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Funded Projects Query Form
119 matches

Grant programs:Digital Humanities Advancement Grants*
Date range: 2018-2021
Sort order: Award year, descending

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University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)
Rebecca Salzer (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Gesel Mason (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)

HAA-277185-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$99,996 (approved)
$99,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Prototyping an Extensible Framework for Access to Dance Knowledge

The creation of an online resource to increase accessibility to recordings of works by Black choreographers along with tools to make it easier to study dance by providing the ability to search and create connections across collections.

In keeping with the values of “experimentation, reuse, and extensibility,” this Level II proposal, titled “Dancing Digital,” leverages artist/scholar Gesel Mason’s existing collection No Boundaries: Dancing the Visions of Contemporary Black Choreographers and the open-source software CollectiveAccess to create a working prototype for an online resource that 1) provides online access to important full-length recordings of works by historically-underrepresented Black choreographers, 2) models how to imaginatively combine these full length recordings of dance with innovative features and supporting materials that enrich dance study across humanities disciplines, 3) creates a scalable, open-source, digital framework that broadens the focus from one choreographer’s work to the possibility of an interconnected field-wide archive, and 4) documents and shares the process, constructing a road map for other artists and organizations seeking to provide access to their collections.

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Marissa Katherine Lopez (Project Director: June 2020 to November 2022)
Kelley Arlene Kreitz (Co Project Director: October 2020 to November 2022)

HAA-277190-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$31,529 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

Pursuing the Potential of Digital Mapping in Latinx Studies

A two-day workshop and support network to build capacity in digital mapping methods for scholars in Latinx Studies.

We request a Level 1 grant for a two-day workshop at UCLA on August 12-13, 2021. Latinx Studies is built on understanding how spatial struggles shape racial, ethnic, and national identity. As Latinx Studies scholars increasingly use digital mapping in their research and teaching, we will bring scholars, GIS experts, and public and academic research librarians together to: 1) provide technical training to help participants build skills and advance their individual projects; and 2) plan a support network to facilitate the creation of shared data repositories, partnerships with libraries, training and mentoring opportunities, and an online hub of best practices and teaching materials. The workshop will draw on UCLA’s extensive resources and expertise in GIS research. In line with the “A More Perfect Union” initiative, this project will advance digital mapping as a method of increasing understanding of the enduring presence of people of Latin American descent in the history of our nation.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Matthew Thomas Miller (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
David Smith (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)

HAA-277203-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,571 (approved)
$282,905 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 6/30/2023

Automatic Collation for Diversifying Corpora: Improving Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) for Arabic-script Manuscripts

Refinement of machine learning methods to improve automatic handwritten text recognition of Persian and Arabic manuscripts and make these sources more accessible for humanities research and teaching.

The Automatic Collation for Diversifying Corpora (ACDC) project will significantly improve the accuracy of handwritten text recognition (HTR) for Arabic-script manuscripts by developing a collation tool to automatically create large amounts of training data from existing digital texts and manuscript images without time-consuming human annotation of individual manuscripts. The ACDC project will accomplish this task by extending the capabilities of the text alignment tool passim and the HTR engine Kraken to align very poor initial HTR transcriptions of diverse manuscript exemplars with existing digital texts in order to automatically produce training data in a “distantly supervised” manner. The ACDC tool’s acceleration of the training data production process will enable, for the first time, the creation of generalizable Arabic and Persian HTR models required for the digital transcription of large-scale Persian and Arabic manuscript collections.

Klezmer Institute, Inc. (Yonkers, NY 10702-1175)
Christina Crowder (Project Director: June 2020 to present)

HAA-277220-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

The Klezmer Archive

A series of planning meetings to consider how to approach the technical challenges of developing a digital resource on klezmer music that will incorporate multilingual oral histories of klezmer musicians along with written scores.

The Klezmer Archive project aims to create a universally accessible, useful resource for interaction, discovery, and research on all available information about klezmer music. The project will adapt and apply methodology from computational musicology and library sciences to create a tool to facilitate study of the klezmer corpus in a deeper, more systematic manner and on a more comprehensive scale than previously possible.

Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Kimberly A. Christen (Project Director: June 2020 to present)

HAA-277233-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,996 (approved)
$324,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Mukurtu Hubs: Sustaining and Empowering Community Digital Stewardship with Native American and Native Alaskan Communities

Technical improvements to the Mukurtu Content Management System and the addition of two additional community hubs for Native American and Native Alaskan communities located in southern California and Alaska.

This project seeks to expand the digital and human infrastructure necessary for the ongoing development, deployment, support, and training related to Mukurtu CMS—a free and open source content management system and community digital access platform built with and for Indigenous communities globally. Now in its second decade of development, Mukurtu CMS is an established digital platform used to empower and sustain the ethical circulation, curation, management and preservation of cultural heritage materials and traditional knowledge, including endangered languages and digitally repatriated cultural materials. The proposed project will expand the current Mukurtu Hubs program from four to six regional hubs, and extend the Mukurtu CMS software to provide increased capacity, infrastructure and support to Native American and Native Alaskan communities as they seek to manage, share, and provide access to their valuable cultural, linguistic and historic materials.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Lisa Pon (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Curtis Fletcher (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Tracy Cosgriff (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Andreas Kratky (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Erik Loyer (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)

HAA-277236-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Remastering the Renaissance: A Virtual Experience of Pope Julius II's Library in Raphael's Stanza della Segnatura

Development of a software connector between Unity and Scalar and the publication of a virtual reality experience of Pope Julius’s Stanza della Segnatura.

To develop deliberate-play experiences broadly available beyond museum walls, we need to build, test and implement a bridge that allows Scalar annotations to migrate to and from 3D environments built in Unity, and to port Scalar coordinates in order to allow easeful mapping of images in Scalar onto virtual environments. This new Scalar-Unity bridge will make possible many discursive platforms for virtual visitors. Our proof of concept: the Vatican's Stanza della Segnatura, painted by Raphael as the setting for Pope Julius II's library. We seek to construct an immersive digital environment of that room and its original contents, using Scalar as a back-end authoring platform to annotate and tag connections between the library’s books, images, and themes, and using Unity 3D to visualize them. This virtual reality environment will enable contemporary audiences everywhere to "visit" this canonical space, open window shutters, move furnishings, and select books from recreated shelves.

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
Ligeia Lugli (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Senja Pollack (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

HAA-277246-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$97,384 (approved)
$97,384 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 4/30/2023

Computing the Dharma: a natural language processing infrastructure to explore word meanings in Buddhist Sanskrit literature

Research into the application of natural language processing techniques to study the evolution of language in Buddhist Sanskrit texts.

This application is for a Level II DHAG. The project has two objectives: 1) to advance research in Indian Buddhism by developing semi-automated methods to study the vocabulary of Buddhist Sanskrit texts; and 2) to contribute to the Digital Humanities by refining computational methods that leverage representations of words as numerical vectors. These vector representations of language, called "word embedding models," have found wide application in industry and are gaining traction in Humanities research. Due to their technical complexity, however, the full potential of cutting-edge word embedding techniques is rarely deployed in the Humanities, and best practices for reliably applying them to the study of historical texts are yet to be drafted. This project brings together Natural Language Processing experts and Buddhist Sanskrit scholars to devise and test new methods for harnessing the power of latest-generation word embedding techniques for historical textual scholarship.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Stephanie Sapienza (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Eric Hoyt (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

HAA-277247-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$294,265 (approved)
$270,311 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 6/30/2023

Broadcasting Audiovisual Data: Using linked data and local authority aggregators to enhance discoverability for broadcasting collections

The federation of three archival radio collections held by the University of Maryland, the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the University of Minnesota using a linked open data framework for use by scholars, students, and the general public. Several case studies using the collections will be developed to demonstrate the project’s potential use by different audiences.

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Madison seeks Level III funding for a project entitled 'Broadcasting Audiovisual Data: Using linked data and local authority aggregators.' The project will expand the capabilities developed during the creation of the NEH-funded 'Unlocking the Airwaves' project (PW-259067-18) to virtually connect four historic collections across three institutions: University of Maryland, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and University of Minnesota which contain overlapping and complementary archival radio broadcasts. By linking these collections, we will deliver an innovative linked data framework that enables robust research across a number of fields, including media studies, cultural history, and sociology. The project will be a model for future initiatives that seek to connect and contextualize disbursed a/v collections.

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Andrew Kissel (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
John Shull (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Krzysztof Rechowicz (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)

HAA-277270-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$85,161 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

Philosophical Thought Experiments in Virtual Reality

The development and testing of virtual reality-based philosophical thought experiments for both classroom teaching and research.

Philosophers present hypothetical scenarios called “thought experiments” to analyze philosophical concepts. This project modifies, extends, and disseminates ongoing work to develop VR scenarios based on the popular “trolley problem” thought experiment, a hypothetical dilemma involving a choice between five deaths and one death. By presenting thought experiments in VR (instead of written presentations), we can address previous concerns that thought experiments are too abstract to be of much use in theorizing, research, and education, and that they do not accurately reflect widespread philosophical beliefs. The scenarios will be disseminated, along with a pilot study data set, via an online and modifiable repository for VR thought experiments. The project will conclude with a symposium to discuss challenges, opportunities, and recommendations for humanities-based research using VR and to promote the use of and ongoing additions to the repository.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
David Mimno (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Melanie Walsh (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

HAA-277275-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$46,074 (approved)
$39,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

BERT for Humanists: Anticipating the Reception of Contemporary NLP in Digital Humanities

The development of an open-source toolkit and workshop series that will begin to address these fundamental barriers to the adoption of BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) by humanities scholars interested in large-scale text analysis.

We propose to study the potential impact of a new paradigm in natural language processing for humanities research. Contextual embedding methods like BERT have become central to contemporary NLP by offering a high-level numeric representation of individual word tokens in their context. We expect that humanists will start to be increasingly interested in using BERT-like methods, but based on our experience with similar waves in topic modeling and word embeddings there is a lot that we don’t yet know. The applications, tools, protocols, and mental models that humanists will find compelling are almost certainly different from those familiar or expected by NLP researcher. We will bring together researchers with experience at the intersection of NLP and humanities to identify both potential use cases as well as potential obstacles. Using these insights we will develop initial case studies, tools, and training materials.

University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Scott Branting (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Joseph Kider (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)
Lori C. Walters (Co Project Director: November 2020 to present)

HAA-277278-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals (outright + matching):
$375,000 (approved)
$318,462 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH): Damage Assessment and Digital Preservation

Development of augmented reality software for rapidly documenting cultural heritage artifacts from archaeology and related disciplines while doing fieldwork.

The Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH) project will, building on the successful prototype created using funding provided by an NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Level II grant, further develop DATCH open-source software for field assessment and documentation of built and movable cultural heritage using augmented reality hardware. It will permit real-time overlay comparisons of cultural heritage against earlier documentation and enable creation of to scale drawings, even in the field without a network connection. An internet connection will allow additional features, such as video calls with subject experts, to facilitate rapid needs assessments of heritage sites and enable on-site multi-disciplinary collaborations. With our goal of creating a cross platform system for head-mounted augmented reality devices, DATCH will continue to be developed in Unity and field-tested with different versions of Microsoft’s HoloLens and Magic Leap One.

Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)
Brian Goldstein (Project Director: June 2020 to present)
Francesca Russello Ammon (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Garrett Dash Nelson (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)

HAA-277284-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$85,939 (approved)
$85,392 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Sunset Over Sunset: Exploring the Street-Level View of Postwar Urban Redevelopment Using Ed Ruscha’s Los Angeles Photography

The creation of computational methods to stitch together large collections of photographs and to then layer in historical data to allow for new insights about rapid postwar urban change and development.

Sunset over Sunset proposes an interactive website that maps Ed Ruscha’s newly-digitized Los Angeles photographic archive to visualize everyday patterns of urban redevelopment. By bringing together five years of street-view photography--covering 1966-2007--along six miles of Sunset Boulevard, and sources including the US Census, occupancy records, and newspapers, the project will explore small-scale urban change in a manner never before possible. Sunset over Sunset illuminates vernacular forms of redevelopment that have been overshadowed by large-scale projects and shifts the locus of historical agency from top-down planners to tenants and others whose modest gestures substantively shaped the postwar city. The project advances the digital humanities by building replicable toolkits for making street-level photographs broadly accessible as primary sources and by joining visual and non-visual evidence to create a novel resource for place-based research by scholars and the general public.

Shift Design, Inc. (New Orleans, LA 70117-6726)
Jon Voss (Project Director: July 2020 to January 2021)
Lynette Johnson (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-277313-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$374,903 (approved)
$374,903 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Historypin for Collaborative Public Humanities Programs

Redesign and redevelopment of the collaborative public digital humanities platform, Historypin.

This project will improve three key elements of the Historypin platform to provide further support for historical geospatial exploration and analysis for scholarly research and public programming in the humanities. The 2-year project will implement new site designs that enable easier use for digital humanities scholars and small cultural heritage organizations that were developed in user studies during a recent Phase I award. We’ll focus on three humanities project areas, including: Preservation, Place and Narrative; Collaboration in University Digital Humanities; and Collaborative Public History Programs. Each project area will be showcased by programs run by members of our Digital Humanities Advisory Panel and explore particular humanities questions.

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Austin Chad Hill (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Jesse J. Casana (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Kathleen D. Morrison (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280669-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,962 (approved)
$99,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Archaeorover - Harnessing autonomous robot technology to reveal buried archaeology

Prototyping of an autonomous robot that will utilize Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to search for historically and archaeologically significant artifacts and sites.

Finding, identifying, and mapping buried archaeological sites and features is a critical component of archaeological research. The most powerful tools to do this are non-destructive geophysical prospection technologies such as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). These tools have been used to identify buried architecture, artifacts, fields, roads, ditches, and stratigraphic sequences. However, the established field techniques for collecting this data are slow and limiting, requiring initial surveys and the manual recording of small individual grids. This proposal seeks a level-II grant to support continued development and deployment of a novel autonomous robot, the Archaeorover, that dramatically increases the efficiency and scale of geophysical survey by combining recent advances in robotics, autonomous navigation technology, and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with geophysical instruments

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Virginia Steel (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Dawn Childress (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280677-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Sinai Manuscripts Data Portal Project

The development of a Linked Open Data (LOD) web application to provide access to the data for contextualizing the digitized manuscripts of St. Catherine’s Monastery in the Sinai Peninsula that are hosted by the University of California, Los Angeles.

This proposal seeks Level III funding for the Sinai Manuscripts Data Portal, a web-based Linked Open Data application in support of a comprehensive data program that will both define and provide access to the rich data that describe and contextualize the manuscripts of St. Catherine’s Monastery.

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum (Santa Fe, NM 87501-1826)
Liz Neely (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280680-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Reimagining the Georgia O'Keeffe Catalogue Raisonné Digitally

The planning stages to develop a digital catalogue raisonné for Georgia O'Keeffe, which will allow scholars and the public to engage with O'Keeffe's works.  

The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum seeks a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to envision a new type of digital publication to enhance scholarly discourse around the life, art and contexts of Georgia O’Keeffe. In the field of art history, catalogues raisonnés are critical in researching and understanding the full arc of an artist’s output, exhibitions, provenance, and publication histories. A 1999 print edition of the "Georgia O’Keeffe Catalogue Raisonné" is out of date and has limited access. Working with a cross-disciplinary group of scholars, this project proposes research and processes investigating the possibilities for updating the Georgia O’Keeffe Catalogue Raisonné in a digital format as a generative and collaborative form of humanities-based scholarship. The Museum will publish its findings in a white paper as well as develop a project plan for implementing this new digital research tool.

Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA 30332-0415)
Nathaniel Condit-Schultz (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Claire Arthur (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280706-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,983 (approved)
$99,893 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 7/31/2023

humdrumR: A user-friendly software package for computational music analysis

A set of software tools and instructional materials that will facilitate the computational analysis of musical scores. 

Musicology research is a humanistic endeavor well suited to computational methods. Yet, despite the work of a small niche of scholars, most humanistic music scholarship is conducted via traditional, non-digital techniques. This research vacuum has been largely filled by those pursuing digital music research from a largely engineering perspective - the field of Music Information Retrieval. Unfortunately, this research often lacks crucial humanistic knowledge and perspective. We seek NEH funding to produce a set of software tools and pedagogical materials for computational musicology analysis which are appealing and accessible to musicologists and music theorists. Our project is based off a well-established computational musicology framework, humdrum. Our project modernizes and expands the humdrum ecosystem (consisting of a toolkit and unique data format), introducing a new software package called humdrumR (hum-drummer), and will include online computational musicology tutorials.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Elisa Gironzetti (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280770-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$49,987 (approved)
$49,987 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Multimodal Corpus of Heritage Spanish

Protocol development, data collection, and preliminary analysis of a multimodal corpus representing the written and oral discourse of regional Spanish heritage speakers in the United States. 

We are applying to the Level I DHAG in order to support the initial stages of a large innovative project with the end goal of creating the first annotated, bilingual, multimodal corpus of written and oral discourse produced by heritage speakers of Spanish in the U. S. in English and Spanish. The corpus will include speakers from different sociolinguistic generations of the understudied and underrepresented varieties spoken in the DMV (the DC-Maryland-Virginia area). The project will engage scholars, educators, and students in the field of Spanish as a heritage language (SHL) as well as members of the Latinx community to create an open-access online resource that will facilitate the study of SHL discourse and support research in languages in contact, bilingualism, and heritage language discourse, and serve as a digital repository representing the voices and experiences of the diverse population of Latinx Spanish heritage speakers from the DMV area.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Angela Sutton (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280775-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,442 (approved)
$99,442 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Building a Searchable Database for Collections of the Enslaved & Free Builders and Defenders of Nashville's Civil War Fortifications: A Community-Driven Linked Data Approach

The development of a database of the enslaved and free Black builders and defenders of Nashville's Civil War Fortification through the use of community-driven linked data using the Spatial Historian platform.

This proposal requests funds to build a searchable database of aggregate data and transcribed microfilm collections of the enslaved and free Black builders and defenders of Nashville's Civil War Fortifications. The project proposes to take a linked data approach to upload community-sourced material about the Civil War in Nashville and make them available under a Creative Commons license using the Spatial Historian, a customizable historical and geospatial information system. The system allows for the extraction and analysis of the documents to integrate simultaneously the collection of data, extraction of content, and analysis and visualizations of the information according to customizations which are dictated by the public history and heritage community’s needs. The resulting product will be a website by and for public historians that allows for dynamic querying of the data, network and map visualizations, and the linking of data to other repositories of slavery and the US military.

University of Rochester (Rochester, NY 14627-0001)
Michael J. Jarvis (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280830-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,874 (approved)
$99,874 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Black Past Lives Matter: Digital Kormantin

Development, prototyping, and testing of a virtual heritage tour of Kormantin (Abandze), Ghana, an early Atlantic Slave Trade port.

Black Past Lives Matter:Digital Kormantin uses 3 intertwined interactive virtual heritage tours of a Ghanaian slave trade fort to educate a global public about the Atlantic slave trade and its continuing legacy. Kormantin was England’s first permanent African slave trade base and an important but poorly known site in African American history. Our team of archaeologists, historians, computer scientists, digital media and videogame designers, and Ghanaian heritage scholars will use reconstructed and reality-captured 3D models to let users visit the site as it is today, midway through archaeological excavations in 2019, and as it was in 1790. In making free self-guided photorealistic explorations of a key World Heritage Site, our digital portal offers an example of how to expand accessibility to historic sites while showing how scholars use documents, archaeological evidence, and oral history to interpret a complex, painful past at a slave trade site that operated for more than 250 years.

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Andrew McGraw (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Joanna Katherine Love (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280975-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$47,357 (approved)
$47,357 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

America’s Music Scenes in the Age of Social Media

A series of workshops to identify best practices for automatically collecting and archiving online data about musical events.

Our project responds to a new crisis in American music scholarship: the digital revolution has led to the digitization or dissolution of traditional archival sources (like newspapers and magazines) crucial to studying local music scenes. And while existing web archiving projects capture some relevant content, they are biased towards established genres and artists and miss most events advertised solely through social media—a difficult dataset to capture, yet essential to understanding 21st-century music-making. This project thus convenes fourteen interdisciplinary humanities scholars and technologists to: 1) explore and propose best practices for automatically collecting and archiving digital music event data by geographic location; 2) develop a pilot sample of music-related social media data and; 3) build upon previous Digital Humanities work to analyze the datasets and reveal their humanistic potential for future scholarship.

Fort Lewis College (Durango, CO 81301-3999)
Janine Marie Fitzgerald (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Carolina Alonso (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280976-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,981 (approved)
$99,981 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Yo Soy Porque Tú Eres: recursos para el aprendizaje de Español en contexto (resources for teaching Spanish in context)

Development of a free online OER (open educational resource) for teaching Spanish language using humanities collections and cultural experiences of Latinx in the US for all learners. 

Yo Soy Porque Tú Eres: recursos para el aprendizaje de Español en contexto (I Am Because You Are: resources for teaching Spanish in context) project will be a free digital platform that promotes U.S. Hispano/Latinx texts as resources to learn Spanish in the undergraduate classroom. The platform is organized around both themes of identity, trauma and resistance, and traditional knowledge and around skill levels. The platform provides digital pedagogical tools to allow students to not only analyze the texts, but to also tell their own stories in Spanish. We also encourage users to submit content and ideas to increase performance and robustness.

Allegheny College (Meadville, PA 16335-3902)
Xiaoling Shi (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280982-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Media coverage]

Totals:
$48,356 (approved)
$48,355 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

An Engaging Digital Curriculum for Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture

Convening a three-day meeting bringing together Chinese language scholars, instructors, and digital technologists to design a free online curriculum for teaching Chinese language in a cultural context. 

Our proposed curriculum intends to advance a pedagogical shift in language teaching by taking up opportunities afforded by Web 2.0 to explore ways to improve communicative competence and develop critical cultural awareness. Three characteristics are: creating an immersive learning environment by pulling in rich resources from the online world; engaging learners by utilizing online engagement tools/platforms and social media; developing critical cultural awareness by taking advantage of the immersion and engagement created. It will serve as a model for curriculum design not only for other less commonly taught languages, but also for language and culture teaching as a whole. A Level 1 grant will enable Allegheny College to convene a conference to collect comments and feedback on experiments and innovations made in classrooms and revise them accordingly. The project will culminate with a white paper and a website delineating if, why, and how the digital curriculum will achieve its goals.

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Wendy Belcher (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280988-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2024

Increasing Access to and Developing Digital Tools for Early African Literature: The Princeton Ethiopian, Egyptian, and Eritrean Miracles of Mary Project

The creation of a web-based platform and tools to enable scholars to search and engage with a unique online collection of African literature.

The Princeton Ethiopian, Egyptian, and Eritrean Miracles of Mary project (PEMM) is working to provide scholars and students with access to data about the hundreds of vivid stories written for centuries in Egypt, Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia about the miracles that the Virgin Mary performed for the faithful, whether sinners or saints. Emerging out of the ancient African Christian tradition and in dialogue with the Islamic and Western Christian traditions, these Marian folk stories preserved in the ancient African language of G???z (classical Ethiopic) are rich repositories of intellectual history and cultural knowledge, illuminating how Africans make sense of the human in the context of precarity. PEMM is seeking funding to build a public-facing open-access web application and data portal to share the stories in, images about, translations of, and scholarship on this crucial body of medieval African literature and to build upon our innovative prototype tool for searching in G???z.

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Daryl Ray Ireland (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Eugenio Menegon (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280992-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

China Historical Christian Database: Mapping the Spatial and Social Networks of Christianity in China, 1550-1950

The development of the China Historical Christian Database that seeks to map and visualize the relationships among Chinese Christians, missionaries, and the people with whom they interacted from 1550-1950.

The China Historical Christian Database quantifies and visualizes the place of Christianity in modern China (1550-1950). It provides users the tools to discover where every Christian church, school, hospital, orphanage, publishing house, and the like were located in China, and it documents who worked inside those buildings, both foreign and Chinese. Collectively, this information creates spatial maps and generates relational networks that reveal where, when, and how Western ideas, technologies, and practices entered China. Simultaneously, it uncovers how and through whom Chinese ideas, technologies, and practices were conveyed to the West. This project breaks new ground in providing quantifiable data about modern Sino-Western relations. Scholars can interact with the data through an intuitive website, while advanced users have open access to the CHCD’s data for elaboration. Boston University’s digital infrastructure guarantees the project’s long-term sustainability.

Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1698)
Heather Hurst (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Franco Rossi (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-280996-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,990 (approved)
$49,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 12/31/2022

Architectural walking tour of ancient Maya masterpieces: Visualizations of San Bartolo and Xultun, Guatemala

The creation of an interactive online platform to present 3D models of Maya artworks that document the spread of cultural and scholarly knowledge across the region.

This project will develop a web-based platform that will interactively present and publicly curate two in situ artworks of global significance from Maya archaeological sites. The two significant finds are the San Bartolo murals and the Los Árboles temple friezes at Xultun, Guatemala. These artworks are tangible evidence of the hallmarks of Maya civilization that include the invention of writing, complex calendrical knowledge, and governance by divine kingship. However, located in extremely remote jungles and buried by the ancient Maya, these important artifacts of Indigenous Maya cultural heritage are nearly impossible to access and visitors to the sealed tunnels threaten their very preservation. Our innovative digital models will expand virtual tours beyond well-known, highly-traveled sites and bring spectacular buried Maya architectural masterpieces to scholars, students, and the public through an open access, bilingual 3D interface—usable in digital research, teaching, and learning.

CyArk (Oakland, CA 94612-3017)
John Ristevski (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-280997-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$41,042 (approved)
$41,042 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 6/30/2023

Expanding and Redesigning Open Heritage 3D

Two field surveys and a virtual convening that will assess the use of the Open Heritage 3D platform, a repository for 3D cultural heritage data.  

The goal of this project is to enhance the Open Heritage 3D (OH3D) platform – an open access repository of 3D cultural heritage data. Through two surveys targeting 3D content creators and OH3D end users we aim to better understand the open access and data preservation requirements for publishers of data as well as identify technical barriers, IP limitations and re-use scenarios for end users and ultimately develop a plan of action to enhance the platform for both constituencies.

RFCUNY - Brooklyn College (Brooklyn, NY 11210-2850)
Johanna Catriona Devaney (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-281007-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

AMPACT: Automatic Music Performance Analysis and Comparison Toolkit

A suite of tools to enable the computational analysis of musical performances. 

This project proposes to further develop a suite of automatic software tools for quantitatively analyzing musical performances for which a corresponding musical score is available, entitled the Automatic Music Performance Analysis and Comparison Toolkit (AMPACT). Musical performance is an interesting focus of study because, unlike musical scores, a traditional object of study, the performance is what listeners actually hear. A musical performance can convey both the musicians’ interpretation of the written score as well as emphasize, or even manipulate, the emotional content of the music through small variations in timing, dynamics, and tuning. Historically, studies of recorded musical performance have made use of manual techniques, but their laboriousness limited the number of performances that could be studied and the observations that could be made. The automatic tools provided by AMPACT facilitate much larger-scale investigations than are possible with manual annotation methods.

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Lauren Frederica Klein (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-281011-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,900 (approved)
$88,729 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Data by Design: An Interactive History of Data Visualization

The creation of a born-digital publication documenting and analyzing the history of data visualization from the 18th century to the present.

Data by Design: An Interactive History of Data Visualization is a born-digital, open-access, book-length publication that offers a new history of data visualization from the eighteenth century to the present. Through a set of five interactive narratives, Data by Design challenges the common belief that visualizations of data simply "reveal" the significance of the data underneath. This project shows, instead, how visualizations always carry a set of implicit assumptions-and, at times, explicit arguments-about how knowledge is produced, and who is authorized to produce it. The project moves chronologically, blending humanistic analyses of historical visualization examples, culled from archival research, with interactive digital recreations of those same designs. The project's custom web platform, collaboratively built with a student development team, taken with its technical features and scholarly content, model a new form of digital humanities scholarship to the academy and beyond.

University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)
Olivia Wikle (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Kate Thornhill (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Gabriele Hayden (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-281018-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$49,919 (approved)
$49,919 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Powering Digital Humanities Teaching and Learning with Static Web Approaches

The development and testing of curricular modules for teaching the CollectionsBuilder static web tool in humanities classes.

The University of Idaho (UI) Library and University of Oregon (UO) Libraries seek support of a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant in the amount of $49,919 to create, test, evaluate, and release curricular project templates for humanities courses that use minimal computing concepts and static web technologies to enhance student experience with humanities data, web technologies, and collaborative development.

Wichita State University (Wichita, KS 67260-9700)
Darren DeFrain (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-281022-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Media coverage]

Totals:
$99,915 (approved)
$99,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

Graphic Narrative Accessibility: Encoding Images for Blind and Visually Impaired (and Sighted) Readers and Researchers

The development and release of a beta-level app to improve accessibility of graphic and visual narratives for blind and low-visioned readers, together with a searchable database of encoded visual narratives that will enable analysis by humanities scholars and students.

The Graphic Narrative Accessibility App (GNAA) project will provide an equitable, robust reading experience to help all readers hear, interact and experience comics and graphic novels in a number of fully accessible ways. Drawing on psycholinguistic theory and utilizing haptic (vibratory) computer responses, the app will help blind and visually impaired readers understand page layout and other artistic and spatial design elements previously unavailable. As comics and graphic novels continue to gain in popularity in K-12 and college classrooms, schools must comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990 by having an equitable, accessible version of each work taught. All users will enjoy the ability to have parts or whole sections read aloud at one touch, plus each work will come fully translated into several languages. Finally, this novel approach will also use TEI coding to help make comics and graphic novels searchable for research and archival purposes.

City of Austin (Austin, TX 78768-2287)
Jennifer Elizabeth Chenoweth (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

HAA-281028-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2023

Creating Community: A Geographical Approach to Inclusive History at Oakwood Cemetery

The creation of an innovative digital model to help determine the location of and provide historical context for marginalized individuals in unmarked graves in an Austin, Texas cemetery.

To construct a digital model of a three-acre segregated section of a historic cemetery. Men, women and children buried in the 1800s were of African American, Mexican American, and European American heritage; segregated due to race and class. This Level I grant project completes a 3D spatial analysis of monuments and adds the potential burial locations of approximately 88% of burials that people cannot “see.” Less than 300 monuments exist in this three-acre area that holds 2,731 burials. Therefore, it is difficult for the public to imagine that this grassy area is full of the unmarked graves of people who were marginalized in both life and in death. Poorly kept and incomplete records add to the frustrations of people researching their ancestors or cultural history. Our model of this area combines photography and lidar, adding historic data including photo, video, exhibits and legacy maps. The project culminates in community outreach call for additional historical information.

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Marilyn Thomas-Houston (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-281030-21
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$375,000 (approved)
$375,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Building Literacy and Curating (Critical Cultural) Knowledge in Black Humanities: BLACK DH

Building of a digital hub and virtual community to support humanities research, teaching, and public engagement using digitized collections of African American literature available in the History of Black Writing project.

At a time when DH extends its reach into all areas of scholarly research and production, and with discussions of race more central than ever to academic and public discourse, the DH community must account for the ways in which it provides access to experiences and materials that have been marginalized. In response to this need, the Project on the History of Black Writing seeks funding for Building Literacy and Curating [Critical Cultural] Knowledge in Digital Humanities (BLACK DH), a 3-year project in community building that removes economic, social and technological barriers to DH learning and provides space for dialogue, debate, advancing knowledge and generating public-facing scholarship. Driven by 3 goals: building knowledge networks, content creation and pipeline development, BLACK DH will focus on the use of black materials to explore questions of humanity and diversity in American society through the increased involvement of those who remain outside the current DH network.

Unicode Consortium (Mountain View, CA 94043-3941)
Gabrielle Vail (Project Director: June 2019 to December 2022)

HAA-268887-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$99,990 (approved)
$99,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2021

Classic Maya Text Repository: An open-access collaborative platform for research and annotation of encoded hieroglyphic texts

The development of an open-access, online collaborative platform and repository of Maya hieroglyphic texts for use by scholars and descendent communities. This project contributes to the longer-term endeavor to expand the international Unicode Standard repertoire to include the Maya script.

Our Level II project seeks to annotate Classic period (ca. 250-900 CE) Maya hieroglyphic texts from the Northern lowlands, Central Peten, and Western regions and make them accessible for study online. Using an open-access online platform for annotating ancient documents (READ), texts from the Postclassic Maya codices (ca. 1250 – 1519 CE) that were digitally rendered during the project’s previous phase will be published in digital form for public use. Concurrently, select Classic period inscriptions will be encoded and annotated using READ, resulting in a repository of digitally encoded Maya hieroglyphic texts. These texts form an important part of the dataset of Maya literature extending from the second century BCE through the colonial, republican, and more recent periods—an almost unbroken record spanning two millennia. Through these tools, online users have the ability to examine, query, manage, edit, annotate, and render Maya texts in ways not previously imaginable.

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Jessica DeSpain (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Emily J. Rau (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Melissa J. Homestead (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

Participating institutions:
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL) - Applicant/Recipient
Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE) - Participating Institution

HAA-268984-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$45,267 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2022

Society for the Study of American Women Writers Recovery Hub

A series of planning activities to create a network of scholars (or “hub”) to surface works by women writers through digital methods and also provide support, mentorship, and peer-review services for women in the digital humanities.

The project team is seeking a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to plan a digital recovery hub that will operate as a network of scholars grounded in diverse feminist methods under the umbrella of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW). The hub will provide a much-needed resource for project consultation and technical assistance for scholars engaged in the recovery of the works of American women writers from all periods. The hub's broader goals are to: 1) reinvigorate the value of digital scholarship as a recovery method by extending traditional editing projects with network mapping, spatial analysis, and the distant reading of massive datasets; 2) provide support for projects at a variety of levels; 3) act as a feminist peer reviewing body for in-process work; and 4) build a community of use to help recovery projects reach broader audiences by interfacing with SSAWW’s membership and journal Legacy.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Alexander Raymond Jones (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269004-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,761 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 10/31/2023

Shanati: Reconstructing the Daily Ancient Babylonian Chronology in Synchronization with the Proleptic Julian Calendar

A reconstruction of ancient chronology combining textual and astronomical data that will allow scholars to identify when past events took place with greater precision.

The goal of this project is to reconstruct the Babylonian Chronology of the 1st millennium BCE, the ancient old world's foremost calendar, with daily granularity on the basis of cuneiform economic and scholarly textual evidence, in consonance with a retrojective astronomical model of first moon visibility. The basic results will be presented in terms of the proleptic Julian Calendar. The project will gather the textual data from scholarly databases and publications, integrate them in a custom database and present its results through a high-end website, with embeddable widget and API access, as well as via print publication. The project targets the scholarly, lay, and undergraduate and high school educational audiences.

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Jinah Kim (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269007-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$99,017 (approved)
$94,245 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 2/28/2023

Mapping Color in History

The development of a pilot database and visualization tools that will allow users to search a large collection of paintings by pigment and to determine the time and location where particular works of art were painted based on the availability of pigments.

Mapping Color in History [MCH] brings together the scientific data drawn from existing and on-going material analyses of pigments in Asian painting in a historical perspective. As a digital portal with a searchable online database, MCH will not only document pigments and their material properties, but also enable an in-depth historical analysis of pigment data through a search tool that will identify specific examples and their locations in both time and space. It takes an object-based method for data collection instead of a pigment-based organization scheme. By developing a database model that can normalize fragmentary and uneven data, MCH will help scholars to bring together disparate data that is difficult to find or compare. A Level II NEH grant will support the completion of a pilot database of historical pigments linked to paintings, locations, times and a visualization tool that will allow users to search the database for entries that match a particular pigment.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Edward Triplett (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Philip J. Stern (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269013-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,339 (approved)
$99,339 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 6/30/2023

The Sandcastle Workflow: A Malleable System for Visualizing Pre-modern Maps and Views

Designing and implementing new spatial humanities practices to visualize and interpret pre-modern spaces, using the Portuguese text, Livro das Fortalezas, or Book of Fortresses, as a case study.

Spatial humanities projects have long struggled to find a suitable platform for representing pre-modern concepts of space and place. GIS has served as the dominant platform, but its core paradigm – that historical data should be layered and often stretched (georectified) to fit modern Cartesian cartography – is particularly problematic for scholars who study medieval and early modern maps and views. Our solution proposes a workflow that integrates GIS, CAD, and the Unity game engine to build a malleable mapping environment that forgoes the concept of historical layers in favor of linked views that allow simultaneous navigation among original sources, modern cartography, and virtual landscapes. Using work already begun on a 16th-century Portuguese chorography known as the Book of Fortresses as our primary and initial case study, this ”Sandcastle Workflow” proposes a method for confronting a range of pre-modern spatial idiosyncrasies that GIS alone has proven incapable of visualizing.

Marshall University Research Corporation (Huntington, WV 25701-2218)
David J. Trowbridge (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269019-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$128,559 (approved)
$128,559 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2021

Accessibility in Digital Humanities: Making Clio Available to All

A collaboration between Marshall University and the American Foundation for the Blind to develop enhanced accessibility features and related user documentation for the Clio project, a platform that allows educators and cultural institutions to design mobile tours for exploring local history and culture.

Our team of humanities scholars and developers will work with the American Foundation for the Blind to make Clio accessible. The team will share lessons learned and hopes to become a model for other public-facing digital humanities projects.

Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA 30332-0415)
Todd Michney (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Brad Rittenhouse (Co Project Director: December 2019 to present)

HAA-269020-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$99,991 (approved)
$99,991 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Hidden Histories: Digitally Processing, Analyzing, and Visualizing Large Archives in Omeka

Development of plugins for the Omeka platform to enable large-scale text processing and data visualizations for digitized collections, using the Mayor Ivan Allen Digital Archive as one test case.

We are applying for an NEH grant to produce an Omeka plugin suite that leverages new visual and digital methodologies, enabling researchers and archivists to explore sizeable digital archives with minimal technical barriers. The resulting tool will allow users to produce key metadata and explore these archives by connecting the important entities they contain semantically and visually. It processes the entirety of a collection, so that queries return a more intuitive collection of significant entities within the collection, allowing users to navigate visually and semantically from an initial point of interest to all connected points in the archive. We have already produced a working prototype of the system, which Georgia Tech scholars are currently using for research. Primarily, the grant will provide us with time and resources to lead a team of Georgia Tech student researchers in the development of the platform.

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Kevin C. Nolan (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
John Fillwalk (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269032-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$99,996 (approved)
$99,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Virtual World Heritage Ohio

The development and testing of a prototype of an interactive three-dimensional simulation of the Newark Earthworks, one of Ohio’s Hopewell ceremonial centers.

People the world over build monuments to connect land and sky, structuring human experience of the cosmic through their creations. When built of earth, these monuments degrade in ways that obscure the intended earth-sky connection and meaning ascribed to it. We overcome some of these challenges by employing recent digital technologies to virtually reconstruct one of the most significant earthworks built by the American Indian people of the Hopewell Culture. With a Level II grant, Virtual World Heritage Ohio develops a full digital model and virtual exploration prototype of the Octagon Earthworks--a Hopewell culture site on the U.S. Tentative List for World Heritage. The publicly accessible prototype builds upon the existing CERHAS reconstructions, expanding avenues for humanities scholarship while broadening public understanding of and appreciation for these significant American Indian monuments.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Allyssa Anne Guzman (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269051-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$303,277 (approved)
$291,477 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2022

Enabling and Reusing Multilingual Citizen Contributions in the Archival Record

Enabling multilingual citizen contributions to an existing open-source platform for transcribing and translating historical documents and adding these contributions to the archival record.

This project seeks $302,477 in support to enhance FromThePage (FtP), an open-source platform for the collaborative transcription, translation, and indexing of texts, with the intent to enable multilingual citizen contributions to DH activities (Part 1) and reuse these citizen contributions in the archival record (Part 2). The expected outcomes include platform restructuring to enable multilingual versions of FtP, a Spanish and Portuguese translation of the interface and user guides, enhanced support for object metadata and faceted browsing, additional export options to facilitate the use of machine-readable textual outputs in other digital scholarship tools, and workflows to incorporate citizen contributions into the archival and digital asset management system record.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Heather Marie Richards-Rissetto (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Karin Michelle Dalziel (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269061-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021

Revitalizing and Enhancing the Open Source 3D WebGIS of the MayaArch3D Project

Planning for the revitalization of the MayaArch3D project and documentation for using 3D WebGIS data in digital scholarship.

This level I project revitalizes and enhances the 3D WebGIS component of the MayaArch3D Project, which integrates 3D models of cities, terrain, and objects with associated, geo-referenced data for humanities scholarship. First, we will review the existing code of the 3D WebGIS. Second, we will define concrete steps to (1) make the system more customizable and extensible (2) add functionality for dynamic interchange of 3D models (3) develop a friendlier UX (User Experience), and (4) revamp the infrastructure to store and call up 3D models from an open source repository. Broader project outcomes enhance the humanities in several ways: (1) documentation for a customizable open source 3D WebGIS (2) 3D WebGIS for data management and preservation for cultural heritage, (3) 3D WebGIS to foster scholarly collaboration , and (4) contribute to 3D digital data preservation and access by designing infrastructure in collaboration with libraries.

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Sarah Catherine Stanley (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269062-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$30,117 (approved)
$30,117 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 8/31/2022

Data Repository Infrastructure for Prosopographic Data

A workshop for humanities scholars and librarians on the long-term storage and maintenance requirements for prosopographic data.

This Level I project will convene a 3-day meeting of experts in prosopographic data, repository infrastructure, and humanities data to determine the requirements for a prosopographies-specific data repository. This project will seek to answer questions about the metadata required, the techinical requirements, and potential user base for such a repository.

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Stephen Ramsay (Project Director: June 2019 to present)
Susan L. Wiesner (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Brian L. Pytlik Zillig (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269065-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$21,744 (approved)
$15,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2023

Digital Notation Across the Movement-Based Arts

A workshop for scholars and practitioners to develop standard methods for digitally notating dance and other movement-based arts to enable easier preservation and analysis.

A Level I proposal for a three-day workshop that draws together a small group of experts in the areas of (traditional) dance notation and digital data modeling. This working group aims to lay the groundwork for the creation of a digital notation format for the movement-based arts that can interoperate with other media-based tools.

Utah Valley University (Orem, UT 84058-0001)
Rodney Smith (Project Director: June 2019 to August 2020)
Scott Paul (Project Director: August 2020 to October 2022)
Verlan Lewis (Project Director: October 2022 to present)
Scott Paul (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

HAA-269067-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$374,791 (approved)
$374,791 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 10/31/2023

"Digital Modeling of Western State Constitutional Conventions by Undergraduates: Extending the Quill Project"

Extending the Quill Project to include additional research by undergraduate history students to help create a digital model of archival materials that document US state constitutional conventions.

The Center for Constitutional Studies (CCS) at Utah Valley University requests NEH level-III support of $324,791, with an added match of $50,000, for a major expansion of its undergraduate-led digital modeling of state constitutional conventions. Building upon our completion of an interactive edition of the Utah convention records, an accomplishment enabled by a partnership with Oxford University’s Quill Project, we propose to model three more state conventions from the American west. State constitutionalism is a neglected field, especially with the western states; moreover, Quill’s software cannot be enhanced without more attempts to apply it. CCS would hire five student employees to do the modeling, purchase an additional server for the sake of upgrading Quill’s user-friendliness, and hold a conference where we share our findings and encourage other universities to model a convention. Overall, our project would spur academic research and digital advancement in tandem.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Trevor Muñoz (Project Director: June 2019 to present)

HAA-269068-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,993 (approved)
$98,906 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 12/31/2022

Advancing Community Digital Collections through Minimal Computing: The Lakeland Digital Archive

The redesign of the Lakeland Digital Archive using minimal computing approaches and the creation of tutorials to teach other community organizations how to build and maintain digital public humanities projects.

Residents of Lakeland, a 130-year-old African American community adjacent to the University of Maryland (UMD) have worked for more than 10 years to document, preserve, and share their cultural heritage. Their ambition has been to capture a history that covers African American life in the long 20th century in their own voices as community members. This project will develop a working prototype of the Lakeland Digital Archive to demonstrate how digital humanities methods such as minimal computing can enhance community-led projects by empowering them to build digital publications that are resilient, shareable online and off, and amenable to models of shared governance. Continuing an existing community-university partnership, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) will collaborate on this Level II grant with the Lakeland Community Heritage Project (LCHP) and other local partners.

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115-2214)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: January 2020 to September 2020)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Erin Bell (Co Project Director: May 2020 to present)

HAA-271574-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$79,568 (approved)
$79,510 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022

PlacePress: A WordPress Plugin for Publishing Location-based Tours and Stories

The development, testing, and release of PlacePress, a plugin for WordPress, for designing and launching digital public humanities projects. 

We seek a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to develop PlacePress, a WordPress plugin that enables humanities scholars, content experts, or organizations to create and share interpretive location-based tours and stories easily, affordably, and sustainably using the world's most ubiquitous content management system. The project will generate three use cases in collaboration with institutional partners in support of ongoing public humanities initiatives, as well as usability testing with a focus group drawn from identified target users.

University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2009)
Kirsten Delegard (Project Director: January 2020 to present)

HAA-271653-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals (outright + matching):
$374,460 (approved)
$374,460 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2023

Mapping Racial Covenants in the United States: A Technical Toolkit

To expand and refine a set of digital tools and workflows to generate and map datasets of racial covenants from communities across the United States within one web platform.

Through a process of experimentation over the last four years, Mapping Prejudice has developed a powerful, new methodology that combines optical character recognition (OCR), crowd-sourcing and geographic information science (GIS), to map racial covenants found in property deeds at an unprecedented level of granularity. This has allowed the project to create a comprehensive spatial dataset of racial covenants for Hennepin County, Minnesota (Minneapolis and the surrounding suburbs)—the first such dataset in the country. The Mapping Prejudice team will leverage what it has learned from mapping racial covenants in Hennepin County to open up new opportunities for public engagement and research on the history of segregation and the urban environment in the United States.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
David Bamman (Project Director: January 2020 to present)

HAA-271654-20
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$324,874 (approved)
$292,054 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2023

Multilingual BookNLP: Building a Literary NLP Pipeline Across Languages

The expansion of the BookNLP platform for studying the linguistic structure of textual materials to allow for the analysis of resources in Spanish, Japanese, Russian and German.

BookNLP (Bamman et al., 2014) is a natural language processing pipeline for reasoning about the linguistic structure of text of books, specifically designed for works of fiction. In addition to its pipeline of part-of-speech tagging, named entity recognition, and coreference resolution, BookNLP identifies the characters in a literary text, and represents them through the actions they participate in, the objects they possess, their attributes, and dialogue. The availability of this tool has driven much work in the computational humanities, especially surrounding character (Underwood et al., 2018; Kraicer and Piper, 2018; Dubnicek et al., 2018). At the same time, however, BookNLP has one major limitation: it currently only supports texts written in English. The goal of this project is to develop a version of BookNLP to support literature in Spanish, Japanese, Russian and German, and create a blueprint for others to develop it for additional languages in the future.