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Funded Projects Query Form
23 matches

Program: Exhibitions: Implementation*
Date range: 2017-2018
Sort order: Award year, descending

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GI-259245-18

Peabody Essex Museum (Salem, MA 01970-3726)
Lynda Roscoe Hartigan (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Empresses of China's Forbidden City

Implementation of the installation of a 10,000-square-foot-exhibition exploring the role of empresses in China’s Qing Dynasty (1644–1912).

Organized by the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM), the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Freer|Sackler), and the Palace Museum, Beijing, The Last Empresses of China is the first international exhibition to explore the role of empresses in shaping China’s Qing dynasty (1644–1912). Empresses exercised significant power in this male-dominated hierarchical society, even when it was officially denied them. Featuring approximately 150 objects, many loaned for the first time, the exhibition offers a dramatic view of empresses’ lives, providing visitors with an understanding of the roles they played in court politics, art, and religion. Timed to mark the fortieth anniversary of the normalization of US-China relations, Last Empresses will be presented at PEM, August 18, 2018 to February 10, 2019, and at the Freer|Sackler, March 30 to June 23, 2019.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


GI-259366-18

Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Emilie Johnson (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty

Implementation of traveling and panel exhibitions exploring the complicated role of slavery in our national founding and the experiences of enslaved people at Monticello.

Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty is an exhibition that uses Monticello, the home and plantation of Thomas Jefferson, as a lens through which to explore the dilemma of slavery and the lives of the enslaved families and their descendants. Given the relevance and popularity of this landmark exhibition, initially launched in 2012 in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello (TJF) requests funding to update Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello with new content—including a feature on Sally Hemings—and launch a new national tour to four African American museums. TJF also plans a “pop-up” exhibition that will travel to libraries and schools. Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello presents Monticello as a microcosm of the American story—a lens through which to understand the complicated dynamics of our founding, and the ways in which slavery continues to shape our nation.

Project fields:
African American History; Public History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 3/31/2020


GI-261046-18

Autry Museum of the American West (Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462)
Joshua Garrett-Davis (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

The Autry Museum of the American West: A Reinterpretation of the Imagined West

Implementation of a permanent exhibition, a documentary, and public programs exploring images of the American West in popular culture.

The Autry seeks an implementation grant of $400,000 to re-envision a 30-year-old exhibition, the “Imagination Gallery,” as "Imagined Wests." Our goals are to explain the historical and current significance of the “imagined West,” and stimulate critical reflection and participation in reshaping cultural narratives. The exhibition seeks to widen its view from a specific focus on the Western genre to reflect new understandings of popular culture, genre art, gender and ethnicity. The new, permanent exhibition will explore many myths of the West. The primary learning objective will explore the power of these myths, but also their malleability. There will be four themes: overlapping imagined geographies of the imagined West; the power of myths to shape the West and the world; the power of creative actors to change perceptions; and the cross-cultural hybridity of popular culture in the West. Activities will include public and educational programming, and documentary media with KCETLink TV.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2021


GI-261067-18

Mississippi Museum of Art, Inc. (Jackson, MS 39215-1330)
Elizabeth Abston (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Mississippi Stories: Visions of a Changing South

Reinstallation of a permanent exhibition and creation of accompanying public programming and publications with art and stories of Mississippi.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2019


GI-261111-18

Museum Associates (Los Angeles, CA 90036-4504)
Stephen Little (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Beyond Line: The Art of Korean Writing

Implementation of a temporary, single-site exhibition on the art and history of Korean calligraphy.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


GI-261115-18

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Lisa Graziose Corrin (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Medieval Trans-Saharan Exchange

Implementation of a traveling museum exhibition on the trade network that linked West Africa, the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe from the eighth to the sixteenth century.

Project fields:
African Studies; Art History and Criticism; Medieval Studies

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2020


GI-261050-18

Baltimore Museum of Art (Baltimore, MD 21218-3898)
Oliver Shell (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Monsters & Myths: Transatlantic Surrealism in the 1930s and 1940s

Implementation of a traveling exhibition, public programs, and a catalog exploring the impact of war and transatlantic exchange on the art of surrealists during the 1930s and 1940s.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 10/31/2019


GI-261125-18

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx, NY 10458-5126)
Joanna Groarke (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Roberto Burle Marx: Modern Nature of Brazil--A Garden-Wide Humanities Exhibition

Implementation of a traveling exhibition on Brazilian artist and landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx (1909–94).

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$460,000 (approved)
$460,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2021


GI-261155-18

Philadelphia Museum of Art (Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646)
Kathleen Adair Foster (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

American Art Galleries Reinstallation Project

Implementation of a reinterpretation of the museum’s permanent early American art galleries.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art respectfully seeks a three-year, $400,000 implementation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the reinterpretation of its renowned collection of early American art (to 1840) and its reinstallation in new, purpose-built galleries. This reinstallation, the first of its kind in four decades, will provide a welcome opportunity to highlight the many strengths of the Museum’s extensive holdings in this field, including art made in the Philadelphia region, and to interpret this material in new and engaging ways for 21st-century visitors. Critical support from the NEH will create an innovative installation, audience-driven interpretive strategies, and new educational programming for all ages that explores the pluralism inherent in the American experience and the art that was shaped by it. Dr. Kathleen A. Foster, The Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Senior Curator of American Art and Director of the Center for American Art, leads this project.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, General; Arts, Other

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 7/31/2021


GI-259216-18

Idaho State Historical Society (Boise, ID 83702-5652)
Janet Gallimore (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Idaho: The Land and Its People

Implementation of a permanent exhibition on the role of Native Americans in the history and culture of Idaho.

The Idaho State Historical Society (ISHS) is currently engaged in a multi-year, significant effort to expand and improve its flagship property, the Idaho State Museum (Museum) in Boise. The State of Idaho is providing funding for the remodel and construction of the expanded Museum building, while the ISHS is raising half the funds for the design, fabrication, and installation of the new exhibits. The ISHS is applying for a $400,000 grant to support the implementation of the new exhibition called Idaho: The Land and Its People. This exhibition includes co-created, accurate and respectful tribal content that is the basis of the tribal interpretations developed for the five new exhibits that comprise Idaho: The Land and Its People. The tribal path interpretive experience described within this proposal reflects this important humanities content about Idaho's five federally recognized tribes, from origins to contemporary times.

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 3/31/2019


GI-261156-18

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Bentonville, AR 72712-4947)
Mindy Besaw (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Native North America: Indigenous Art from the 1950s to Now

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art seeks support from the National Endowment for the Humanities in the amount of $400,000 to support the implementation of the exhibition Native North America: Indigenous Art from the 1950s to Now (working title), the first exhibition to chart a history of contemporary Indigenous art from the United States and Canada. By examining the practices and perspectives of the most influential Native artists and their important contributions in conversation with the well-known history of American artistic practice, Native North America places Indigenous art within in rightful context. Themes will include the politics of representation and self-representation as well as Indigenous perspectives of land and history, thereby expanding understanding of American art.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$65,000 (approved)
$65,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


GI-261147-18

Museum of New Mexico Foundation (Santa Fe, NM 87504-2087)
Marla Redcorn-Miller (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Here, Now, and Always: Renovation and Renewal

Implementation of a reinterpretation of a permanent exhibition on Native American art of New Mexico and the Southwest at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$460,000 (approved)
$460,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 11/30/2020


GI-259343-18

New-York Historical Society (New York, NY 10024-5152)
Marci Reaven (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow

Implementation of a national touring exhibition, educational programing, and a website exploring citizenship and Jim Crow laws in the post-emancipation era.

The New-York Historical Society respectfully requests a Chairman's Special Award from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a major traveling exhibition and educational initiative titled Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow. Scheduled to be on view in New York from September 2018 through January 2019, the project will include a 3,000-square-foot exhibition, a suite of public programs, digital educational curriculum with national reach, on-site workshops for students and teachers, an illustrated publication, and a multimedia resource website. Following its run in New York, the exhibition will embark on a national touring schedule.

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/2/2018 – 3/31/2020


GI-259310-18

Delta Blues Museum (Clarksdale, MS 38614-4336)
Shelley Ritter (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Delta Blues Museum: The Story of America's Music

Implementation of a 9,000-square-foot exhibition, public programs, and curriculum materials exploring the history and influence of American Blues music and its connection to the Mississippi Delta.

The Delta Blues Museum will complete final design documents the fall of 2017 and is seeking implementation funding to build new permanent exhibits based on these designs. We also seek to update our website and create a position in the public humanities to develop a curriculum guide that correspond with and enrich the new permanent exhibits. The Blues has inspired Jazz, Rock n’ Roll, R&B, Soul, Funk, Bluegrass, and beyond. Many of the most revered artists came from the isolated Mississippi Delta, making this place a unique convergence of blues history, culture, and music. Clarksdale, Mississippi is home to the men and women who helped define Delta Blues as we know it today, and the Delta Blues Museum explores the story of their music and its role as a seminal American art form. This remarkable story will be communicated through a dynamic new visitor experience to connect with the artists who made their mark on the world through music.

Project fields:
African American Studies; Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$460,000 (approved)
$360,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2018 – 5/31/2020


GI-253987-17

Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ 85004-1323)
Janet Cantley (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Tragedy and Triumph: The American Indian Boarding School Experience

Tragedy and Triumph examines an important but often unknown period of American history. Beginning in the 1870s, the U.S. government aimed to assimilate American Indians into “civilized” society by placing them in boarding schools. Children were taken from families and transported to far-away schools where all signs of “Indianness” were stripped away. Students were trained for servitude and many went for years without familial contact—events that still resonate today. Boarding schools were designed to change American Indians, but it was American Indians who changed the schools. A sense of Pan Indianism grew on campuses, and advocates demanded reform. Eventually, schools came to celebrate the very culture they were designed to eradicate. The exhibit places archival materials, works of art, video, audio, and interactive technology in an immersive environment that conveys the complex history of these schools and recognizes the resilience, vitality, and creativity of American Indians.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


GI-253978-17

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Stephen John Tinney (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Galleries of the Ancient Middle East

Implementation of the reinstallation of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s collection of art and artifacts of the Near East.

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (Penn Museum) is requesting funds to support the reinstallation of our permanent galleries housing collections from the Near East. Since its founding in 1887, the Penn Museum has excavated an unparalleled constellation of sites in the Middle East, producing some of the most significant and unique artifacts in the history of archaeological excavation. Scheduled to open in Fall 2017, the newly installed permanent galleries will more than double the exhibition space dedicated to objects from the Near East, allowing more of this important collection to be displayed than ever before. The new galleries will vividly explore life in the Mesopotamian and ancient Iranian world-from writing to burial practices, agriculture to music, cooking to transportation-and reveal how much our modern urbanized world owes to these ancient societies.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


GI-254038-17

Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN 55403-1139)
Olga Viso (Project Director: August 2016 to March 2018)
Siri J. Engberg (Project Director: March 2018 to present)

Adios Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950

Organized by the Walker Art Center and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in partnership with the Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO), Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 will be the most comprehensive exhibition of contemporary Cuban art presented in the U.S. Bringing together more than 100 works, the exhibition and its companion publication focus on artists who were born and trained in Cuba and who remained in Cuba after the 1959 Revolution, tracing the development of artistic production through key moments of Cuban history over the past 65 years. Rather than provide an exhaustive survey or totalizing account of Cuban art, the aim of Adiós Utopia is to reveal the dialogue and frictions among constellations of works that embody Cuba’s utopian spirit. With the current shifts in U.S.-Cuba relations, it is the ideal time for U.S. audiences to gain a greater understanding of the history of Cuba, its art, its people, and its history of relations with the U.S.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; International Relations; Latin American History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


GI-253972-17

Henry Street Settlement (New York, NY 10002-4808)
Susan LaRosa (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

The House on Henry Street: Settlements, Public Health, and Social Reform

Implementation of a permanent exhibition, a website, a walking tour, and public programs examining the history of Henry Street Settlement on New York City’s Lower East Side.

Henry Street Settlement (HSS) requests $460,000 to implement a multi-platform humanities project that will explore social activism, urban poverty, and public health through the lens of Henry Street’s history. The project centerpiece is a permanent interpretive exhibition in the Settlement’s landmarked c.1830 Federal style row house headquarters. A web-based exhibition with curriculum materials for high school and college teachers will deepen the interpretation and a walking tour application for mobile devices will take the story to the streets of the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Public programs developed with our partner organizations, the Museum at Eldridge Street and Tenement Museum, will expand the interpretation of the history of HSS into its larger neighborhood, linking it to immigrant life and worship, union organizing and suffrage. A public historian will develop programs targeted to HSS neighbors and clients, reaching public audiences underserved by the humanities.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$360,000 (approved)
$360,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


GI-254061-17

University of Alaska, Fairbanks (Fairbanks, AK 99775-7500)
Aldona Jonaitis (Project Director: August 2016 to present)

Renovating Gallery of Alaska

Implementation of the reinstallation of the Gallery of Alaska in the University of Alaska’s Museum of the North.

The University of Alaska Museum of the North (UAMN) requests consideration for a National Endowment for the Humanities Implementation Grant for $400,000 as well as $60,000 to support a position in public humanities. Our project fits well into the NEH award category, “Humanities and Sciences and Technology.” These funds will help us reinvent the thirty-five year old Gallery of Alaska, our flagship exhibit space. Using engaging methods of display, the 7,000-square-foot gallery will introduce 21st-century audiences to the vast, complex state of Alaska and immerse them in its natural and cultural legacy as well as its future. The new exhibit will interpret nearly 2,000 objects from our interdisciplinary, research-based collections. This is by far the largest museum collection in the state, with biological, geological, cultural, and art objects.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$360,000 (approved)
$360,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


GI-256063-17

National Museum of American Jewish History (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2197)
Ivy Weingram (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Leonard Bernstein: The Power of Music

Implementation of a traveling exhibition about American composer Leonard Bernstein on the centennial of his birth.

The National Museum of American Jewish History (NMAJH) respectfully requests an Implementation Grant to support the special exhibition, Leonard Bernstein: The Power of Music, opening in March 2018. For a generation of Americans, Bernstein personified classical music and produced a rich repertoire of original compositions for orchestra and the theater. This exhibition will expand the scope of national discussions about and previous analyses of Leonard Bernstein by focusing on his Jewish identity and social activism in the context of his position as an American conductor and his works as a composer. This will be the first museum exhibition dedicated to exploring Bernstein as an historical figure through this unique lens, and the first opportunity to access this caliber of scholarly analysis and material culture related to Bernstein in a museum setting.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Music History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2019


GI-256094-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Marla C. Berns (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths

Implementation of a 5,700-square-foot traveling exhibition, a website, and public programs on the history, culture, and art of blacksmithing across the African continent.

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths is a major internationally traveling exhibition organized by the Fowler Museum at UCLA. It will present over 200 diverse artworks from across the African continent, focusing on the region south of the Sahara and covering a time period spanning early archaeological evidence of iron-working to the present day. Scheduled to open in April 2018, the project also comprises a multi-author scholarly publication, a diverse roster of public programs including lectures, a family festival, and community collaborations, along with web and K-12 curricular resources that will extend Striking Iron's reach to American audiences and enhance the visitor experience. Based on decades of research by its curatorial team, Striking Iron synthesizes established and new scholarship with artworks of great aesthetic strengths and beauty to create what will be the most comprehensive treatment of the blacksmith's art in Africa to date.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2020


GI-256174-17

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx, NY 10458-5126)
Joanna Groarke (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Georgia O'Keeffe: Visions of Hawai'i

Implementation of a traveling exhibition and public programs exploring the historical and ecological contexts surrounding artist Georgia O’Keeffe’s commercial art commission by the Hawaiian Pineapple Company in the late 1930s.

Funds will support an Implementation Grant for the exhibition, Georgia O’Keeffe: Visions of Hawai’i (May 12-October 28, 2018) and a two-year public humanities position. Portions of the show will travel to the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art (Tennessee). This exhibition will use a lesser-known body of work by Georgia O’Keeffe as the entry to an examination of Hawai’i’s complex ecological and cultural history—one that is often obscured by romanticized views of the Islands. This show will include two major exhibitions—an art-historical installation of all 20 of O’Keeffe’s Hawai’i paintings as well as drawings and sketches, and a horticultural exhibition that introduces visitors to the “three floras” of Hawai’i—and smaller exhibitions on the cultural and ecological significance of plants that figure prominently in the Islands’ history, the Islands in commercial art, and O’Keeffe’s journey through Hawai’i. Public and children’s education programs will complement these components.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2020


GI-256212-17

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Julie Golia (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Sick: Seven Diseases That Changed Brooklyn

Implementation of a permanent exhibition, an accompanying website, educational materials, and public programs exploring the 400-year history of public health in Brooklyn.

BHS is requesting NEH funds to support its newest exhibition, Sick: Seven Diseases That Changed Brooklyn, which, along with complementary education programs, public programs, and a project website, aims to reveal to diverse audiences that conceptions of illness and health are a manifestation of not just biology, but beliefs, institutions, and identity. Sick will use Brooklyn’s rich history to show how concepts of illness and wellness have transformed over 400 years with a focus on seven different diseases. Topics range from smallpox and Native Americans in the seventeenth century; to devastating nineteenth-century outbreaks of cholera in the growing city of Brooklyn; to pharmaceutical innovations that would grow into global corporations; to local doctors and nurses, activists, and communities who fought disease and redefined caregiving; to the experiences of a diverse group of borough residents and their families during the earliest days of HIV/AIDS; and more.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History of Science; Urban History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 4/30/2019