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Funded Projects Query Form
80 matches

Grant programs:Humanities Collections and Reference Resources*
Date range: 2017-2018
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Patricia Fumerton (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2022)

PW-258977-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$230,595 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 9/30/2021

EBBA and the British Library: Making Popular Ballads of the Past more Present

The continued development of the English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) with the addition of 1,300 rare, pre-1701 printed ballads held at the British Library.  In addition, the project would catalog 905 tune titles and approximately 18,250 woodcut impressions, as well as enhance access to the existing ballad collection by providing faceted searching and other features to improve the user experience.

The Univ. of California-Santa Barbara requests critical funding to launch its penultimate, 7th phase of the English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), significantly expanding the archive with 1,300 rare ballads from the British Library, many unique. As always, EBBA will provide high-quality color facsimiles, text transcriptions, deep cataloging in TEI/XML/MARC, recordings, and informative essays. In this phase, we will also enhance our interface with 1) configurable, faceted searches; 2) user controls and MEI encoding of tune recordings and their transcriptions; and 3) sophisticated human cataloging of the ballads' illustrative woodcuts, matched by our existing image-association software. Additionally, we will develop a new section to support K-12 and undergraduate pedagogy, with class plans and interactive tools. EBBA will in the process widen access to these crucial cultural artifacts so that scholars, students and the general public can engage with them as text, data, art, and song.

Institute For Advanced Study - Louis Bamberger And Mrs. Felix Fuld Fdn (Princeton, NJ 08540-4907)
Sabine Schmidtke (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2022)

PW-258989-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2022

The Zaydi Manuscript Tradition: A Digital Repository and Portal

Digitization of 488 Zaydi manuscripts held in European libraries and preparation of 143 microfilm images of manuscripts held at the University of Texas, Austin, and 1,000 images of manuscripts from collections in Yemen, currently held by the Institute of Advanced Study, for uploading to the digital repository at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library. All 1,631 manuscripts, which range from the 9th to the 20th century, would be cataloged.

The literary tradition of the Zaydi community, a branch of Shi’i Islam that originated in Kufa and later developed in Northern Iran and Yemen, is among the richest and most variegated strands within Islamic civilization and one of the least studied due to issues of preservation and access. The most significant collections of Zaydi manuscripts are housed in Yemeni libraries, many of which have been damaged or destroyed over the course of the 20th century, and the continuing war constitutes an imminent threat. Only a fraction of collections, including those in Europe, North America, and the Middle East, have been preserved digitally and even fewer are freely accessible. The Zaydi Manuscript Tradition, an initiative of the Institute for Advanced Study and Hill Museum & Manuscript Library, aims to digitize and house the entire Zaydi manuscript culture in a single repository and provide comprehensive open access to its literary tradition for scholars, researchers, and educators worldwide.

Wartburg College (Waverly, IA 50677-2200)
Amy M. Moorman (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2020)
Fred D. Ribich (Project Director: October 2020 to November 2021)
Kay Grigsby (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

PW-258991-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$165,276 (approved)
$165,276 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2023

Implementation Project: Archives of Iowa Broadcasting Creation of Online Media Library

Improved public access for the Archives of Iowa Broadcasting through the cataloging of 28,000 items and digitization of over 2,000 broadcast tapes from KWWL-TV, a flagship public news station in eastern Iowa. The collection documents the history and development of community radio and television in the state and includes oral histories, documents, photographs, and artifacts dating from 1922 to 2007.

The Archives of Iowa Broadcasting (AIB) contains oral histories, documents, photographs, promotional materials, artifacts and over 28,000 audiovisual recordings (1922-2007) that document the history and development of radio and television in Iowa. These represent a unique body of records all too often lost due to the ephemeral nature of original broadcasts and the degradation and obsolescence of the media carriers that captured them. This grant project would create an online media catalog of the more than 28,000 items in the AIB audiovisual collection. The grant would also involve digitization of 2,230 videotapes of broadcast footage from KWWL-TV, a flagship news station in eastern Iowa. Digitizing these materials will allow for their preservation.  The files will be made available online through the media catalog. Creating an online catalog of Iowa Broadcasting materials and beginning to digitize our fragile media holdings are essential to expanding future use of the AIB collection.

American Foundation for the Blind Inc. (New York, NY 10121-0101)
Helen J. Selsdon (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2022)

PW-258999-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$295,000 (approved)
$295,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2021

Digitization and Metadata Creation for the Helen Keller Archive Press Clippings and Scrapbooks

The digitization of scrapbooks and news clippings, totaling 34,000 digital images, from the personal papers of Helen Keller, completing the comprehensive digitization and free online access of Keller’s archive, including for users with visual and hearing disabilities.

In 2015, the American Foundation for the Blind received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to digitize a large segment of Helen Keller’s archive and to create an online collection that is free of charge and fully accessible to blind, deaf, deafblind, sighted, and hearing audiences alike. The site currently includes over 72,000 images, and by the end of 2017 will include over 160,000. Because of limitations in funding, the press clippings and scrapbooks were omitted from the 2015 project. AFB now seeks to digitize and disseminate these remaining materials. Approximately 34,000 digital images will be created during this phase of the project. These are the most fragile and difficult items to handle and have been closed to researchers and the public. Details of Keller’s life that are undocumented in other parts of the archive can be found here. The collection is an untapped resource for women’s history, American culture, and Disability Studies in the 19th and 20th centuries.

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
Christa Beranek (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259002-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$181,000 (approved)
$181,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2022

Digitizing Plimoth Plantation’s 17th-Century Historical Archaeology Collections

Cataloging, digitization, and creation of access to the archaeological collections connected to the early colonists of Plimoth Plantation.  Focusing on historical artifacts from four key sites, the project would encompass field notes, plans, drawings, and photos associated with the excavations that took place between 1940 and 1972.  Materials would be made accessible for the public, teachers, students, and scholars via an online database and finding aids.

In the years since The Mayflower made her iconic voyage, American cultural identity and heritage have developed a complex mythology surrounding the ship and her passengers. The approaching 400th anniversary (1620-2020) of this voyage has generated renewed public and scholarly interest in this time period and the Pilgrims’ daily lives. This project will digitize Plimoth Plantation’s key 17th-century archaeological collections connected to these early colonists: the RM/Clark Garrison site (C-1), the Winslow site (C-2), the William Bradford II site (C-6), and the Allerton-Cushman site (C-21). When finished, the data will be made accessible via an online catalog and finding aids designed for both the public and scholarly communities. As a result, anyone with internet access will be able to explore and learn from the primary source archaeological record and gain a better understanding of the early colonists in Massachusetts who captured the national imagination.

Wisconsin Library Services (Madison, WI 53715-1255)
Emily Pfotenhauer (Project Director: July 2017 to December 2021)

PW-259003-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$135,000 (approved)
$135,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 7/31/2020

Listening to War: Digitizing Wisconsin's Wartime Oral Histories

The digitization of 1,100 oral history interviews, comprising 1,299 hours of sound recordings and 330 hours of moving images, pertaining to Wisconsin's experience in wartime during the 20th century.

Wisconsin Library Services (WiLS) requests a grant of $147,534 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a two-year initiative to digitize, preserve and provide access to more than 1,100 oral history interviews documenting the lives of Wisconsin veterans and civilians during wartime. The proposed project builds on a yearlong planning project conducted by the Recollection Wisconsin collaborative statewide digital program, supported by an NEH Foundations grant. The Foundations project identified a range of hidden, at-risk analog and born-digital audio and video formats held by 22 small and mid-sized libraries, archives, historical societies and museums across Wisconsin. As program manager for the Recollection Wisconsin consortium, WiLS will work with partners including UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, Wisconsin Historical Society, Wisconsin Public Radio and the Wisconsin Veterans Museum to extend the reach, visibility and useful life of these audiovisual recordings.

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA 30602-1589)
Claudio Saunt (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259005-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$185,176 (approved)
$185,176 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2023

Mapping the People of Early America

Completion of a database and Web platform mapping the settlement and movement of African, Native, and European populations in North America between 1500 and 1790.

The spread of Old World peoples across North America reshaped the continent and is a signal event in the making of the modern world, and yet we cannot picture the demographic revolution in any detail. Astoundingly, even after a century of professional scholarship on early America, the great transformation that remade the continent remains unmapped. Under the proposed grant, the Mapping the People of Early America Project intends to complete a population geodatabase representing early American peoples and to build a web platform that allows users to visualize and analyze the changing African, Native, and European populations in North America between 1500 and 1790. We expect that the data will become the base layer, literally and figuratively, for all future studies of early America, undertaken by humanists and environmental scientists alike. Scholars are sorely in need of this most essential of reference resources.

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Alan N. Degutis (Project Director: July 2017 to November 2022)

PW-259024-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 3/31/2021

North American Imprints Program

The production and enhancement of cataloging data for 11,269 imprints published in North America before 1841, along with creation of links in catalog records to 17,796 digital reproductions of imprints available through online repositories and content providers.

This application seeks funding for support of the North American Imprints Program (NAIP). The North American Imprints Program’s overall objective is the creation of highly detailed cataloging data for United States imprints published from the beginning of American printing in 1639 through the centennial of American independence in 1876. We seek funds to continue work on the 1639-1840 segment of NAIP in several ways. With these funds we will: 1. Complete the work of enhancing 4,525 records descriptive of titles reproduced in the microform and digital Early American Imprints, Second Series, 1801-1819. 2. Significantly expand the scope of the 1820-40 segment of the NAIP file by integrating 5,544 records from the New-York Historical Society and the Library Company of Philadelphia. 3. Enhance to rare-book level 1,200 acquisition-level and brief-level records. 4. Augment the pre-1801 segment of the file by adding an estimated 17,796 links leading to digital images of the texts.

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Morgen Stevens-Garmon (Project Director: July 2017 to December 2019)
Lindsay Turley (Project Director: December 2019 to January 2022)

PW-259028-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$143,804 (approved)
$143,804 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Conservation and Digitization of the Museum of the City of New York’s Theatrical Broadsides

The preservation and digitization of 700 early, one-sheet playbills from New York theaters from 1785 to the 1880s. The Museum of the City of New York would complete the conservation, description, and digitization of its Collection of Theatrical Broadsides, ensuring the survival of documents important for the study of early American performing arts.

This two-year project will improve stewardship of and increase public access to 700 early one-sheet playbills comprising the Collection of Theatrical Broadsides. In addition to providing a record of theatrical history, these items provide diverse scholarly perspectives on New York City, and hold value for scholars interested in cultural history, as well as evidentiary documentation of day-to-day life. Dating from 1785 through the 1880s, the Collection of Theatrical Broadsides is comprised of the earliest and most fragile group of materials in the Theater Collection. If successfully funded, this project would provide for the Museum to carry out conservation on half of the broadsides, digitize 95% of the items, and catalog and rehouse all 700 objects. Upon the project’s conclusion, the digitized broadsides will be publicly searchable and freely available via the Museum’s online Collections Portal—http://collections.mcny.org—and a descriptive finding aid will be posted online.

American Congregational Association (Boston, MA 02108-3704)
Margaret L. Bendroth (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2019)
James F. Cooper (Project Director: October 2019 to present)

PW-259029-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$308,000 (approved)
$308,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2021

New England's Hidden Histories: Providing Access to Founding Documents of American Democracy

The addition of at least 18,000 pages, finding aids, and select transcriptions to the New England’s Hidden Histories collection of early New England church records.

New England's Hidden Histories is a program, sponsored by the Congregational Library and Archives, to collect and display on its website all extant seventeenth- and eighteenth-century church records of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine as well as supporting ecclesiastical papers—diaries, synod records, sermons, etc. We propose to continue and expand ongoing efforts (funded by NEH in 2015) to create a minimum of 18,000 new digital scans over the course of three years, along with finding aids and other tools (including transcriptions). We intend to expand our geographic scope to regions, like Maine, that are historically under-documented, and to strategically extend partnerships with like-minded institutions that embrace our mission and are eager to do their part to move it forward.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Suzanne L. Eckert (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259034-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$298,000 (approved)
$298,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2023

Implementing a Consolidated Collections Information System

The continued development and completion of a single, searchable database for the Arizona State Museum’s ethnographic and archaeological collections, which document 13,000 years of cultural heritage in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.  At the completion of this phase, over 360,000 database entries would be made accessible online and linked to archival records of original excavation notes and reports.

Funding is requested to implement Phase Two of the Arizona State Museum Consolidated Collections Information System (ASM-CCIS), which is designed to ultimately migrate all ASM collection catalogs into a unified, online system. Phase Two focuses on the archaeology catalogs and will span two years with a request of $331,616 from NEH (total cost for Phase Two is $653,593). Once completed, ASMCCIS will include a single searchable database comprised of ASM’s ethnographic and archaeological collections that will be linked to our archival records of original excavation notes and reports. ASM-CCIS will be available online to students, researchers, tribal governments, and the general public resulting in greater access to ASM collections than ever before possible. This will be a major advancement in ASM’s stated mission to enhance understanding and appreciation of the cultural history of Arizona and the surrounding region.

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Afsaneh Najmabadi (Project Director: July 2017 to December 2021)

PW-259037-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$235,000 (approved)
$235,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Women's Worlds in Qajar, Iran

A project to expand the Women’s Worlds in Qajar Iran (WWQI) digital archive and website with family and institutional archives held in over 40 collections in five regional areas not represented in the current resource, dating from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries.  A guided tour with audio on a specific subset of the collection would be featured on the project website.

The WWQI project is a comprehensive digital archive and website that addresses a significant gap in the scholarship related to the Qajar era in Iran by making available writings and other personal documents created by, and reflecting the lives of, women during that era. To date, the WWQI archive contains over 41,000 digital facsimiles of primary materials (over 6,000 distinct items) held by 166 private families and individuals and 22 major archival institutions. New funding will not only enable the project to increase the volume of its collections, but also to substantially expand the range of socio-economic classes, ethnicities, and geographical locations represented within the WWQI archive. The WWQI project draws upon the Harvard Libraries’ robust and stable structure for cataloging, archiving, and maintenance-through-time of digital research collections, thus ensuring long-term access to all materials digitized under the auspices of NEH funding.

Abbe Museum (Bar Harbor, ME 04609-0286)
Julia C. Gray (Project Director: July 2017 to May 2018)
Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko (Project Director: May 2018 to June 2018)
Jodi DeBruyne (Project Director: June 2018 to January 2020)
Julia C. Gray (Project Director: January 2020 to April 2021)
Lyle M. Cairdeas (Project Director: April 2021 to present)

PW-259039-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2023

Access to Native American Collections at the Abbe Museum

The Abbe Museum is requesting funding through the Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations program to collaboratively develop and assess processes, systems, tools, and workflows to connect traditional cultural knowledge to Wabanaki collections at the Abbe Museum. These processes and tools will at the same time enable Native communities to reclaim control over access to and use of their cultural heritage. This project is a critical part of decolonizing our collections care, management, and interpretation practices at the Abbe Museum. It will add invaluable information that significantly increases the cultural and intellectual relevance and value of a unique humanities collection.

Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
David Seubert (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2021)

PW-259040-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$314,993 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2020

The American Discography Project: Edison Disc Recording Access Initiative

The completion of discographic entries for the complete output of Edison Diamond Discs, Thomas Edison’s recording company, in the Discography of American Historical Recordings. The project would make information publicly searchable for about 14,000 discs recorded and released from 1912 to 1929 and also would digitize 9,000 selections for public streaming access through the National Jukebox.

The American Discography Project-Edison Disc Recording Access Initiative is a project to add discographic data on all 14,000 Edison disc recordings to UC Santa Barbara's Discography of American Historical Recordings (DAHR) as well as digitize 9,000 issued sides from major repositories holding Edison discs. The project will be the first to digitize the complete corpus of an American record company for online access.

Trustees of Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
Jonathan Eller (Project Director: July 2017 to September 2019)

PW-259047-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2019

Preserving the World of Ray Bradbury

A Foundations planning project to preserve and process a collection of papers and memorabilia associated with the writer Ray Bradbury.

The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies houses a lifetime of the author’s literary works, artifacts, library, correspondence, typescripts, photographs, awards and mementos, recordings, and juvenilia, nearly 30,000 pounds of materials in all. Most of these thousands of documents and artifacts are fragile and disordered, requiring the kind of consultation and planning outlined and requested in this grant application. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies requests HCRR Foundations grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to bring in expert consultants from peer research centers as well as local consultants who will provide guidance in archival accessioning, artifact preservation, database documentation, digital imaging, public outreach, and collections management. A central outcome will be a formal Preservation Plan that will support, describe, and provide guidelines for the project, reported and disseminated through a white paper and future public access to the archive.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Lawrence Robert Rinder (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2020)
Susan Oxtoby (Project Director: March 2020 to December 2020)
Julie Rodrigues Widholm (Project Director: December 2020 to October 2022)

PW-259048-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$220,537 (approved)
$219,889 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Saving Top Value Television: Alternative Documentation of American Cultural History and Politics

The digitization and preservation of 254 hours of video footage and documentaries and related archival materials, created by Top Value Television, an independent collective of video and media artists and documentarians who captured American cultural events and political campaigns in the 1970s.

The two-year project "Saving Top Value Television: Alternative Documentation of American Cultural History and Politics" will preserve and enhance access to the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive's distinctive Top Value Television (TVTV) Collection--videotapes and paper materials that document a seminal component of the early history of video, important historical and political events, and an alternative approach to television. This initiative will ensure the longevity of this unique, vulnerable, and socially significant historical collection, and will make it widely available to students, faculty, researchers, scholars, and the general public via the Internet and on site at the BAMPFA Film Library & Study Center.

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Lindsay Turley (Project Director: July 2017 to November 2022)

PW-259053-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$96,618 (approved)
$96,618 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2020

Eyes on America: Processing and Cataloging the LOOK Collection

Processing a collection of approximately 170,000 photographic negatives from LOOK magazine, including cataloging, copyright research, evaluation, and creation of 8,500 reference scans.

This eighteen-month project is part of an ongoing endeavor to provide access to the LOOK Collection, which includes photographs for 2,242 stories from 41 different photographers made between 1938 and 1968 for LOOK magazine, and vividly documents the cultural transformation of the nation from World War II through the Cold War era. Rather than continuing to focus efforts solely on digitization, the Museum determined that the next phase of this project should be to process the collection as a unit. This project will continue our progress toward increased public access to photographs from the LOOK Collection through processing, assignment level cataloging, copyright research, and evaluation.

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Aaron Glass (Project Director: July 2017 to November 2021)

PW-259054-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$291,000 (approved)
$290,735 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Digitization and Description of Boas/Hunt Collections

The digitization of 6,000 pages of texts, 200 photographs, 272 objects, and 212 sound recordings representing the core research materials used in the preparation of the monograph The Social Organization and Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, authored by Franz Boas and George Hunt in 1897.

This Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grant will support digitization of invaluable primary source materials relating to the Kwakwa_ka_’wakw (Kwakiutl), compiled by Franz Boas and George Hunt during the years 1886-1939 and now dispersed over a wide array of institutions, along with their indexing and description in accordance with nationally recognized metadata standards. The proposed work will develop new reference resources describing the larger Boas-Hunt collections, their historical origins, and their cultural significance; contribute significant digital content to the various holding institutions; prepare digital assets for a planned preservation repository at the University of British Columbia; and create an open-access online interface that allows discovery of the newly digitized and described content, thereby providing integrated public access while repatriating long inaccessible cultural heritage to its indigenous inheritors.

Chicago Botanic Garden (Glencoe, IL 60022-1168)
Leora Siegel (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2022)

PW-259055-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$202,000 (approved)
$202,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2022

Conserving, Digitizing, and Disseminating Rare and Fragile Horticultural Records

Conservation and digitization of 62 rare and unique volumes of “language of flowers” literature published in the United States and Europe during the 19th century, to be made publicly available via the Biodiversity Heritage Library. 

The Chicago Botanic Garden’s Lenhardt Library seeks to conserve, digitize, and disseminate 62 rare and fragile language of flowers volumes. The project will create and sustain free, public access to the culturally significant works, providing insights into 19th literature, gender roles, and botanical culture. Two contracted vendors, ARTEX, a fine art shipper, and the nationally recognized Northeast Document Conservation Company, will ship, conserve, and digitize the works to the highest professional standards. Library staff will inspect the work, assign metadata to digital pages and images, shelve conserved volumes in a secure rare book room, and upload digitized content to the Biodiversity Heritage Library, an open access repository of biodiversity literature facilitated by Smithsonian Libraries. Staff will broadly disseminate the grant products through rare book viewings, exhibitions, lectures, Public Library Days, youth programs, social and legacy media, and the Garden blog.

Presbyterian Historical Society (Philadelphia, PA 19147-1516)
Beth Shalom Hessel (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2019)
Nancy J. Taylor (Project Director: October 2019 to April 2020)

PW-259056-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$44,135 (approved)
$44,045 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2019

Digitizing the Religious News Service Photographs: A Planning Project

A Foundations planning project to place online 68,000 photographs taken by the Religious News Service; 500 high-priority images would be selected for digitization.

The Presbyterian Historical Society will use an NEH Foundations Grant to plan for the future digitization and sharing of the 68,000 Religious News Service photograph collection at PHS (date span 1945 to 1982). An advisory panel of scholars, technical and legal experts, and PHS staff members will develop a three-tier, five-point rating system to prioritize scanning of RNS images based on: a) historical significance of the photograph; b) physical condition of the print and/or negative; and c) quality of available descriptive information. PHS staff will then conduct a small pilot project to test the rating system and digitization workflows. Following the pilot project's completion, the Presbyterian Historical Society will write a white paper featuring project findings and conclusions and submit the paper to the NEH.

Treasury of Lives, Inc. (New York, NY 10011-5510)
Alexander Patten Gardner (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2021)

PW-259060-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$49,610 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2019

Planning for the Long-Term Sustainability of The Treasury of Lives Encyclopedia of Tibet, Inner Asia, and The Himalayan Region

A Foundations planning project for preservation of and access to a digital biographical encyclopedia that documents the lives of prominent religious and cultural leaders of the Tibetan/Himalayan region from the 11th to the 20th centuries.  Planning would address improvements in data management, editorial standards, search optimization, and public engagement for the online encyclopedia.

The Treasury of Lives is seeking a Foundations grant in order to plan for the long-term sustainability of our open access born-digital biographical encyclopedia of Tibet, Inner Asia and the Himalayan Region. Working closely with consultants, experts in their fields of Library Science, Data Science, Geographic Information Systems, and the Humanities, the team will develop a robust framework for data discovery, cataloging convention, categorization, and searching, while also planning for long term storage and preservation of the growing resource that is accessed by 6000 users monthly. Based on the knowledge gained over the grant period, the project will culminate in a discussion of how similar organizations can work together to create unified standards and share knowledge. The proposed project will be carried out over 18 months and consist of regular meetings with specialists who will collaboratively assess our current systems and make recommendations for protocols going forward.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Stephanie Sapienza (Project Director: July 2017 to January 2022)

PW-259067-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$217,000 (approved)
$216,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 5/31/2021

Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public Radio Collection

The creation of an online research environment for up to 3,300 hours of digital audio files from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) and approximately 120,000 digitized images of the NAEB’s historical paper records.

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Historical Society proposes to create Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public Radio Collection, a curated online reference resource providing integrated access to finding aids, digitized paper collections and transcribed digital audio files relating to the National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB), an historically-significant educational and public broadcasting collection. By coordinating the expertise of archivists, humanities researchers, and digital humanists, the creation of this new resource for humanities research will deliver enhanced access to important, often hidden, collections of archival audiovisual materials.

Glassell School of Art (Houston, TX 77005-1803)
Mari Carmen Ramirez (Project Director: July 2017 to November 2021)

PW-259076-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Beyond Recovery—A Collaborative Expansion of the ICAA Documents Project Digital Archive

A project to process and upload approximately 10 art journals and 1,500 documents by notable Latin American and Latino artists, critics, curators, and historians into a digital archive that integrates artists’ sketches and notes, lectures, manuscripts, correspondence, and newspaper articles documenting 20th-century Latin American and Latino art. A new database and user interface would improve the functionality of the resource.

Documents of 20th-Century Latin American and Latino Art: A Digital Archive and Publications Project is a multi-year, multi-million dollar project dedicated to the recovery and publication of critical primary source documents related to Latin American and Latino art. This initiative addresses the endemic lag in the field of Latin American/Latino art history, research, and teaching by providing access to writings by artists, artistic groups, critics, and curators from North and South America. The project’s Digital Archive provides users free, universal access to a database of thousands of primary source documents that are fundamental resources for Latin American and Latino studies."Beyond Recovery-A Collaborative Expansion of the ICAA Documents Project Digital Archive" is a long-term strategic approach to utilize collaborative partnerships to move the project into the 21st century, ensuring the Digital Archive’s operational advancement and future relevance.

MLA (New York, NY 10004-2434)
Barbara Chen (Project Director: July 2017 to June 2019)

PW-259079-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$16,635 (approved)
$16,635 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/1/2018

The Hidden History of Modern Language: Revitalizing the Archives of the Modern Language Association

The arrangement and description of 42 linear feet of organizational records of the Modern Language Association dating from 1896 to 2010.  These archival materials would also be rehoused and a collection finding aid produced.

The Modern Language Association (MLA) seeks National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grant support for a project titled The Hidden History of Modern Language: Revitalizing the Archives of the Modern Language Association. The MLA aims to process, preserve, and catalog materials in its core archival collection, called the General Chronological Series (GCS), 1896–2010. Cataloging will result in both a searchable database and a classic finding aid hosted on the MLA archives Web site. This project will transform a hard-to-access and little-known repository of historical documents into a widely accessible, twenty-first-century digital archives and rich educational resource and will result in the creation of what may be the first publicly accessible archives on the study of modern languages in America as a unified subject.

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Jennifer K. Sherer (Project Director: July 2017 to January 2022)

PW-259083-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$195,000 (approved)
$195,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2021

Indexing the Iowa Labor History Oral Project

Transcription of 363 oral history interviews from the Iowa Labor History Oral Project and completion of a comprehensive digital index.

Indexing the Iowa Labor History Oral Project is a two-year initiative to transcribe and index oral history interviews from the Iowa Labor History Oral Project, an over forty-year-old statewide oral history collaboration that has to date produced more than one thousand audio interviews with Iowa workers. The grant will fund the transcription and auditing of 363 interviews and the creation of individual (transcript-level) indexes for 326 of these same 363 (excluding those interviews without releases). The grant will also provide for the digitization of an existing print index to over 750 interviews and integrate the 326 new interview indexes to create a complete and expandable ILHOP Digital Index (IDI). Building off an ongoing digitization initiative funded by the National Historical Preservation and Records Commission (NHPRC), the grant will set the stage for future growth, dissemination, and access opportunities for one of the most important resources in twentieth-century Midwestern history.

Amistad Research Center (New Orleans, LA 70118-5665)
Laura J. Thomson (Project Director: July 2017 to August 2019)

PW-259090-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2019

African American Land Ownership in the South: Increasing Access to the Records of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives and the Emergency Land Fund

A planning project to organize the records of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives and the Emergency Land Fund relating to African American land ownership and agriculture in the rural South from the 1960s through the 1990s.

The Amistad Research Center seeks funding through an HCRR Foundations Grant to complete the first of two planned stages to increase access to two large sets of related organizational records that pertain to African American land ownership and agriculture in the rural South from the 1960s through the 1990s.

Monticello (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Jillian E. Galle (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259091-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 10/31/2022

The Origins of a Slave Society: Digitizing Flowerdew Hundred

Cataloging and digitization of archaeological collections from the Flowerdew Hundred site, a major 17th-century plantation in the Virginia Tidewater region.  Artifacts, site records, maps, and photographs would be integrated into the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, where they would be made publicly accessible along with materials from approximately 80 other slavery sites in the Atlantic and Caribbean region.   

The Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, in collaboration with the University of Virginia Library, will identify, catalog, digitize, and make accessible to diverse stakeholders collections from four of the earliest and most significant 17th-century archaeological sites at Flowerdew Hundred, a thousand acre plantation near Jamestown, Virginia. The occupations of these four sites span a dynamic period of settlement and agricultural expansion in the region. Fifteen of the first 25 enslaved Africans imported into British North America lived at Flowerdew Hundred by 1619. They joined indentured Europeans, neighboring Weanock Indians, and European landowners in shaping mid-17th century plantation settlements. By making accessible a vital part of the limited material record of the social and economic struggles that comprised the 17th-century Chesapeake, this project will provide data to address complex questions about a critical period of America’s development and survival.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Naomi L Nelson (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2022)

PW-259094-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$85,753 (approved)
$85,753 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2020

Voices of Change II: Bringing Radio Haiti Home

Enhanced description of nearly 4,000 audio recordings in the Radio Haiti Archive and a pilot project to test more effective access channels for Haiti and other underserved areas.

Voices of Change II: Bringing Radio Haiti Home, a twelve-month, $85,753 project at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University, will result in the enhanced description of the Radio Haiti Archive and a roadmap for repatriating the Archive’s 5,300 audio recordings to Haiti. The Radio Haiti team will create detailed, trilingual description for all the recordings, vastly improving the ability to search the individual programs and making the collection more accessible to those who do not speak Haitian Creole. They will also complete a pilot to explore whether YouTube, Internet Archive or a low-bandwidth version of the Duke Digital Repository would provide the most effective access for people in Haiti and other underserved areas. Voices of Change II provides far-reaching access to a singular archive of information and voices and provides a model for the repatriation of other such displaced archives.

Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Matthew Thaddius Rutz (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259098-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$166,632 (approved)
$166,632 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 12/31/2022

Digital Preservation of Archival Tablets from the Syrian Kingdom of Ugarit

A project to catalog 2,061 cuneiform clay tablets written in seven languages from the site of Tell Ras Shamra, ancient Ugarit, in modern-day Syria. The project would also transliterate and translate 1,887 tablets into English and make all catalog information, transliterations, and translations available online.

Digital Preservation of Archival Tablets from the Syrian Kingdom of Ugarit will catalog the archival clay tablets written in the cuneiform script excavated at the Syrian site of Tell Ras Shamra, ancient Ugarit (c. 1350â??1185 BC) and make their contents freely accessible in digital form via The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative and Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus. These historical witnesses (letters, economic texts, legal contracts, records of state) document the daily life of a cosmopolitan Syrian city that flourished over three millennia ago, but they are now threatened by the ongoing crisis in Syria. The project will highlight museum registration information for all 2,061 archival tablets and transliterate (transcribe the cuneiform script into the Roman alphabet following scholarly conventions) and translate the 1,887 published texts. The catalog, transliterations, and translations will provide a complete digital record of these imperiled cultural artifacts.

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Deirdre A. Scaggs (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2022)

PW-259108-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$199,148 (approved)
$195,272 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2020

Revealing 200 Years of the American Mosaic through the Wade Hall Collection of American Letters

Arrangement and description of 355 cubic feet of letters, diaries, and other personal papers from the Wade Hall Collection of American Letters, which chronicle various aspects of the American experience from 1750 to 1960.  Fifty cubic feet of material would be digitized, resulting in over 2,000 finding aids and 80,000 digitized documents. 

The Wade Hall Collection of American Letters, held at the University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center (SCRC), includes thousands of individual collections, comprising 372 cubic feet of letters, diaries, and other personal papers. This diverse material documents the American experience through letters and diaries written by men women of different ages, races, education, and socio-economic status, from all over North America from 1750-1970s. “P.S. Write Again Soon”: Revealing 200 Years of the American Mosaic through the Wade Hall Collection of American Letters requests National Endowment of the Humanities funding to hire a Project Archivist to provide online access to this significant collection. The project expects to generate over 2000 keyword searchable finding aids and the digitization of 50 cubic feet from the collection.

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Henry F. Raine (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2021)

PW-259113-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$87,310 (approved)
$87,310 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2020

Digitization of the New-York Historical Society's Subway Construction Photograph Collection

The digitization of 66,000 photographs produced by the New York City Board of Transportation before and during construction of the New York subway system from 1900 to 1950, documenting people, buildings, streetscapes, and the construction process throughout the subway network across Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.

The New-York Historical Society will digitize its Subway Construction Photograph Collection, dating from 1900-1950 and numbering 66,000 images, and make them publicly available through the use of its new Islandora digital portal, N-YHS Digital Collections, the Digital Public Library of America, and WorldCat. The photograph collection documents the construction of New York City's subway system in four boroughs including Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, and Queens. The collection also documents the face of the city, including its built environment, streetscapes, and people during the first half of the 20th century. Many of the photographs are works of art completely unknown to researchers and the public alike. The digitized collection will facilitate their use for educational and scholarly purposes. The images will include enhanced metadata as well as geo-coding with latitude and longitude information.

Huguenot Historical Society of New Paltz New York Inc. (New Paltz, NY 12561-1415)
Josephine Bloodgood (Project Director: July 2017 to March 2021)

PW-259115-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$59,996 (approved)
$59,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2020

Preserving and Enhancing Access for the Historic Documents of New Paltz, New York

A collaborative planning and pilot project to assess and selectively digitize archival records held at four cultural heritage institutions in New Paltz, New York, pertaining to the history and culture of the Mid-Hudson Valley region during the 17th-19th centuries, including the experiences of Native American, African American, and Dutch Reformed communities.

Historic Huguenot Street seeks planning support for the preservation and digitization of selections from its own archival collections, as well as portions from the Town of New Paltz, the Dutch Reformed Church of New Paltz, and the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Memorial Library. The proposed planning phase consists of three main steps: 1) review by scholars to evaluate and prioritize collections for digitization based on humanities value and relative uniqueness of the materials; 2) a condition survey of archives by professional conservators; and 3) development of a digitization plan and written procedures to ensure safe handling of documents during the process. The ultimate goal of the project is to provide essential documents to inform and guide a multi-year implementation project to extend the life of these nationally-significant collections, while making their intellectual content more accessible through digitization.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Virginia Garrard Burnett (Project Director: July 2017 to present)

PW-259116-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020

Transcribing AILLA: Increasing Collection Access and Reusability through Crowdsourced Transcription

A Foundations pilot project to transcribe materials in Mixtec, a pre-Columbian language spoken in south-central Mexico, and that are housed at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America.  Working with undergraduate linguistics students and Mixtec community members who have migrated to southern California, the applicant would undertake transcription of hand-written documents and audio recordings to make them searchable, thereby improving access and reuse. 

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has thousands of images of handwritten manuscripts whose text cannot be searched, making them difficult for users to discover and access. Since many of these documents are transcriptions or translations of recordings in AILLA's collections, improving access to a manuscript increases access to other media. This project pilots a low-cost process to improve access to resources in AILLA's collections by crowdsourcing the transcription of select handwritten documents written in Mixtec languages using open-source software. It will be implemented in an undergraduate linguistics course at UT, for which lesson plans will be developed, and within a Mixtec speech community in California, in an effort to develop a community of practice. More broadly, investigators will disseminate findings among other digital archives so they may adapt the approach to any language.

California State University, Northridge, University Corporation (Northridge, CA 91330-8316)
Jose Luis Benavides (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2022)

PW-259117-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$314,561 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 10/31/2021

Creating a Digital Database of the Richard Cross Photographic Collection at the Tom & Ethel Bradley Center at CSU

The arrangement, description, and selected digitization of a collection of 35,000 images produced by American photojournalist Richard Cross, documenting civil wars in Central America during the 1970s-80s as well as daily life in the city of Palenque de San Basilio in Colombia, populated by descendants of the oldest community of escaped slaves in the Americas.

This proposal seeks funding to enable the Tom & Ethel Bradley Center to create a digital archive of photographs by Richard Cross. Digitizing these photographs will preserve and allow broad access to a threatened visual repository, which addresses themes of import to Black communities that resisted enslavement, and which embodies the collective visual memory of the lived experience of war in Central America.

Moravian Archives (Bethlehem, PA 18018-2757)
Paul M. Peucker (Project Director: July 2017 to September 2021)

PW-259118-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$196,000 (approved)
$195,761 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 4/30/2021

Eastern West Indies Records Preservation and Digitization Project

The conservation treatment and digitization of eight volumes (3,566 pages) of Moravian Church records focused on missions on the Caribbean islands of St. Croix and Antigua from the late 18th through the mid-20th centuries.

The Moravian Archives in Bethlehem, Pa. (MAB) is seeking a HCRR Implementation grant of $265,359 to preserve and digitize selected records from the Eastern West Indies (EWI), held by the Moravian Archives and based on existing guidelines for prioritization of treatment and digitization. The goal of the project is 1) To provide conservation treatment for these selected records in order to allow future use of these records 2) To digitize these records 3) To provide wide public access to their content by uploading the digitized material to an appropriate digital platform.

University of Arkansas, Little Rock (Little Rock, AR 72204-1000)
Deborah J. Baldwin (Project Director: July 2017 to September 2021)

PW-259124-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$28,333 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 1/31/2020

Mapping Renewal Pilot Project

The development of a pilot database with online access to archival collections, 1940-1970, focusing on urban renewal, desegregation, and civil rights era history in Little Rock, Arkansas.  The project would provide online access to maps, architectural drawings, photographs, and other archival materials via a beta version of a database and Web portal, and would result in enhancements to controlled vocabularies, a tested workflow, and a white paper detailing lessons learned.

The Mapping Renewal Pilot Project will bring together humanities scholars and technical specialists focused on creating access to and providing context to spatial segregation and urban renewal in the city of Little Rock, Arkansas, through the digitization of maps, architectural drawings, reports, and related architectural photographs. This project will result in several products: a tested workflow for digitizing, geocoding, describing, and making available a large amount of material in a virtual collection; new controlled vocabulary terms added to our existing controlled vocabularies; an ontology specific to the needs of researchers in urban history; increased availability of additional digitized primary resource materials; archetypal descriptions of our three target audiences (as a result of the reports from focus groups and usability testing); and a beta version of a project website with specific interfaces designed for each audience.

Robert Aqqaluk Newlin, Sr. Memorial Trust (Kotzebue, AK 99752-0509)
Hans Bernhardt Nelson (Project Director: July 2017 to July 2020)
Denise Koutchak (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

PW-259128-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$45,087 (approved)
$45,087 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 9/30/2022

Aqqaluk Trust Alaska Native Voices: Pilot Study to Preserve and Disseminate the Indigenous Spirit Conference Tapes

A Foundations project to preserve and create access to 700 audiocassette tapes of Alaskan Iñupiaq elders, recorded between 1976 and 1981, that document native lifeways during a period of rapid cultural change.  The collaborative project includes training, digitization, cataloging, long-term storage, and creation of online access to the original recorded narratives, speeches, and musical works.  It would establish a collaborative process for native Alaskan organizations to preserve at-risk audio recordings.  

Aqqaluk Trust Alaska Native Voices (ATANV) is a collaborative effort to preserve and provide access to 700 unique Alaska Native Elders’ cassette tapes recordings. These primary source materials document the Iñupiaq “Spirit Program” from 1976-81 which records firsthand descriptions in Iñupiaq of essential indigenous Northwest Alaskan survival skills and moral maxims. The lifeways described are now largely historical, yet the Spirit Program forms the bedrock of present-day Iñupiaq values. Stored in extremely high relative humidity conditions on the Northern Alaska coast for the past 36-41 years, these tapes are now at risk from magnetic tape failure or ever-present threats from the natural environment. The ATANV project hopes to provide these historic audio tapes with preservation and digital access before they are lost, providing cataloging and online access to the digital files while storing the originals in environmentally controlled conditions.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Ellen Cunningham-Kruppa (Project Director: July 2017 to January 2022)

PW-259130-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$195,141 (approved)
$187,674 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2020

Unlocking Sound Stories: Preserving and Accessing the Harry Ransom Center's Audio Collections

The digitization and preservation of 2,862 sound recordings in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. The selected recordings focus on unique interviews with noted public figures, with particular emphasis on 20th-century literary and public figures such as Julia Alvarez, Ben Bradlee, Norman Mailer, Isaac Bashevis Singer, David O. Selznick, Anne Sexton, Gloria Swanson, William Faulkner, and others.

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin requests $207,459 from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support an implementation project to preserve and provide access to 2,862 rare and endangered sound recordings and to make their digitized contents available to researchers and the public at large.The collections identified for this project are especially significant because of the breadth of subject areas addressed by their creators, ensuring that the sound recordings will be a rich source of new information for scholars across the humanities. They reveal and preserve the work of Julia Alvarez, Ben Bradlee, Erle Stanley Gardner, Norman Mailer, Anne Sexton, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Arnold Newman, David Douglas Duncan, Ian McEwan, Truman Capote, T.S. Elliott, Paul Bowles, John Beecher, Ross Russell, Norman Bel Geddes, David O. Selznick, Anne Sexton, Gloria Swanson, John Fowles, and William Faulkner, among others.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Susan Luftschein (Project Director: July 2017 to May 2022)
Rachel Mandell (Co Project Director: February 2019 to October 2019)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Co Project Director: October 2019 to May 2022)

PW-259144-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$270,000 (approved)
$262,901 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2021

L.A. as Subject Community Histories Digitization Project

Digitization of around 17,000 items including paper materials, historic photographs, video recordings, and cultural objects from collections held by six community archives in the L.A. as Subject research alliance.

The L.A. as Subject Community Histories Digitization Project will make publicly accessible via the USC Digital Library and Digital Public Library of America collections held by 6 community archives from the L.A. as Subject research alliance: the Filipino American Library, the First AME Church of Los Angeles, the Go for Broke National Education Center, the Pasadena Museum of History, the Southern California Library, and the Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum. The 6 collections document the experiences of post-WWII Filipino immigrants; videos of 400 sermons by Rev. Dr. Cecil "Chip" Murray at a socially engaged African-American church in South Los Angeles; firsthand perspectives of Japanese-American WWII veterans in 1,100 video oral history interviews; the daily lives of late 19th and early 20th century African-American, Asian-American, and Latino communities; and Jewish women's groups. The project will publish 2,950 hours of video and 15,000 photos and pages of paper materials.

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Julie I. May (Project Director: July 2017 to June 2019)
Julie Golia (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

PW-259161-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals (outright + matching):
$135,000 (approved)
$135,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 3/31/2020

Portal to the Past: Creating Brooklyn Historical Society's Digital Map Collection

The cataloging, conservation, and digitization of 1,600 flat and folded maps of Brooklyn, from the Revolutionary War era to 2015, concentrating on the early development of the city (and, eventually, borough of New York City) in the 19th century.

Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS) seeks funding to increase public access to the institution’s extensive collection of flat and folded maps through conservation, digitization, and the creation of a web-based portal. This initiative will extend the useful life of BHS’s maps, as they are regularly used for research and throughout BHS exhibitions, multimedia initiatives, and K-12+ education programming. What distinguishes this collection from those held by other local repositories is the sheer number and concentration of Brooklyn maps. Taken all together, the historical sweep, focus, and number of maps in this collection provide an unparalleled opportunity to see the span of Brooklyn’s development in one sitting. Online access to the collection will enable and encourage new scholarship with a nationwide scope, as internet researchers will be able to find information about the collection, view maps, and draw connections to related collections held by other repositories.

San Antonio Museum of Art (San Antonio, TX 78209-6396)
Heather Snow Fulton (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2022)

PW-259165-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021

San Antonio Museum of Art Collection Digitization Project

A three-year project to capture digital images of approximately 1,850 artworks representing the museum’s diverse international collections, develop digital content, and upgrade infrastructure associated with its collection management system. Newly digitized materials would be freely available through a redesigned website.

The San Antonio Museum of Art provides transformative experiences for its annual 130,000 visitors and 20,000 students through its collection, special exhibitions, and 1,175 programs. Since opening in March 1981, the Museum’s permanent collection has grown to over 30,000 works of art spanning 5,000 years of history, from Egyptian antiquities to contemporary Australian Aboriginal art. Currently, the Museum’s collection is almost exclusively beneficial to visitors to the physical campus, mostly residents of Central and South Texas and travelers to San Antonio. To continue to fulfill its mission and reach the broadest audience possible, the Museum would like to make its collection available in an online searchable database. A grant of $350,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities would allow the Museum to take the necessary steps to digitize its collection and make it globally accessible.

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Nancy M. Shawcross (Project Director: July 2016 to July 2017)
Philip S. Palmer (Project Director: July 2017 to October 2019)

PW-253676-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$261,000 (approved)
$261,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 10/31/2018

Digitizing Annotated Books, 1472-1814

The digitization of 76,600 pages of annotated printed books dating from 1472-1814.  The selected pages have extensive contemporary (or near-contemporary) manuscript additions, which include reading notes, proofreaders’ and/or printers’ marks, scholarly commentary, drawings, and pen trials.  In addition, 279 original catalog records would be created for the annotations, and the digital content would be made accessible through Calisphere, the California Digital Library’s website, as well as through the Digital Public Library of America.

UCLA's Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies, which administers the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, seeks to produce and make freely available on the Internet digital facsimiles of 76,600 pages—containing more than 2.5 million (2,500,000) handwritten words—of the Clark's copiously or extensively annotated printed books from the hand-press era. The facsimiles will be hosted by the California Digital Library (CDL) on its website, Calisphere. Metadata about and links to the facsimiles will be harvested by the Digital Public Library of America and be freely available to other sites and scholarly endeavors. Complete sets of the 600- or 400-dpi TIFF files created by the project will be archivally stored by both the UCLA Digital Library and CDL. Metadata already gathered about the nature and extent of the annotations will be made available through original cataloging records created in OCLC during the course of the project.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
James C. Kuhn (Project Director: July 2016 to February 2021)

PW-253678-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$195,000 (approved)
$192,227 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 11/30/2019

Writers Without Borders: Creating Global Access to the PEN International and English PEN Records

The Harry Ransom Center (HRC) at The University of Texas at Austin requests support in the amount of $245,694 from the National Endowment for the Humanities for a two-year project to arrange, describe, and selectively digitize the PEN Records and share them with the global community. The story of twentieth-century political activism, persecution, and creative expression cannot be fully understood without exploring the rich materials in the PEN Records at the HRC. The archives of PEN International and English PEN offer unique insight into human rights crises and document important cultural, historical, and literary debates of the last century. They illustrate in vivid and compelling ways why the humanities are integral to questions of equality, social justice, and freedom of expression and how humanists can successfully and powerfully engage in the public square.

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-3629)
Sue Kim (Project Director: July 2016 to March 2021)

PW-253692-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$239,000 (approved)
$239,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 2/29/2020

The Southeast Asian Digital Archives

The University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML) requests $265,643 to establish the Southeast Asian Digital Archives (SEADA) by processing and digitizing eight archival collections documenting the rich history of Southeast Asian (SEA) refugees in the greater Lowell, Massachusetts, region in the late 20th century. UML's Library and Center for Asian American Studies will collaborate with several community organizations to better understand the histories and cultures of Southeast Asian Americans by collecting, documenting, preserving, and making publicly accessible the vast public and personal materials that are currently in danger of being damaged, lost, or discarded.

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Nicolas Kanellos (Project Director: July 2016 to October 2019)

PW-253694-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 8/31/2018

Survey of Hispanic Materials in Small Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums

A planning project, conducted by the Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage program, to survey small libraries, archives, museums, and historical societies in several states in the Southwest that house documentation on Hispanic/Latino history and culture, resulting in an online directory and printed publication of a guide to these collections.

The University of Houston seeks support for a Foundations-level project to identify and develop institution-level descriptions for small cultural heritage repositories in order to assess their Hispanic/Latino holdings and the conditions in which they are held, and to inform the interested community of the existence of these holdings. The proposed survey will be the basis for creating a guide to these materials and will represent a first step in making them accessible as well as improving the conditions in which they are held. The Survey of Small Historical Societies, Libraries and Museums for Hispanic Materials and Their Management will constitute an entirely free database accessible through the "Hispanic Collections" website of Special Collections and the Arte Publico Press website, both of the University of Houston.

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (Richmond, VA 23220-4007)
Stephen Bonadies (Project Director: July 2016 to November 2022)

PW-253706-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$173,833 (approved)
$173,833 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 11/30/2019

Digitization of the Louis Draper Papers and Archives

Cataloging and digitization of the archive of Louis Draper, an African American photographer and educator, who captured the urban life of African-Americans, mostly in New York City, over the latter half of the 20th century.  Draper’s archive consists of 20 linear feet of prints, negatives, contact sheets, color and black and white slides, as well as photographic equipment, notebooks, and manuscripts.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) seeks a grant from the NEH: Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Implementation program in the amount of $173,833 for a 29-month project to digitize, preserve and disseminate the entire archive of the important 20th-century African American photographer and educator, Louis Draper. Containing over 50,000 objects, the Draper archive is the most significant acquisition in the history of the VMFA Archives. Through this project, VMFA will improve its stewardship and care of this comprehensive archival collection and its associated content.

MIPoPS (Seattle, WA 98104-1822)
Rachel Price (Project Director: July 2016 to March 2021)

PW-253708-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$136,500 (approved)
$136,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 10/31/2019

Magnetic Media in the Pacific Northwest: Saving our Visual Media

The appraisal and digitization of audiovisual collections held by members of the Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound (MIPoPS) regional consortium, including materials documenting Pacific Northwest history, Native American languages and cultures, and the history of industry in the region. The four participating institutions would participate in training to build their capacity for the stewardship and preservation of audiovisual collections.

The urgency of digitizing audio and videotape is a critical concern for professional moving image archivists. Magnetic media tapes have a lifespan of twenty to thirty years from the date they were created; tapes in archives across the country are reaching the end of their lifespan. Based on a 2015–16 pilot program, MIPoPS is poised to address the magnetic media crisis in the Pacific Northwest on a larger scale. This grant proposes assisting four institutions with videotape in their holdings preserve a portion of their visual history, by targeting specific collections that have not been preserved or made accessible: University of Washington Ethnomusicology Archives, University of Washington Special Collections, Museum of History and Industry and Wing Luke Museum. Participants will work with MIPoPS to digitize video of high research value, creating preservation quality digital surrogates, while also providing important access to previously hidden collections.

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Christopher Brick (Project Director: July 2016 to September 2019)

PW-253714-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$95,000 (approved)
$94,840 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2019

The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers: Audio Edition

Proposal to transcribe, digitize, curate and publish 145 Hours of Eleanor Roosevelt audio materials to the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers (ERP) website.

Ohio History Connection (Columbus, OH 43211-2474)
Lily Birkhimer (Project Director: July 2016 to November 2019)

PW-253715-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$171,849 (approved)
$171,849 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 4/30/2019

Little Stories of the Great War: Ohioans in World War I

The digitization of 5,000 items related to Ohio’s experiences of  World War I, including photographs, letters, diaries, journals, government records, posters and advertisements, leading to the creation of a statewide collection for researchers, educators, and the public.

The Ohio History Connection (OHC), formerly the Ohio Historical Society, seeks support in the amount of $171,849 for a two year Humanities Collections and Reference Resources implementation grant entitled Little Stories of the Great War: Ohioans in World War I. The goal of the project is to develop a comprehensive statewide digital collection of World War I (WWI) materials in order to increase access to and use of WWI scholarly and primary sources. Accompanying educational resources will also be developed, and the final digital collection will support upcoming commemoration efforts for the centennial of United States (U.S.) involvement in the conflict and the role played by Ohio.

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Ruth Mostern (Project Director: July 2016 to October 2022)

PW-253719-17
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 12/31/2020

World-Historical Gazetteer

This is a project to create content, standards and digital infrastructure for a World-Historical Gazetteer (WHG): a spatially and temporally comprehensive index of significant world historical place names (a Spine), and a system for collaborative digital and data-driven historical scholarship at the global scale (an Ecosystem).  It focuses significantly but not exclusively on the centuries since 1500, so as to dovetail with synergistic efforts devoted to the ancient and medieval world.