection and featured in a two-day scholarly symposium and a virtual public program. 

The American Antiquarian Society, a learned society and independent research library of pre-20th century American history and culture, seeks NEH support for Historic Children's Voices, 1799-1899, which will address the difficulty of discovering archival evidence from—not about—people under age 20, who represented half the U.S. population in the 19th century. This project will make child-authored texts, which are abundant yet not easily discoverable in archives, accessible via detailed cataloging and digitization, as well as dissemination via a research guide on the AAS website featuring a webinar on how to search for these materials as well as curricular guides for K-12 and for college educators. A public program will introduce parents and children to historic children's voices, and a two-day symposium (to be recorded and shared via the AAS YouTube channel) will bring together researchers to discuss the significance and use of child-authored texts as historical evidence.

Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
Matthew Charles Short (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Demian Katz (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

PW-285073-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,920 (approved)
$348,920 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

The Tousey Project

Digitizing 4,218 volumes of dime novels and story papers published by Frank Tousey. A partnership among five academic libraries—Northern Illinois University, Villanova University, Stanford University, Bowling Green State University, and Oberlin College—the project would provide images and full texts of the works, catalog records for the volumes, and indexed entries for the stories, series, and authors to augment an existing online bibliography of dime novels. 

The Tousey Project seeks to digitize the dime novels of Frank Tousey, the most sensational and prolific publisher of the format. Best known for his series marketed to children, Tousey made an indelible mark on American culture through the introduction of the first American science fiction hero, Frank Reade, and the popularization of stories about the outlaw Jesse James. This digitization project builds directly on the recently completed Albert Johannsen Project and the ongoing Street & Smith Project, with partners at Northern Illinois University, Villanova University, Stanford University, Bowling Green State University, and Oberlin College and Conservatory. In addition to making thousands of these publications widely available for the first time anywhere in over a century, the project will also add index entries for every story, series, and author to the online dime novel bibliography at dimenovels.org, which will be used to aggregate each partner’s digital dime novel holdings.

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Lucas Richert (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285080-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$326,326 (approved)
$326,326 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Accessing the History of Health, Pharmacy, and Medicines at UWSoP/AIHP

The arrangement and description of 1,000 linear feet and digitization of 2,000 artifacts and ephemera documenting the history of pharmacy, pharmaceuticals, medicines, and public health in the U.S. from 1850 to the late twentieth century.

The goal of this three-year project is to improve the ability of researchers to discover, use, and access important historical and archival collections held by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy (AIHP) and the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy (UWSoP). The collections sit at the intersection of the humanities and the health sciences and provide valuable historical context about a range of contemporary issues related to pharmacy, pharmaceuticals, drugs, and public health. The project will (1) create a comprehensive and detailed finding aid for the Kremers Reference files, a deep, diverse, and uncataloged topical archival collection of about 1,000 cubic feet; (2) begin inventorying the significant and uncataloged AIHP and UWSoP ephemera and artifact collections that document the material culture of pharmacy; and (3) create an online freely accessible digital library populated by about 1,000 artifacts and 1,000 pieces of ephemera from the collections.

Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, Inc. (Becket, MA 01223-4001)
Norton Owen (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285091-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Jacob's Pillow Archives digitization of the moving image collection from 1992.2009.

Digitization and updated catalog records for 3,336 audiovisual materials featuring performances, oral histories, lectures, and master classes from the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival from 1992 through 2010.

To support a large-scale digitization project of one-of-a-kind physical media from the Pillow’s extensive Archives. This three-year project will focus primarily on a collection of 3,336 moving images (performances, talks, classes, oral histories, special events, and more) recorded from 1992 through 2010, that currently exist on obsolete physical media and are only accessible on-site at Jacob’s Pillow in Becket, MA. Additional materials to be digitized include photographs, correspondence, and other paper and photographic materials; these assets will provide invaluable contextualization to the moving images. This digitization work will make it possible to significantly grow our existing online resource Jacob’s Pillow Dance Interactive, will dramatically increase access to these unique resources, and will address critical preservation needs.

Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)
Jessica Richard (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285095-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$58,005 (approved)
$58,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Maria Edgeworth Letters

Planning for the creation of a fully searchable corpus of Maria Edgeworth’s letters through crowdsourced transcription, expert annotation, and TEI-encoding. Her letters are held at 26 libraries across the United States and United Kingdom, and this would be the first effort to unite them digitally.

The Maria Edgeworth Letters project provides open access to the thought and wide-ranging correspondence network of an extraordinary woman writing at the turn of the nineteenth century whose ideas on gender, race, religion, education, and science have important ramifications today. The grant would support the early stages of development of a digital edition of the letters of Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849), an Anglo-Irish novelist and educational theorist who was more famous in her day than Jane Austen. Her letters, held at archives around the world, have never been comprehensively edited or accessible; this digital project will gather the scattered letters and create their associated metadata, allowing for network and other analyses. This collaborative endeavor between four universities provides research and learning opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students and engages the public through the Zooniverse crowdsourcing initiative.

Creighton University (Omaha, NE 68178-0133)
Simon Appleford (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285099-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,461 (approved)
$349,459 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

The Natural Face of North America: A Public Portal to the Maximilian-Bodmer Collection at Joslyn Art Museum

The development of a digital portal for access to journals, watercolors, and drawings of Indigenous peoples encountered on Maximilian von Wied and Karl Bodmer's expedition across North America in 1832-1834. The digital portal would offer multiple points of entry to the journals, artwork, a geocoded map, interpretive essays, and K-12 curriculum tools. 

Creighton University, the Joslyn Art Museum, and the Nebraska Indian Community College will implement a digital portal to increase public access and interpretation of materials related to Maximilian von Wied and Karl Bodmer's 1832-1834 expedition across North America. Staff will digitize, geocode, and markup Maximilian's Journal and Bodmer's artworks. Users will be able to browse and search the collection or follow the expedition using georeferenced maps, creating an integrated digital experience that allows multiple entry points into text and image. The project will enrich these resources with scholarly essays and ensure its broad impact through public outreach and a K-12 curriculum developed in coordination with Native American communities. The Natural Face of North America will be the most comprehensive public resource for the Maximilian-Bodmer expedition, provoking new and Indigenous-centered understandings of nineteenth-century America on the cusp of immense cultural change.

ARCE (Alexandria , VA 22314-1555)
Yasmin El Shazly (Project Director: July 2021 to May 2022)
Yasmin El Shazly (Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285113-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2025

Sharing 7,000 Years of Egyptian Culture with the American Research Center in Egypt’s (ARCE) Open Access Conservation Archives

A three-year implementation project to digitize and create online access to 26 archival collections of conservation records from sites in Egypt, ranging from prehistoric through Coptic, Islamic, and Jewish periods, and that are of interest to scholars, the public, and students and teachers. 

The American Research Center in Egypt is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting research on Egyptian history and culture, fostering knowledge about Egypt among the public, and strengthening American-Egyptian cultural ties. The proposed three-year project will digitize and publish online 26 collections of materials from conserved sites in Egypt, which encompass prehistoric, Pharaonic, Coptic, Islamic, and Jewish sites and monuments. Egyptian monuments documented in the archives contain a wealth of information for scholars interested in the history of urban design; the study of Islamic inscription programs; the evolution of mosque architecture; and other topics. Long-term, this project will create significant benefits to research, education, and public programming in the humanities, as it will provide easily discoverable, free, open-source digital access to the ARCE online archives for scholars and the public across the globe with an interest in Egyptian history and culture.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Andrew Wade Jewell (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Melissa J. Homestead (Co Project Director: July 2022 to present)
Emily J. Rau (Co Project Director: September 2022 to present)

PW-285125-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$304,207 (approved)
$304,207 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2023 – 1/31/2026

A Digital Library of Willa Cather's Literary Manuscripts

The Willa Cather Archive proposes to create a digital library of American novelist Willa Cather's literary manuscripts (broadly construed to encompass all pre-publication forms of her work). These materials are currently distributed across a range of repositories and are largely ignored by scholars and students of her writing. Our plan is to create a digital library of these materials that includes: 1) high-resolution images of each document, sufficient to facilitate close inspection of its details; 2) rich metadata about each item capturing its relationship to Cather's published work and other documents, its physical properties, the editorial hands visible on it, and other details about its creation; and 3) an expert-authored document analysis that describes, in straightforward prose, details about the manuscript that will help users make sense of its meaning and its place in the evolution of a particular work, including its relationship to other documents in the digital library.

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Margaret Gamm (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285126-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

The Ruth and Marvin Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry at Iowa: Increasing Access to 20th Century Avant-garde

Preserving and providing access to the Ruth and Marvin Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry, a collection of over 75,000 pieces, including artists’ books, typography, and other artistic works that combine writing and images. The project would produce an archival finding aid for the collection, catalog records for approximately 4,500 items, and a website featuring collection highlights. 

The Sackner Archive is the world’s largest repository of material documenting the international avant-garde movement of artists and writers who combined words and visual elements to create a new kind of artwork. Now contextualized by complementary collections of Dada, Fluxus, book arts, and more, this new collection at the University of Iowa Libraries promises to significantly expand the potential for scholarship in 20th Century avant-garde. The Sackner Archive exists as a largely “hidden collection” due to the enormous amount of work needed to organize, catalog, and preserve the materials to make them accessible to researchers, educators and the general public. This Implementation Project will make the materials available to all by providing staffing to aid in the housing of objects, the standardization of metadata, and the creation of new finding aids, allowing improved discoverability for a large selection of collection material.

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Anne Hunnell Chen (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285127-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

International Digital Dura-Europos Archive (IDEA): Reassembling and Recontextualizing Ancient Cultural Heritage

The development of the Yale Digital Dura-Europos Archive (YDEA), a digital archive of materials related to the archaeological site of Dura-Europos, Syria, a multicultural center of the ancient world that has been threatened in recent years by looting and conflict.

The Yale Digital Dura-Europos Archive (YDEA) is a project aimed at increasing global access to, and comprehensibility of, data and artifacts from the important cultural heritage site of Dura-Europos (Syria). Using Linked Open Data (LOD), YDEA endeavors to create a comprehensive and extensible digital archive whose data points can be freely reused, and to develop a web application that provides multilinguistic access to the integrated Dura-Europos archival resources in a single interface, together with visualizations to enhance data intelligibility at a glance. The planned work will make c. 30,000 artifacts and archival documents searchable in Arabic for the first time. Looting at Dura since 2011 has regrettably compromised the site for future stratigraphic research. Accessibility of data from controlled scientific excavations prior to 2011 is therefore of paramount importance as the basis for future teaching and research, including anti-trafficking efforts related to the site.

National Hispanic Cultural Center Foundation (Albuquerque, NM 87102-4508)
Tey Marianna Nunn (Project Director: July 2021 to July 2022)
Jadira Gurule (Project Director: July 2022 to present)

PW-285132-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2025

Digitizing and Sharing the Art of the National Hispanic Cultural Center (New Mexico)

A collaborative project to digitize, describe, and make accessible a collection of Mexican American art and related documents at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for inclusion on the museum’s website and the open-source aggregating portal Rhizomes of Mexican American Art Since 1848.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center, University of Minnesota, and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley seek an NEH HCRR Implementation grant to undertake a three-year collaboration to digitize, describe, and make accessible a large concentration of Mexican American art and related documents. Building on UMN’s successful Foundations grant, we propose to digitize 3,400 works of art and 16 linear feet of archival materials from the Center’s Art Museum. The nominated materials will be published to the Center’s website and the open-source, aggregating portal, Rhizomes of Mexican American Art Since 1848, which implements culturally-informed descriptors, metadata, and search strategies discovered under the Foundations grant. Rhizomes will link relevant holdings from the nation’s libraries, archives, and museums, thereby fostering a sustainable network for digital collections of Mexican-American art and enhancing how humanities scholars think about American art, history, and culture.

American Film Institute (Los Angeles, CA 90027-1625)
Sarah Blankfort Clothier (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285143-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2025

Behind The Veil: Establishing a New Canon of Marginalized Voices at the AFI Catalog

The expansion of the AFI Catalog, the filmographic online database which documents the first 100 years of American cinema, by adding 45,000 titles and associated data for short films released from 1893 to 1933 and completing 6,000 records of short films from the silent film era.  

The American Film Institute (AFI) upholds the first tenet of its original mission -- to preserve the history of the motion picture -- through the AFI Catalog, an authoritative online resource recording the first century of American film (1893-1993). AFI respectfully requests a three-year, $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of a landmark project to include short films in its AFI Catalog database for an unprecedented effort to study the artistic contributions of women and people of color in early film. By documenting short subjects from the silent and early sound eras (1910-1933), the AFI Catalog will illuminate the work of diverse storytellers that have traditionally been omitted from history due to a lack of scholarly resources about short films. The inclusion of short films in the AFI Catalog will allow us to look behind the veil of historical bias to reveal the true diversity of America’s cultural legacy and bring marginalized artists into view.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285146-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Understanding Change: The Los Angeles County Demographic Data Project

A Foundations project to plan for the accessibility of a dataset documenting demographics and social change in the City of Los Angeles and 86 Los Angeles County municipalities between 1950 and 2010. 

Our Foundations project will preserve and make accessible a remarkable dataset tracing many aspects of social change in the City of Los Angeles and 86 L.A. County municipalities between 1950 and 2010. In consultation with historian Becky Nicolaides (creator of the dataset) and an advisory board of humanities scholars, geospatial data librarians, and media organizations, we will develop file format and metadata guidelines, planning documents for a website, and a roadmap for publishing the data on public-access platforms including online digital libraries, linked open data repositories, and GIS and geospatial data resources. We will also publish a pilot collection for free online public access via the USC Digital Library, Calisphere, and DPLA.

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Henry F. Raine (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285153-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Digitizing the Time-Life News Service Correspondent Wires, 1930-1960, Phase 1: the Subject Files

The digitization of 267 reels of microfilm containing the Subject Files from the Time-Life News Service Correspondent Wires dating from the 1930s to 1960. 

The New-York Historical Society proposes to digitize 267 reels of microfilm of Time-Life News Service Correspondent Wires (1930s-1960) that no longer exist in hard copy. Submitted by a global network of correspondents, the wires comprise the raw reporting that Time and Life staff used to write stories and form an extraordinary trove of information about a tumultuous, defining period in United States and world history. Since only a small portion of the correspondents’ submissions ever appeared in print, and they have only recently been opened to researchers, digitizing this unique set of microfilm will result in an essential resource for humanities scholarship. This is Phase 1 of a two- phase project that will ultimately result in the digitization of 576 reels of microfilm. The goals of the project are threefold: to preserve the content of the collection, which only exists in this one set of master microfilm; to make it freely available online; and to disseminate it to a large audience.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Peter M. Hedlund (Project Director: July 2021 to April 2022)
Peter M. Hedlund (Project Director: April 2022 to present)

PW-285169-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,670 (approved)
$348,670 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

By the People: The Inclusive Story of Revolution in Virginia, 1763–1800

The addition of 200 entries to Encyclopedia Virginia to make more inclusive its coverage of the Revolutionary era (1763–1800), and the addition of primary sources, artifacts, lesson plans, and digital public history experiences, all in preparation for the 250th anniversary of American independence. 

This project proposes to develop content about the American Revolution and Early Republic (1763–1800) for Encyclopedia Virginia, a free, online resource about the history and culture of Virginia. In partnership with leading cultural institutions, a consulting group that specializes in collaborating with Native communities, and an educational consultant, Encyclopedia Virginia will develop and publish entries, primary resources, media objects, virtual tours, and leveled content that addresses Virginia history from 1763 to 1800—with a particular focus on the experiences and contributions of Indigenous people, Black people, and women.

Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
Jamie Rogers (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285172-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Enhancing Access and Research Possibilities through Critical Engagement with Historical Data

Enhanced access to the papers of Dana A. Dorsey, who, as Miami’s first Black millionaire, developed the city’s Colored Town (present day Overtown) in the early twentieth century. This work would include transcription, georeferencing, and creating tabular data from the 291 records and 620 pages of legal documents that constitute the collection. 

This project aims to develop a set of preliminary data resources, based on the Dana A. Dorsey Papers held at FIU, that will expand our understanding of the interpersonal networks and investment by and for Miami’s Black community during the pre-redlining era. These resources will include (1) full transcripts of Dorsey’s financial papers, (2) a geospatial dataset plotting the properties involved in his financial transactions, as well as (3) a data set derived from his papers consisting of details about his transactions and, most importantly, the individuals involved. The core values of this work are centered on addressing the significant gaps in the historical record, critical engagement in data collection processes that are rooted in humanity through the histories of individuals, and the establishing of a model for future collaborative human centered data work.

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Jennifer Gunter King (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Elizabeth Roke (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285174-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$46,630 (approved)
$46,630 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

The Wayfinder Project: Revealing Black Print Culture to a Linked World, 1830-

Planning for a digital bibliography of African American serials publications in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Using the 6,500 entries in James Danky and Maureen Hady's African American Newspapers and Periodicals: A National Bibliography (1998) as its basis, the project would integrate data from both open-source resources, such as Chronicling America, and proprietary databases, such as Readex’s Early American Newspapers and Accessible Archives

The Wayfinder Project: Revealing Black Print Culture to a Linked World, 1830-, is a collaborative Emory University Libraries initiative to update and republish James Danky and Maureen Hady's 1998 African American Newspapers and Periodicals: A National Bibliography. Led by the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, and in collaboration with the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship; Research, Engagement and Scholarly Communications; and Access and Resource Services Divisions, it will add new serials to the bibliography and reimagine the current volume using a linked data framework to make it more searchable, discoverable, and usable. The Foundation grant will support establishing an advisory committee to guide the decision-making of the project team who will establish a data model, metadata mapping plan, cataloging standards, an editorial model, and design for online access for creating a digital version of this foundational bibliographic resource.

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Cecilia Smith (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285181-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,930 (approved)
$348,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Mapping Chicagoland

A collaborative project to digitize, georeference, and make maps and atlases of Chicago published before 1940 accessible online. The project would include 1,167 maps from the Newberry Library, 2,934 maps from the Chicago History Museum, and 1,015 maps from the University of Chicago.

The Mapping Chicagoland project will digitize, georeference, and make accessible maps and atlases of Chicago from the Newberry Library, the Chicago History Museum, and the University of Chicago. The project will focus on making the earliest cartographic representations of Chicago accessible. The nominated collections consist of Chicago maps and atlases that were published in 1940 or earlier. Each institution’s collection has unique strengths that complement one another in scale, time period, and subject. The maps selected are among the most used at the three institutions but are also fragile in nature.

Regents of the University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
Keramet Reiter (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Naomi Sugie (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)
Kristin Turney (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285183-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

UC Irvine’s PrisonPandemic: Digitizing and Amplifying Stories of Incarceration During COVID-19

A Foundations project to plan for the preservation and access of a multimedia collection chronicling the experience of incarcerated people in California during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The University of California, Irvine (UCI) is fast becoming a center for incarcerated voices in the United States. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, UCI’s PrisonPandemic collection has received thousands of letters and hundreds of phone calls from incarcerated people describing their experiences in prison during this global crisis. With this Foundations proposal, UCI faculty and librarians seek planning support to develop processes for both ethically preserving this collection of stories (protecting incarcerated contributors from any risk of identification or retaliation) and maximizing public accessibility of these stories for research and public programming. If successful, UCI’s PrisonPandemic collection and digital interface will be the first university-based portal providing ongoing access -- and a model for continued acceptance and processing -- of these typically hidden and marginalized voices.

Ohio University (Athens, OH 45701-1361)
Miriam Nelson (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285184-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

The Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis Dance Collection: Developing a Roadmap for AV Reformatting and Expert Sourced Metadata

A digital preservation assessment, rehousing, and new finding aid for over 2,000 audio and audio-visual materials dating from 1936 through 2001 in the Alwin Nikolais and Murry Louis Dance Collection at the Ohio University Libraries’ Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections. The project team also would develop workflows and build relationships for incorporating metadata from expert sources.

The Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis Dance Collection is held by the Ohio University Libraries’ Mahn Center for Archives and Special Collections. The collection is an invaluable record of American Modern Dance pedagogy providing a rich resource for students and teachers of dance, in higher education and beyond. This project aims to increase access to the collection and its extensive audiovisual formats in two ways. First an AV assessment will provide a roadmap for the Libraries to pursue digital reformatting and preservation. The collection contains valuable moving image and audio content that has not been broadly accessible and may now be at risk from degradation. Second the project seeks to create additional access points to a growing digital collection of non-AV material by working with the Nikolais/Louis Foundation to collect expert-sourced metadata. This approach opens opportunities for the libraries to deepen description even where subject expertise is lacking.

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Mauro Nobili (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285185-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$59,571 (approved)
$58,413 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Building Maktaba: A Digital Collection of African Arabic Manuscripts in Translation

A pilot project to create a digital collection of 20 African Arabic manuscripts from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University with images, translations, and brief essays.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) and Northwestern University (NU) in Evanston propose a two-year Foundations grant to pilot an open-access digital collection that joins the rich West African Arabic manuscript holdings of our universities’ libraries. The digital collection, called Maktaba (meaning “library” in Arabic), will display images of a sample set of 20 manuscripts from the UIUC and NU collections. To make the manuscripts legible and teachable for non-specialists, each manuscript will be paired with its English translation and a brief essay providing historical and cultural context. The planning period (6/1/2022-5/31/2024) will allow the project team to establish processes and test concepts that will inform expansion of the collection after the planning period. The Maktaba project contributes to ongoing efforts to decolonize the production of knowledge about African societies at large.

School of Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60603-3002)
Carolyn Faber (Project Director: July 2021 to November 2022)
Brittan Nannenga (Project Director: November 2022 to present)

Participating institutions:
School of Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL) - Applicant/Recipient
Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL) - Participating Institution

PW-285199-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Foundations - Chicago Gallery Project

The development of a processing plan and pilot online project portal for archival collections representing six independent Chicago art galleries and totaling 800 linear feet of materials, including exhibition files, promotional materials, administrative records, correspondence, publications, photographs, slides, and audiovisual materials from 1973 through the early 2010s.

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (School), in partnership with the Art Institute of Chicago (Museum), will undertake a year-long Foundations process to plan for a full collections processing project for the archives of six notable Chicago galleries: ARC, Artemisia, Rhona Hoffman, Donald Young, Randolph Street Gallery and Threewalls. The School and Museum will create a processing plan for the six gallery collections, supported by preservation and content assessments for each, and pilot a public-facing Chicago Gallery Project website, created with the expertise of Chicago curators, archive staff, and artists. This site will enhance discoverability of the School’s and Museum’s gallery collections and similar content held by other institutions.

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Carla Klehm (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285206-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 3/31/2023

Foundations of the Urban Cholula Salvage Archaeology Geodatabase (UCSAG)

A Foundations project to undertake a collections assessment, design a geo-database, and establish metadata and digitization protocols for archaeological data from two areas around the site of Cholula (Puebla), Mexico, an important pre-Columbian urban and religious center, occupied through the conquest.

UCSAG-Foundations focuses on the initial development for a database that will be known as UCSAG (Urban Cholula Salvage Archaeological Geodatabase), associated with archaeological collections from the last 2,000 years in the Cholula area of Mexico. The Cholula collections have the potential to enable research for and tell the story of the rich Mexican indigenous history and living heritage before, during, and after Spanish colonialism. The collections from Urban Cholula, discovered through salvage excavations in two modern cities adjacent to Cholula's Great Pyramid, have the potential to transform understandings of how Cholula operated as a political and religious center during the pre-Columbian era, and continued to be a resilient locus of Mesoamerican culture throughout the colonial period. UCSAG-Foundations will design the database and determine the protocols to bring the attention of the world to these little-known, but incredibly significant humanities collections.

Washington College (Chestertown, MD 21620-1197)
Adam Goodheart (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285207-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$59,809 (approved)
$59,809 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Digitization and Interpretation Plan for Four Centuries of Black History in a Chesapeake Bay Community

Planning further development of Washington College Starr Center’s “Chesapeake Heartland: An African American Humanities Project” through an expansion of its digital collections and community engagement activities. Identified contributing partners would include four repositories that hold materials related to more than two centuries of African-American history on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. 

In 2019, Washington College's Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, with an $800,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, launched "Chesapeake Heartland: An African American Humanities Project," an innovative collaboration among Washington College, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, and a broad array of community partners in Kent County, MD. Chesapeake Heartland collects, preserves, digitizes, and makes accessible artifacts and oral histories related to the area’s African American heritage. With NEH support, the Starr Center can expand significantly the project's reach by bringing in items that are scattered in institutional repositories across the Chesapeake region, including the Maryland State Archives (Annapolis), Maryland Center for History and Culture (Baltimore), American Antiquarian Society (MA), and the National Museum of African American History and Culture (DC), broadening the project's scope to four centuries.

San Francisco Art Institute (San Francisco, CA 94133-2206)
Jeff Gunderson (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285208-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$234,820 (approved)
$234,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024

Expanding the Conversation: Improving Access to 150 Years of Archival Collections at the San Francisco Art Institute

The arrangement, description, and rehousing of 544 linear feet, which constitute the institutional archives for the San Francisco Art Institute, founded in 1871. Approximately 41 finding aids would be posted to the organization website and Online Archive of California, and 23 hours of at-risk audiovisual materials would be digitized and made available on the Internet Archive. 

The institutional archives of the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is an unparalleled resource, chronicling the 150-year history of the school and its vital role—as hub, incubator and repository—in the development of 19th, 20th, and 21st century art and culture. While this rich archival resource has always been open to researchers and has informed dozens of books, articles, exhibitions, films, lectures and college courses, it has never been as accessible or discoverable as its historical value demands. The project will significantly increase access to and preservation of this unparalleled resource through comprehensive arrangement and archival rehousing of the collections, digitization of at-risk audio-visual recordings, and the creation of detailed finding aids, which will be made available to a global audience online.

Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma (Norman, OK 73019-3003)
Raina Heaton (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285221-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$345,494 (approved)
$345,494 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Creating Online Access for the Native American Languages Collection

An Implementation project to create access through a collections database to Native language holdings at the Sam Noble Museum, University of Oklahoma. Activities include metadata enhancement, digitization, software development, and development of a web portal for access.   

The Native American Languages collection at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma seeks to fund a three-year project to provide online access to our collections for the first time. This project builds on the work of a previous NEH Foundations grant (PW- 269366-20) that funded workshops with community and academic partners to create the framework for a user-oriented website that will best serve the needs of our visitors and contributors. These activities will ultimately allow community members, researchers, and the public to make use of the collections Native American language materials in ways not previously possible. There are four components to achieving our goal of making the collections available online: 1) website development, 2) continuing archival software development, 3) digitization, and 4) collections metadata enhancement.

Center for Jewish History (New York, NY 10011-6301)
Rachel Miller (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

Participating institutions:
Center for Jewish History (New York, NY) - Applicant/Recipient
American Jewish Historical Society (New York, NY) - Participating Institution

PW-285228-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2025

Connection and Community: Documenting 20th-century American Jewish Philanthropy and Public Service

The arrangement and description of 1,475 linear feet of Council of Jewish Federations records dating from 1916 to 1999, as well as the digitization of 5,000 items selected from the collection. 

Jewish federations are collectively among the largest charities in the U.S. and the world. Federations were created by and for local communities at the turn of the 20th century to address social needs like immigrant relief, education, and elder care before state-led social service infrastructure was available. As Jewish federations grew, so did the necessity for collaboration among them, leading to the establishment in 1932 of the Council of Jewish Federations to coordinate efforts on a national scale. The Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Historical Society will arrange and describe the records of the Council of Jewish Federations (1,475 linear feet), opening this prodigious collection to researchers for the first time. A selection of 5,000 items will also be digitized. The Council’s records hold tremendous potential for humanities research across many fields and appeal to a broad public interested the history of communities across the nation.

Kyuk Am Tv (Bethel, AK 99559-0468)
Katie Basile (Project Director: July 2021 to May 2022)
Gabby Hiestand Salgado (Project Director: May 2022 to present)

PW-285230-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$338,475 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Nutarrluki: Make Them New

Reformatting and cataloging an estimated 1,000 to 1,200 hours of video and audio recordings documenting the traditional language, lifestyle, and culture of Yup’ik and Cup’ik Alaska Native people, which would be discoverable through the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website. 

The NUTARRLUKI: “Make Them New” project seeks funding to digitize, catalogue and share portions of a large collection of video and audio tapes documenting the lifestyles, cultural traditions and languages of the Yup’ik and Cup’ik Alaska Native people. This rare collection, owned by KYUK - Bethel Broadcasting Inc., reflects a unique, indigenous American population and is in critical need of attention if it is to survive, much less be publicly shared. It is believed to be the largest collection in the world of Yup’ik/Cup’ik related video content that captures the traditions, language and customs that were developed before contact with the West.

Library Company of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5679)
Rachel D'Agostino (Project Director: July 2021 to present)

PW-285234-22
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2025

The Library Company Papers Project: Archiving & Preserving Early American History

The Library Company Papers Project: Archiving and Preserving Early American History is a three-year project that will comprehensively review, process, and digitize the Library Company’s institutional records from its founding in 1731 through 1880 - the first 150 years. The project will also include the creation of a web portal (the Library Company Papers Portal) to serve as an entry-point to access these foundational documents, as well as a transcription project to be publicly launched at the culmination of the three years. This project is part of a larger initiative to prepare the Library Company to celebrate our 300th anniversary in 2031.

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Charles Richard Cobb (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277334-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$318,944 (approved)
$318,944 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

The Colonial St. Augustine Project: Digitizing 400 Years of Interaction Phase 1

The development of a database and online portal to archaeological material at the Florida Museum of Natural History from three house lots at the colonial city of St Augustine. The house lots encompass material from the late 16th to 19th centuries. A total of approximately 52,000 artifacts and over 2000 documents, maps and photos, would be added – including pottery, architecture, clothing, and metals that document the diverse cultural representation in St Augustine at that time. 

The Colonial St. Augustine Project will rely on a sample of artifact collections from house lots from the city of St. Augustine, Florida to accomplish two goals: 1) develop an digital database that helps to describe the colonial history of the city based on archaeological investigations; and, 2) make that data freely accessible through an online web portal. Established by the Spanish Crown in 1565, St. Augustine is widely celebrated as the earliest colonial town in North America that is still an active community today. As the capital of the Spanish colony of Florida, it played a major role in the colonial history of eastern North America, and its later integration into the United States strongly shaped the character of the American South. The public website to be made available through this project will emphasize the importance of archaeological research for sharing this story with the American public.

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
James Cassaro (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277337-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$145,897 (approved)
$145,897 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2023

Providing Open Access to Photoplay Music: The Mirskey Collection Digitization Project

The cataloging and digitization of the Mirskey Collection, a set of approximately 3,000 cinema scores published during the early motion picture era, dating from ca. 1895 to 1927.

The University of Pittsburgh Library System (ULS) seeks a grant to support the Mirskey Collection Digitization Project. This two-year project will process and digitize sheet music for silent [mute] film accompaniment in the Mirskey Collection (MC), held by the ULS Theodore M. Finney Music Library. The MC contains approximately 3,000 sets of “photoplay” music, or music published specifically for cinema orchestra, with each set averaging fifteen instrumental parts, for a total of approximately 45,000 pages. Music for silent film accompaniment is an important resource for humanities scholars and musicologists exploring media studies, popular music, historical art music, gendered activities, class and social stratification, and a variety of other areas. Yet, silent film music remains very difficult for scholars and performers to access. The proposed project will preserve the entire MC and make it freely available online for research, performance, public programming, and exhibition.

California State University, Northridge, University Corporation (Northridge, CA 91330-8316)
Jose Luis Benavides (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277345-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2024

Farmworker Movement Digital Photo Archive, Multimedia Website, and On-Demand Exhibition

The processing and partial digitization of 22,000 35mm negatives, slides, contact sheets, and prints, along with 20 oral histories that document the farmworker movement in the 1960s and early 1970s.

The Farmworker Movement Collection of the Tom & Ethel Bradley Center contains 22,000 negatives, slides, and prints by American photographers John Kouns (1929–2019) and Emmon Clarke (1931–) taken during the 1960s and 1970s. The movement forged a broad coalition that pushed the country toward a more perfect union. The proposed project will create a digital database of this collection to digitally preserve the images and enable educational online access through the university’s Oviatt Library Digital Collections website. The digital archive will include 6,600 images 30% of the Center’s holdings). Dissemination activities include the creation of a multimedia website that uses this newly created digital photographic archive, 20 oral histories of farmworker participants that are part of the Center’s collection, and other publicly available digital resources, and the creation of a Do-It-Yourself educational exhibition for schools, community centers, and union groups using these photographs.

University of Arkansas, Little Rock (Little Rock, AR 72204-1000)
Deborah J. Baldwin (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277352-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$325,043 (approved)
$325,043 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2024

Mapping Urban Fracture: Charting the Context and Consequence of the Little Rock Central High Crisis

The digitization and geolocation of maps, architectural drawings, reports, and related photographs to address humanities questions about concepts of desegregation, urban renewal, and racial distribution over time with regard to housing and schools.  The Mapping Urban Fracture project would create a virtual collection comprising approximately 700 new reports and maps created after 1989 and develop an access interface to research spatial segregation with meta- and geospatial data.

The Mapping Urban Fracture project will engage scholars, educators, and the general public through the digitization and geolocation of maps, architectural drawings, reports, and related photographs to address humanities questions about concepts of desegregation, urban renewal, and racial distribution overtime with regard to housing and schools. The project will create a virtual collection and develop an access interface to research spatial segregation with meta- and geo- data for broad dissemination to a variety of audiences.

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04473-1513)
Margo Lukens (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277362-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$59,436 (approved)
$59,436 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

Wabanaki Resources Portal

A Foundations project to plan for the development of an online portal to archival materials dealing with Wabanaki history and culture that are held at University of Maine’s Hudson Museum, Maine Folklife Center, and Fogler Library.  The portal would serve research, public, and educational audiences.

The McGillicuddy Humanities Center (MHC), the College of Education and Human Development (COEHD), and the Native American Programs at the University of Maine (UMaine) together with partners at the Maine Department of Education (DOE), and members of the Wabanaki Confederacy (the Penobscot Nation, Passamaquoddy Tribe, Aroostook Band of Micmacs and Houlton Band of Maliseets), propose to investigate developing a prototype portal to provide centralized access to, and increase discoverability of underutilized Wabanaki resources and archival collections distributed across a number of institutions.

Yiddish Book Center (Amherst, MA 01002-3375)
Christa Whitney (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277363-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2024

Creating and Enhancing Access to the Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project

Providing access to a collection of oral history interviews about Yiddish language and culture through transcription, the creation of time-coded indices, and descriptive metadata enhancement.

The Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project seeks funding to enhance access to its digital collection of video oral histories about Yiddish language and culture in the non-ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. With this grant, we will create time-coded transcripts and bilingual indices for a large portion of our continuously growing collection, thereby increasing multilingual access to this unique archive. Additionally, we will align geographic and subject metadata to widely used formats and link the oral history collection to related digital collections at the Yiddish Book Center. Finally, we will make the archive discoverable on major scholarly search platforms and allow for integration into universal digital libraries alongside other humanities resources. These efforts enable researchers, educators, artists, and the general public to more easily access and utilize these invaluable primary source materials about the culture of an important ethnic minority in the US and beyond.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
John Gartrell (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277365-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,178 (approved)
$349,178 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2024

Documenting African American Life in the Jim Crow South: Digital Access to the Behind the Veil Project Archive

The digitization, cataloging, and transcription of Duke University’s Behind the Veil (BTV) oral history collection of 1,200 analog master recordings and over 3,800 supplemental materials, including photographs and project files, to current digital standards. The collection, which illustrates African American life in twenty Southern communities under Jim Crow, would be published in the Duke Digital Repository.

“Documenting African American Life in the Jim Crow South" will expand online access to the the Behind the Veil (BTV) project archive, housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University. The archive's provenance is traced to an oral history initiative from the early 1990's launched by the Duke's Center for Documentary Studies which interviewed African Americans from twenty distinct communities in the US South to document their experiences living through the era of segregation commonly known as Jim Crow. The BTV archive contains interviews with over 1,200 individuals and families, nearly 3,000 pieces of visual materials including slides, prints and photo negatives, and supplementary project files and electronic records. This proposal will migrate the archive's analog master recordings, photographs, and project files to current digital standards and publish the collection in the Duke Digital Repository with appropriate metadata and transcription.

Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center (Asheville, NC 28801-2916)
Jeff Arnal (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277369-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 9/30/2022

Piloting an online collections platform for historic Black Mountain College resources

A plan for metadata standards, accessibility, user needs, and long-term strategic planning and sustainability for Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center’s collections, as well as the pilot implementation of a digital collections management system and online collections portal with approximately 1,000 digital items.

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center requests $50,000 to develop a pilot project creating online access to a part of its permanent collection. This will be an invaluable resource for scholars studying Black Mountain College’s history and legacy as it includes the creative output of groundbreaking figures in American culture from 1933 to the present, across visual, performing, and literary arts. Outputs for this planning period will include development and population of the back-end and front-end of a new collections management system, and documents detailing strategies and standards for future implementation. An earlier related phase, funded by the Luce and Windgate Foundations, involved the digitization of BMCM+AC resources which will be used as pilot data and media for the online collections portal. The project will take place from June 2021-September 2022. Full implementation at a later date will entail digitizing and adding the rest of the collection.

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Matthew H. Edney (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277395-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2023

The History of Cartography Project

The production of the fifth and final volume of the History of Cartography, a standard reference for the field of maps and map history. This volume, Cartography in the Nineteenth Century, would include an interpretive encyclopedia of 408 entries written by 193 contributors, to be made available online and archived digitally. 

We request an implementation grant for July 2021–June 2023 to advance towards completion the final volume of a major reference series, The History of Cartography. Work planned includes research and extensive preparation of Volume Five. This award-winning series is the only comprehensive and reliable resource to study the people, cultures, and societies that have produced and used maps from prehistory to the present. It provides intellectual access to the complex world of maps for scholars and the public. It promotes and sustains the humanistic interpretation of maps as evidentiary sources. Experienced editors, contributors, and staff thoroughly research and rigorously check its content. The University of Chicago Press is responsible for publishing and distributing the volumes, making them available to a broad audience in print, e-book, and eventually free online editions.

Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875)
Page Talbott (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-277398-21
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,964 (approved)
$349,964 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2024

Digitizing the Atwater Kent Museum Collection

Digitization of approximately 25,000 three-dimensional objects that represent 350 years of history in Philadelphia, including historical artifacts and fine and decorative arts. The images and associated metadata would be available to the public through an online database.

In an unmarked warehouse in a former industrial area of Philadelphia, the 133,000+ items that made up the collection of the now-shuttered Philadelphia History Museum (PHM) await discovery. Through a partnership with the Museum trustees and City of Philadelphia, Drexel University is becoming steward of this collection, called the Atwater Kent Collection (AKC). As the new steward, Drexel is planning an innovative model of a “museum without walls” that will allow the public to know—for the first time—the extent of what is included in this far-ranging, priceless Collection. As essential underpinning for long-term public programming, education, research, and institutional collaboration, this significant Collection of material culture must be accessible—particularly online. As part of this ambitious undertaking, Drexel is applying for a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Implementation grant to digitize the three-dimensional objects of the Atwater Kent Collection.