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Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities*
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HT-267268-19

University of Central Florida, Orlando (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Anastasia Salter (Project Director: March 2019 to present)

Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research

A five-day institute for twenty-five participants organized by and hosted at the University of Central Florida for using digital methods to research digital culture.

There has been growing awareness of the need for humanist inquiry into the internet platforms and communities driving contemporary culture. From fan communities and discourse about works of literature to meme-makers skewering cultural objects, online spaces enable readership, creation, circulation, and transformation of humanist texts—and the active making and remaking of public history. However, much internet research is driven by computational approaches without also being rigorously grounded in theories of culture and textual production. Navigating this space can be particularly daunting to early-career humanities scholars. This is where we seek to intervene. Understanding Digital Culture: Humanist Lenses for Internet Research will foster a transdisciplinary humanities institute to provide resources, training, and a community of collaborators to engage both computational network and data analysis tools and the ethics and best practices of using the web as a site of research.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$129,102 (approved)
$129,102 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


HT-267285-19

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2019 to present)

Advanced Digital Editing: Modeling the Text and Making the Edition

A two-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for twenty-five participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The proposed NEH Institute, “Advanced digital editing: modeling the text and making the edition”, will train 25 participants who already know how to edit their texts in TEI XML to participate directly in the modeling, conceptualization, and implementation of their editions, empowering them to express innovative philological scholarship in a way that is informed by a deep understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it.

Project fields:
Slavic Languages

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,456 (approved)
$247,596 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020


HT-267293-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: March 2019 to present)

Digital Humanities Research Institutes: Further Expanding Communities of Practice

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills. The in-person institute will be hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York with follow up workshops offered through online webinars.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,978 (approved)
$249,493 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


HT-267259-19

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rachael Samberg (Project Director: March 2019 to present)

Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining

A four-day summer workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, and follow-up activities for thirty-two participants on the ethical and legal issues around data mining of large scale textual collections for humanities research.

Digital humanities (DH) scholars, and professionals who support them, often perceive a barrier to utilizing text data mining (TDM) techniques: the law. Uncertainty about the breadth of TDM rights can impede the scope of DH research questions, or unnecessarily expose scholars to risk. Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM), hosted by UC Berkeley from June 23-26, 2020, will equip DH TDM researchers, librarians, and professionals with foundational skills to: 1) confidently navigate law, policy, ethics, and risk within DH TDM projects; 2) integrate workflows for DH TDM research and professional support; 3) practice sharing these new tools through authentic consultation exercises; 4) prototype plans for broadly disseminating their knowledge; and 5) develop communities of practice to promote cross-institutional outreach about the DH TDM legal landscape. Instructional materials will be shared publicly as a CC0 (Creative Commons Zero waiver) open educational resource.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$165,034 (approved)
$141,093 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HT-261794-18

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Alison Langmead (Project Director: March 2018 to present)

Workshops on Sustainability for Digital Projects

A series of five workshops for up to 150 participants to explore approaches to long term sustainability of digital humanities projects. The workshops would be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh, Brigham Young University, Brown University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Oklahoma State University.

The ongoing sustainability of digital humanities projects is of critical concern to the field. To help increase engagement with sustainability planning, the University of Pittsburgh has developed, with prior support from the NEH, the Socio-Technical Sustainability Roadmap (STSR). The STSR is a structured workshop that guides participants through the practice of creating effective sustainability plans, based on research findings that demonstrate that the needs of a project’s social infrastructure must be addressed alongside the needs of its technological infrastructure in order to successfully sustain digital work over time. We are applying to the NEH ODH IATDH Program to fund a series of five facilitated STSR workshops at regional digital humanities hubs located across the United States. We anticipate reaching 125-150 people in total and are particularly interested in attracting participants who lack access to digital sustainability infrastructures at their home institutions.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Brigham Young University, Provo (Provo, UT) - Participating Institution
Brown University (Providence, RI) - Participating Institution
Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA) - Participating Institution
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater (Stillwater, OK) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$215,380 (approved)
$215,380 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


HT-261812-18

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Sarah Connell (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Institutes on Critical Teaching and Research with Vector Space Models

A series of four three-day institutes for a total of 72 participants on the use of word embedding models for textual analysis. The three-day institutes would be hosted by Northeastern University.

The Northeastern University Women Writers Project seeks funding for a three-year institute series on word embedding models, to overcome barriers to entry for humanist researchers and teachers. We plan four institutes in all: two aimed at teachers and two aimed at researchers, with a novice and intermediate event for each audience. Each event will be followed by a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants, and sharing of research and teaching outcomes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$197,385 (approved)
$197,385 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021


HT-261817-18

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Laurie N. Taylor (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Hélène Huet (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Leah Reade Rosenberg (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Paul A. Ortiz (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute

A week-long, residential institute followed by a series of virtual sessions on collaborative digital humanities, archival collections, and Caribbean Studies for 26 participants. The institute would be hosted at the University of Florida.

The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Latin American Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$231,093 (approved)
$212,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


HT-256968-17

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: March 2017 to present)

Expanding Communities of Practice

A ten-day residential institute and follow-up activities for 15 participants to develop core humanities computational research and project development skills. The in-person institute and follow-up workshop would be hosted at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

The CUNY Graduate Center’s Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) will advance the research goals and professional growth of individual participants, while at the same time supporting their efforts to organize and lead digital humanities workshops in their local contexts. During a ten-day residential institute in June 2018, participants will explore interdisciplinary digital humanities research and teaching with leading DH scholars, develop core computational research skills through hands-on workshops, and begin developing versions of the DHRI for their own communities. Over the following academic year, each participant will have access to an online network of peers, as well as 20 hours of consultation from our experienced staff. When participants return to New York in June 2019 to report on their experiences, their reflections will inform the publication of a guide to leading digital humanities skill workshops in a variety of institutional contexts.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$246,856 (approved)
$246,856 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HT-256969-17

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Victoria Szabo (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Philip J. Stern (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Virtual and Augmented Reality for the Digital Humanities Institute (VARDHI)

A two-week institute and follow-up activities for twelve participants on the theory and application of virtual and augmented reality technologies to humanities research. Duke University would serve as the host for the institute.

The Virtual and Augmented Reality for the Digital Humanities Institute (VARDHI) explores the importance of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) theories, methods, and technologies to humanities research and communications, with an emphasis on historical and cultural representation and analysis, media arts applications, and experience design for virtual and augmented realities. This field of inquiry brings together narrative, archival, data-driven, and spatial approaches to humanistic research in combination with studies of virtual reality, human cognition, experiential learning, and digital storytelling. The key focus of VARDHI is to understand what is at stake with VR and AR, both of which are enjoying a cultural renaissance thanks to advances in mobile technologies and head mounted displays, and both of which make VR and AR more accessible to a wider range of producers and a potential mass of consumers.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$248,641 (approved)
$248,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


HT-256958-17

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Anke Lüdeling (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Monica Berti (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Digital Editions, Digital Corpora and new possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond

An intensive two-week institute and follow up workshop for 30 humanities scholars on the application of new methods for annotating textual sources for digital editions and digital corpora of historical languages. The institute would be hosted at Tufts University.

Tufts University proposes to host an intensive two week, in-residence institute in the summer of 2018 for 30 humanists on the application of new methods for annotating textual sources. Support will be offered for on-campus housing, meals, and travel to and from Tufts. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the new techniques to their own sources materials; collaborate with others on a wide range of source materials; discuss challenges and results; set and evaluate project goals; and integrate annotation work into the classroom. The proposed workshop builds upon experiences from, and work subsequent to, “Working with Text in a Digital Age,” a 2012-2014 NEH IATDH project and the on-line seminar, Sunoikisis Digital Classics, which has introduced the proposed topics to a virtual and international audience. A two day follow up workshop will be held to expand upon the topics and results of the institute. Project output will inform new Sunoikisis Digital Classics curricula.

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Computational Linguistics; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,359 (approved)
$169,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HT-256977-17

Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0001)
Lauren Coats (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Emily McGinn (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom

A one-week in-person institute hosted at Mississippi State University on approaches to computational textual analysis and how these techniques may be incorporated into the classroom. This institute will be followed by a series of virtual sessions focused on digital pedagogy and the humanities.

While the digital humanities often center on developing long-term research projects, it is the goal of our Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities Institute to bring the tools and methods of the digital humanities directly to the undergraduate classroom. “Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom” aims to expand engagement with and access to digital humanities, particularly at under-resourced institutions, by teaching undergraduate instructors how to incorporate small-scale, data-focused digital projects into their humanities teaching. Our institute will include a one-week in-person session with hands-on instruction in turning text into data, and then analyzing that data and sharing the results. This week will be followed by bimonthly virtual sessions with experts in digital pedagogy. By the end of the institute, participants will have developed a classroom DH project or assignment about textual data.

Participating institutions:
Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA) - Applicant/Recipient
Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS) - Participating Institution
University of Georgia (Athens, GA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$90,000 (approved)
$90,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HT-250993-16

Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Jason Mittell (Project Director: March 2016 to present)
Christian Michael Keathley (Co Project Director: July 2016 to present)

Scholarship in Sound and Image

Two two-week workshops for 15 participants each on the study of time-based media like video and audio in multimodal humanities scholarship. The first instance of the workshop would be for advanced graduate students, while the second instance would be targeted toward humanities faculty and professionals.

In June 2015, we hosted a highly successful workshop, “Scholarship in Sound and Image,” funded by a grant from the NEH’s Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH). This workshop brought together 14 scholars of film and media studies to learn how to produce videographic criticism that incorporates sound and moving images via digital technologies. We are again applying for an IATDH grant, this time to support a pair of two-week workshops, in June 2017 and June 2018. The workshops – whose curriculum is based on a course that has been successfully taught four times at Middlebury College, in addition to the successful IATDH workshop in 2015 – is designed for 15 participants whose objects of study involve audio-visual media, especially film, radio, television, and other new digital media forms. The two iterations of the workshop will subdivide the participants, inviting Ph.D. students in 2017, and faculty or postdocs in 2018.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$241,001 (approved)
$241,001 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 12/31/2018


HT-251001-16

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
David J. Birnbaum (Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Make your edition: models and methods for digital textual scholarship

A three-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions for 25 participants to be hosted at the University of Pittsburgh.

The digital scholarly edition is more than a reading text with links and annotations. The digital scholarly edition is an integrated platform for performing research, and digital textual scholarship advances as this platform comes to support new types of inquiry The Institute will train 25 participants who already know how to mark up their texts (in TEI XML or similarly) to participate directly in the technological conceptualization and implementation of their editions, empowering them to undertake philological work that is informed by an understanding of what is possible technically, and of how to achieve it. This training responds to the risk of miscommunication or missed opportunity in collaborative situations where no participant in a project understands fully both the textual and the technological issues involved in designing and building a digital scholarly edition.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$156,251 (approved)
$156,251 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-251006-16

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: March 2016 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis (EMDA2017)" institute

A two-week summer institute and follow-up workshop for 12 participants to explore network analysis approaches to early modern studies. The institute would be hosted at the Folger Shakespeare Library with a variety of visiting experts.

The Folger Institute proposes to host a two-week institute on “Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis” in summer 2017 (EMDA2017). Under the direction of Professor Jonathan Hope and Dr. Ruth Ahnert, this institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty—computing specialists, social historians, network analysts, literary historians, linguists, and visualization designers—to model best practices for the design and implementation of quantitative network analysis. EMDA2017 will be an opportunity for 12 scholarly practitioners to consider the ways this approach may be shaping the very nature of early modern research through intensive application and analysis.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-251008-16

West Virginia University Research Corporation (Morgantown, WV 26505-2742)
Cheryl E. Ball (Project Director: March 2016 to March 2018)
Brian Douglas Ballentine (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Cheryl E. Ball (Co Project Director: March 2018 to present)

Digital Publishing Institute: Authoring and Editing Digital Humanities Scholarship

A series of workshops for humanities scholars and editors on developing and publishing digital multimedia scholarship to be hosted by West Virginia University and held on-campus as well as in conjunction with scholarly publishing conferences.

This institute will offer two sets of workshops for authors and editors who want to learn more about composing and publishing scholarly multimedia and web-based academic texts. The workshops will attend to beginners’ concerns about starting a scholarly multimedia project to more advanced author concerns regarding infrastructural and preservation work plans. The two-week author workshops provide hands-on time and staff support for completing a segment of a digital humanities project. The two-day editor/publisher workshops will focus on workflows for peer review, copy-editing, and publication (including preservation) in scholarly multimedia.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$219,832 (approved)
$219,832 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


HT-231816-15

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sharon M. Leon (Project Director: March 2015 to present)
Sheila A. Brennan (Co Project Director: July 2015 to present)

Doing Digital History 2016: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians

A two-week institute for 25 historians of the United States, to be hosted by George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, on advanced theory and application of new media tools for teaching and scholarship.

In the August 2014, twenty-three mid-career digital novices came to George Mason University (GMU) for the two-week intensive summer institute, Doing Digital History, organized by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM). Experts in their field of American history, these novices in digital methodologies were nervous, unsure of their own abilities, and intimidated by digital history. They all left as confident digital ambassadors with new skills, insights, and motivation to pursue digital work and become active participants in the growing community of digital humanists. Because of this success, and due to a continued need in the field, RRCHNM requests support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to organize Doing Digital History: 2016, a second Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH), during the summer of 2016 to serve a cohort of twenty-five established, mid-career American history faculty and public historians.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$219,301 (approved)
$200,651 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 3/31/2017


HT-231812-15

Indiana/Purdue University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-5148)
Jennifer E. Guiliano (Project Director: March 2015 to present)

The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project

Three three-day workshops of 35 participants each hosted by Yale University, Northern Arizona University, and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of preservation and access in Native American Studies. 

The Digital Native American studies Project (DNSP) proposes to offer three three-day workshops that will educate participants on issues of digital humanities research and methodology in the context of Native American Studies. Native American Studies, an interdisciplinary field of study exploring the history, culture, politics, issues, and contemporary experience of indigenous peoples of America, intersects with a number of issues related to access, preservation, and methodology that are problematized through the development and deployment of digital tools and methods and the conduct of digital research. While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices, and methods function within Native communities and through Native American Studies scholarship outside of the anthropological context. Each three-day long workshop will serve thirty-five participants drawn from academic, cultural heritage, and tribal communities.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Native American Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,817 (approved)
$210,921 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 1/31/2018


HT-231824-15

Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Kim Gallon (Project Director: March 2015 to present)
Angel David Nieves (Co Project Director: July 2015 to present)

Space and Place in Africana/Black Studies: An Institute on Spatial Humanities, Theories, Methods and Practice

A three-week summer institute and a follow-up workshop for 20 participants to explore spatial approaches to Africana Studies.  The institute would be hosted by Purdue University and the follow-up workshop would be held at Hamilton College.

Hosted by the African American Studies & Research Center (AARC) at Purdue University, this two-year long institute beginning the summer of 2016 is designed to advance knowledge in Africana/Black Studies by affording 20 early and mid-career Africana/Black Studies scholars, graduate students and librarians an opportunity to think critically about the relationship and intersections between Africana Studies and the spatial humanities. To that end, the Institute is concerned with helping participants to think spatially, to internalize the concept of space, and to develop spatial literacies. The Institute will also advance digital and spatial humanities approaches among Africana/Black Studies scholars. Participants will explore key topics in spatial humanities and will be introduced to a breadth of geospatial technologies. The web-based platform, BlackDH.org (www.blackdh.org) will serve as a clearinghouse and portal for scholarly discussions that will grow out of the Institute.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$245,299 (approved)
$245,299 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2017


HT-50088-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Ethan C. Watrall (Project Director: March 2014 to present)
Lynne Goldstein (Co Project Director: July 2014 to present)

Institute on Digital Archaeology Method & Practice

A twelve-day institute to be held over two summers, hosted by Michigan State University, for 20 participants to explore advanced theory and application of computational approaches and new media for archaeology.

The Institute on Digital Archaeology Method & Practice will be hosted jointly by MATRIX: The Center for the Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences and the Department of Anthropology. The institute will bring together 20 participants to the campus of Michigan State University for two 6-day sessions in 2015 and 2016. In order to fulfill the institute's goals, attendance will be open to public sector archaeologists, private sector archaeologists, students, scholarly archaeologists from both the anthropological and humanist communities, and scholars from fields closely aligned with archaeology. Talks and workshops will be delivered by a wide variety of internationally regarded experts from the world of classics and ancient history, archaeology, the digital humanities, museums, and neogeography. The institute is organized along several themes: Field Methods, Data & Linked Data, Geospatial, Scholarly Publication & Communication, and Public Outreach & Engagement.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,708 (approved)
$249,708 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 9/30/2017


HT-50091-14

University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
Alyson Ann Gill (Project Director: March 2014 to present)
Lisa M. Snyder (Co Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Advanced Challenges in Theory and Practice in 3D Modeling of Cultural Heritage Sites

A one-week institute with a follow-up workshop held over two summers, hosted by Arkansas State University and the University of California, Los Angeles, to consider the theoretical and ethical issues associated with three-dimensional modeling of cultural heritage sites and objects.

This joint proposal by Arkansas State University and the University of California, Los Angeles builds on issues raised in the 2013 NEH Institute, considering advanced problems and issues facing content creators and end users, and attempting to bridge that gap. This ten day institute would take place over two consecutive summers at ASU in 2015 and UCLA in 2016, bringing together twenty scholars working in the humanities who have research or teaching projects that would benefit from advanced discussion of theoretical issues with an impressive group of content creators working from different perspectives.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$218,139 (approved)
$218,139 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


HT-50092-14

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: March 2014 to present)
Jonathan Hope (Co Project Director: July 2014 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" Institute

A 13-day summer institute, hosted by the Folger Shakespeare Library, for fifteen technically-advanced scholars of early modern English studies to explore advanced analytical techniques for engaging with digitized humanities collections.

The Folger Institute proposes to host an NEH institute on "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" in summer 2015. This institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty-historians of technology, information catalogers and retrievers, computing specialists, linguists, literary historians, visualization theorists, and statisticians-to model best practices for the design and implementation of digital projects. EMDA2015 will be both an expansively defined training institute and an opportunity for scholarly practitioners to consider how new technologies may be shaping the very nature of early modern research. Fifteen participants will have two and a half weeks of intensive application and analysis to answer such questions.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$175,649 (approved)
$175,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 3/31/2017


HT-50085-14

Lane Community College (Eugene, OR 97405-0640)
Anne McGrail (Project Director: March 2014 to present)

An Institute for Community College Digital Humanists: Beyond Pockets of Innovation, Toward a Community of Practice

A 5-day institute for 25 community college faculty members, to be hosted by Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon, on new digital methods, tools and practices for humanities teaching and scholarship.

Community college humanists have been slow to join communities of practice in digital humanities (DH), in part due to intensive teaching/ service workloads in an open-access context which puts constraints on professional development. To address this lag, Lane's July 13-17, 2015 institute will teach faculty DH theory and methods, build DH tools and projects, and scaffold these for their students' unique learning needs, with the result of expanding the definition of digital humanities practice to include the work of community college teachers, scholars and students. 25 participants will create a portfolio of project prototypes in data visualization, geospatial mapping, crowdsourcing, and digital storytelling, et al, emerging with a firm grounding in the complexity of DH and its applicability to their courses. A public keynote address will welcome the community into the conversation and participants’ work will be shared in an online commons that will serve as a hub for a community of practice.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$88,778 (approved)
$87,436 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HT-50086-14

Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Christian Michael Keathley (Project Director: March 2014 to present)
Jason Mittell (Co Project Director: July 2014 to present)

Scholarship in Sound and Image: Producing Videographic Criticism in the Digital Age

A two week workshop at Middlebury College for twelve participants on the topic of incorporating time-based media like video and audio in multimodal humanities scholarship.

This two-week workshop, scheduled for June 2015, will gather scholars interested in producing critical work in a multi-media format. The workshop is designed for 12 participants, ranging in rank from advanced graduate students to full professors, whose objects of study involve audio-visual media, especially film, television, and other new digital media forms. In a workshop setting, we will consider the theoretical foundation for undertaking such innovative work, and we will experiment extensively with producing multi-media scholarly work, resulting in at least one work of publishable quality per participant. The goals will be to explore a range of approaches by using moving images as a critical language and to expand the expressive possibilities available to innovative humanists. The curriculum and work produced by the participants in the workshop will be featured in a special issue of [in]Transition, the first peer reviewed journal devoted exclusively to videographic criticism.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$95,152 (approved)
$95,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 9/30/2015


HT-50077-13

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sharon M. Leon (Project Director: March 2013 to present)
Sheila A. Brennan (Co Project Director: July 2013 to present)

Doing Digital History: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians

A two-week institute for 25 historians, to be hosted by George Mason University's Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, on advanced theory and application of new media tools for teaching and scholarship.

Historians, as a group, are reluctant and anxious to engage in digital research methods and to integrate those methods and accompanying tools into their teaching. Taking a cue from the most recent Ithaka S+R report, "Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians," the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University (RRCHNM) requests support from the National Endowment for the Humanities to host a two-week institute in 2014 to fill a much-needed gap for historians who need instruction and a professional learning community to engage with new media methods and tools, and to push forward with work on their own digital projects. In the spirit of capitalizing on our own expertise and the significant resources in the field, we will solicit our participants from the broad field of American History, without respect to subfield specialty.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$215,718 (approved)
$175,746 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 5/31/2015


HT-50078-13

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
Jennifer E. Guiliano (Project Director: March 2013 to present)
George H. Williams (Co Project Director: July 2013 to present)

Building an Accessible Future for the Humanities

A series of four two-day workshops to be held at Northeastern University, Emory University, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and the University of Texas, Austin, on theoretical and practical approaches for making digital humanities scholarship accessible to blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. An online guide of best practices with examples of humanities projects would be produced as a part of these workshops.

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland will partner with the BrailleSC.org project, the Northeastern Center for Digital Humanities, the Emory University Libraries Digital Commons (DiSC), the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) at the University of Nebraska, and the College of Information at the University of Texas-Austin to foster the making of digital environments accessible and usable by blind, low-vision, deaf, and hard-of-hearing users. AccessibleFuture will facilitate four two-day long workshops for one hundred humanists, librarians, and information scholars (twenty-five per workshop) to develop and educate humanities scholars with all levels of expertise from beginner to the most advanced about technologies, design standards, and accessibility issues associated with the use of digital technologies.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,302 (approved)
$220,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2016


HT-50080-13

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Clifford Blake Anderson (Project Director: March 2013 to present)

XQuery Summer Institute: Advancing XML-Based Scholarship from Representation to Discovery

This two-week summer institute at Vanderbilt would train 12 participants in the techniques and methodologies of XQuery language, which allows for searching and manipulating texts encoded in XML.

The XQuery Summer Institute at Vanderbilt University will be aimed at archivists, librarians, professors, and students who have experience marking up texts in XML, but do not yet know how to work computationally with those documents. Our institute aspires to recruit twelve members of the digital humanities community to a two week institute in June 2014. The faculty of the institute will teach participants to work productively with their XML-encoded texts using XQuery, a programming language designed specifically for XML. With XQuery, scholars can learn a single language to ingest their texts into an XML database, ask questions of them, connect them with other sources of information, and publish them on the web. Participants will go beyond using XML for representation to querying XML for discovery.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,760 (approved)
$70,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


HT-50070-12

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Trevor Muñoz (Project Director: March 2012 to present)

Digital Humanities Data Curation

A series of three-day institutes to be held at the University of Maryland, College Park, Brown University, and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, for 51 participants on approaches to data curation of humanities research materials for librarians, archivists, and humanities scholars.

Digital Humanities Data Curation (DHDC) will engage scholars in sustained collaboration around issues of data curation in order to educate scholars on best practices and technologies for data curation and their relationship to scholarly methods. The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland will lead a collaboration partnering the Women Writers Project (WWP) at Brown University, and the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS) at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS), at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign that will foster innovation in digital humanities research by integrating recent advances in the research and practice of data curation to address the specific needs of humanities researchers. DHDC will serve as an opportunity for participants to receive guidance in understanding the role of data curation in enriching humanities research projects.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$248,721 (approved)
$248,721 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2015


HT-50074-12

Arkansas State University, Main Campus (Jonesboro, AR 72403-0600)
Alyson Ann Gill (Project Director: March 2012 to present)

Humanities Heritage 3D Visualization: Theory and Practice

A training institute in practical and theoretical approaches to 3D real-time visualization of cultural heritage sites for twenty humanities scholars.

The past thirty years have seen a tremendous upsurge in the use of digital modeling in archaeology as well as in projects and applications based in the humanities. Digital representations can create new forms of visual knowledge, which in turn can lead to new research streams. As such, digital models have become increasingly important tools in a wide range of applications. Despite the power of these models as representational and visualization tools, the tools themselves are often difficult to use and not easily accessible by the novice. This proposal is for a 'digital toolbox' that bridges this gap. A unique feature of this institute is the incorporation of visits to Arkansas State University heritage sites modeled by the University's Center for Digital Initiatives. Beyond this, in bringing together an impressive group of lecturers working in the digital humanities, the institute itself would create an important resource in the form of a community of scholars, encouraging future collaborations between individuals and universities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$198,503 (approved)
$186,472 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


HT-50059-12

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Joseph "Tom" Scheinfeldt (Project Director: March 2012 to August 2013)
Patrick Murray-John (Project Director: August 2013 to present)

Another Week | Another Tool - A Digital Humanities Barnraising

A one week institute for twelve participants on the principles of humanities-centered tool design, development, and implementation, followed by a year of development support and evaluation.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University proposes a reprise of One Week | One Tool for summer 2013. Another Week | Another Tool: A Digital Humanities Barnraising will once again bring together a group of twelve digital scholars, students, librarians, and museum professionals of diverse disciplinary backgrounds and practical experience to CHNM to build something useful and useable in seven days. Not for the faint of heart, a one-day course of training in the principles of open source software development will be followed by an intense six days of doing and a year of continued community engagement, development, testing, dissemination, and evaluation. Comprised of designers and programmers as well as project managers and outreach specialists, the group will conceive a tool, outline a roadmap, develop and disseminate a modest prototype, lay the ground work for building an open source community, and make first steps toward securing the project's long-term sustainability.

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$230,000 (approved)
$227,315 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 3/31/2015


HT-50067-12

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Owen Williams (Project Director: March 2012 to present)

Folger Shakespeare Library Summer Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities: "Early Modern Digital Agendas"

A three-week institute, hosted by the Folger Shakespeare Library, for twenty scholars of early modern English studies to gain both applied and theoretical familiarity with digital research resources and methods.

Early Modern Digital Agendas is an expansively defined training institute. Its exercises will instill a working knowledge of the methods and models that are currently broadening the interpretive horizons of early modern scholars. It will create a forum in which participants can historicize, theorize, and evaluate digital tools and approaches, with discussion growing out of, and feeding back into, their own projects. Each week builds on the previous one. During the first, participants will work with online catalogues and textual archives. In the second, they will investigate additions to the textual corpus through digital and interoperable editions. During the third, participants will explore corpus linguistics, the latest methods for visualizing that work, and the implications these advancements have for research in the humanities. With these tools, participants will create a digital footprint to disseminate their period-specific discoveries of the best DH approaches and sources.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$159,056 (approved)
$153,518 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2014


HT-50069-12

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Tanya E. Clement (Project Director: March 2012 to present)

Institute for High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS)

A four-day institute at the University of Texas, Austin, with a follow-up workshop for humanities scholars, librarians, archivists, and advanced graduate students on the use of analytical tools to study digital audio collections of spoken word, such as oral histories, poetry, and Native American oral traditions.

We are applying for an Institutes for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities grant from the NEH to support bringing together librarians and archivists, humanities scholars and students, and computer scientists and technologists invested in understanding and developing infrastructure for computational analysis on poetry, folklore, speeches, and storytelling sound files. The School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin and the Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign propose to host the High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS) Institute to include meetings in May 2013 and in May 2014. In the interim year, scholars will work on scholarship in consultation with the HiPSTAS team. The second meeting is a symposium on the scholarship produced through the year as well as a meeting to propose recommendations for the development of tools for supporting advanced digital scholarly inquiry in spoken text sound.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$235,000 (approved)
$234,952 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 9/30/2015


HT-50043-11

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Taking TEI Further: Teaching and Publication

A series of workshops to be held at Brown University for humanities faculty, related staff, and graduate students to explore advanced uses of digital text encoding for use in humanities scholarship and teaching.

This three-year institute series will offer an opportunity for advanced exploration and training in three areas of critical importance to scholarly users of the TEI Guidelines. Building on two previous seminar series, we will offer advanced three-day institutes on TEI customization, XSLT for digital humanists, and bringing text encoding into the digital humanities classroom. These seminars will be aimed at an audience of faculty, archivists, librarians, and digital humanists who have had some experience with TEI and need grounding in more advanced tools, systems, and approaches. Each seminar will emphasize discussion, hands-on practice, and close attention to the specifics of participants' own projects. The seminars will be led by the WWP staff, who are internationally recognized as experts in TEI encoding, project design, and digital humanities, together with guest instructors with expertise in specific domains appropriate to each seminar.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,974 (approved)
$249,973 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2012 – 2/28/2016


HT-50044-11

Tufts University (Medford, MA 02155-5818)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Working with Text in a Digital Age

A three-week institute with follow-up activities at Tufts University on the use of computational and corpus linguistics methodologies for scholarly research for humanities scholars, library professionals, and graduate students.

This Institute will provide 30 participants with three weeks in which (1) to develop hands on experience with TEI-XML, (2) to apply methods from information retrieval, text visualization, and corpus and computational linguistics to the analysis of textual and linguistic sources in the Humanities, and (3) to rethink not only their own research agendas but also new relationships between their work and non-specialists (e.g., an expansion in opportunities for tangible contributions and significant research by undergraduates, new collaborations that transcend boundaries of language and culture, and increased opportunities for the general public both to contribute to our understanding of the past). A two-day conference on the theme of the Institute will then follow in the summer of 2013 with an open call for contributions and will provide both a venue for and a challenge to the issues/ideas raised during the initial Institute and their importance for the digital humanities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,727 (approved)
$249,542 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 6/30/2015


HT-50046-11

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Jennifer E. Guiliano (Project Director: February 2011 to August 2011)
Jijun Tang (Project Director: August 2011 to present)

High Performance Computing Collaboratory

A series of workshops to be held at the University of South Carolina and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign to consider uses of high-performance computing applications in humanities research and teaching.

The Center for Digital Humanities (CDH) at the University of South Carolina will partner with the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science (I-CHASS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) to foster innovation in the research and development of computational resources for humanities research groups. Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HpC) will engage scholars in a year-long collaboration with computing specialists in order to: 1) receive a comprehensive education in four computational concentrations; 2) receive instruction in digital humanities project design and management; 3) obtain hands-on experience with a variety of technical platforms; 4) work with technical staff to outline pilot explorations in at least one area of computational concentration; and 5) join a year-long virtual community where scholars will support their peers in authoring digital humanities projects. Participants will come from a wide range of institutions, with a particular focus on recruiting students and faculty from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,588 (approved)
$248,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


HT-50047-11

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Todd Presner (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Digital Cultural Mapping: Transformative Scholarship and Teaching in the Geospatial Humanities

A three-week summer institute hosted by the University of California, Los Angeles to explore how geospatial technologies like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used for teaching, learning, and research in the humanities.

"Digital Cultural Mapping: Transformative Scholarship in the Geospatial Humanities" is a proposal for a three-week summer institute at UCLA for an interdisciplinary group of 12 humanities scholars and advanced graduate students to learn how to develop innovative publications and courses that harness the theoretical and practical approaches of the "geospatial humanities." Situated at the intersection of critical cartography and information visualization, the Institute will combine a survey of the state of the art in interoperable geospatial tools and publication models, with hands-on, studio-based training in how to integrate GIS data into humanities scholarship, develop robust spatial visualizations, and deploy a suite of mapping tools in the service of creating publication- ready research articles and short monographs. The Institute will culminate in an "impact and evaluation" seminar of these publications with representatives from major university presses and journals.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$248,184 (approved)
$248,177 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2013


HT-50048-11

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Thomas R. Elliott (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Linked Ancient World Data Institute

A two-year series of summer seminars, hosted by New York University and Drew University, for humanities scholars, library and museum professionals, and advanced graduate students on the possibilities of the Linked Open Data model for use in humanities scholarship with a particular focus on Ancient Mediterranean and Near East studies.

We propose two three-day sessions of an Institute designed to train scholars on the use of Linked Data in online publication for ancient studies. Participants will work with a cadre of experienced scholars and technologists who will guide them through a hands-on overview of current best practice, equipping them to make their own intellectual content discoverable and re-usable in a highly networked world.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$217,081 (approved)
$184,013 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2014


HT-50049-11

Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
David J. Bodenhamer (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Spatial Narratives and Deep Maps: Explorations in Advanced Geo-spatial Technologies and the Spatial Humanities

A two-week institute and follow-up activities for humanities scholars to consider the potential for incorporating geospatial theories, methodologies and technologies into humanities research and teaching, with a particular focus on the history of religion in the United States.

The Institute proposes to link and deepen scholarly understanding of complex humanities data and geospatial technologies through a focus on two innovative forms-spatial narratives and deep maps-that bend spatial and other digital technologies to the intellectual traditions of humanists, thereby constituting a bridge between diverse avenues of investigation. In doing so, we address the first and fourth goals of the NEH call for proposals, namely, to bring together humanists and technologists to advance an innovative approach to the digital humanities and to assess the tools and methods available to support it.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$241,513 (approved)
$241,513 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 12/31/2013


HT-50030-10

University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)
Marvin J. Croy (Project Director: February 2010 to present)
Anthony F. Beavers (Co Project Director: February 2010 to present)

Computer Simulations in the Humanities

A three-week institute and follow-up activities on the use of computer simulations and modeling techniques in the humanities for twenty-four humanities scholars.

This project will advance research in the humanities by adding a variety of simulation techniques to the standard repertoire of methods already employed by humanists. Interested humanists from a range of disciplines including philosophy, history, archeology, linguistics, anthropology and political science, among others, will work not only with technical experts but also with humanists already familiar with methods involving computer simulations and models. Our aim in bringing technologists and humanists together in precisely this way is to promote the dual notion of "the humanities shaping technology" as well as "technology shaping the humanities." Modeling experts will be pressed to not merely present existing techniques but to shape those techniques in ways that address questions and on-going inquiries pursued by humanists. Twenty-four humanists will spend 3 weeks in June 2011 and 3 days in 2012 interacting with modeling experts.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$155,415 (approved)
$154,589 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 8/31/2012


HT-50032-10

University of Denver (Denver, CO 80208-0001)
Adrienne Russell (Project Director: February 2010 to present)

University of Denver's Institute for the Digital Humanities

A series of three workshops held over 18 months for twenty humanities faculty and advanced graduate students on the use of digital media in scholarship and teaching.

This institute brings together 20 humanities scholars from a variety of disciplines with little or no technical expertise to collaborate with each other and with experts in the field of digital humanities who are at the forefront of developing tools and methods for using digital media in their scholarly work. Institute fellows participate in a series of 3 workshops over an 18-month period. The institute program is designed to introduce and train fellows in the use of cutting-edge technological tools and methods, and to offer support and guidance as they work in groups to carry out a research project that involves collaboration with the public. Focus will be on the use of digital tools to facilitate collaboration among humanities scholars across various disciplines, to present and consider new strategies of representation and knowledge in emerging digital literacies, and to forge more engaging relationships with the public.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,433 (approved)
$245,613 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2011 – 7/31/2013


HT-50034-10

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Andrew M. Stauffer (Project Director: February 2010 to present)

NINES Summer Workshops: Emerging Issues in Digital Scholarship

A two-year series of summer workshops engaging scholars and institutional administrators in concerns relating to peer review and evaluation of digital scholarship in the humanities.

NINES proposes a two-year series of summer workshops with emphasis on institutional concerns surrounding digital scholarship in the humanities, specifically in regard to peer-review and the tenure-and-promotion process. We plan to host 22 people each year for a 5-day workshop, in which digital project leaders will interact with institutional representatives with a stake in the evaluation of scholarship. We will come at issues under rubrics: "markup and metadata," "interface," "documentation," "collaboration," and "sustainability." We hope to guide the development of projects and use the group to generate public working papers towards a rationale for peer-review and promotion. Both workshops will be held at the University of Virginia, with its rich supporting environment in the digital humanities. In combining opportunities for technical, theoretical, and institutional training and discussions, NINES hopes to cultivate digital scholarly production and reception in the humanities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$193,963 (approved)
$180,811 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2013


HT-50036-10

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Philip J. Ethington (Project Director: February 2010 to present)
Tara L. McPherson (Co Project Director: February 2010 to present)

Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-CTS Summer Institute on Digital Approaches to American Studies

A four-week summer institute to explore ways digital scholarship and new media publication can advance research in the fields of American Studies and Ethnic Studies.

We propose to bring fifteen (15) scholars with strong interests in digital publication both in the fields of new media and in traditional areas of American Studies and Ethnic Studies to attend a four-week summer institute at the University of Southern California (USC) from mid-July to mid-August, 2011, that will explore how digital scholarship can address the needs of the changing fields of American Studies and Ethnic Studies. This summer institute will be administered by USC’s Center for Transformative Scholarship (CTS) and held at the Institute of Multimedia Literacy (IML), also the operational base for Vectors, the international electronic journal. The institute will be an introduction to key issues in the digital humanities within the context of American Studies and also a hands-on practicum in the creation of digital scholarship. The projects created will enrich participants’ understanding of the digital humanities and will model the field for other scholars in American Studies.

[White paper]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,826 (approved)
$248,125 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2012


HT-50038-10

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: February 2010 to present)

Institute for Digital Archaeology

A semester-long program of advanced training in geospatial technologies critical to the practice of modern archaeology, followed by participation in field projects.

This proposal seeks funding to support a program designed to provide junior scholars in archaeology with advanced training in geospatial technologies and their application to archaeological research. While geospatial technologies ranging from satellite remote sensing, to subsurface geophysical prospection, to three dimensional scanning and visualization have all become increasingly critical to modern archaeology, few practitioners have the necessary technical skills to integrate these technologies into research and teaching programs. Participants in this program will have the opportunity to spend an entire semester taking a series of intensive courses in geospatial technologies and make use of the hardware, software and instrumentation available at the University of Arkansas's Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies on independent research projects. On-campus training will be followed up by participation in one of numerous archaeological field projects.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,885 (approved)
$249,756 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013


HT-50041-10

SUNY Research Foundation, Albany (Albany, NY 12222-0001)
Jon Rubin (Project Director: February 2010 to present)

Institute for Globally Networked Learning in the Humanities, SUNY - COIL Center

A three-year institute for 60 humanities scholars and staff that includes a three-day workshop, online discussion, and a capstone conference on developing international team-taught courses in the humanities.

The proposed Institute for Globally Networked Learning in the Humanities is a four-phase, three year long initiative (start July 1 2010 - June 30 2013) aimed at preparing and supporting humanities faculty, instructional design and international programs staff in their development and implementation a globally networked course. These courses allow students to work cross-culturally with their peer students from other countries, without leaving their home campus, using digital technologies such as the internet. These courses help humanities scholars bring a global perspective to the content of their course, and are a means to internationalize content in an engaging and affordable way. The Institute will consist of five discipline-specific 3-day workshops, an online course, ongoing support for the development and implementation of the course, and a capstone conference for sharing of lessons learned.

[White paper]

Project fields:
European History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, Other; Sociology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,938 (approved)
$249,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 9/30/2013


HT-50015-09

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Bethany Nowviskie (Project Director: February 2009 to present)

Institute for Enabling Geospatial Scholarship

The creation of two institutes, aimed at scholars, librarians, museum officials, and advanced graduate students, to explore how geospatial technologies like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be used for teaching, learning, and research in the humanities.

The Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia Library requests $162,457 from NEH to host two rounds of an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, on the theme of Enabling Geospatial Scholarship. The first four-day event would invite 20 competitively selected library, museum, and digital humanities center professionals to shape policy and begin building the technical capacity of the institutions they represent, to support boundary-pushing geospatial scholarship. Ongoing work in implementing a standards-based, open source infrastructure for discovery, delivery, and manipulation of geospatial data would be supported through an online clearinghouse and open-access community to be maintained long-term by the Scholars' Lab. The second Institute would invite 20 humanities scholars and advanced graduate students to train with and critique the open source and standards-based GIS tools and geospatial approaches to humanities scholarship being developed by the University of Virginia Library.

Project fields:
Geography

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$162,457 (approved)
$162,457 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011


HT-50016-09

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Timothy R. Tangherlini (Project Director: February 2009 to present)

Network Analysis for the Humanities

A ten-day workshop and follow-up symposium for humanities faculty members and advanced graduate students on the use of large-scale network analysis for humanities topics and questions.

We propose to host an Institute in Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities focusing on techniques for the discovery, visualization and analysis of networks in Humanities corpuses. Networks in this context are broadly defined to include both external networks (networks of production, networks of circulation, networks of influence, and networks of reception) and internal networks (networks of characters, networks of text, networks of language) in the data. The institute will consist of two main parts: a ten day intensive institute, taking place over two weeks in June 2010, and a shorter three day research symposium in June 2011. Both events will be housed at NSF's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics on UCLA's campus.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$232,737 (approved)
$232,737 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2011


HT-50021-09

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Joseph "Tom" Scheinfeldt (Project Director: February 2009 to present)

One Week, One Tool: A Digital Humanities Barn Raising

A one week institute for twelve participants on the principles of humanities-centered tool design, development, and implementation, followed by a year of development support.

For one week in June 2010, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University will bring together a group of twelve digital humanists of diverse disciplinary backgrounds and practical experience to build a useful and useable software tool for digital humanities research. A short course of training in principles of open source software development will be followed by an intense five days of brainstorming and development. Following the workshop will be a year of continued development, testing and evaluation. The group members will be comprised of designers and programmers as well as project managers and outreach specialists. The group will conceive a tool, outline a roadmap, develop and disseminate a prototype, lay the ground work for building an open source community, and make first steps toward securing sustainable funding for the project.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,221 (approved)
$249,221 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011


HT-50022-09

University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
David Theo Goldberg (Project Director: February 2009 to present)
Tara L. McPherson (Co Project Director: February 2009 to present)

Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-IML/UC-HRI Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship

A four-week summer institute to investigate scholarly research methods in the digital age, to include thematic discussion seminars and hands-on workshops in collaboration with technologists.

The Vectors-IML/UCHRI Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship is a four-week program designed for the humanities scholar who does not have a great deal of computing experience but who has begun to express an interest in the digital humanities and in digital media more broadly. The Institute will offer a new cadre of scholars the opportunity to explore the benefits of interactive media for scholarly analysis and authorship, illustrating the possibilities of multimodal media for humanities investigation. The scholars participating in our program will learn both by engaging with a variety of existing projects and also through the production of their own project in collaboration with the Vectors-IML and UCHRI teams.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,895 (approved)
$249,895 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2009 – 10/31/2010


HT-50025-09

University of South Carolina Research Foundation (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Duncan A. Buell (Project Director: February 2009 to present)

Humanities Gaming Institute: Serious Games for Research and Pedagogy

A three-week institute on the role of immersive, interactive technologies and games within the context of the humanities, with a year of follow-up support for the twenty participants.

We propose a three-week Institute on Humanities Gaming to develop the intellectual frameworks necessary to support gaming as an active area of humanities research and pedagogy. Our institute aims to reduce the technical barriers to the adoption of gaming as a research and teaching platform by leveraging investments in the infrastructure of computing and digital media. The institute will (a) investigate the cognitive components of games that inform and enable successful game play, including immersive structure, rule governance, interactivity, and simulation; (b) provide hands-on research into existing serious games from a variety of fields, including history, literature, linguistics, philosophy, and economics; (c) produce, under the guidance of experienced game developers, games that can scale to meet participants' research and teaching needs in the humanities.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$232,096 (approved)
$232,096 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 5/31/2011


HT-50006-08

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

Advanced Topics in TEI Encoding

A series of workshops for humanities faculty and graduate students to explore advanced uses of digital text encoding as an essential method in humanities scholarship.

This project offers a series of nine advanced 3-day and 4-day institutes in text encoding for scholarly humanities projects with TEI. Aimed at an audience with a working knowledge of the TEI Guidelines, these institutes provide an intensive environment for more advanced project development, including schema customization, encoding strategy, and documentation. The institutes will focus on three topics of particular interest to scholars working on digital humanities projects: the encoding of manuscripts, the representation of contextual information, and the development of large thematic research collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$196,000 (approved)
$196,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011


HT-50010-08

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Holly Willis (Project Director: April 2008 to present)
Tara L. McPherson (Co Project Director: April 2008 to present)

Broadening the Digital Humanities: The Vectors-IML Summer Institute on Multimodal Scholarship

A four-week summer institute to investigate scholarly research methods in the digital age, to include thematic discussion seminars and hands-on workshops in collaboration with technologists.

This proposal requests funding to support a four-week summer institute for 12 participating scholars. The Institute, set to take place at the University of Southern California's Institute for Multimedia Literacy from mid-July to mid-August, 2009, will serve as an introduction to key issues in the multimodal digital humanities and as a hands-on practicum in the creation of digital scholarship. Scholars will learn both by engaging with a variety of existing projects but also through the production of their own project; these projects will at once enrich the participants??? own understanding of the digital humanities and model the field for other scholars through their publication in the electronic journal Vectors, and elsewhere online. The Institute will provide the opportunity to explore the benefits of interactive media for scholarly analysis and authorship, illustrating the possibilities of multimodal media for humanities investigation.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2008 – 10/31/2009


HT-50013-08

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL 61801-3620)
Orville Vernon Burton (Project Director: April 2008 to September 2009)
Kevin D. Franklin (Project Director: September 2009 to present)

Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HpC): Coordinating High Performance Computing Institutes and the Digital

A total of nine institutes and one joint conference for humanities scholars, to be hosted by three different high-performance computer centers: the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, and the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

The Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science (I-CHASS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will lead a collaboration partnering the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center (PSC), and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) that will engage scholars in sustained collaboration with high performance computing specialists in order to identify, create, and adapt computational tools and methods. The Humanities High Performance Computing Collaboratory will serve as a portal for humanities scholars to receive technical support, access to high performance computing, and products and services associated with the digital technologies. Participants will consult with each computing staff about digital technology, discuss these technologies via a virtual community, and develop long-term technological goals for their projects via nine mini-residencies and a two-day conference.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,997 (approved)
$249,997 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 2/28/2011