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Program: Digital Humanities Advancement Grants*
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HAA-255885-17

York County Community College (Wells, ME 04090-5341)
Dianne Fallon (Project Director: 12/16/2016 to present)

Go Local: Building Capacity for Public History in York County, Maine

A series of planning and development activities to help York County Community College and local historical societies in southeastern Maine develop their own digital public history projects.

York County Community College respectfully seeks a Digital Humanities Advancement grant to build capacity for public history in York County, Maine by providing support for professional development and training for local organizations to develop public history projects using digital tools. The grant would also support a needs assessment of committed historical organizations, two workshops focused on planning and expanding digital expertise, and the development of an entry-level course at York County Community College aimed at teaching students to use digital tools to present public history projects based on local history. The main goal of the project is to foster networking, information sharing, and collaboration between and among local organizations and with York County Community College, and to plan for future projects that might involve the College and its students.

Project fields:
Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$21,000 (approved)
$21,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HAA-255937-17

St. Lawrence University (Canton, NY 13617-1501)
Ellen Rocco (Project Director: 01/06/2017 to present)

Diviner, A Digital Platform

The development of a digital platform to assist small historical societies and other local humanities institutions, including public media organizations, in curating their federated collections on the web.

North Country Public Radio is developing Diviner, an innovative digital platform for organizing and sharing humanities materials with the public, and encouraging exploration and personal interaction with that content. Our proposal is to package Diviner, the digital platform, and make it available to other humanities and public media organizations. During the grant period we will evaluate our current platform, develop new elements, and finally package all elements of the platform into free WordPress elements to be shared publicly in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory. During the grant period we will develop Diviner into a configurable platform useful for other organizations, through staff development meetings, meetings with our advisory board on how best to package the platform for public use, meetings with our humanities collaborators to design new features, and periods of testing and quality assurance for all aspects of the platform.

Project fields:
Communications

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$73,500 (approved)
$73,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 1/30/2019


HAA-255942-17

James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA 22807-0001)
Brooks Hefner (Project Director: 01/06/2017 to present)
Edward Timke (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Circulating American Magazines: Making Lost Historical Data from the Audit Bureau of Circulations Publicly Available

The creation of web-based tools to visualize magazine circulation and readership data for historically significant magazines dated between 1880 to 1972. This will allow scholars and students to easily access information about circulation that has, to date, been “virtually invisible” due to an arcane and difficult-to-navigate cataloging system.

Although digitization has made more periodical content available to historians, literary critics, and print culture specialists, scholars remain largely in the dark about periodicals’ reach. Circulating American Magazines offers tools to analyze and visualize circulation data for historically significant magazines between 1880 and 1972. Using detailed reports from the Audit Bureau of Circulations and the advertising firm N.W. Ayer & Son, this project provides complete access to circulation numbers by issue, in addition to each title’s geographical circulation across the United States and abroad. The project offers web-based visualization tools that allow students and scholars to investigate the history of a magazine or compare multiple magazines’ readership. The project’s centralization of circulation data allows students and scholars to see American periodical history in radically new ways, describing periodicals’ development with an accuracy that has not been possible before.

Participating institutions:
James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA) - Applicant/Grantee
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) - Participating institution

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Journalism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,904 (approved)
$50,904 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HAA-255979-17

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Jeremy Morris (Project Director: 01/09/2017 to present)
Eric Hoyt (Co Project Director: 05/18/2017 to present)

Investigating the Golden Age of Podcasting through Metadata and Sound

Prototype development and adaptation of open-source software tools to facilitate large-scale search and analysis of podcasts.

Despite an explosion of interest in podcasts - claims of a “Golden Age” of podcasts abound - sound remains mystifyingly difficult to analyze and the history of this emerging media form is already at risk of being lost. PodcastRE Analytics: Investigating Podcasting through Metadata and Sound aims to put podcasting’s data traces to work, making digital audio more usable, visible and audible than current archives. PodcastRE Analytics leverages the 120,000+ podcasts of the PodcastRE database (http://podcastre.org), a preservation collaboration between UW-Madison’s Libraries and Dept. of Communication Arts, to pioneer new techniques for the analysis and visualization of audio and metadata. While tools for data mining text archives exist, PodcastRE Analytics will allow users to explore audio in ways that are as familiar as textual resources. Using digital humanities methods, we can better research contemporary culture and investigate a new media form that has captured significant attention.

Project fields:
Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,972 (approved)
$74,972 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


HAA-255990-17

Cleveland State University (Cleveland, OH 44115-2214)
J. Mark Souther (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)
Meshack Owino (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Curating East Africa: A Platform and Process for Location-Based Storytelling in the Developing World

Expansion of the Curating Kisumu project, which brings together collaborators from the United States and Kenya to develop a mobile website interpreting regional history and culture in East Africa.

We seek a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to develop a Curatescape for WordPress beta, a toolset comprised of an open-source plugin and theme framework that enables scholars or small teams to create interpretive humanities presentations optimized for the mobile-first Internet culture in East Africa and the developing world. Expanding upon our Curating Kisumu project, we will continue to involve transnational student teams in building collaboratively researched and curated location-based stories in Kisumu, Kenya, with project partner Maseno University. After building the beta, which expands upon the existing Curatescape toolset, we will test it with Kisumu content and engage a panel of humanities experts in Kenya and Tanzania to evaluate both the content and the framework. By overcoming regional technical constraints, the project addresses gaps between ambition and adoption of digital humanities practice in Africa and supports local cultural production.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,939 (approved)
$74,939 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-255991-17

University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)
Steven Jones (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)

Reconstructing the First Humanities Computing Center

The digital re-creation of the laboratory of pioneering digital humanities scholar Father Roberto Busa to study the methods used by his team in early computational work with scholarly texts.

In 1956, Roberto Busa, SJ, founded the first humanities computing center in Italy. After five years in other locations, the operation moved in 1961 into a former textile factory outside Milan, where IBM punched-card data processing machines were installed. There student operators worked on the Index Thomisticus, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and other projects, 1961-1967. We aim to digitize a key range of materials in the Busa Archive directly relevant to the establishment of the center, to augment these with oral histories of machine operators and link to punched-card machine software emulators and an immersive 3D model of the center. The goal is to begin to recover the infrastructure, workflow, and institutional contexts for this highly significant “site” (both literally and figuratively) in the history of technology and the humanities. The outcome will be increased historical understanding through the creation of models for research and learning.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


HAA-255994-17

St. John's University, Collegeville (Collegeville, MN 56321-2000)
Columba Stewart (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)

Ensuring Access to Endangered and Inaccessible Manuscripts

Further development of the virtual Hill Museum and Manuscript Library, a digital portal that provides online access to manuscript collections from Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This phase of the project would support development of the platform’s underlying technical framework as well as features to enhance the researcher experience.

The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, seeks support for the next phase of development for its recently-launched vHMML platform for manuscript studies (www.vhmml.org). vHMML 1.0 was released in October 2015 with resources to support the use of manuscripts in research; vHMML 2.0 launched in August 2016 with an online Reading Room that is making tens of thousands of otherwise inaccessible and often endangered manuscript books and archival documents available to users around the world free of charge. NEH funding will make it possible to create vHMML 3.0, with greatly increased discoverability of manuscripts and metadata, and much richer data sharing with other digital humanities projects. vHMML 3.0 will add features requested by partner projects and researchers, and NEH support in both outright and matching funds will sustain the human resources needed to guarantee best-practice administration and continued development of vHMML.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$366,388 (approved)
$323,958 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-255998-17

Louisiana State University and A & M College (Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0001)
Jeffrey Leichman (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)
Françoise Rubellin (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

V-ESPACE: Virtual Early Modern Spectacles and Publics, Active and Collaborative Environment

The early-stage development of a virtual reality environment that re-creates an 18th century theater at the Paris Fair. The environment is intended to provide users with an immersive experience that will allow them to learn about social and political issues, discourse, and status during the time of the Enlightenment.

The V-ESPACE project consists of devising and implementing an interactive and explorable virtual reality video game of an evening at the eighteenth-century Paris Fair theater. Players select avatars with distinct goals to complete, keyed to the play on stage and their social status, as they navigate the virtual theater space alongside other users and non-player characters. Game play accommodates a range of linguistic ability, making this an inclusive learning tool for undergraduates studying French, theater, or early modern history. During this grant period, we will establish (1) the floor plan and architectural features of an historically accurate virtual Fair theater space; (2) the text(s) that will comprise the theatrical entertainment, as well as modalities for digital capture of a live performance; (3) avatar profiles, story lines, and characteristics, integrating historical research with computerized behavioral modeling; and (4) detailed roadmaps for continued research and implementation.

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,982 (approved)
$39,982 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-255999-17

Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
William Noel (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)
Laura Aydelotte (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)

The Philadelphia Playbills Project

A proof-of-concept effort to transcribe and disseminate textual data from a collection of theater playbills documenting 19th-century American theater history.

The Philadelphia Playbills Project (PPP) takes materials from the archive and transforms them into Linked Open Data. The project will be based at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries and collaborate with the New York Public Library and the Yale University Digital Humanities Lab. It will use a sample set of 19th century playbills filled with performance information from America's oldest theaters to test approaches to generating data from these materials, including publically crowdsourcing transcriptions using the Ensemble software produced by the NYPL. The PPP will then test workflows for transforming this data into RDF (Linked data). The project will produce a previously unavailable data set that will support new research about the American Theater, develop and refine methodologies for generating such data in the future on a larger scale with other playbill collections, and lay the grounds for future collaborative work with a conference on Performance History in the Digital Age.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 9/1/2018


HAA-256044-17

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Taylor Berg Kirkpatrick (Project Director: 01/10/2017 to present)
David Bamman (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Text in Situ: Reasoning about Visual Information in the Computational Analysis of Books

Implementation of three studies and creation of software tools that computationally analyze visual information about printed books. Partners include the Folger Shakespeare Library and the HathiTrust Research Center.

While humanistic inquiry traditionally involves synthesizing a rich set of contextual information, computational approaches to text analysis introduce several forms of simplification, beginning from the initial act of digitization. In this work, we advocate for an alternative that seeks to reason about text within a rich material context: as ink on paper. We propose new computational approaches to three tasks: using visual information about the physical layout of pages to segment the document structure of books in the HathiTrust; reconstructing lacunae (physical gaps in the medium of writing), and attributing and identifying compositors from visual cues in typesetting (using Shakespeare’s First Folio). Our core unifying principle is reasoning about text holistically—awareness of a text’s rich material context can not only shape the historical questions we ask of large-scale book corpora, but can also be informative for traditional tasks that text alone has been used to answer.

Participating institutions:
Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA) - Applicant/Grantee
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-256069-17

Salem State University (Salem, MA 01970-5353)
Roopika Risam (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Networking the Regional Comprehensives

The formation of a network of digital humanities practitioners at regional comprehensive universities. The network is intended to facilitate collaboration and sharing of knowledge and resources among faculty, librarians,and students across the United States at smaller universities that offer less institutional support for computationally-intensive humanities projects.

Salem State University is proposing a Level I project, “Networking the Regional Comprehensives: Digital Humanities beyond the R1 and SLAC,” for the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants Program. The project initiates a much-needed national dialogue on the role of regional comprehensive universities in the field of digital humanities. The project’s short-term goal is bringing together national thinkers and digital humanities practitioners from regional comprehensive universities for a strategic conversation on developing a network to facilitate collaboration of regional comprehensive faculty, librarians, and students across the U.S. The long-term goal is to activate and grow this network so regional comprehensive digital humanities practitioners are better suited to share their knowledge and resources with each other and share their expertise with others across a range of institutions, including K12, community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and research universities.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$39,305 (approved)
$39,305 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-256078-17

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Brian Joseph (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Christopher Brown (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)
Micha Elsner (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)
Marie Catherine de Marneffe (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Named Entity Recognition For The Classical Languages For The Building Of A Catalog Of Ancient Peoples

The creation of a catalog of individuals and groups of individuals mentioned in ancient sources, in part to focus attention on the historical role played by those other than the “great actors” (the important individuals, states, or empires singled out in historic texts). To do so, they will use Named Entity Recognition, a computational linguistics method which identifies people and place names in texts and then sorts them into pre-defined categories, allowing further study and analysis.

The Herodotos Project is creating a catalog of all groups of peoples mentioned in ancient sources, ultimately to assemble informational material for a detailed ethnohistoric profile of each. Our sources at first are Latin and Greek texts. Given the labor-intensive and time-consuming nature of manually searching texts in the original language, and for greater accuracy, we are automating the group name extraction process, drawing on Named Entity Recognition (NER) technology from computational linguistics to identify significant entities in a given text, including our target group names. Most NER systems are English-based, so we have been creating a Latin system that is successful (c. 90% accuracy) but needs more development to achieve even better results. Also, we must adapt our Latin-based system for use with Greek. The NER-development phase of the Project is an essential step towards furthering the creation of the catalogue that will fuel the ethnohistoric side of the overall project.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Classical Languages; Computational Linguistics

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,808 (approved)
$74,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


HAA-256086-17

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Jesse Casana (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Exploring Archaeological Landscapes through Advanced Aerial Thermal Imaging

A series of six case studies in locations in the United States and internationally to further methods in aerial thermography, an imaging process that allows non-destructive photography and data collection for archaeological sites.

Archaeologists have known since the 1970s that aerial thermal images can reveal a wide range of ancient cultural features including buried architecture, artifact concentrations, as well as roads, fields, and earthworks. Until recently, technological hurdles have largely prevented aerial thermography from being deployed in archaeological research, but our work on a Level II Start-Up grant brought together a small drone, a lightweight thermal camera, and photogrammetry software to explore new methods for aerial thermal surveys. The proposed project seeks to build on this success by using a newly developed radiometric thermal camera, improved drone technology and new processing methods to undertake a series of aerial thermal surveys at sites in the US, Mexico, Cyprus and Iraq. Results of the project have the potential to transform understanding of the various sites under investigation, and will develop a new set of protocols for collection and processing of thermal imagery in archaeology.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,930 (approved)
$324,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2019


HAA-256102-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Edward Baptist (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
William Block (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Freedom on the Move: Advancing a Crowdsourced, Comprehensive Database of North American Runaway Slave Advertisements

Implementation of Freedom on the Move, a public history resource that will offer a unified access point to 100,000 runaway slave advertisements published in American newspapers through the end of the Civil War. In addition, the project will develop tools for students to engage with primary sources by transcribing the advertisements.

“Freedom on the Move” (FOTM) creates a digital resource from an estimated 100,000 runaway slave advertisements from pre-1865 U.S. newspapers. These ads, placed by enslavers when enslaved people attempted to escape, comprise one of the richest sources of information about enslaved individuals in United States history. The FOTM database, which will be freely available for browsing and research, is the first comprehensive collection of these ads. Using crowdsourcing to parse ad data into a database, FOTM enables new research analyses of the history of U.S. slavery. The prototype interface is already built. We seek funds to complete FOTM as a site for public engagement that supports lessons for K-12, university, and museum education. NEH implementation funding will enable us to build tools for analyzing and visualizing data, managing student interaction, engaging the public, and establishing a prototype for future digital resources.

Project fields:
African American History; Women's History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$374,581 (approved)
$324,581 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


HAA-256122-17

Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, NC 28216-5398)
Brandon Lunsford (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Mapping the Historic West End: The Digital History of African American Neighborhoods in Charlotte, North Carolina

The creation of content to populate a digital interactive map of a 150-year-old African American neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina that is undergoing significant social change and gentrification. The project is intended to allow community residents to participate in a large-scale effort to document and engage with the city’s history.

This project will create a web and mobile app framework for publishing location-based content including historical photographs, documents, and oral histories that will populate a digital interactive map. The map will document the Historic West End, a vibrant 150 year old African American community that surrounds the university on the west side of Charlotte, North Carolina and is currently faced with gentrification and social change. This project will expand the boundaries of how libraries can use mobile technology to bring visual history and users together, and will utilize a partnership between academic and public libraries, museums, government agencies, and community members that will provide a model for other small and historically black college and university libraries that seek to bring their local history alive in the digital age.

Project fields:
African American History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$69,039 (approved)
$69,039 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 2/28/2019


HAA-256123-17

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Andrew Weislogel (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
C. Richard Johnson (Co Project Director: 05/18/2017 to present)

Building a Decision Tree for Watermark Identification in Rembrandt's Etchings - The WIRE Project

Development of a prototype tool to enhance museum and art historical research into the printmaking practices of Rembrandt and other artists.

This project seeks to creatively merge digital, computational, and art historical methodologies to significantly broaden access to crucial watermark information elucidating Rembrandt’s printing practice and chronology. Its central innovation is the use of the decision tree model, which allows rapid, confident visual identification of Rembrandt watermarks by non-specialists. The project will build interrogatory decision tree branches for each of the 54 types of watermarks on Rembrandt’s papers, resulting in a complete tree that will be coded into purpose-developed software. The project will also develop procedure to add new watermarks to the tree as they arise, and will lay the foundation for a watermarks database for Rembrandt’s etchings in U.S. collections. The decision tree will provide proof of concept for application to other research questions requiring visual differentiation in datasets too large for the unaided researcher but too small to recommend a machine-learning approach.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,994 (approved)
$74,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


HAA-256132-17

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Edward Ewing (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History

An advanced workshop on incorporating digital humanities tools into medical history research. Preceded by a series of virtual meetings and activities, the two-day workshop will be held at the National Institutes of Health and will result in an open access publication of scholarly essays.

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Medical History and Digital Humanities will bring together scholars from the field of medical history whose research shows particular promise for making innovative use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop in February 2018 at the National Institutes of Health with structured virtual editing activities that produce innovative scholarship. Workshop participants include twelve Contributing Scholars, each producing a chapter of original research; Consulting Scholars who are experts in network analysis; and an Advisory Board who will coordinate stages of collaborative writing, peer review, collective editing, and final publication in an open access and freely available scholarly platform. The requested funds will support travel costs for workshop participants; salaries for a Graduate Research Assistant and the Project Director; workshop costs; and honoraria for Consulting Scholars.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


HAA-256138-17

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5000)
Julia Flanders (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Mining Citation in Digital Humanities: A central bibliography of Digital Humanities Quarterly

The further development of a centralized bibliography, a revised editorial workflow, and pilot citation analysis study for the scholarly journal Digital Humanities Quarterly.

Digital Humanities Quarterly seeks funding to complete the development of a centralized bibliography of digital humanities that will support the journal's publication and provide data for citation research and analysis. Building on an NEH-funded prototype, the project will expand the existing bibliography, enhance it with local authority control, and develop a streamlined workflow for maintaining the bibliography as part of the journal's regular production. A pilot research analysis will explore the potential of the data for rhetorical and citation analysis focusing on discipline formation and discursive practices in digital humanities. An exploratory interface for the bibliography will be integrated into the DHQ publication, and the data will also be exposed through a public API.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,123 (approved)
$74,123 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 4/30/2019


HAA-256146-17

Trustees of Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28035-7149)
Suzanne Churchill (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Linda Kinnahan (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)
Susan Rosenbaum (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)

Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde

A multimedia research project, including a public crowdsourcing component, exploring the work of early 20th century artist and writer Mina Loy.

A pressing need in digital humanities is for multimodal, user-directed narratives that situate evidence, interpretation, and arguments in ways that allow readers to understand the scholarly project. Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde is a scholarly website that charts the career of the 20th century writer and artist Mina Loy. Using Loy as a case study, our goals are to: provide access to and interpretations of Loy’s work in diverse media, using new digital modes of textual and visual expression to invite closer, more informed and interactive engagement; develop a theory of the en dehors garde (literally, “coming from the outside”) that accounts for contributions of women and people of color who have been excluded from conventional formulations of the avant-garde; and, conduct an experiment in public humanities scholarship that involves students in transforming scholarly methods and products, tests new processes for peer review, and sets UX design standards for digital scholarship.

Participating institutions:
Trustees of Davidson College (Davidson, NC) - Applicant/Grantee
Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA) - Participating institution
University of Georgia (Athens, GA) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Literature, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,960 (approved)
$74,960 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


HAA-256158-17

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Sheila Brennan (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Transcribing and Linking Early American Records with Scripto and Omeka S

An update and redesign of Scripto, which is a free, open-source tool used for collaborative online transcriptions of documents and multimedia files. This update will ensure it is compatible with Omeka S, a platform for publishing linked open data and integrating collections. In addition to this, the team will migrate the holdings in an important archive (The Papers of the War Department) to Omeka S and develop guidance to assist other cultural heritage organizations in managing their own community transcription projects.

RRCHNM seeks a Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the NEH-ODH to 1) update and redesign the Scripto transcription tool to make it compatible with the new data architecture in Omeka S; 2) migrate the substantial holdings in the Papers of the War Department collections to Omeka S; 3) and use the project as the basis for producing a number of publications and guides that will support other cultural heritage organizations in their efforts to develop community transcription projects with Scripto and Omeka S.

Project fields:
Military History; Political History; Public History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$230,000 (approved)
$180,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


HAA-256175-17

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Erica Cavanaugh (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)
Cathy Hajo (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)

The Development of Digital Documentary Editing Platforms

A workshop for scholarly editors and software developers to discuss how the Omeka and Drupal digital platforms can better serve the needs of documentary editions.

The Center for Digital Editing will host a forum that will bring together editors and technical experts currently engaged with two open-source content management systems -- Omeka and Drupal -- during a two-day workshop to discuss the use, development, and distribution of options for creating and publishing digital documentary editions. Information generated at this workshop will be made available through a website and presented at professional meetings and institutes to promote feedback and discussion.

Participating institutions:
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA) - Applicant/Grantee
Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ) - Participating institution

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$18,236 (approved)
$18,236 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-256186-17

Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)
Brigetta Abel (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Amy Young (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Grenzenlos Deutsch: an Inclusive Curriculum for German Studies

The creation of a digital open educational resource for German language and culture. The applicants aim to produce an alternative to traditional textbooks by developing an interactive and immersive environment for language and culture that makes use of videos and interviews with native and near-native German speakers.

We seek a Level II grant to complete Grenzenlos Deutsch, an online, open-access curriculum for introductory German language and culture courses that creates an inclusive and interactive learning experience. The curriculum, started by Professors Brigetta (Britt) Abel and Amy Young during their sabbatical leaves in the fall of 2016, is intended as a no-cost alternative to current traditional textbooks in the field. Funding will be used primarily for the formation of a Collaborative Working Group of German faculty to assemble for further development and completion this full-year curriculum, which mixes materials from real-world, contemporary communication scenarios, multimedia content, and online learning activities. Firmly rooted in humanities, including language and culture, this curriculum will be openly available to German Studies teachers and learners worldwide, and our project will present a viable alternative to traditional textbooks across humanities fields.

Participating institutions:
Macalester College (St. Paul, MN) - Applicant/Grantee
Central College (Pella, IA) - Participating institution

Project fields:
German Language

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$69,837 (approved)
$69,837 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


HAA-256187-17

Association of Research Libraries (Washington, DC 20036-1109)
Judy Ruttenberg (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Cynthia Hudson Vitale (Co Project Director: 05/19/2017 to present)

Integrating Digital Humanities into the Web of Scholarship with SHARE: An Exploration of Requirements

A series of activities to adapt the SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) platform that enhances the discoverability of scholarship for use by humanities faculty and librarians.

This project will develop a plan to optimize the SHARE aggregator and data set for digital humanities in consultation with scholars, institutions, and centers. A digital humanities project may produce more than one book or article manuscript, each published on a different publisher’s website, any number of pre-prints on institutional repositories or pre-print servers, data sets and code books on Dryad or Figshare, and text mining or cleaning scripts on github. Such project components may be housed semi-permanently in web-publishing platforms like Omeka without formal integration with library discovery systems or other services to link them to similar projects. The SHARE platform links scholarly activity across the research lifecycle and makes it available as enhanced, free, open metadata. The project team will administer a survey, conduct focus groups, and engage with the humanities community to detail requirements and prototype applications for digital scholarship curation.

Participating institutions:
Association of Research Libraries (Washington, DC) - Applicant/Grantee
Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


HAA-256218-17

University of Central Florida, Orlando (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Scott Branting (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
Lori Walters (Co Project Director: 05/18/2017 to present)
Joseph Kider (Co Project Director: 05/18/2017 to present)

Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH): Damage Assessment and Digital Preservation

The development of open source software that will allow archaeologists, historians, and archivists to conduct rapid needs assessment of cultural heritage in conflict and non-conflict situations. The software will, when used in conjunction with mixed reality hardware (which merges both real and virtual worlds), allow users to quickly identify and document damage to structures and sites by providing overlays that compare real-time conditions against previously collected images.

The Documenting and Triaging Cultural Heritage (DATCH) project will develop prototype open-source software for field assessment and documentation of built and movable cultural heritage using mixed reality hardware with or without network connections. It will permit real-time overlay comparisons of cultural heritage against earlier documentation while also enabling the creation of new scaled drawings using gestures, even in field situations with no network connections. When network connections are available additional features such as video calls with specialists and data sharing with management systems will be enabled. DATCH will aid rapid needs assessments of cultural heritage in conflict situations, ongoing assessments of cultural heritage in the field, and enable field work across multiple disciplines. The prototype software will be developed and field tested with Microsoft’s HoloLens, but with a goal of cross-platform compatibility across head mounted display mixed reality devices.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$74,916 (approved)
$74,916 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HAA-256224-17

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Robert Englund (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)

Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative Framework Update

An infrastructure update of the established Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative that focuses on improving sustainability and enhancing accessibility for both new users and the existing user community.

The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) is a 20-year strong international digital humanities project curating data and maintaining the largest database of artifacts inscribed with cuneiform writing from ancient Iraq and adjacent regions. The CDLI Framework Update is a consolidation project aimed at ensuring both the longevity of the CDLI data and interface, and at increasing access, usability, and accessibility to the information it curates. As part of numerous sub-projects, a wide array of technologies to provide software support have been used through the years. The CDLI Framework Update will consolidate actual features into a framework structure and prepare new data displays, including machine readable outputs, to enhance information diffusion. This update will strengthen digital structure of CDLI, facilitating maintenance and future developments, and increasing access to information about ancient cultures to actual and prospective audiences, including the disabled.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Linguistics; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


HAA-256249-17

Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890)
Golan Levin (Project Director: 01/11/2017 to present)
David Newbury (Co Project Director: 07/21/2017 to present)

Supporting Cultural Heritage Research in Historic Photography Archives with Machine Learning and Computer Vision

The development of a set of prototype image identification tools and techniques to allow enhanced access to large photography archives. The Carnegie Museum of Art’s Charles “Teenie” Harris Archive of African American life in Pittsburgh would serve as the test collection.

We address the challenges faced in the research and annotation of large digital image archives by creating prototype software tools that use machine learning and computer vision. Specifically, we are developing software tools to aid research into the Carnegie Museum of Art’s publicly available Teenie Harris Archive, a major photography collection documenting 20th century African American life in Pittsburgh. Our goal is to create open-source software that uses state-of-the-art techniques to help identify and annotate visually distinctive features across this large (80,000 item) set of digitized photographs, to improve and expedite the Museum's archiving and cataloging process. Through compatibility with International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) standards, our project will furthermore provide free tools and reproducible, computer-vision based workflows that other museums, libraries and archives can use to help organize their own digital collections.

Project fields:
African American History; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$72,458 (approved)
$72,458 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 2/28/2019


HAA-256368-17

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Michele Weigle (Project Director: 01/13/2017 to present)
Michael Nelson (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)
Deborah Kempe (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)
Pamela Graham (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)
Alexander Thurman (Co Project Director: 07/20/2017 to present)

Visualizing Webpage Changes Over Time

The development of prototypes for a set of open-source visualization tools to ease navigation of web archive collections. Partners include the New York Art Resources Consortium and Columbia University Libraries.

As web archives grow in importance and size, techniques for understanding how a web page changes through time need to adapt from an assumption of scarcity (just a few copies of a page, no more than a few weeks or months apart) to one of abundance (tens of thousands of copies of a page, spanning as much as 20 years). Old Dominion University, New York Art Resources Consortium (NYARC), and Columbia University Libraries (CUL) will jointly research and develop tools for efficient visualization of and interaction with archived web pages. We will develop 1) a tool for visualizing web page changes in arbitrary web archives, 2) a plug-in for the popular Wayback Machine web archiving system (for better support of the functionality otherwise available via #1), and 3) scripts for easy embedding of the visualizations in live web pages, providing tighter integration of the archived web and live web. This work will be informed and in support of CUL's and NYARC's existing web archiving activities.

Participating institutions:
Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA) - Applicant/Grantee
Columbia University Libraries (New York, NY) - Participating institution
New York Art Resources Consortium (New York, NY) - Participating institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019