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Program: Digital Humanities Advancement Grants*
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HAA-266457-19

Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
James John Connolly (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Library Circulation Histories Workshop

A workshop on Library Circulation Histories to be hosted at Ball State University's Center for Middletown Studies. The workshop will bring together representatives from eleven library and reading history digital projects along with additional scholars and digital humanities developers to investigate making historical library circulation data more accessible for humanities research.

Ball State University's (BSU) Center for Middletown Studies, in conjunction with BSU's Digital Scholarship Lab, seeks a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to support the Library Circulation Histories Workshop, to be held March 6-7, 2020. The project period will run from September 1, 2019 to August 31, 2020. The aim of the Workshop is to make historical library circulation data more accessible and more analytically powerful. The Workshop assembles scholars and developers representing eleven (or more) library and reading history projects to share insights and develop new strategies or increasing the value for these already powerful research tools. Topics addressed will include the use of computational text analysis, network analysis, ethical issues, and data aggregation. The Workshop will result in published articles in a special issue/section of one or more journals, an online video recording of the conference, and a white paper on best practices.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,900 (approved)
$49,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HAA-266462-19

Trustees of Tufts College (Boston, MA 02111-1817)
Gregory R. Crane (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Beyond Translation: New Possibilities for Reading in a Digital Age

An expansion of the widely-used Perseus Digital Library to integrate reading tools that are designed to facilitate the study of ancient texts and the ability to conduct searches for relevant words and phrases.

Our goal in this Level III project is to promote a fundamental change in how human beings view translations and the cultures of which their original source text is a product. To support this larger goal we integrate into the emerging new version of Perseus new reading tools that we have developed as separate applications over the past decade: (1) the ability to produce, automatically and manually, word and phrase level alignments between source texts and translations and to see these alignments while reading; (2) the ability to view the full morphological and syntactic analysis of each word in a text; (3) new forms of searching and browsing based on this new data (e.g., find all English words used to translate a word or to view all subject/verb, adjective/noun combinations); (4) both large scale work (alignment of 50 million words of English to Greek and Latin) as well as focused projects (e.g., a bilingual edition of Homer).

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$375,000 (approved)
$286,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2022


HAA-266465-19

North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
David R. Ambaras (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Kate Linette McDonald (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)

Using Scalar to Deep-Map Modern East Asian History

The further development of the Bodies and Structures series on East Asian history and geospatial studies. As part of the project, the Scalar publishing platform would be improved to allow for the incorporation of additional spatial visualizations.

Cartographic maps visualize only a small part of the historical relationships and experiences that constitute spatial history. Yet they remain the mainstay of digital spatial history projects. Bodies and Structures captures the multivocality of spatial history. Built in the open-source platform Scalar, the site enables scholars and students to analyze the historical, multivocal nature of space and place in East Asia and beyond. We are applying for a Level II grant for September 2019-August 2021 to greatly enhance the site’s utility for teaching and research in modern East Asian history and the spatial humanities. During this period, we will enhance Scalar’s capacity for analytical visualizations and user-directed engagement; add twelve modules to expand the project’s geo-historical scope and provide new disciplinary perspectives; and use the new Scalar tools to design new maps and visualizations that locate the modules in the site’s new spatial historical environment.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,995 (approved)
$99,995 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HAA-266472-19

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (Columbia, SC 29202-0167)
Karen Yvonne Smith (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Song Wang (Co Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Jun Zhou (Co Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Colin Wilder (Co Project Director: May 2019 to present)

SnowVision: A Machine Learning-Based Image Processing Tool for the Study of Archaeological Collections

The expansion and extension of a set of machine learning-based tools designed to assist scholars with identifying and classifying artifacts from archaeological sites based on design motifs.

Two years of NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant Level III funding is sought to increase availability and strengthen usability of SnowVision. The grant will support 1) the integration of SnowVision with an interactive, online user interface, 2) the acquisition and integration feedback from scholars working in laboratories and curation facilities across the Southeast, 3) the enhancement of the technological infrastructure of SnowVision so that the newly integrated system meets the needs of the user community and has a framework built for long-term success, and 4) providing select institutions with start-up funds to begin digitizing collections, providing the USC team with rigorous, off-site testing of the system. Collaboration between the USC development team and an Advisory Committee will increase the utility of SnowVision, secure buy-in from stakeholders, and ensure extensibility of the software. NEH funding will support software enhancement of accuracy, reliability, and speed.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$323,668 (approved)
$323,668 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HAA-266482-19

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Jonathan D. Amith (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Mesolex: Lexicosemantic Resources for Mesoamerican Languages

Planning and early stages of development for an open-access portal of linguistic and cultural documentation of indigenous societies in Mexico and Central America.

Mesolex: Lexicosemantic Resources for Mesoamerican Languages (Level 1) is the first phase in creating an open-access portal of linguistic and cultural documentation of Indigenous societies in Mexico and Central America. The portal will have two basic modules. Mesoamerican Lexicons will disseminate lexical databases including both dictionaries and semantically specific lexicons (e.g., local names for flora; toponyms; body parts). This project will create a standardized data structure able to ingest lexical materials from a wide range of sources. It will also develop powerful search engines to discover data and flexible designs for language-specific online display. Mesoamerican Narratives will develop software to place audio or video recordings in native languages online, accompanied by transcriptions and translations that will be highlighted line-by-line in synchronization with audio or video playback. This Level 1 grant focuses on database design and creating the necessary software.

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Languages, Other; Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$48,698 (approved)
$48,698 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HAA-266490-19

University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)
Christopher Michael Church (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Katherine Hepworth (Co Project Director: April 2019 to present)

Ethical Visualization in the Age of Big Data: Contemporary Cultural Implications of Pre- Twentieth-Century French Texts

A two-day workshop and follow up activities on approaches to developing ethical data visualization techniques and interactive cartographic interfaces with a particular focus on text mining colonial-era French newspapers.

This project advances work toward generating ethical visualizations of historical corpora comprising the European cultural imagination prior to the twentieth century without reproducing ethnocentrism. Visually representing the historical place of misrepresented peoples and locales throughout the world requires interdisciplinary collaboration focused equally on critical theory, data visualization, ethics, machine learning, and text analysis. We seek $49,851 of level-1 funding for a workshop that unites top experts in the fields of information design, computational linguistics, and history to address the conceptual and logistical challenges in realizing this goal. This project will address two key issues: 1) how to create ethical data visualizations--and their underlying forms of training and analysis--that grapple with inherent source biases; and 2) how to computationally process non-modern, non-English languages for humanities research in a critically engaged way.

Project fields:
Communications; Cultural History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,581 (approved)
$49,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HAA-266501-19

Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0001)
Jeffrey M. Leichman (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Interactive VR Simulation of an Eighteenth-Century Paris Fair Theatre: VESPACE

The further development of the VESPACE (Virtual Early modern Spectacles and Publics, Active and Collaborative Environment) project. This stage would focus on the development of an interactive prototype suitable for additional user testing.

The VESPACE (Virtual Early modern Spectacles and Publics, Active and Collaborative Environment) project seeks to model an eighteenth-century Paris Fair theatre through an immersive, playable simulation that allows users to explore the sensory and social worlds of this under-studied early modern cultural space. In order to reconstruct this vibrant facet of public theatre in Enlightenment Europe’s largest city, VESPACE brings together specialists from across the humanities, working in fields including theatre, history, literature, dance, sound studies, and architecture, working alongside computer scientists and engineers in the fields of game design, social interaction simulation, and virtual reality modeling of cultural patrimony. This application is for a LEVEL II Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to support work to develop a playable prototype during the two-year grant performance period (September 1, 2019-August 31 2021).

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,995 (approved)
$93,656 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HAA-266562-19

Shift Design, Inc (New Orleans, LA 70117-6726)
Hali Elizabeth Dardar (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Redesigning Historypin for Open-Source Digital Humanities

The planning for a revitalization of the community-sourced history mapping platform Historypin.org and to migrate its underlying code to an open-source framework.

Shift Design, Inc requests $49,824 to support a 12-month plan for the revitalization of their existing Historypin.org web platform. Historypin.org is a free, user-friendly, and accessible platform for crowdsourcing history open to scholars, community groups, digital humanities classrooms, and the general public. The site has over 98,000 users around the world, over 4,000 of which are cultural heritage organizations. Although widely used, the Historypin platform is in need of revitalization. The project objectives are to 1) better understand the digital humanities scholars’ current use of Historypin, 2) document the general needs of a digital humanities scholar from a user-interaction (UX)/ user-interface (UI) perspective, 3) develop a revised and simplified design for the Historypin website, and 4) draft a plan for a transition to an open-source codebase. Completing this project would position Historypin to begin developing a platform tailored to assist digital humanities research.

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, General; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,824 (approved)
$49,824 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HAA-266565-19

Stone Soup Productions, Inc. (Washington, DC 20036-2504)
Andrea R. Kalin (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Project Maestro

The further development of a platform for middle and high school humanities teachers to incorporate content-based games into their classrooms.

Project Maestro empowers educators and students with limited computer access to make digital humanities games. Created from The Search for Harmony, a web game about the rich, forgotten historical legacy of classical musicians of African descent, this WordPress-based plugin transforms art and text on paper into digital assets for a prebuilt minigame, enabling new versions to be developed without requiring programming skill. This grant’s primary tasks are to build a set of minigames, design activity guides for instructors, and partner with education groups to refine the platform through workshops. The end product will be a website where instructors can publish work as playable games. The producers of this project seek $100,000 for platform development, adviser consultation, game design and documentation. This tool will allow educators and others in the humanities to use digital games as a means of creating engaging, informative experiences for students.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


HAA-266568-19

Rhizome Communications, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-1218)
Michael J. Connor (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Early Online Communities in Context

The development of a context-rich, interactive reconstruction of “The Thing,” a significant early online community, and support scholarship based on this reconstruction.

The Thing was a Bulletin Board System initiated in New York by Wolfgang Staehle in 1991, a short time before the rise of the public web. As a testing ground for forms of experimental writing, and one of the earliest online communities to host in-depth discussion of contemporary art, the platform’s content has unique value for humanities scholars. This content and the community that formed around it is best understood in relation to its BBS infrastructure—slow, mostly local connections; a growing accumulation of posts; the absence of surveillance and metrics. This project involves an effort to reconstruct a legible archive of The Thing from a partial copy created by one of its users, to make this available on the web in emulation, and to convene scholars for a discussion of The Thing as an exemplar of early posting practices.

Project fields:
American Literature; Art History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$45,722 (approved)
$45,722 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 5/31/2020


HAA-266508-19

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Nelson Rios (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Development of a Multi-Camera, Computer Operated Photogrammetric Imaging System for Enhancing Digital Preservation and Access

The further development and refinement of a system to carry out photogrammetric 3D reconstruction quickly, inexpensively, and without the need for specialized equipment.

This project will document, validate and improve upon a high-throughput multi-camera, Computer-Operated Photogrammetric Imaging System (COPIS) for capturing large numbers of overlapping images from multiple viewpoints around an object for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction. This will be accomplished through a demonstration project to image and reconstruct 3D models of approximately 1,000 cultural heritage objects selected from a broad sampling of the Yale Peabody Museum’s Anthropological and Babylonian collections. This project will further evolve the COPIS design specification for photogrammetry, improve usability and performance of the software components, add a preliminary design element to facilitate structured-light scanning and deploy an installation at the Museum to produce high-resolution 3D reconstructions of diverse sets of objects from its Anthropology and Babylonian collections.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,355 (approved)
$99,355 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2021


HAA-266513-19

College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
Deborah Cornell (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Zhenming Liu (Co Project Director: July 2019 to present)

Transkribus and the Georgian Papers Programme Tabular-Formatted Manuscripts

A project to explore the application of the open-source Handwritten Text Recognition tool, Transkribus, to machine-driven transcription of handwritten materials of tabular formats, such as financial records and inventories, using materials from the Georgian Papers Programme.

When scholars have access to machine readable files of text, they can perform data mining, text analysis, visualization, and basic search and discovery with ease and precision. This proposal seeks a Level II Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to experiment with open-source Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) tool, Transkribus to address the challenge of mass transcription of handwritten materials in complex tabular format, such as accounts, and inventories. The project will use a subset of materials in the Georgian Papers Programme. NEH funding would support: a) development of layout analysis tools, templates, and output of data in csv files for Transkribus; b) algorithmic processing of approximately 50,000 images; c) writing documentation, code, and user guides; and d) presentation of project work to relevant communities. This use of Transkribus will serve as a case study for developing methods for transcription of tabular materials and will contribute to HTR models.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 2/28/2021


HAA-266518-19

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Robert Morrissey (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Intertextual Bridges: Search and Navigation across Heterogeneous Collections

The development of a prototype platform that will allow scholars to combine distant and close reading methods to discover relationships between texts and identify texts in collections for further study.

We seek Level II funding for a pilot project to develop a model that will allow scholars to bridge the gap between distant and close reading when conducting research on large, heterogeneous digital text collections. We propose to create a language agnostic environment—called the Intertextual Hub—in which the conceptual relationships among texts discovered by text-mining algorithms can fruitfully guide close reading in dialectical interaction with distant reading. Fundamentally, we are contending that the core of scholarly reading in the digital age should be the discovery and navigation of intertextual relationships. The Intertextual Hub will be a powerful hermeneutical device allowing users to navigate between individual texts and larger corpora that are related through shared themes, ideas, and passages. Focusing on the French Revolutionary period, we will test this model by applying it to the extensive and diverse 18th-century French collections of UChicago’s ARTFL Project.

Project fields:
Romance Languages

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,497 (approved)
$99,497 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HAA-266528-19

University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Aaron Beveridge (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

MassMine Advancement Grant for Sustainable Data-Driven Humanities Research

The continuing development of the MassMine platform, an open-source toolkit that allows humanities scholars to collect large-scale, publicly available data drawn from social media sites for research and teaching.

MassMine (www.massmine.org) automates the collection and processing of data from digital sources to support data-driven humanities research. MassMine currently supports data collection and processing from Twitter, Google Trends, Wikipedia, Tumblr, as well as collecting and archiving text data from any web URL (web scraping). In 2015 MassMine’s initial development was funded through an NEH/ODH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant for $60,000, and we are now pursuing our next round of funding to further extend MassMine’s functionality and accessibility. [Edited by staff]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; English; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,865 (approved)
$322,092 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2022


HAA-266553-19

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3846)
Kelly O'Neill (Project Director: January 2019 to present)

Imperiia: An Information Ecosystem for Russian History

The further development of a map-based platform and enhanced set of tools to better integrate spatial history and Russian studies, allowing scholars to make connections between disparate sources and identify new research questions and areas of study.

We are applying for a Level II Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to support a 12-month project from September 1, 2019, to August 31, 2020. This funding will support the first attempt to not only apply the tools and methods of spatial history to the Russian past but to build an open framework for collaborative historical GIS work in the field of Russian studies. The information ecosystem we are building is intended to uncover and forge meaningful connections among historical sources, both quantitative and qualitative, that have not been studied together before. Our goal for the grant period is to shift from our current focus on database design and data development to three methodological challenges: 1) machine-based extraction of spatial data from texts and maps, 2) definition of a flexible, extensible ontology that will connect all project elements, and 3) innovation of a map-centric digital platform for visualizing, analyzing, and interpreting Russia’s spatial history.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,783 (approved)
$99,783 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


HAA-263651-19

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Donna Thompson Ray (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Pennee Bender (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)

An Open Educational Resource for Who Built America

The development of an open educational resource (OER) for college-level and advanced high school students based on content from the popular textbook Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s History. The OER will also integrate interactive materials from an existing website, History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web.

ASHP/CML proposes to create an open education resource (OER) that integrates the narrative of its textbook Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s History with enhanced, interactive resources from the website History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web. This new project—Who Built America? / OER—will offer instructors and students a multi-layered resource that provides a linear and analytical historical narrative, and the digital means to look beyond the text to understand how its narrative was constructed. The project encompasses three goals: to create an open digital version of Who Built America? that extends and updates its distinctive narrative for college and advanced placement students; to update, expand, and enhance the resources in the textbook and History Matters so these vital materials remain available; and to integrate the textbook narrative, primary sources, and teaching resources in a multi-layered OER.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,996 (approved)
$324,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


HAA-263803-19

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
John P. Bell (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Understanding Visual Culture through Silent Film Collections

The creation of a large-scale compendium and research platform for silent films that are currently housed in separate collections and a suite of tools to be used by scholars studying the transition of visual culture from stage to screen.

This Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant project aims to produce a digital compendium of over 400 films from the silent film era that document the transition of visual culture from stage to screen. It will combine highly-influential and rare works archived in the Paper Print collection of pre-1930 cinema at The Library of Congress with films at the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam to create a digital resource designed for film scholars around the world. The compendium will be built by merging two pieces of software: The Media Ecology Project's Semantic Annotation Tool and the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture's Scalar. The resulting platform will provide an open software and data framework scholars can use to compare disparate types of data in a single interface. This valuable tool will unite a wide and growing variety of data and invite scholars to gather and post ideas, asking and answering new questions about key historical features in the evolution of motion pictures.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$222,438 (approved)
$222,438 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


HAA-263818-19

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA 30602-1589)
Scott Nesbit (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Alisea Williams McLeod (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

Freedom's Movement: Mapping African American Space in War and Reconstruction

The planning for future integration of three independent digital projects focused on African Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction through convening a meeting of scholars, genealogists, and technical experts to create a blueprint for next stages of collaboration.

“Freedom’s Movements” brings together three extant projects--(1) Visualizing Emancipation, (2) African American Civil War Soldiers, and (3) Last Road to Freedom. Project Directors for this grant began collaborations in 2015, each project director providing feedback and their expertise in extending the work of the other projects, driven by the complementary nature of their work. By 2017, it became clear that a partnership between these projects could be beneficial. This Level I proposal is the first fruit of that more robust partnership.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,021 (approved)
$28,376 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HAA-263825-19

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Samantha Blickhan (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Laura Trouille (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Advancing Access to Transcribed Text in Citizen Humanities

Extending Zooniverse.org’s online platform to allow individual crowdsourcing project teams to review, compare, and edit transcriptions, and to work directly with raw text data generated from community transcription projects.

Advancing Access to Transcribed Text in Citizen Humanities will build off of existing methods used by Zooniverse.org for online crowdsourced transcription of handwritten documents. The Zooniverse team has noted that humanities researchers frequently require additional support when working with the results of text-transcription crowdsourcing projects, particularly for review and analysis of data. In this proposal, we request a Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant, which will facilitate the creation of an online viewer and editor which will allow researchers to work with the raw and aggregated text data from Zooniverse transcription projects (including the ability to review and edit transcriptions) before uploading them into their Content Management Systems to be presented to the public.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$178,961 (approved)
$178,103 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


HAA-263773-19

University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)
Rebecca Salzer (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Creating National Access to Digital Dance Resources

A three-day workshop for dance scholars, archivists, librarians, and media specialists on approaches to researching and teaching with digitized collections of dance resources.

Film and video technologies have revolutionized dance education and scholarship by serving as a text for what has historically been an oral tradition; allowing preservation and analysis of dance work. While digital video makes recording dance easier, archives of recorded dance have not been made available online for education and research, and dance scholars face significant geographical and financial barriers to access. Our project brings together dance scholars, archivists, and educators for a three-day symposium during which attendees will explore expansion and aggregation of existing online dance resources along with design of a new pilot resource. The symposium’s results will be disseminated and support for its blueprint actively sought through publication of a white paper, presentations at national conferences, and at open sharing events throughout the United States.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Dance History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,142 (approved)
$43,933 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HAA-263831-19

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA 30314-3776)
Aaron Michael Carter-Enyi (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Algorithmic Thinking, Analysis and Visualization in Music (ATAVizM)

The creation of an improved, open source method for visualizing patterns and themes in music and the development of course modules for undergraduate students at HBCUs.

Innovations in music visualization render new possibilities for understanding music. One example is Wattenberg’s Shape of Song, a defunct web app. The arc diagram visualization technique for Shape of Song is brilliant, but ultimately the project did not live up to its potential because of a poor understanding of how composers develop musical themes, a central object of inquiry for music theorists. Algorithmic Thinking, Analysis and Visualization in Music (ATAVizM), identifies and implements major improvements over Shape of Song: (1) pattern recognition based on heuristics from music theory, (2) theme identification by users integrated into the application, and (3) visualization enhancements that make arc diagrams utilitarian for research and teaching. The team will also design and implement a course module at Emory, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, Spelman College and the University of Georgia.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,947 (approved)
$99,947 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HAA-263835-19

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Mary Furlong Minkoff (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Elizabeth Ladner (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Montpelier Digital Collections Project

The planning of an online collections platform that will aggregate four distinct collections held by James Madison’s Montpelier, the historic house and surrounding area administered by The Montpelier Foundation. The project team will convene a three-day workshop of leading digital cultural heritage professionals, scholars in American history and culture, and descendants of Montpelier’s enslaved families.

This project will bring together leading humanities scholars, museum professionals, digital heritage experts, and members of the public in a 2 ½-day workshop to design an online, publicly accessible digital library that integrates four collections: architecture/historic preservation, archaeology, archives, and decorative arts. The digital library will be created for the collections at James Madison’s Montpelier in partnership with Michigan State University’s MATRIX: The Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences, and designed to be easily adapted by other institutions. The workshop will consist of 1½ days of presentations by leaders in the digital humanities, followed by a day of of breakout sessions and group discussions. The workshop will result in a white paper synthesizing the findings and recommendations of participants that will be shared on multiple websites and by social media.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,968 (approved)
$37,555 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HAA-263837-19

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
David Smith (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Improving Optical Character Recognition and Tracking Reader Annotations in Printed Books by Collating and Transcribing Multiple Exemplars

Further research in enhanced optical character recognition techniques for historical print books and automatic discoverability of handwritten marginalia drawing upon the collections of the Internet Archive.

Most past digitization projects have focused on transcribing documents individually. With the availability of library-scale digital collections, we propose a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant (Level II) to develop computational image and language models to discover multiple copies and editions of similar texts and to correct each text using these comparable witnesses. We provide evidence that this collational transcription system can significantly improve optical character recognition on historical books. We also propose to use these collated editions to discover annotated passages in large digitized book collections. This approach will therefore not only mitigate the errors that reader annotations introduce into the OCR process but will also produce the first automatically generated database of handwritten annotations, Ichneumon. Methods and software developed by this project will thus benefit future research on automatic collation, book history, and historical reading practices.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HAA-263807-19

Regents of the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070)
J.B. Shank (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Benjamin Wiggins (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Building a Digital Portal for Exploring Bernard and Picart’s Religious Ceremonies and Customs of the World

The development of an online, open-access portal bringing together the multiple editions of The Religious Ceremonies and Customs of All the Peoples of the World, an important Enlightenment volume about world religions and customs.

The project team will build an open-source online portal to facilitate the study of the transformative Enlightenment blockbuster, The Religious Ceremonies and Customs of All the Peoples of the World. Despite the massive influence of its numerous and variable lavishly illustrated editions, its unstable print history has deterred scholarly study of the work, not least because its many variants are strewn all over the globe. Our portal will allow digitized copies of diverse editions from disparate repositories to be accessed in a single virtual space, permitting searching and comparative inter-textual study of word and image across multiple versions and in conjunction with other books from the era. It will also serve as a model for other comparative projects based on curated aggregations of texts, images, and collections in a way that avoids copyright problems and prohibitive costs.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$95,220 (approved)
$95,220 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2019 – 7/31/2020


HAA-263774-19

University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. (Athens, GA 30602-1589)
Steven Soper (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Barry Godfrey (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)
Heather Ann Thompson (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Historical Profiles of American Incarceration

A project to research and assess the state of archival records of American incarceration before 1970, leading to a two-day workshop for historians and data experts to plan for the creation of a digital archive to facilitate new scholarship across numerous humanities disciplines.

The digitization of American prison records now makes it possible to conduct large-scale analysis of incarceration in the United States, from the early nineteenth century to the present. This opportunity could not be timelier: for the past decade, scholars and policymakers have debated the causes and consequences of the phenomenon of “mass incarceration” in the United States. A new digital history of incarceration in the US before the 1970s, by revealing broad geographical and sociological patterns, the impact of historical contingencies, and the human face of individual prisoners’ lives, can make a significant contribution to our understanding of this issue. For this Level I application, we will employ a research assistant to assess existing digital sources on the history of criminal justice in the United States, and then gather for a two-day workshop to plan the creation of a new database and website.

Project fields:
Sociology; U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,219 (approved)
$39,219 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


HAA-263850-19

University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
William B Seales (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Reading the Invisible Library: Rescuing the Hidden Texts of Herculaneum

The continued development of computerized techniques to recover writings from the Herculaneum library, the entire collections of which were destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 BCE.

Using authentic materials from national libraries in Italy and France, this project will apply proven computerized techniques and innovate new approaches to reveal the hidden writing in the most iconic collection of damaged humanities manuscripts--the scrolls from Herculaneum.

Project fields:
Ancient Literature; Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


HAA-263878-19

University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
Deanna M. Shemek (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
Anne Elizabeth MacNeil (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Virtual Studiolo

The design and production of a 3D environment re-creating Isabella d’Este of Mantua’s (1474-1539) art and music “studiolo” for use with virtual reality headsets, laptops, and visualization walls.

The Italian Renaissance is famed for art, architecture, music, and learning. The integrated experience of these achievements is difficult to grasp, given the dispersal of physical evidence and the disciplinary confines of our learning. It is also often gendered as male. This online, virtual reality project for study of one of Renaissance Italy's most stunning art spaces and collections -- the studiolo of Isabella d'Este (1474-1539) -- will address both of these problems with cross-disciplinary tools for approaching the period through one of its most important women. Its immersive, interactive character will convey the human scale, cognitive density, and aesthetic specificity of a Renaissance art space and capture the multi-sensory complexity of interiors meant to dazzle visitors with humanist ideals. Individual and collaborative work in this environment will foster new approaches to studying and teaching the multi-media Renaissance and provide models for analogous projects in other periods.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Music History and Criticism; Women's History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,897 (approved)
$99,897 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


HAA-263800-19

Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
Karen Desmond (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Measuring Polyphony: An Online Music Editor for Late Medieval Polyphony

The development of a prototype of an online music editor to help scholars and students analyze medieval music manuscripts. The project would also convene a workshop for medieval studies scholars, musicologists, and technical specialists to evaluate the prototype.

The development of an online music editor will allow a variety of modern readers (students and experts, musicologists, music theorists, those interested in the history of music notation, counterpoint, medieval palaeography and/or manuscript studies) to access and contribute transcriptions of music directly linked to digital images of the medieval manuscripts, and to learn about the original notation. A two-day workshop will bring together the leading experts in music encoding and medieval musicology to evaluate the prototype editor and to devise plans for its further development and rollout. This tool will offer new possibilities for the analysis and interpretation of late medieval music. In a broader humanities context, the project investigates how modeling the meanings of notational signs can lead to new understandings of the interaction between the sign and the signified, and of the relationship between notational style and changes in musical style across time and place.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$46,799 (approved)
$46,799 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2019 – 2/29/2020


HAA-266444-19

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Jessica Otis (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
Lincoln A. Mullen (Co Project Director: May 2019 to present)

Datascribe: Enabling Structured Data Transcription in the Omeka S Web Platform

The creation of a structured data transcription module for the Omeka S platform that will make it easier for scholars working with quantitative data (such as government forms or institutional records) to transcribe them into structured data which can be analyzed or visualized.

Datascribe is an application for a Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to create a structured data transcription module, or plug-in, for the Omeka S platform for digital collections. Scholars often collect sources, such as government forms or institutional records, intending to transcribe them into datasets which can be analyzed or visualized. Existing software enables transcription into free-form text but not into tables of data. The proposed module will enable scholars to identify the structure of the data within their sources, speed up the transcription of their sources, and reliably structure their transcriptions in a form amenable to computational analysis. Scholars will be able to turn sources into tables of data stored as numbers, dates, or categories. This module will build on the Omeka S platform, enabling scholars to display transcriptions alongside the source images and metadata, to crowdsource transcriptions, and to publish their results on the web.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,733 (approved)
$324,733 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2022


HAA-261101-18

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Kelly Schrum (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Jessica Otis (Co Project Director: October 2018 to present)

World History Commons

Digital revitalization and content upgrades for World History Matters, a free-to-use educational web resource for teaching world history.

World History Commons, a Level III grant, will provide an essential digital resource for teaching and research in world and global history, reviving and expanding World History Matters, the award-winning, NEH-funded collection of world history websites now almost twenty years old. Using robust, modular, and extendable open-source software, this Open Educational Resource (OER) will preserve and enhance widely-used resources while introducing new humanities scholarship and pedagogy. World History Commons represents a ground-breaking collaboration between the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, the World History Association, and Monash University (Australia) which runs one of the largest world history programs in the southern hemisphere. World History Commons will provide a free, centralized, digital, world history platform with high quality, peer-reviewed resources for high school and higher education students, teachers, and scholars.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$375,000 (approved)
$365,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2021


HAA-261070-18

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Samuel Scott Graham (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Transparency to Visibility (T2V): Network Visualization in Humanities Research

The development of a set of tools to automatically extract and visualize relationships in large textual corpora, with a focus on making “hidden” relationships more visible.

Humanities researchers have long studied how power and influence circulate through cultural systems. Advances in network visualization tools support this work, allowing scholars to create graphical representations of complex systems. However, extracting and preparing relational data for visualization can present significant technological challenges when working with the kinds of textual artifacts commonly studied by humanists. This project will develop and test an innovative approach for efficiently curating and visualizing relationships in ways that align with humanities research. Using sample texts from medical research, a digital and medical humanities team will develop, test, and enhance a new toolkit for automatically extracting and visualizing relationships in large textual corpora. The project team will create both a graphical user interface for the toolkit and an open-source code repository to support use by digital humanities scholars.

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$80,649 (approved)
$80,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/29/2020


HAA-258602-18

Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Jonathan D. Amith (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Documenting the Ethnobiology of Mexico and Central America: A Digital Portal for Collaborative Research

The further development of a database and web portal that would aggregate indigenous linguistic information relevant to Mesoamerican flora and fauna.

This project will develop a web portal, Documenting the Ethnobiology of Mexico and Central America, designed to forge an innovative web-based environment for multidisciplinary and multiethnic collaboration among anthropologists and linguists studying traditional ecological knowledge; biologists interested in collections mostly from poorly explored areas; and Indigenous communities and scholars who want to document and preserve traditional knowledge of local flora and fauna. This project will expand Symbiota, a widely used open source content management system for curating specimen- and observation-based biodiversity data, for use by humanities scholars and professionals by developing standards for tagging ethnobiological data, data that crosses thresholds separating the humanities, social science and natural science. By making available research on native nomenclature, classification, and use of flora and fauna, it will disseminate material key to understanding the cultural history of Indigenous Mexican populations.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Comparative Languages; Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,875 (approved)
$74,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


HAA-258712-18

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Kathryn Starkey (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

The Global Medieval Sourcebook

The further development of the Global Medieval Sourcebook, an open-source resource for transcriptions, translations, and contextual information about digitized medieval texts from Europe, North Africa, and Asia. This project adds new content, expands the available languages, integrates TEI markup, and develops new pedagogical features.

The Global Medieval Sourcebook, a teaching and research resource, will present transcriptions of original medieval texts and their translations in an accessible, user-friendly, downloadable, open-source format. It will include information about each text, including a scholarly and user-friendly commentary on the text and translation. Links to online manuscripts and other relevant materials will enable scholars to use the site as a research portal and will provide essential context to students and teachers. Texts will be searchable by genre, author, date, language, keywords, and themes. Additionally, with teachers and students in mind, we will create and upload audio files of specialists reading the texts in their original language. Currently we are able to cover the following languages: Middle High German, Old French, Old and Middle English, and Medieval Chinese, Arabic, and Persian. In the next two years, we will expand to include medieval Spanish and Italian, with Slavic languages anticipated for addition in the next phase.

Project fields:
Languages, General; Literature, Other; Medieval History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,393 (approved)
$74,393 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2018 – 8/31/2020


HAA-258767-18

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Walter J. Scheirer (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Neil Coffee (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Tesserae Intertext Service: Intertextual Search Access to Digital Collections in the Humanities

The further development of the Tesserae search engine to be used with additional online collections to enhance research into intertextuality.

From its inception in 2008, with support of an NEH ODH Start-Up Grant in 2012-2013, the Tesserae Project has developed a uniquely successful approach to tracing literary, linguistic, and intellectual history in ancient Greek and Roman literature, as well as a selection of English texts. The Tesserae web tool (http://tesserae.caset.buffalo.edu/) allows users to automatically find instances where one author quotes or alludes to another, or employs similar concepts. This project will support the creation of the Tesserae Intertext Service (TIS). TIS will make the Tesserae search capability available as a new and sophisticated way of accessing the many existing humanities texts that have been digitized, showing all the similarities between the works selected by a user. TIS opens the door for scholars, students, and the general public to answer fundamental questions about the human condition that require traversing languages, genres, and histories in expansive digital collections.

Participating institutions:
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN) - Applicant/Recipient
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Classical Literature; Classics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$279,609 (approved)
$279,609 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 7/31/2020


HAA-258768-18

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
John O'Brien (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Tonya Howe (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Christine Ruotolo (Co Project Director: November 2017 to present)

Literature in Context: An Open Anthology

Development of a working prototype for an open-access, curated, and classroom-sourced digital anthology of British and American literature in English (1650-1800).

Literature in Context is a TEI-encoded digital anthology of British and American literature in English (1650-1800) designed for use by students, teachers, and the general public. The project will innovate by taking full advantage of the affordances of digitization to create an Open Educational Resource that incorporates annotation, interactivity, digitized page images of original editions, and other contextual media materials. It also develops templates, assignments, and resources to help instructors at the college level engage students in the task of editing and annotating literary texts that can be added to the collection. Literature in Context provides a mechanism for the thoughtful, collaborative dissemination of our shared humanistic heritage. By including students in the production of the anthology, the project will foreground how the public construction of knowledge is essential to understanding the modern world.

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,542 (approved)
$72,542 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


HAA-261214-18

Sonoma State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Janet Berry Hess (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories

A prototype digital map of three indigenous American nations that will document their geographic ranges, languages, architectural styles, and cultural practices both before and after contact with European settlers.

This Level I project will create the prototype of a digital map of pre- and post-contact American Indian tribal and national regions, cultural histories, and tribally submitted and approved data that is non-archaeological in nature. The prototype, upon completion, will consist of a national map with general information and dynamic details related to three indigenous nations: the Osage, Modoc, and the consolidated Pomo/Miwok. This map will be available to scholars and the public, and envisions future collaboration with, and a centralized reference site for, existing indigenous maps and digital sites. We intend in this project to connect the study of humanities (specifically, indigenous histories and cultures) to conditions of social and cultural life by enabling the public, around the world, to access current and historical maps, cultural practices, and other data related to the life of indigenous peoples.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/28/2021


HAA-261218-18

Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Daryl W. Baldwin (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Gabriela Perez Baez (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Breath of Life 2.0: Indigenous Language Revitalization through Enhancement of the Miami-Illinois Digital Archive

The expansion and improvement of an existing digital archive for indigenous languages, the development of software to identify and analyze archival materials, and two training workshops for tribal representatives and scholars engaged in language revitalization efforts.

The Miami-Illinois Digital Archive (MIDA) is critical to the educational development of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma’s language revitalization efforts: it is the only software for the organization, storage, retrieval and analysis of digital surrogates of archival language documentation. The proposed Breath of Life 2.0: Creating a ‘Second Breath’ for Indigenous Language Revitalization (BoL 2.0) project will enhance the proven functionality of MIDA by providing a stable and secure data platform to share this powerful tool with Native American communities engaged in archivally-based research and analysis for language revitalization. The resulting Indigenous Languages Digital Archive will be disseminated in two one-week training workshops for alumni from the National Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages who seek to engage in the type of advanced archivally-based research that has enabled languages such as Miami-Illinois to be spoken again after decades of silence.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Languages, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$311,641 (approved)
$311,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2021


HAA-261228-18

Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
Peter Logan (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Jane Greenberg (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Developing the Data Set of Nineteenth-Century Knowledge

A project to study the structure and transformation of nineteenth-century knowledge via computational analysis of several editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica from 1788 to 1911.

This project draws on historic editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica, a vital resource of knowledge to build one of the most extensive, open, digital collections available today for studying the structure of nineteenth-century knowledge and its transformation. The most comprehensive representation extant of what constituted official knowledge at the time, they also demonstrate changes in the nature of knowledge in the English-speaking world. The project creates the first accurate textual data for this corpus and extends its usability by applying innovative methods to automatically generate metadata for each of the 100,000 entries. Each entry will be tagged with both current and historical subject categories. At the end of the grant period, all of the data will be made freely available, and a series of experiments will be conducted to identify the feasibility of tracking concept drift across time within the corpus.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
British History; Intellectual History; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$88,766 (approved)
$88,766 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/28/2020


HAA-261239-18

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Lauren Tilton (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Taylor Arnold (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Distant Viewing Toolkit (DVT) for the Cultural Analysis of Moving Images

The development of an open source software library that will allow scholars, teachers, and students to analyze time-based media including films, news broadcasts, and television programs.

This project allows scholars to work with large-scale collections by building an open source software library to facilitate the algorithmic production of metadata summarizing the content (e.g., shot angle, shot length, lighting, framing, sound) of time-based media. The software allows scholars to explore media in many forms, including films, new broadcasts, and television, revealing how moving images shape cultural norms.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$99,984 (approved)
$99,984 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 4/30/2020


HAA-261240-18

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Seung Mo Jang (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Elaine Chun (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Jijun Tang (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Chin-Tser Huang (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Evolution in Digital Discourse: Toward a Computational Tool for Identifying Patterns of Language Change in Social Media

The development of an open access, user-friendly tool to allow scholars and the public to study and document the spread and evolution of information shared over social media networks.

As a team of humanities scholars and computer scientists, we aim to produce a computational tool for analyzing how digital dialogue originates, spreads, and changes as dialogue texts are widely circulated and shared across social media platforms. Unlike prior social media network analyses, this project seeks to develop and disseminate a tool for humanities scholars by allowing them to observe, track, and identify text-level evolutions over the spreading and sharing process in digital communities. With this tool, scholars will be able to analyze how and why the linguistic structure of social media texts as well as their authenticated status can undergo meaningful changes over the course of their broad circulation.

Project fields:
Communications; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$89,566 (approved)
$89,566 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


HAA-261258-18

American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
Braxton Boren (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Hearing Bach's Music As Bach Heard It

The recreation of acoustic conditions of the Thomaskirche (St. Thomas Church) in Leipzig, where J.S. Bach worked as a concert master, to better understand the relationship between the acoustic clarity of the physical space and Bach’s compositions.

Research on J. S. Bach has revealed new insights into the clarity and intimacy of Bach’s music as it was originally performed, including the possibility that Bach’s repertoire at Leipzig was mainly performed with only four singers in the choir. But Bach’s music was also profoundly shaped by the notable acoustics of the Thomaskirche in Leipzig, where he spent the last 27 years of his life. The church was altered during the Lutheran Reformation to improve the acoustics of the spoken word, which also increased the acoustic clarity for Bach’s works two centuries later. This project will use physical measurements and computer simulations to recreate the acoustic conditions as they existed both during Bach’s time as well as the more reverberant pre-Reformation church. Using this data, we will record a Bach cantata inside the virtual Thomaskirche, both in Bach’s time and before. This will allow us to examine the relationship between the acoustic clarity of the church and Bach's music.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Architecture; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2018 – 5/31/2020


HAA-261249-18

Trustees of Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN 46202-2915)
Andre De Tienne (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Implementing an Online Text-Editing Platform for Scholarly Editions

The further development of the online Scholarly Text-Editing Platform for the production of print and digital critical and documentary editions.

Following a successful NEH start-up grant, we propose to implement a cloud-based Scholarly Text-Editing Platform (STEP). That platform is a complete workflow environment designed by scholarly editors, interface specialists, and web and application developers, for facilitating the production of print and online critical or documentary scholarly editions. STEP helps (1) facilitate rigorous TEI-XML transcriptions through timesaving encoding methods; (2) import digitized images of original documents; (3) compile textual apparatus lists; (4) enable the online scholarly editing, annotating, and formatting of texts in an interface that keeps track of and archives every iteration of a document through multiple stages of corrections and editorial interventions; (5) link edited texts and their components both to the digitized documents and to their critical editorial apparatus; and (6) streamline the conversion of edited texts to laid-out and hyperlinked texts for online or print publication.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Philosophy, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$277,320 (approved)
$277,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020


HAA-261261-18

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Tyler Jo Smith (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

Linked Open Greek Pottery

The development of a model for aggregating information about dispersed collections of ancient Greek pottery based on the concepts of linked open data to provide greater access to the collections and to allow new ways of analyzing the materials. 

Linked Open Greek Pottery: Kerameikos.org is an international effort to define the intellectual concepts of Archaic and Classical Greek pottery following the methodologies of Linked Open Data (LOD). These concepts include categories such as shapes, artists, styles, and production places. When linked externally to other LOD thesauri, such as the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, Kerameikos.org allows for the normalization and aggregation of disparate museum and archaeological datasets into an information system that facilitates broader public access (e.g., Pelagios Commons). Beyond the definition of pottery concepts, following open web standards, Kerameikos.org will standardize and document an ontology and model for exchanging pottery data, provide easy-to-use interfaces to visualize geographic and quantitative distributions of Greek pottery, and publish a series of data manipulation web services enabling archaeologists and museum professionals to contribute data to this ecosystem.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$85,382 (approved)
$85,382 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/29/2020


HAA-261266-18

Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA 30318-5775)
Scott Robertson (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Jesse P. Karlsberg (Co Project Director: June 2018 to present)

The Digital Drawer: A Crowd-Sourced, Curated, Digital Archive Preserving History and Memory

The development and testing of the Digital Drawer project on digitized community archives for rural Georgia audiences. The project partners include the Historic Rural Churches of Georgia and Emory University.

The Digital Drawer is a collaborative partnership among Georgia Tech, Emory University’s Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS) and the Historic Rural Churches of Georgia (HRCGA) to pilot a method of gathering, curating and disseminating crowd-sourced community memory. This effort of the state library system, universities, humanities and non-profit organizations is testing an online concept through a program permitting Georgians to upload their carefully preserved documents, photographs, images of artifacts, and oral memories of historic churches that were the foundation of their community life. The project seeks to develop and pilot a cloud-hosted media and metadata repository and public-facing web application for submitting content to the archive. The Digital Drawer will be designed to accommodate the limited technical capacity of an anticipated older demographic with disabilities.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA) - Applicant/Recipient
Emory University (Atlanta, GA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$86,471 (approved)
$86,471 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/28/2020


HAA-261267-18

SUNY Research Foundation, Albany (Albany, NY 12222-0001)
David Paul Hochfelder (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Stacy Sewell (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Ann E. Pfau (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

Picturing Urban Renewal

Development of a website featuring historical photographs and maps that explores the process of urban renewal in large and small cities across New York State.

We are applying for a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement grant for the amount of $49,587 to develop a design, technical plan, and prototype for the Picturing Urban Renewal website. This innovative website will place in space and time historic photographs of major redevelopment projects in four New York cities. It will encourage active looking as a way of learning about urban history and encourage users to compare how urban renewal transformed these four cities, for better and worse. This project makes two key contributions to urban and public history: (1) By focusing on the visual record, particularly pre-demolition and construction-era photographs, we foreground the human experience of redevelopment. 2) By comparing the impact of urban renewal on cities of varying sizes and economic fortunes, we fill an important gap in the scholarly literature, which emphasizes urban centers almost to the exclusion of the small and mid-sized towns and cities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,587 (approved)
$49,587 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/29/2020


HAA-261271-18

Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Amir Zeldes (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)

A Linked Digital Environment for Coptic Studies

The creation and expansion of a suite of language processing tools to better analyze documents written in Coptic – the language of first millennium Egypt – and other ancient Near Eastern languages.

Building on our previous work in Natural Language Processing for Coptic, we will capitalize on recent advances in Digital Humanities & Computational Linguistics to strengthen tools & data available for Coptic. Specifically, we will harness Deep Learning methods to handle a variety of source materials, including OCR data & editions with varying orthography, enhance materials via Linked Open Data and automatic Named Entity Recognition, & integrate automatic syntactic analyses into our materials.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$323,767 (approved)
$323,767 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2021


HAA-261290-18

University of Maine, Orono (Orono, ME 04473-1513)
Anne Kelly Knowles (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Anika Walke (Co Project Director: July 2018 to present)
Paul B. Jaskot (Co Project Director: July 2018 to present)

The Holocaust Ghettos Project: Reintegrating Victims and Perpetrators through Places and Events

The creation of a spatial model of 1,400 Jewish ghettos during the Holocaust that maps the locations of victims and perpetrators and extracts content from interviews about the experience of living in ghettos, allowing scholars to analyze the relationships between perpetrators and victims using geospatial methods.

This project will implement a place-based model of the Holocaust to bridge the long-standing divide in Holocaust Studies between victims and perpetrators by locating them together in places targeted by ghettoization. We will do this by combining three approaches from the digital and spatial humanities. First, we will create an historical GIS of 1,400 ghettos, extracting key information from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s authoritative Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos. This will enable the first systematic, comparative analysis of Jewish ghettos, forced labor, and mass murder in Eastern Europe, 1939-1945. Second, we will use methods from corpus and computational linguistics to extract and analyze content related to ghettoization in 1,800 transcripts of video interviews with Holocaust survivors from USHMM and the USC Shoah Foundation. Third, we will employ geovisualization as a mode of analysis and to convey the relationships we find between Nazi actions and victims’ experiences.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
European History; Geography; Jewish Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$296,455 (approved)
$296,455 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2021


HAA-261291-18

Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History (Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2303)
Della Pollock (Project Director: January 2018 to present)

The Northside Digital Commons

The development and documentation of a digital community archiving project focusing on the Northside community in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The Northside Digital Commons is a new initiative in community archiving. It goes well beyond preservation to engage users in both saving and making history. Our primary goal is to provide a virtual space through which historically black communities facing economic displacement and generational discontinuity can continue to grow and prosper. The proposed project uses innovations in digital historiography to mobilize a professionally curated body of oral histories and artifacts for community renewal and national reckoning. It focuses on the Northside community in Chapel Hill, which emerged as a segregated labor settlement serving the University, and will model possibilities for similarly endangered communities across the nation. Primary activities include web development, resource supplementation, guidance by a Community Review Board, integration into an existing k-12 curriculum, a large-scale launch event, and ongoing evaluation and revision.

Project fields:
African American History; Communications

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$79,000 (approved)
$79,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 2/29/2020


HAA-258754-18

Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Christina E. Frei (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Timothy B. Powell (Co Project Director: February 2018 to November 2018)

DH from an Indigenous Perspective: Strengthening Partnerships between Indigenous Communities, Scholars, Museums, and Archives

The study of how four Indigenous communities, with whom this team collaborated on a Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant to digitally repatriate archival materials, have used those materials in culture and language revitalization efforts.


This grant proposes to study how four Indigenous partners built digital archives based on Indigenous epistemologies and how they are using the materials for cultural and language revitalization. The grant will also support DH projects being constructed by the four communities using the digitally repatriated materials, which reflect how DH tools and theories take on very different forms when incorporated into Indigenous knowledge systems.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,622 (approved)
$74,622 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2020


HAA-258756-18

Gallaudet University (Washington, DC 20002-3600)
Patrick Boudreault (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Exposing the Borders of Academia: Sign Language as a Medium of Knowledge Production, Preservation, and Dissemination

Improvements to the technological infrastructure of the Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) to implement a fully bilingual digital platform for use by both signers and non-signers. The project also increases access to and sustainability of DSDJ content and supports refinements to the peer review process in American Sign Language.

The Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) is a peer-reviewed, digital journal in American Sign Language and English text dedicated to advancing the cultural, creative and critical output of work in and about sign languages and its communities. DSDJ publishes work in the form of scholarly video articles, original works of signed literature, as well as interviews, reviews, and historical resources. This project will preserve and migrate past issues of DSDJ to a new open-access, technologically sustainable platform that adheres to and advances accessibility standards in publishing through fully bilingual video and text articles, advanced interactive videos, and integration into library databases. Furthermore, the project develops innovative peer-review processes that support the exclusive use of sign language to produce the next iteration of DSDJ in an effort to transform scholarly communication.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$323,479 (approved)
$323,479 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


HAA-258763-18

Baylor University (Waco, TX 76798-7284)
Elise King (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
King-Ip (David) Lin (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Digital Floor Plan Database: A New Method for Analyzing Architecture

The continued development of a prototype of an analytical tool and database to allow humanities scholars and students to comparatively study architectural floor plans. The test case would be a collection of floor plans by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright from the Alexander Architectural Archives at the University of Texas, Austin.

Currently, those who design and study the built environment are hindered by an inability to examine large datasets of architectural drawings. Despite advancements in image recognition, no integrated system is capable of storing, reading, and analyzing floor plans. To solve this problem, this project is developing the Building Database & Analytics System (BuDAS) to partially automate the process of floor plan analysis. This project is seeking funding to expand the prototype into an integrated open source system with image recognition software for automatic floor plan detection, a database for the storage and management of data, and advanced query and graphing tools. BuDAS will allow users to compare thousands of plans to discover common design elements, examine spatial relationships over time, and mine for patterns across datasets. These findings will allow for a deeper understanding of the trends and patterns of space usage and the relationship between buildings and human experience.

Project fields:
Architecture; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,390 (approved)
$72,390 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 1/31/2020


HAA-258779-18

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Patrick Murray-John (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Omeka S ORCID Integration

The development of modules for the Omeka-S publishing platform to allow integration with the ORCID system of persistent researcher identifiers. The project would increase the number of humanities scholars in the United States using this system for reliably identifying humanities research publications.

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media proposes an integration between Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and Omeka S, a widely-used platform for publishing humanities content online. Omeka S puts special emphasis on the needs of small- to medium-sized institutions and integration with other systems and Linked Open Data (LOD). ORCID provides a global, standardized mechanism for reliably identifying scholars and researchers and for providing metadata about them via unique identifiers. ORCID data, however, is currently overwhelmingly tilted toward researchers in the sciences. This integration will encourage humanists to register an identifier with ORCID, fostering new connections between humanists' research. Thus, Omeka S would both augment ORCID's goal of "enabl[ing] transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions, and affiliations" within the humanities, and it would expand the utility of Omeka S for users and data aggregators. 

[White paper]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,076 (approved)
$39,076 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


HAA-258826-18

Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-0316)
Jillian E. Galle (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Worthy N. Martin (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Expanding the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery Research Consortium

Major infrastructure improvements to the multi-institutional Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.

Over the past two decades, archaeologists have struggled to discover how the web can help them collaborate across institutional boundaries to generate accurate and commensurate data, share them publicly, and analyze them to advance our understanding of human history. This proposal from the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, based at Monticello, offers linked social and digital strategies that can meet these challenges in the archaeological study of early-modern slave societies. The project seeks Level III funding to enhance proven open-source software (www.daaacrc.org) and training programs that provide our collaborators with flexibility in how they collect data and share it with diverse stakeholders. The project will optimize search and navigation on the DAACS website (www.daacs.org) to accommodate a 10-fold increase in the number of archaeological sites represented. The project would demonstrate how a core facility like DAACS can leverage collaboration among researchers working in diverse institutions.

Participating institutions:
Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
African American History; Archaeology; History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$375,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 2/28/2021


HAA-258799-18

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Neil Kanwar Harish Verma (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Marit MacArthur (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Tools for Listening to Texts-in-Performance

The development of tools to allow humanistic researchers to analyze recorded literary and cultural materials ranging from poems, radio plays, and books to political speeches and sermons.

Audio archives provide tremendous resources for studying texts-in-performance, performance styles, and media history and formats. Such research requires tools that work well on low-quality, noisy audio common in humanities research, e.g., poetry readings, radio plays, and talking books, the datasets for this project. The proposed project will develop, provide access to, and support humanistic research using two state-of-the-art, open-source, user-friendly tools, Gentle and Drift. Drawing on advanced speech recognition and signal processing algorithms, Gentle and Drift visualize and quantify prosodic, expressive features of speech, including pitch range, intonation patterns, intensity, and rhythm. The project will also train a network of scholars in using these tools, and solicit and apply their feedback to develop new features to fit their needs. In so doing, the project will provide practical tools, broaden the community of users and develop new digital humanities research on sound.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Communications

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HAA-258807-18

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (San Juan, PR 00925-2512)
Nadjah Rios-Villarini (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Mirerza González-Vélez (Co Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Caribbean Diaspora: Panorama of Carnival Practices

Early planning for a project to explore migration and the Caribbean diaspora through the lens of cultural practices related to Carnival. Coordinated through a series of meetings and drawing on multiple archival collections, the project will produce a website for public audiences and a white paper.

This project aims to initiate new approaches to inquiries on migration at the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras (UPR-RP) that can be digitally shared with a broader audience, particularly those of the Caribbean and its diasporas. Project activities and outcomes will be: (1) to hold a series of discussion-based meetings between external digital humanities specialists and local librarian and Caribbean scholars to design an interactive, general audience website on Caribbean mobility as evidenced in Carnival; (2) to generate a preliminary webpage that includes curated content using existing digital audiovisual materials and artifacts related to Caribbean Carnivals in the UPR archives, the Puerto Rico Foundation for the Humanities, the original Project Diaspora website, University of Florida’s Digital Library of the Caribbean, and other sources; and (3) to produce a final white paper documenting the development process with implications so that digital humanities scholars can benefit.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; Immigration History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


HAA-258706-18

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Bryan E. Wagner (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

Applying Named Entity Recognition to Explore Louisiana Slave Conspiracies

Frameworks for linking and analyzing documents dealing with slave conspiracies (defined as planned or actual insurrections against slave owners) to help resolve questions and uncertainties in historical accounts.


We are a multidisciplinary research project dedicated to preserving, digitizing, transcribing, translating, publishing, and analyzing manuscripts from three Louisiana slave conspiracies. We are presenting these manuscripts, with original transcription and translation, alongside interactive, data-driven maps in an effort to address essential but still unresolved questions about the organization of social relations and the circulation of ideas in these conspiracies.

Project fields:
English

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


HAA-258717-18

Utah State University (Logan, UT 84322-1400)
Mattie Burkert (Project Director: June 2017 to present)
Katie Dana (Co Project Director: March 2018 to May 2019)

The London Stage Database

The recovery and revitalization of a unique and important database, supported by NEH and other funders in the 1970s, containing information on theater and popular culture in London in the long eighteenth century (1660-1800).


Obsolescence is a serious issue facing the digital humanities today. Projects can take years to complete, by which time the data and software are out of step with current platforms and file formats. We propose to recover an NEH-funded humanities computing project completed in the 1970s: the London Stage Information Bank. In addition to revitalizing and making available a database of great interest to scholars of eighteenth-century British culture, this project will address three broader goals: (1) model best practices for recovering obsolete digital projects; (2) make visible the Information Bank’s underlying assumptions about the nature of the data itself, fostering awareness of the theoretical underpinnings of humanities databases used today that were begun in the early decades of humanities computing; and (3) create a platform that can interface with other digitization and data collection projects now underway, enabling the future growth of a network of related databases and tools.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,970 (approved)
$74,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HAA-255937-17

St. Lawrence University (Canton, NY 13617-1501)
Ellen J. Rocco (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Diviner, A Digital Platform

The development of a digital platform to assist small historical societies and other local humanities institutions, including public media organizations, in curating their federated collections on the web.

North Country Public Radio is developing Diviner, an innovative digital platform for organizing and sharing humanities materials with the public, and encouraging exploration and personal interaction with that content. Our proposal is to package Diviner, the digital platform, and make it available to other humanities and public media organizations. During the grant period we will evaluate our current platform, develop new elements, and finally package all elements of the platform into free WordPress elements to be shared publicly in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory. During the grant period we will develop Diviner into a configurable platform useful for other organizations, through staff development meetings, meetings with our advisory board on how best to package the platform for public use, meetings with our humanities collaborators to design new features, and periods of testing and quality assurance for all aspects of the platform.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Communications

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$73,500 (approved)
$73,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 5/31/2019


HAA-255994-17

St. John's University, Collegeville (Collegeville, MN 56321-2000)
Columba A. Stewart (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Ensuring Access to Endangered and Inaccessible Manuscripts

Further development of the virtual Hill Museum and Manuscript Library, a digital portal that provides online access to manuscript collections from Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This phase of the project would support development of the platform’s underlying technical framework as well as features to enhance the researcher experience.

The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, seeks support for the next phase of development for its recently-launched vHMML platform for manuscript studies (www.vhmml.org). vHMML 1.0 was released in October 2015 with resources to support the use of manuscripts in research; vHMML 2.0 launched in August 2016 with an online Reading Room that is making tens of thousands of otherwise inaccessible and often endangered manuscript books and archival documents available to users around the world free of charge. NEH funding will make it possible to create vHMML 3.0, with greatly increased discoverability of manuscripts and metadata, and much richer data sharing with other digital humanities projects. vHMML 3.0 will add features requested by partner projects and researchers, and NEH support in both outright and matching funds will sustain the human resources needed to guarantee best-practice administration and continued development of vHMML.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$366,388 (approved)
$343,958 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


HAA-255998-17

Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0001)
Jeffrey M. Leichman (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Françoise Rubellin (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

V-ESPACE: Virtual Early Modern Spectacles and Publics, Active and Collaborative Environment

The early-stage development of a virtual reality environment that re-creates an 18th century theater at the Paris Fair. The environment is intended to provide users with an immersive experience that will allow them to learn about social and political issues, discourse, and status during the time of the Enlightenment.

The V-ESPACE project consists of devising and implementing an interactive and explorable virtual reality video game of an evening at the eighteenth-century Paris Fair theater. Players select avatars with distinct goals to complete, keyed to the play on stage and their social status, as they navigate the virtual theater space alongside other users and non-player characters. Game play accommodates a range of linguistic ability, making this an inclusive learning tool for undergraduates studying French, theater, or early modern history. During this grant period, we will establish (1) the floor plan and architectural features of an historically accurate virtual Fair theater space; (2) the text(s) that will comprise the theatrical entertainment, as well as modalities for digital capture of a live performance; (3) avatar profiles, story lines, and characteristics, integrating historical research with computerized behavioral modeling; and (4) detailed roadmaps for continued research and implementation.

[White paper]

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,982 (approved)
$39,982 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 10/31/2018


HAA-256078-17

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Brian Daniel Joseph (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Christopher Brown (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Micha Elsner (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Marie-Catherine de Marneffe (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Named Entity Recognition For The Classical Languages For The Building Of A Catalog Of Ancient Peoples

The creation of a catalog of individuals and groups of individuals mentioned in ancient sources, in part to focus attention on the historical role played by those other than the “great actors” (the important individuals, states, or empires singled out in historic texts). To do so, they will use Named Entity Recognition, a computational linguistics method which identifies people and place names in texts and then sorts them into pre-defined categories, allowing further study and analysis.

The Herodotos Project is creating a catalog of all groups of peoples mentioned in ancient sources, ultimately to assemble informational material for a detailed ethnohistoric profile of each. Our sources at first are Latin and Greek texts. Given the labor-intensive and time-consuming nature of manually searching texts in the original language, and for greater accuracy, we are automating the group name extraction process, drawing on Named Entity Recognition (NER) technology from computational linguistics to identify significant entities in a given text, including our target group names. Most NER systems are English-based, so we have been creating a Latin system that is successful (c. 90% accuracy) but needs more development to achieve even better results. Also, we must adapt our Latin-based system for use with Greek. The NER-development phase of the Project is an essential step towards furthering the creation of the catalogue that will fuel the ethnohistoric side of the overall project.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Classical Languages; Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,808 (approved)
$74,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


HAA-256086-17

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Exploring Archaeological Landscapes through Advanced Aerial Thermal Imaging

A series of six case studies in locations in the United States and internationally to further methods in aerial thermography, an imaging process that allows non-destructive photography and data collection for archaeological sites.

Archaeologists have known since the 1970s that aerial thermal images can reveal a wide range of ancient cultural features including buried architecture, artifact concentrations, as well as roads, fields, and earthworks. Until recently, technological hurdles have largely prevented aerial thermography from being deployed in archaeological research, but our work on a Level II Start-Up grant brought together a small drone, a lightweight thermal camera, and photogrammetry software to explore new methods for aerial thermal surveys. The proposed project seeks to build on this success by using a newly developed radiometric thermal camera, improved drone technology and new processing methods to undertake a series of aerial thermal surveys at sites in the US, Mexico, Cyprus and Iraq. Results of the project have the potential to transform understanding of the various sites under investigation, and will develop a new set of protocols for collection and processing of thermal imagery in archaeology.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,930 (approved)
$324,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


HAA-255885-17

York County Community College (Wells, ME 04090-5341)
Dianne Fallon (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

Go Local: Building Capacity for Public History in York County, Maine

A series of planning and development activities to help York County Community College and local historical societies in southeastern Maine develop their own digital public history projects.

York County Community College respectfully seeks a Digital Humanities Advancement grant to build capacity for public history in York County, Maine by providing support for professional development and training for local organizations to develop public history projects using digital tools. The grant would also support a needs assessment of committed historical organizations, two workshops focused on planning and expanding digital expertise, and the development of an entry-level course at York County Community College aimed at teaching students to use digital tools to present public history projects based on local history. The main goal of the project is to foster networking, information sharing, and collaboration between and among local organizations and with York County Community College, and to plan for future projects that might involve the College and its students.

[White paper][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$21,000 (approved)
$21,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HAA-256122-17

Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, NC 28216-5398)
Brandon Lunsford (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Mapping the Historic West End: The Digital History of African American Neighborhoods in Charlotte, North Carolina

The creation of content to populate a digital interactive map of a 150-year-old African American neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina that is undergoing significant social change and gentrification. The project is intended to allow community residents to participate in a large-scale effort to document and engage with the city’s history.

This project will create a web and mobile app framework for publishing location-based content including historical photographs, documents, and oral histories that will populate a digital interactive map. The map will document the Historic West End, a vibrant 150 year old African American community that surrounds the university on the west side of Charlotte, North Carolina and is currently faced with gentrification and social change. This project will expand the boundaries of how libraries can use mobile technology to bring visual history and users together, and will utilize a partnership between academic and public libraries, museums, government agencies, and community members that will provide a model for other small and historically black college and university libraries that seek to bring their local history alive in the digital age.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$69,039 (approved)
$69,039 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-256123-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Andrew Weislogel (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
C. Richard Johnson (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Building a Decision Tree for Watermark Identification in Rembrandt's Etchings - The WIRE Project

Development of a prototype tool to enhance museum and art historical research into the printmaking practices of Rembrandt and other artists.

This project seeks to creatively merge digital, computational, and art historical methodologies to significantly broaden access to crucial watermark information elucidating Rembrandt’s printing practice and chronology. Its central innovation is the use of the decision tree model, which allows rapid, confident visual identification of Rembrandt watermarks by non-specialists. The project will build interrogatory decision tree branches for each of the 54 types of watermarks on Rembrandt’s papers, resulting in a complete tree that will be coded into purpose-developed software. The project will also develop procedure to add new watermarks to the tree as they arise, and will lay the foundation for a watermarks database for Rembrandt’s etchings in U.S. collections. The decision tree will provide proof of concept for application to other research questions requiring visual differentiation in datasets too large for the unaided researcher but too small to recommend a machine-learning approach.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,994 (approved)
$74,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


HAA-256132-17

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History

An advanced workshop on incorporating digital humanities tools into medical history research. Preceded by a series of virtual meetings and activities, the two-day workshop will be held at the National Institutes of Health and will result in an open access publication of scholarly essays.

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Medical History and Digital Humanities will bring together scholars from the field of medical history whose research shows particular promise for making innovative use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop in February 2018 at the National Institutes of Health with structured virtual editing activities that produce innovative scholarship. Workshop participants include twelve Contributing Scholars, each producing a chapter of original research; Consulting Scholars who are experts in network analysis; and an Advisory Board who will coordinate stages of collaborative writing, peer review, collective editing, and final publication in an open access and freely available scholarly platform. The requested funds will support travel costs for workshop participants; salaries for a Graduate Research Assistant and the Project Director; workshop costs; and honoraria for Consulting Scholars.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HAA-256069-17

Salem State University (Salem, MA 01970-5353)
Roopika Risam (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Networking the Regional Comprehensives

The formation of a network of digital humanities practitioners at regional comprehensive universities. The network is intended to facilitate collaboration and sharing of knowledge and resources among faculty, librarians,and students across the United States at smaller universities that offer less institutional support for computationally-intensive humanities projects.

Salem State University is proposing a Level I project, “Networking the Regional Comprehensives: Digital Humanities beyond the R1 and SLAC,” for the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants Program. The project initiates a much-needed national dialogue on the role of regional comprehensive universities in the field of digital humanities. The project’s short-term goal is bringing together national thinkers and digital humanities practitioners from regional comprehensive universities for a strategic conversation on developing a network to facilitate collaboration of regional comprehensive faculty, librarians, and students across the U.S. The long-term goal is to activate and grow this network so regional comprehensive digital humanities practitioners are better suited to share their knowledge and resources with each other and share their expertise with others across a range of institutions, including K12, community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and research universities.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,305 (approved)
$39,305 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-256044-17

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
David Bamman (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Text in Situ: Reasoning about Visual Information in the Computational Analysis of Books

Implementation of three studies and creation of software tools that computationally analyze visual information about printed books. Partners include the Folger Shakespeare Library and the HathiTrust Research Center.

While humanistic inquiry traditionally involves synthesizing a rich set of contextual information, computational approaches to text analysis introduce several forms of simplification, beginning from the initial act of digitization. In this work, we advocate for an alternative that seeks to reason about text within a rich material context: as ink on paper. We propose new computational approaches to three tasks: using visual information about the physical layout of pages to segment the document structure of books in the HathiTrust; reconstructing lacunae (physical gaps in the medium of writing), and attributing and identifying compositors from visual cues in typesetting (using Shakespeare’s First Folio). Our core unifying principle is reasoning about text holistically—awareness of a text’s rich material context can not only shape the historical questions we ask of large-scale book corpora, but can also be informative for traditional tasks that text alone has been used to answer.

Participating institutions:
Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


HAA-256102-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Edward E. Baptist (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
William C. Block (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Freedom on the Move: Advancing a Crowdsourced, Comprehensive Database of North American Runaway Slave Advertisements

Implementation of Freedom on the Move, a public history resource that will offer a unified access point to 100,000 runaway slave advertisements published in American newspapers through the end of the Civil War. In addition, the project will develop tools for students to engage with primary sources by transcribing the advertisements.

“Freedom on the Move” (FOTM) creates a digital resource from an estimated 100,000 runaway slave advertisements from pre-1865 U.S. newspapers. These ads, placed by enslavers when enslaved people attempted to escape, comprise one of the richest sources of information about enslaved individuals in United States history. The FOTM database, which will be freely available for browsing and research, is the first comprehensive collection of these ads. Using crowdsourcing to parse ad data into a database, FOTM enables new research analyses of the history of U.S. slavery. The prototype interface is already built. We seek funds to complete FOTM as a site for public engagement that supports lessons for K-12, university, and museum education. NEH implementation funding will enable us to build tools for analyzing and visualizing data, managing student interaction, engaging the public, and establishing a prototype for future digital resources.

Project fields:
African American History; Women's History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$374,581 (approved)
$342,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


HAA-256138-17

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Mining Citation in Digital Humanities: A central bibliography of Digital Humanities Quarterly

The further development of a centralized bibliography, a revised editorial workflow, and pilot citation analysis study for the scholarly journal Digital Humanities Quarterly.

Digital Humanities Quarterly seeks funding to complete the development of a centralized bibliography of digital humanities that will support the journal's publication and provide data for citation research and analysis. Building on an NEH-funded prototype, the project will expand the existing bibliography, enhance it with local authority control, and develop a streamlined workflow for maintaining the bibliography as part of the journal's regular production. A pilot research analysis will explore the potential of the data for rhetorical and citation analysis focusing on discipline formation and discursive practices in digital humanities. An exploratory interface for the bibliography will be integrated into the DHQ publication, and the data will also be exposed through a public API.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,123 (approved)
$74,123 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 4/30/2020


HAA-256146-17

Trustees of Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28035-7149)
Suzanne W. Churchill (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Susan B. Rosenbaum (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Linda Arbaugh Kinnahan (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)

Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde

A multimedia research project, including a public crowdsourcing component, exploring the work of early 20th century artist and writer Mina Loy.

A pressing need in digital humanities is for multimodal, user-directed narratives that situate evidence, interpretation, and arguments in ways that allow readers to understand the scholarly project. Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde is a scholarly website that charts the career of the 20th century writer and artist Mina Loy. Using Loy as a case study, our goals are to: provide access to and interpretations of Loy’s work in diverse media, using new digital modes of textual and visual expression to invite closer, more informed and interactive engagement; develop a theory of the en dehors garde (literally, “coming from the outside”) that accounts for contributions of women and people of color who have been excluded from conventional formulations of the avant-garde; and, conduct an experiment in public humanities scholarship that involves students in transforming scholarly methods and products, tests new processes for peer review, and sets UX design standards for digital scholarship.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Trustees of Davidson College (Davidson, NC) - Applicant/Recipient
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA) - Participating Institution
University of Georgia (Athens, GA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,960 (approved)
$74,960 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


HAA-256158-17

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sheila A. Brennan (Project Director: January 2017 to June 2018)
Christopher Hamner (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Transcribing and Linking Early American Records with Scripto and Omeka S

An update and redesign of Scripto, which is a free, open-source tool used for collaborative online transcriptions of documents and multimedia files. This update will ensure it is compatible with Omeka S, a platform for publishing linked open data and integrating collections. In addition to this, the team will migrate the holdings in an important archive (The Papers of the War Department) to Omeka S and develop guidance to assist other cultural heritage organizations in managing their own community transcription projects.

RRCHNM seeks a Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the NEH-ODH to 1) update and redesign the Scripto transcription tool to make it compatible with the new data architecture in Omeka S; 2) migrate the substantial holdings in the Papers of the War Department collections to Omeka S; 3) and use the project as the basis for producing a number of publications and guides that will support other cultural heritage organizations in their efforts to develop community transcription projects with Scripto and Omeka S.

Project fields:
Military History; Political History; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$230,000 (approved)
$230,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


HAA-256175-17

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Erica Cavanaugh (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Cathy Moran Hajo (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)

The Development of Digital Documentary Editing Platforms

A workshop for scholarly editors and software developers to discuss how the Omeka and Drupal digital platforms can better serve the needs of documentary editions.

The Center for Digital Editing will host a forum that will bring together editors and technical experts currently engaged with two open-source content management systems -- Omeka and Drupal -- during a two-day workshop to discuss the use, development, and distribution of options for creating and publishing digital documentary editions. Information generated at this workshop will be made available through a website and presented at professional meetings and institutes to promote feedback and discussion.

[White paper][Grant products]

Participating institutions:
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$18,236 (approved)
$18,236 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HAA-256186-17

Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)
Brigetta Abel (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Amy Young (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Grenzenlos Deutsch: an Inclusive Curriculum for German Studies

The creation of a digital open educational resource for German language and culture. The applicants aim to produce an alternative to traditional textbooks by developing an interactive and immersive environment for language and culture that makes use of videos and interviews with native and near-native German speakers.

We seek a Level II grant to complete Grenzenlos Deutsch, an online, open-access curriculum for introductory German language and culture courses that creates an inclusive and interactive learning experience. The curriculum, started by Professors Brigetta (Britt) Abel and Amy Young during their sabbatical leaves in the fall of 2016, is intended as a no-cost alternative to current traditional textbooks in the field. Funding will be used primarily for the formation of a Collaborative Working Group of German faculty to assemble for further development and completion this full-year curriculum, which mixes materials from real-world, contemporary communication scenarios, multimedia content, and online learning activities. Firmly rooted in humanities, including language and culture, this curriculum will be openly available to German Studies teachers and learners worldwide, and our project will present a viable alternative to traditional textbooks across humanities fields.

[Media coverage]

Participating institutions:
Macalester College (St. Paul, MN) - Applicant/Recipient
Central College (Pella, IA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
German Language

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$69,837 (approved)
$69,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2020


HAA-256187-17

Association of Research Libraries (Washington, DC 20036-1109)
Judy Ruttenberg (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Cynthia Hudson-Vitale (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Integrating Digital Humanities into the Web of Scholarship with SHARE: An Exploration of Requirements

A series of activities to adapt the SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) platform that enhances the discoverability of scholarship for use by humanities faculty and librarians.

This project will develop a plan to optimize the SHARE aggregator and data set for digital humanities in consultation with scholars, institutions, and centers. A digital humanities project may produce more than one book or article manuscript, each published on a different publisher’s website, any number of pre-prints on institutional repositories or pre-print servers, data sets and code books on Dryad or Figshare, and text mining or cleaning scripts on github. Such project components may be housed semi-permanently in web-publishing platforms like Omeka without formal integration with library discovery systems or other services to link them to similar projects. The SHARE platform links scholarly activity across the research lifecycle and makes it available as enhanced, free, open metadata. The project team will administer a survey, conduct focus groups, and engage with the humanities community to detail requirements and prototype applications for digital scholarship curation.

Participating institutions:
Association of Research Libraries (Washington, DC) - Applicant/Recipient
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-256218-17

University of Central Florida, Orlando (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Scott Branting (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Joseph Kider (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Lori C. Walters (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH): Damage Assessment and Digital Preservation

The development of open source software that will allow archaeologists, historians, and archivists to conduct rapid needs assessment of cultural heritage in conflict and non-conflict situations. The software will, when used in conjunction with mixed reality hardware (which merges both real and virtual worlds), allow users to quickly identify and document damage to structures and sites by providing overlays that compare real-time conditions against previously collected images.

The Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH) project will develop prototype open-source software for field assessment and documentation of built and movable cultural heritage using mixed reality hardware with or without network connections. It will permit real-time overlay comparisons of cultural heritage against earlier documentation while also enabling the creation of new scaled drawings using gestures, even in field situations with no network connections. When network connections are available additional features such as video calls with specialists and data sharing with management systems will be enabled. DATCH will aid rapid needs assessments of cultural heritage in conflict situations, ongoing assessments of cultural heritage in the field, and enable field work across multiple disciplines. The prototype software will be developed and field tested with Microsoft’s HoloLens, but with a goal of cross-platform compatibility across head mounted display mixed reality devices.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,916 (approved)
$74,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-256224-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Robert Keith Englund (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative Framework Update

An infrastructure update of the established Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative that focuses on improving sustainability and enhancing accessibility for both new users and the existing user community.

The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) is a 20-year strong international digital humanities project curating data and maintaining the largest database of artifacts inscribed with cuneiform writing from ancient Iraq and adjacent regions. The CDLI Framework Update is a consolidation project aimed at ensuring both the longevity of the CDLI data and interface, and at increasing access, usability, and accessibility to the information it curates. As part of numerous sub-projects, a wide array of technologies to provide software support have been used through the years. The CDLI Framework Update will consolidate actual features into a framework structure and prepare new data displays, including machine readable outputs, to enhance information diffusion. This update will strengthen digital structure of CDLI, facilitating maintenance and future developments, and increasing access to information about ancient cultures to actual and prospective audiences, including the disabled.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Linguistics; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2019


HAA-256249-17

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Golan Levin (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
David Newbury (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)

Supporting Cultural Heritage Research in Historic Photography Archives with Machine Learning and Computer Vision

The development of a set of prototype image identification tools and techniques to allow enhanced access to large photography archives. The Carnegie Museum of Art’s Charles “Teenie” Harris Archive of African American life in Pittsburgh would serve as the test collection.

We address the challenges faced in the research and annotation of large digital image archives by creating prototype software tools that use machine learning and computer vision. Specifically, we are developing software tools to aid research into the Carnegie Museum of Art’s publicly available Teenie Harris Archive, a major photography collection documenting 20th century African American life in Pittsburgh. Our goal is to create open-source software that uses state-of-the-art techniques to help identify and annotate visually distinctive features across this large (80,000 item) set of digitized photographs, to improve and expedite the Museum's archiving and cataloging process. Through compatibility with International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) standards, our project will furthermore provide free tools and reproducible, computer-vision based workflows that other museums, libraries and archives can use to help organize their own digital collections.

Project fields:
African American History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,458 (approved)
$72,458 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 2/29/2020


HAA-256368-17

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Michele C. Weigle (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Deborah Kempe (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Pamela Graham (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Alexander Thurman (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)
Michael L Nelson (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)

Visualizing Webpage Changes Over Time

The development of prototypes for a set of open-source visualization tools to ease navigation of web archive collections. Partners include the New York Art Resources Consortium and Columbia University Libraries.

As web archives grow in importance and size, techniques for understanding how a web page changes through time need to adapt from an assumption of scarcity (just a few copies of a page, no more than a few weeks or months apart) to one of abundance (tens of thousands of copies of a page, spanning as much as 20 years). Old Dominion University, New York Art Resources Consortium (NYARC), and Columbia University Libraries (CUL) will jointly research and develop tools for efficient visualization of and interaction with archived web pages. We will develop 1) a tool for visualizing web page changes in arbitrary web archives, 2) a plug-in for the popular Wayback Machine web archiving system (for better support of the functionality otherwise available via #1), and 3) scripts for easy embedding of the visualizations in live web pages, providing tighter integration of the archived web and live web. This work will be informed and in support of CUL's and NYARC's existing web archiving activities.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
Columbia University Libraries (New York, NY) - Participating Institution
New York Art Resources Consortium (New York, NY) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


HAA-255979-17

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Jeremy Wade Morris (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Eric Hoyt (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Investigating the Golden Age of Podcasting through Metadata and Sound

Prototype development and adaptation of open-source software tools to facilitate large-scale search and analysis of podcasts.

Despite an explosion of interest in podcasts - claims of a “Golden Age” of podcasts abound - sound remains mystifyingly difficult to analyze and the history of this emerging media form is already at risk of being lost. PodcastRE Analytics: Investigating Podcasting through Metadata and Sound aims to put podcasting’s data traces to work, making digital audio more usable, visible and audible than current archives. PodcastRE Analytics leverages the 120,000+ podcasts of the PodcastRE database (http://podcastre.org), a preservation collaboration between UW-Madison’s Libraries and Dept. of Communication Arts, to pioneer new techniques for the analysis and visualization of audio and metadata. While tools for data mining text archives exist, PodcastRE Analytics will allow users to explore audio in ways that are as familiar as textual resources. Using digital humanities methods, we can better research contemporary culture and investigate a new media form that has captured significant attention.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,972 (approved)
$74,972 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


HAA-255942-17

James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)
Brooks E. Hefner (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Edward Timke (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Circulating American Magazines: Making Lost Historical Data from the Audit Bureau of Circulations Publicly Available

The creation of web-based tools to visualize magazine circulation and readership data for historically significant magazines dated between 1880 to 1972. This will allow scholars and students to easily access information about circulation that has, to date, been “virtually invisible” due to an arcane and difficult-to-navigate cataloging system.

Although digitization has made more periodical content available to historians, literary critics, and print culture specialists, scholars remain largely in the dark about periodicals’ reach. Circulating American Magazines offers tools to analyze and visualize circulation data for historically significant magazines between 1880 and 1972. Using detailed reports from the Audit Bureau of Circulations and the advertising firm N.W. Ayer & Son, this project provides complete access to circulation numbers by issue, in addition to each title’s geographical circulation across the United States and abroad. The project offers web-based visualization tools that allow students and scholars to investigate the history of a magazine or compare multiple magazines’ readership. The project’s centralization of circulation data allows students and scholars to see American periodical history in radically new ways, describing periodicals’ development with an accuracy that has not been possible before.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Participating institutions:
James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Journalism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,904 (approved)
$50,904 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


HAA-255990-17

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115-2214)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Meshack Owino (Co Project Director: May 2017 to present)

Curating East Africa: A Platform and Process for Location-Based Storytelling in the Developing World

Expansion of the Curating Kisumu project, which brings together collaborators from the United States and Kenya to develop a mobile website interpreting regional history and culture in East Africa.

We seek a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to develop a Curatescape for WordPress beta, a toolset comprised of an open-source plugin and theme framework that enables scholars or small teams to create interpretive humanities presentations optimized for the mobile-first Internet culture in East Africa and the developing world. Expanding upon our Curating Kisumu project, we will continue to involve transnational student teams in building collaboratively researched and curated location-based stories in Kisumu, Kenya, with project partner Maseno University. After building the beta, which expands upon the existing Curatescape toolset, we will test it with Kisumu content and engage a panel of humanities experts in Kenya and Tanzania to evaluate both the content and the framework. By overcoming regional technical constraints, the project addresses gaps between ambition and adoption of digital humanities practice in Africa and supports local cultural production.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,939 (approved)
$70,189 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HAA-255991-17

University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)
Steven E. Jones (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Reconstructing the First Humanities Computing Center

The digital re-creation of the laboratory of pioneering digital humanities scholar Father Roberto Busa to study the methods used by his team in early computational work with scholarly texts.

In 1956, Roberto Busa, SJ, founded the first humanities computing center in Italy. After five years in other locations, the operation moved in 1961 into a former textile factory outside Milan, where IBM punched-card data processing machines were installed. There student operators worked on the Index Thomisticus, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and other projects, 1961-1967. We aim to digitize a key range of materials in the Busa Archive directly relevant to the establishment of the center, to augment these with oral histories of machine operators and link to punched-card machine software emulators and an immersive 3D model of the center. The goal is to begin to recover the infrastructure, workflow, and institutional contexts for this highly significant “site” (both literally and figuratively) in the history of technology and the humanities. The outcome will be increased historical understanding through the creation of models for research and learning.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HAA-255999-17

Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
William G. Noel (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Laura E. Aydelotte (Co Project Director: July 2017 to present)

The Philadelphia Playbills Project

A proof-of-concept effort to transcribe and disseminate textual data from a collection of theater playbills documenting 19th-century American theater history.

The Philadelphia Playbills Project (PPP) takes materials from the archive and transforms them into Linked Open Data. The project will be based at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries and collaborate with the New York Public Library and the Yale University Digital Humanities Lab. It will use a sample set of 19th century playbills filled with performance information from America's oldest theaters to test approaches to generating data from these materials, including publically crowdsourcing transcriptions using the Ensemble software produced by the NYPL. The PPP will then test workflows for transforming this data into RDF (Linked data). The project will produce a previously unavailable data set that will support new research about the American Theater, develop and refine methodologies for generating such data in the future on a larger scale with other playbill collections, and lay the grounds for future collaborative work with a conference on Performance History in the Digital Age.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018