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Funded Projects Query Form
24 matches

Grant programs:Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities*
Division or office: Education Programs*
Date range: 2017-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Chapman University (Orange, CA 92866-1099)
Stephanie Takaragawa (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Cathery Yeh (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Jan Osborn (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Angelica Allen (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284417-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,918 (approved)
$149,918 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Asian American Studies Minor Program and Ethnic Studies General Education

Faculty curricular development workshops and public humanities programming to support the creation of an Asian American studies minor.

This project will develop an Asian American studies minor with accompanying public humanities programming at Chapman University in an initiative to broaden our humanities courses and to round out our new ethnic studies minors, with the aim of creating an ethnic studies/diversity General Education course. The goals are to augment the educational opportunities that we offer to students, demonstrating Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences' commitment to a 21st century humanities education. A multicultural education, emphasizing the diversity that exists in the history of the United States will reflect the surrounding Orange County, and larger Southern California communities, and is aimed towards strengthening community partnership and community-based research opportunities for students. This grant would assist us in building curriculum, programming, and community partnerships towards this goal.

University of Guam (Mangilao, GU 96913-1800)
Carlos Raymond Taitano (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Sharleen Q. Santos-Bamba (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)

AA-284468-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$144,102 (approved)
$118,658 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 8/31/2023

Towards a More Perfect Union: Teaching and Learning in Micronesia

A professional and curricular development program on the relationship and history of the United States and Micronesia for 60 university faculty and secondary school teachers in Guam.

This project, Toward a More Perfect Union: Teaching and Learning in Micronesia, explores the relationship and history between the United States and Micronesia and the impact on the Guam community, specifically in teaching and learning within the classroom setting. This project provides a seminar for full-time and adjunct faculty at the University of Guam, with spaces reserved for secondary teachers. Looking through the lens of island centered pedagogy, the modules will enhance participants’ understanding of: 1) history; 2) philosophy, spirituality and religion; 3) culture, tradition, and way of life; 4) art, literature, and storytelling; and 5) the connection of these topics to teaching and learning in the Guam classroom. The seminar’s readings, films, and discussions will lead to improvement in teaching and learning on Guam, and the development of a resource guide for all faculty members and teachers.

University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY 82071-2000)
Jean Garrison (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Jason McConnell (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Colby Gull (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Curtis Biggs (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284473-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,397 (approved)
$149,397 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Integrating the Humanities Across Civics Education in Wyoming

A two-year project to create an online repository of civics education resources for Wyoming teachers.

This proposal addresses the NEH area of interest, “A More Perfect Union,” by bringing to bear the intellectual resources of the University of Wyoming, our state’s community colleges, and Wyoming K-12 educators in a partnership to build an online repository of humanities resources for the purpose of supporting and growing the humanities in civics education and establishing a new civics learning community across all levels of education in our state. This will be achieved through deliberate partnership with humanities professionals to address: 1) core areas of need for new humanities content in the Wallop K-12 social studies catalog and 2) deploying a new online resource catalog rich in humanities content and tied to Wyoming's curricular content and performance standards for English and Language Arts. The K-12 Curriculum Project will focus on the 3 C's of civics education: 1) Civic Knowledge and Skills, Civic Values and Dispositions, and Civic Behaviors.

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045-0900)
Kevin B. Sheets (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Randi Jill Storch (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284496-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$142,955 (approved)
$142,955 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2024

Re-Placing the Gilded Age and Progressive Era: A SUNY Faculty Study Group Transforms the Teaching and Learning of America’s Pivotal Period

A curricular collaboration project to reconceptualize the research and teaching of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

The State University of New York at Cortland (SUNY Cortland), a comprehensive liberal arts college within the 64-campus State University of New York system, proposes leading a multi-campus faculty study group with 20 historians whose research and teaching interests include the period in American history commonly referred to as the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, or GAPE. Led by Dr. Kevin Sheets and Dr. Randi Storch, the project brings together participants and invited scholars to assess the state of the field; to incorporate the latest research into new and revised courses; and to develop and disseminate resources for high school and college-level instructors.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Courtney Rivard (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284498-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$54,981 (approved)
$54,981 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Integrating Storytelling & Critical Game Studies into the Curriculum

A one-year curricular development and faculty training program leading to a minor in critical game studies.

This proposal seeks funding to create a one-year Initiative in Storytelling and Critical Game Studies at the UNC, Chapel Hill that will lead to a minor in Critical Game Studies (CGS) administered by the English & Comparative Literature Department. CGS brings rhetorical and literary theories together with feminist studies, queer studies and ethnic studies to investigate how game narratives shape and are shaped by power structures and cultural representations. The initiative includes five major objectives: (1) the creation of six courses that will constitute the core of the CGS minor, (2) faculty training in game studies scholarship and teaching strategies that incorporate games in the classroom, (3) the development of “plug and play” teaching modules with corresponding workshops, (4) the creation of a vodcast on teaching with games in the classroom, and (5) the submission of the proposal for a new minor.

Auburn University (Auburn, AL 36849-0001)
Kyes Stevens (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Shaelyn Smith (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284505-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,989 (approved)
$149,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2025

Imagining Alabama: Writing Through History

The development and implementation of a new summer bridge program and first-year writing curriculum focused on Alabama history, for students in Alabama correctional facilities.

The Alabama Prison Arts + Education Project (APAEP) at Auburn University (AU) offers quality educational experiences to those inside of state correctional facilities in Alabama. APAEP is proposing a redesign and implementation of year-long Alabama History-themed writing program for incoming first-year college students at Staton Men's Correctional Facility and Tutwiler Prison for Women. First-year APAEP students will have a greater understanding of Alabama history from their unique place and time, and will imagine their current and future contributions to their state's history. Faculty and students based at the AU main campus will serve as instructors and peer tutors to APAEP students, thereby building the connection between APAEP students and the greater AU community.

Gallaudet University (Washington, DC 20002-3600)
Octavian Robinson (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Erin Moriarty Harrelson (Co Project Director: May 2022 to present)

AA-284517-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$146,547 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2025

Revitalizing Deaf Studies, Theorizing the Contemporary

We propose to further develop Deaf Studies through curricular change and the development of an interdisciplinary doctoral program. Curricular change, incorporating innovative methodologies relevant to the digital landscape, will lead to more engaged faculty and students, especially as they see themselves in the material. Through the lifecycle of the grant, we will develop a set of five core courses for an interdisciplinary doctoral program that focuses on the lived experiences of deaf people throughout the world. Those courses are: Deaf Queer Studies, Deaf Studies in the Global South, Digital Humanities, Deaf Ethnographies, and Sensing Washington, DC. The curriculum centers issues of power, history, racism, and violence and the ways in which they manifest in the lives of deaf people.

Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
John David Penniman (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284520-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,994 (approved)
$149,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2025

Revitalizing the Liberal Arts through the Health Humanities Minor

A three-year project to develop a health humanities minor.

Bucknell University’s Health Humanities Working Group proposes the development of a new interdisciplinary minor in the health humanities as a means of revitalizing the liberal arts core, expanding students’ humanistic knowledge of health, and contributing to the University’s already well-situated rural and community partnerships. The minor will have three basic components: 1) a gateway course entitled Humanizing Health; 2) three electives drawn from different humanities departments; and 3) a capstone experience placing students in civic engagement with our rural local communities. Funded activities include summer workshops; curricular development grants; funding for the program director; and external review. Through its emphasis on the urgency of the health humanities for all students--not just those pursuing careers in biomedicine--this project will amplify the humanities’ contribution to understanding health, illness, and medicine within our campus and our regional communities.

Framingham State University (Framingham, MA 01702-2471)
Bartholomew Brinkman (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284524-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$146,785 (approved)
$146,785 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025

Investigating Race Through Digital Humanities Approaches

Workshops for faculty and other educators on integrating the study of race in the United States with resources for digital humanities research and pedagogy.

Framingham State University (FSU) proposes strengthening its commitments to the digital humanities (DH) and to the investigation of race through multiple interrelated activities. FSU will host a faculty institute on race and DH in 2022–2023; a summer program for area high school teachers in 2023; and a series of workshops for area cultural organizations in 2023–2024. It will also host a series of lectures/workshops by local junior scholars on issues of DH and race from fall 2022 through fall 2024. These activities will support existing DH initiatives—including a recently developed interdisciplinary DH minor—as they foreground the ways that such core DH practices as text analysis, geospatial mapping, and online exhibition building can newly address key questions surrounding race in America, both historically and in our present moment. In doing so, the proposed activities ultimately aim to promote “A More Perfect Union” at FSU and throughout the Boston MetroWest region.

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Matthew P. Brown (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Elizabeth E. Yale (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284529-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Global Book Cultures and the Student Laboratory: Undergraduate Education at the UI Center for the Book

A three-year project to develop an undergraduate laboratory space and related curriculum that would engage students in the study of global print and manuscript cultures.

We seek to establish a dedicated undergraduate laboratory space anchored in the world-leading University of Iowa Center for the Book. Further, we propose to develop an undergraduate curriculum that will flourish in the envisioned workspace. The heart of the curricular proposal is a new introductory course in global print cultures, paired with an existing course on global manuscript cultures. Our goals are threefold: 1) to create and sustain spaces where students learn how material texts from diverse cultural traditions were made; 2) by integrating hands-on making into students’ education, to deepen their understanding of key humanities themes, such as the interpretation of texts and how humans transform, reinterpret, and sustain artifacts and ideas over time and across cultures; & 3) to strengthen the humanities at Iowa by building collaborative connections between faculty, curators, book artists, engineers, scientists, and librarians teaching with material texts across the university.

University of Toledo (Toledo, OH 43606-3390)
Melissa Valiska Gregory (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284536-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$133,859 (approved)
$133,692 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Health Humanities Minor

A three-year project to create a health humanities minor.

The creation of an undergraduate Health Humanities minor at the University of Toledo. This minor will train undergraduates interested in questions of health and healthcare to enter the field not only as individual employees within that sector but also as future shapers of its paradigms and methods.

Fort Lewis College (Durango, CO 81301-3999)
Deanne L. Grant (Project Director: May 2021 to January 2023)
Janine Marie Fitzgerald (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Janine Marie Fitzgerald (Co Project Director: December 2021 to January 2023)

AA-284541-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$148,400 (approved)
$148,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024

Fort Lewis College Native Language Revitalization Institute

Design and implementation of a Fort Lewis College summer Native American language institute. 

This project promotes Native American cultural and linguistic revitalization efforts through a theme-based language learning approach that centers Native American beliefs on animacy. This approach centers Native American ways of being to promote not only revitalization of Native languages but also related cultural revitalization, as Native languages describe a world in action and worldview. This approach encourages Native self-identity and furthers awareness of oneself in relation to the world from a Native perspective. We encourage and stimulate Native language learning that excites eager learners to take on the monumental task of learning a language facing extinction and fraught with challenges related to the effects of colonialism. To change the course of language loss, we encourage learners of all abilities, confront shame, and guilt in the process, and incite the needed fanaticism for one to learn their Native language at Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO.

Antioch University (Yellow Springs, OH 45387-1745)
Ingrid Ingerson (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284556-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,516 (approved)
$149,516 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

Clemente Inflection Points

The development and piloting of four second-year interdisciplinary humanities seminars for low-income nontraditional students, through a partnership between Antioch University and the Clemente Course in the Humanities.

Inflection Points offers texts that guide students on a path from self-awareness to engagement via facilitated discussions in history, art history, literature & moral philosophy. Antioch & Clemente will extend an existing partnership to pilot 4, 3-credit, 2nd-year humanities courses for Clemente graduates, all of whom are low-income adults. According to research, Clemente students are more civically engaged than their counterparts in the general population and 2nd-year students are more likely to earn degrees. Courses are free—including books, childcare & transportation—& guided by experienced college faculty. In response to COVID-19 we will transition 2nd-year courses to online delivery, increasing capacity to reach more students, & allowing faculty to collaborate across disciplines & locations. Drawing from 25 years’ experience, & emphasizing close reading, critical thinking, & writing, we give students the skills they need to succeed in college and enhance their civic engagement.

Southeast Missouri State University (Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4710)
Christopher Rieger (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Johannes Burgers (Co Project Director: December 2021 to January 2022)

AA-284561-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$147,673 (approved)
$147,673 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 11/30/2024

Teaching and Learning William Faulkner in the Digital Age

The creation of digital resources for teaching William Faulkner’s fiction, followed by their integration into pilot courses for undergraduate and high school students.  

Teaching and Learning William Faulkner in the Digital Age seeks to harness the resources of the NEH-funded Digital Yoknapatawpha project for classroom teachers at the high school, community college, and four-year college levels by creating targeted lesson plans that help teachers apply the data tools of Digital Yoknapatawpha to specific Faulkner texts. The amount and configuration of data available in Digital Yoknapatawpha can be daunting for users unfamiliar with the digital humanities, and this project seeks to demystify digital humanities and help non-specialists use the site in teaching the most commonly assigned Faulkner short stories and novels though a series of virtual workshops.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Megan Luke (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284562-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,968 (approved)
$149,968 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2025

Images Out of Time: Visual and Material Culture in a Digital Age

A three-year project creating an undergraduate curriculum in visual studies.

"Images Out of Time" is a new humanities curriculum developed in partnership with the Visual Studies Research Institute and Thematic Option Program in General Education at USC. This three-year project brings together faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates to study visual and material culture in periods of rapid cultural change and social upheaval. Monuments to unjust pasts; icons manifesting gods; ancient ruins in modern structures; old images restored by new technology: these images challenge linear historical narratives. Understanding how they pass through time helps us find our place between past and future. Our project enhances the humanities at USC through undergraduate courses and internships, object-based learning site visits, graduate training and mentorship, and public programming. Activities will intersect art history, religion, literature, history, and anthropology, and bridge divisions of premodern and modern, as well as European, Atlantic, and Pacific spheres.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Bryan E. Wagner (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Jessica Marie Johnson (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)

AA-284581-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,768 (approved)
$149,768 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 9/30/2023

An Open Curriculum on New Orleans Culture

The creation of open educational resources on the art, music, culture, and related history of New Orleans.  

Our purpose is to enhance college and university teaching by developing and sharing digital resources on art, music, history, politics, and culture in New Orleans. Our curriculum will be divided into modules that can be adapted in courses across the humanities and interpretive social sciences. Modules will combine original performance and demonstration videos with archival documents, photographs, and field recordings—all annotated with an eye to form, history, context, and technique. We are an outgrowth of a community institution in the Seventh Ward of New Orleans, Neighborhood Story Project, but our network of collaborators includes academics from sectors across higher education at various ranks and career stages as well as independent scholars, curators, archivists, artists, musicians, and culture bearers.

University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Aaron S. Allen (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Karen L. Kilcup (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284590-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,952 (approved)
$149,952 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2024

Watersheds for Place-Based, Experiential Education

The development of an environmental humanities curriculum based on the Cape Fear River in Greensboro, North Carolina.

The Cape Fear Watershed Project (CFWP) is an environmental humanities approach to place-based teaching and learning. Using watersheds to reflect on social connections and human relationships in and with nature, the CFWP increases our sense of place to improve care for human and non-human life. Focusing on the online M.S. in Sustainability & Environment, we will integrate humanities practices in a summer field course, three new topics courses, and flexible online modules, as we unify the M.S. curriculum via the theme of the Cape Fear Watershed. We will also: 1) bring faculty and students together in places studied in courses; 2) build connections between people, institutions, and places in the watershed, especially UNC Greensboro and UNC Wilmington, situated in the headwaters and near the mouth of the watershed, respectively; and 3) emphasize humanities approaches in sharable curricula and resources with regard to topics that are usually the purview of the natural and social sciences.

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Na'ama Rokem (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

AA-284591-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Studying Oak Woods: A Curriculum Development and Collaborative Teaching Proposal

The development of a curricular project focused on the Oak Woods Cemetery, located on Chicago’s South Side.

This is an interdisciplinary, collaborative teaching initiative, using a historic cemetery as a basis for curriculum that focuses on the multifarious histories of the South Side of Chicago, in particular the histories of Jews and African Americans and the interactions between them. Exploring the theme of “A More Perfect Union,” it invites students to engage with the interrelation between race, religion, ethnicity, immigration status, and socio-economic factors, as they have shaped the area. We also aim to develop curricular material that can be used by others, in particular strategies and materials for teaching with and around historical cemeteries, and site-specific teaching about urban history more broadly. Building on existing UChicago courses and programs, and through partnerships with local educational and cultural institutions, this new model will become a permanent feature of the College curriculum at the University and can serve as a platform for similar initiatives elsewhere.

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Kristine Munoz (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Daena J. Goldsmith (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

AA-284617-22
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,999 (approved)
$149,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2025

Salud, to your health! Resources for Teaching Health Narratives in English and Spanish

A three-year project to develop a digital resource for teaching health narratives in English and Spanish.

This project will construct a digital resource bank for teaching and learning health narratives at the postsecondary level, emphasizing the benefits to many kinds of learners of both reading and writing stories about health, illness, and caregiving. By the time they reach college age, many college students have increasingly complex experiences of mental and physical illness, their own or that of their loved ones. Courses that lead students through reading and writing about health issues teach them to contextualize those experiences within broader perspectives on language, meaning, relationship, and ethics. The digital resource bank will facilitate courses in many English disciplines and for Spanish majors and minors, encouraging both health humanities programming and community outreach. PIs will lead in person workshops and webinars to maximize use of the website, and an online journal will be created to publish peer-reviewed undergraduate health narratives in Spanish.

Tufts University (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)
Hilary Binda (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Peter Levine (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Jill D. Weinberg (Co Project Director: December 2020 to present)

AA-277557-21
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$133,437 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Civic Humanities and Decarceration

Course revision and curriculum development in Civic Studies and in programs for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated students.

NEH funding will cultivate a partnership between Tufts University’s Civic Studies program and the Tufts University Prison Initiative of Tisch College (TUPIT) by supporting Tufts humanities faculty developing and delivering curriculum for people with lived experience of incarceration. By teaching courses to incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people working towards a bachelor’s degree – inside prisons, in a re-entry-focused community center program, and at Tufts – often in tandem with Tufts campus students, humanities faculty will provide severely at-risk students who are also disenfranchised citizens with a pathway program that cultivates increased civic knowledge and a new capacity for community engagement. NEH funds will allow us to develop syllabi, scholarly and journalistic writing, and hold a Civic Humanities and Decarceration conference. This laboratory for public scholarship in the humanities will promote its under-represented scholars.

Northeastern Oklahoma State University (Tahlequah, OK 74464-2301)
Farina King (Project Director: July 2020 to July 2022)
John McIntosh (Project Director: July 2022 to present)
John McIntosh (Co Project Director: November 2020 to July 2022)
David Corcoran (Co Project Director: July 2022 to present)

AA-277689-21
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$95,503 (approved)
$95,503 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Mapping Tahlequah History

A curriculum development and public history project creating an interactive map and database to be used in seven courses.

This proposal seeks three years of funding for the Mapping Tahlequah History project based at Northeastern State University (NSU) to support student immersive learning and development of a public educational digital humanities interactive map and accompanying database focused on local history. The map and database will help make local historical information more accessible by providing students and other users with links to documents and other resources such as videos and pictures. The project will highlight Cherokee and diverse regional histories of Tahlequah and surrounding areas of what is known as Green Country in Northeastern Oklahoma.

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Marina A. Rustow (Project Director: July 2020 to present)

AA-277700-21
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$147,749 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Creating a Committee for Manuscript, Rare Book, and Archive Studies

The development of undergraduate and graduate curricula in Manuscript, Rare Book and Archive Studies.

This is a proposal to launch a Committee on Manuscript, Rare Book and Archive Studies (MARBAS) at Princeton University. MARBAS is the initiative of a group of faculty and library staff devoted to teaching with original objects from global cultures before 1600, including manuscripts, documents, early printed books, papyri, coins, inscriptions and archives. Our goals are to bring students into contact with premodern texts and objects, to make specialized techniques (including digital methods) accessible to an expanded pool of instructors and non-specialists, to encourage comparison, and to make the use of physical evidence central to the humanities. We will help make the techniques for teaching with objects widely accessible, develop and distribute tools for undergraduate and graduate teaching with original artifacts, and make these tools scalable and replicable with or without physical access to special collections, whether due to geography, resources or travel restrictions.

Goucher College (Baltimore, MD 21204-2780)
April Oettinger (Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Alex Ebstein (Co Project Director: August 2021 to present)

AA-277708-21
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$149,961 (approved)
$147,711 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Enhancing the Study of Visual, Material, and Historical Culture

The creation of a “Collaborative Humanities Laboratory” as an online learning community for students to discover historical, visual, and material culture through Goucher’s  collections.

Goucher College requests a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the development of Goucher’s Collaborative Humanities Laboratory (CHL), a physical and virtual storytelling “space” where students across humanistic disciplines will gather, curate, and present original scholarship centered on images, objects, and artifacts. Under the guidance of humanities faculty and in consultation with faculty in allied disciplines, Goucher students will serve as the acting curators of the Collaborative Humanities Laboratory. CHL projects will extend classroom learning through innovative and interdisciplinary projects that showcase applied, object-centered research in the physical lab space and in an on-line format. The Collaborative Humanities Laboratory will mediate between the classroom and the community by providing a front-facing physical venue and an online presence that will enhance the intellectual life of Goucher College and our outreach to Greater Baltimore.

St. John Fisher College (Rochester, NY 14618-3597)
Deborah Uman (Project Director: July 2020 to January 2021)
Melissa Bissonette (Project Director: January 2021 to present)

AA-277717-21
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$149,934 (approved)
$149,934 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024

Embedding Place-Based Humanities in the Curriculum

Three summer symposia for three faculty cohorts to incorporate place-based humanities perspectives on the history and culture of the Rochester, NY, region into their curriculum.

St. John Fisher College (SJFC) proposes to create up to 18 new humanities core courses, which intentionally embed a place-based humanities perspective. Place-based humanities is an interdisciplinary humanistic inquiry that focuses on the interconnection of geography; local history; community; and cultural, social, and personal identity. Rochester, NY has been the site of critical intellectual American ideas, from abolitionism to women’s rights. While home to leaders such as Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony, the city’s significance plays but a small part in scholarly understanding of these iconic figures. The project objectives are as follows: 1) create spaces for critical conversation around race focused on place-based humanistic texts, while promoting interest in the humanities; 2) embed the teaching of place-based humanities in the core curriculum; and 3) disseminate a place-based humanities pedagogy with other faculty at SJFC and beyond.