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Grant programs:Collaborative Research*
Date range: 2019-2022
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Regents of the University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
Nicholas R. Jones (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Elizabeth Rebecca Wright (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279836-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$96,347 (approved)
$96,347 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Recovering Black Performance in Early Modern Iberia (1500–1800): A Conference and Special Journal Issue

Planning and holding a conference on Black performance in early modern Iberia (1500-1800) and preparation of conference papers for publication in a journal special issue. (24 months) 

This project will convene a conference on 29-30 April 2022 focusing on how the Atlantic slave trade and resulting African diaspora shaped Iberia’s “Golden Age” of theater. Diverse modes of Black performance enriched this quintessentially early modern entertainment as it took shape in Portugal and Spain on the Iberian Peninsula. This theater also thrived across the Atlantic as these two maritime empires extended their reach. To explore this topic in depth, we will bring together nineteen scholars from North America, Europe, and Latin America to present papers at the conference, which will be free and open to the public, at New York University’s King Juan Carlos I Center. After going through peer review, papers will be published in the Bulletin of the Comediantes (volume 75, no. 1 & 2, 2023), reaching a worldwide audience through print and online editions.

University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)
Purnima Dhavan (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286795-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$194,284 (approved)
$194,284 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Urdu’s Origins Revisited: Vali Dakhani’s Reception in Multilingual South Asia

Completion of a co-authored manuscript on the origins and development of Urdu, an important language spoken primarily in India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh.

We are applying to the NEH Collaborative Research Grant (Manuscript Preparation) to complete our co-authored book, Urdu’s Origins Revisited: Vali Dakhani’s Reception in Multilingual South Asia. 100 million Urdu speakers are present in South Asia and a global diaspora today. Many are unable to read it but understand its spoken form. Urdu’s origins, misrepresented by colonial scholars as coming solely from elite Muslim networks, were also miscast in late nationalist histories. Urdu’s publics remain fragmented today. Our research places early Urdu texts in a broader historical and multilingual context. We offer concrete evidence for the circulation of Urdu across diverse communities. The resulting manuscript intervenes in the humanities debate about the relationship between cosmopolitan and vernacular cultures. We argue that cosmopolitanisms are influenced, accessed, and mediated by local networks and constantly change. Our work also seeks to broaden the Urdu canon.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Adam Mestyan (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286808-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$185,130 (approved)
$185,130 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

Digital Cairo: A Study of Urban Transformation, 1828-1914

Preparation of a digital database and interpretive website about the modernization of Cairo between 1828 and 1914.

We request funding for a two-year (2022-2024) Scholarly Digital Project in the Collaborative Research grant competition. In this project, the participants study the impact of capitalism and bureaucratic agency from pre-industrial to industrial Muslim-majority urban societies through the example of nineteenth-century Cairo, the capital of the Egyptian province in the Ottoman Empire. A historian, a digital humanities specialist, five students at Duke University, and international collaborators in France and Egypt investigate this research topic through the creation of a born-digital tool (an XML TEI database of Arabic and Ottoman Turkish newspaper articles) and an HTML website about Cairo’s urban transformation. The products will include articles in peer-reviewed journals as well as the born-digital, peer-reviewed, and freely available dataset, short interpretative essays, and visualizations on the website, hosted by GitHub and double-stored at Duke University Library.

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Marjorie Elizabeth Plummer (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286848-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$248,474 (approved)
$248,474 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2025

Shared Churches in Early Modern Europe, 1500–1800

Preparation of an interactive map and searchable database on the history of shared devotional spaces in early modern Europe (1500-1800). 

We are applying for an NEH Collaborative Research Grant (digital scholarly project) to develop an interactive map and searchable web-based database revealing the widespread phenomenon of parish churches shared by multiple denominations or congregations in early modern Europe. Between 1500 and 1800, sharing any devotional, ritual, and sacred spaces added complexities to social, political, and economic relationships in Europe and beyond and heralded the rise of mutually exclusive, denominational religious groups. This research project investigates the local spatial arrangements made for sharing sacred spaces in select shared parish churches in central Europe to draw broader conclusions about the abilities and limitations of the human capacity to accommodate religious differences. The Shared Churches Project shows how diverse understandings of holiness could—and could not—coexist under a single roof and how that space functioned to unify and separate diverse faith groups.

Trustees of Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286881-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$49,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2022 – 10/31/2023

Legacies of USIA Moving Images Through International Lenses

Ten planning workshops and a semi-public symposium on the filmic production and international organizational infrastructure of the United States Information Agency (USIA, known internationally as the United States Information Service, USIS) between 1953 and 1999. (12 months)

The “Legacies of USIA Moving Images Through International Lenses” project will bring together (virtually) a team of renowned international scholars and archivists who are committed to developing international studies of the USIA and its corresponding USIS acronym in offices around the world. This team will schedule a series of ten workshops that develop an interrogative process toward the production of granular analyses of hundreds of USIA films, which will lay the groundwork to identify the opportunities, challenges, and inter-disciplinary potentials to realize new humanistic research about the history and impact of USIA moving images (motion pictures and television/video), especially regarding select areas of the world: Latin America, East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the U.S. itself. This grant will entail two years of research, workshops, and granular analysis culminated by a major public conference plus publication in a blind-peer-reviewed online journal.

University of Hawaii at Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
J. Noelani Goodyear-Kaopua (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286888-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$182,486 (approved)
$182,486 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2024

A Biography of Native Hawaiian Leader and Scholar, Haunani-Kay Trask (1949 - 2021)

Preparation of a coauthored book on the life and work of Haunani-Kay Trask (1949-2021), Native Hawaiian scholar, educator, poet, and community leader. (24 months) 

An intellectual and political biography of Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask. A poet, political scientist, activist, and international advocate for human rights, Trask is arguably the most important Native Hawaiian scholar of the 20th century. Her life and works contributed to the global rise of Indigenous subjectivity, and she profoundly shaped Hawaiian movements for justice from the 1970s onward. Written for broad audiences, the book will shed light on ways Native Hawaiians have navigated and organized against inequalities resulting from forced political incorporation into the US in 1898. Charting Trask’s roots and routes, the project illuminates connections between major social movements that transformed Hawaiian, Pacific, and American life in the late 20th century and early 21st centuries, including the ways such movements changed universities. The project engages Trask’s work to consider issues of gender justice, Indigenous-settler relations, and ways public universities shape democratic life

Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Samuel J. Truett (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286898-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2023

Indigenous Borderlands in North America and the World: Borders, Crossings, Histories, and Futures

Planning and holding a conference centering Indigenous people and knowledge-making in the study of North America’s borderlands. (12 months) 

We seek funding to hold a conference on Indigenous borderlands in North America–the first in a series of international conferences on Indigenous borderlands, crossings, histories, and futures in both American and global contexts–and to prepare a volume of essays for publication. The goal is not only to Indigenize our approach to the world’s borderlands, but also to bring these spaces and their crossings to the fore in humanistic approaches to planetary change. We seek nothing less than to center Indigenous histories and interrelationships as a bedrock of world history and to use this foundation to envision new paths into the future. Bringing historians into a strategic conversation with scholars of other disciplines and with Indigenous community representatives, we ask how cross-disciplinary and community-facing dialogue can advance humanistic knowledge, developing new ways to envision borders, crossings, histories, and futures in contexts of social and environmental change.

Texas A&M University-San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78224-3134)
Katherine A Gillen (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286906-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2023 – 4/30/2024

Adapting, Translating, and Performing Shakespeare in the U.S.–Mexico Borderlands

A conference on adaptations of Shakespearian plays by playwrights in the US/Mexico borderlands. (12 months)

We plan to host a conference in San Antonio, TX, in May 2024, which will be co-sponsored by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (ACMRS), and subsequently to edit a special issue of Borrowers and Lenders composed of essays generated by the conference called Shakespeare and Borderlands Cultura. The project foregrounds marginal rewritings of a canonical author while also representing new cultural praxis in decolonizing the U.S.–Mexico Borderlands, a contested area encompassing Northern Mexico and parts of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

SUNY Research Foundation, University at Buffalo (Amherst, NY 14228-2577)
Douglas Perrelli (Project Director: November 2021 to present)

RZ-286910-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,369 (approved)
$249,369 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2025

From the Cataract House to Canada: African American Activism and the Underground Railroad in the Niagara River Borderland

Research and preparation of a print manuscript and accompanying website about the Cataract House hotel in Niagara Falls, New York, an important stop on the Underground Railroad. (36 months).

In the Manuscript Preparation category, From the Cataract House to Canada highlights the activism of African American hotel workers who operated Niagara’s busiest Underground Railroad station. This project is a synthesis of archaeological and archival research, enhanced by an ambitious public information program. Results of excavations begun in 2017 will be integrated with new research identifying and exploring the experiences of an ever-changing staff of seasonal employees. Applying advances in borderland theory with an emphasis on Black agency, the team will examine how the hotel’s employees collaborated with African-descended people on both sides of the US-Canadian boundary to ensure safe passage for uncounted numbers of freedom seekers. Products will include an accessibly written, richly illustrated volume, complemented by a web-based StoryMap, QR-coded interpretive materials linked to the Cataract’s location, and a social media campaign inviting descendant participation.

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Nicole Eggers (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

RZ-286936-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$199,611 (approved)
$199,611 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Refuge in the Spirit: Religion in the Lives of Congolese Refugees

Research and writing leading to a co-authored book on the role of religion in the lives of Congolese refugees. (24 months)

In this study, we seek to illuminate how religion functions both as a space for building community for people who have lost their social safety net, as well as its role in addressing gaps — material, social, psychological, and spiritual — that state and international organizations too often neglect.

Hastings Center (Garrison, NY 10524-4125)
Nancy Scerbo Berlinger (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

RZ-286981-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$147,630 (approved)
$143,509 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 3/31/2024

The Meanings of Dementia: Interpreting Cultural Narratives of Aging Societies

Preparation of a special supplement to the Hastings Center Report composed of 18 essays analyzing cultural narratives concerning dementia in the US and Europe to be made available in print and online. (18 months)

The Meanings of Dementia: Interpreting Cultural Narratives of Aging Societies is an 18-month project to produce new critical writing on meanings of dementia in diverse social groups in the United States and other aging societies. Dementia refers to a group of common, age-associated, progressively debilitating, ultimately terminal conditions affecting thought, memory, speech, and behavior. Humanities scholarship has long studied personal narratives; this humanities-social science collaboration will consider how greater attention to cultural narratives – concepts expressed through metaphors, tropes, images, and other representations that circulate through a society to make meaning out of experience – can translate into public humanities work fostering greater inclusion for fellow citizens living with dementia or providing dementia care. We will produce a print and open-access digital volume of 18 essays for peer review and print publication as a supplement to a scholarly journal.

Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Campus (Altoona, PA 16601-3777)
Julie L. Reed (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

RZ-287010-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$229,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2022 – 9/30/2025

Sovereign Kin: A History of the Cherokee Nation

Preparation of a coauthored book on the history of the Cherokee Nation (pre-1600 to 2010). (36 months) 

The most recent comprehensive history of the Cherokee Nation was written in 1963; it continues to sell more than 500 copies a year through an academic press. It fails to address key issues, such as gender and race, raised by social and cultural historians since the 1960s, let alone cover the last sixty years of Cherokee history. Cherokee Nation citizens, journalists, and academics understand its limitations and have requested an up-to-date book written in accessible, engaging prose. We are working with an agent to pitch this project to presses able to bring this book to the widest audience. As we identify a publisher and seek funding, we already are writing "Sovereign Kin: A History of the Cherokee Nation." With the support of the NEH Collaborative Grant, we intend to conduct research trips to the Cherokee Nation and the Oklahoma Historical Society and collect interviews with key Cherokee Nation citizens. We will complete a draft of the manuscript by August 2025.

California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)
Clorinda Donato (Project Director: December 2021 to present)

RZ-287012-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$24,542 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2023 – 1/31/2024

Rethinking Eighteenth-Century Italian Culture and Its Transnational Connections

Virtual planning activities and travel to conduct fieldwork in Naples leading to a book on Italian engagement with the literary, cultural, and intellectual discourses of the 18th century. (12 months)

This NEH Planning International Collaboration Grant will fund two working group meetings of eighteenth-century scholars of the Italian peninsula to plan an interpretive volume of studies in English on the rethinking of eighteenth-century Italian culture and its transnational connections. With its emphasis on transmissions and reciprocities across borders, the transnational perspective has been redefining the parameters of eighteenth-century studies for the past twenty-five years. It is the goal of our project to establish a strong foothold for Italy in the cultural panorama of the transnational eighteenth century, altering our erroneous sense of a field that appears to be British and French driven. A comprehensive assessment of the significant shift in our understanding of the role of Italy in the global eighteenth century is lacking. Our project seeks to rectify this gap.

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
David Rifkind (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Itohan Iriagbonse Osayimwese (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279864-22
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

Architecture of the African Diaspora in/of the United States

Preparation of a collection of essays on the architecture of the African diaspora in the United States. (36 months)

Architecture of the African Diaspora in/of the United States is a collaborative effort by six scholars to write the first book-length study of architecture by people of African descent in, and from, the United States. The project includes histories of buildings, cities, communities, landscapes, and interiors created by architects, planners, builders, artists, residents, public officials, and activists. This includes professional design work, vernacular architecture, urban design and preservation projects, cultural landscapes, and ephemeral buildings. The work draws connections between disparate topics and situates architectural production within its political, social, and cultural contexts. This collaboration challenges conventional historiographic distinctions between architects and builders, interpreting a range of actors who cross and complicate that dichotomy, and likewise shift the lens of architectural history to diasporic narratives that transcend familiar Eurocentric frameworks.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Iftikhar Dadi (Project Director: December 2020 to present)

RZ-279879-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$65,892 (approved)
$65,892 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 8/31/2024

The Next Monsoon: Climate Change and Contemporary Cultural Production in South Asia

A three-day conference and open access volume on the topic of climate change in South Asia. (24 months)

This application for Collaborative Research: Conference is a collaboration between Cornell University, the University of Pennsylvania, and School of Environment and Architecture, Mumbai, India. This project includes conference and allied publications and outputs that will focus on humanistic approaches to climate change in South Asia. This conference will not only contribute to the emerging field of environmental humanities but also serve to curate the diversity of experiences of a changing planet in South Asia. The project will enable faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars based in the US and abroad to come together in punctuated outputs leading up and subsequent to the major conference convened at Cornell University in September 2022. These outcomes include monthly reading groups, a podcast series, a teaching tools online forum, and an open access edited volume.

Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)
Lauren M. E. Goodlad (Project Director: December 2020 to present)

RZ-279883-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,970 (approved)
$24,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2022

Unboxing Artificial Intelligence: An International Collaboration Bringing Humanities Perspectives to AI

Planning of an international collaboration on the topic of bringing humanities perspectives to the creation of Artificial Intelligence. (12 months)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an emergent set of technologies. Though touted as a fourth industrial revolution, AI is subject to hype and misinformation. Despite increasing talk about making AI “ethical” and “human-centered,” humanists seldom shape these discussions. “Unboxing AI” is a new international collaboration: at Rutgers, Lauren Goodlad, is leading an interdisciplinary working group in “Critical AI.” At Australian National University, Katherine Bode works with faculty in three AI-related institutes. “Unboxing AI” will organize and publicize two exploratory workshops that put humanistic thinking at the core of research questions that move beyond the technical issue of AI’s “Black Box.” Our written plan will lay out steps for a peer-reviewed special issue and may also project 1) a jointly-hosted international conference, 2) jointly-developed and/or team-taught curricula for ANU/RU students, and 3) a white paper for international circulation.

Penn State (University Park, PA 16802-1503)
Michelle Ursula Campos (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Orit Bashkin (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)
Lior B. Sternfeld (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279900-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,842 (approved)
$249,842 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

Reimagining Jewish Life in the Modern Middle East, 1800-Present: Culture, Society, and History

Preparation for print publication of a multi-authored monograph on the history of Jewish life in the Middle East from 1800 to the present, for preparation of a special journal issue, and a website. (36 months)

We propose a large-scale collaborative project to rewrite the histories, narratives, and memories of and by Jews in the Middle East in the 19th-21st centuries. Drawing on original primary sources in numerous languages, diverse interdisciplinary approaches, and creative synthesis of the recent scholarship, we reframe Jews at the center of the modern Middle East and globe rather than on its margins. By analyzing, historicizing, and contextualizing the multifaceted processes of minoritization and sectarianization that took place in different contexts (imperial, colonial, national) beginning in the mid-19th century, we examine the overlapping ways that Jews were both incorporated into and excluded from Middle Eastern polities and societies. These varying trajectories across the region impacted the changing and ongoing political salience of remembering and erasing Jewish presence in the Middle East. We will publish a journal special issue, a multi-authored book, and a robust, dynamic website.

California State University, Stanislaus Foundation (Turlock, CA 95382-3200)
Ellen Elizabeth Bell (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Ricardo A. Agurcia Fasquelle (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)
Loa Traxler (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279915-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$248,762 (approved)
$248,762 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2024

The Architectural Development of Temple 16 at the Classic Period (400-825 CE) Maya Center of Copan, Honduras

Preparation of a print manuscript detailing the American-Honduran excavations at the ancient Maya site of Copan (1989-2010). (36 months)

The comprehensive volume entitled, The Str. 10L-16 Sequence: The Architectural Development of the Core of the Early Copan Acropolis, details the evolution of a Classic Maya capital that dominated the SE Maya area for 400 years (426-822 CE). This two-part volume presents the Structure 10L-16 architectural sequence in its entirety, with Part A focusing on the earliest levels excavated by the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Part B concentrating on the later levels excavated by the Asociación Copán. The proposed project will support the intensive collaboration needed to produce a cohesive study of the architecture, iconography, and hieroglyphic inscriptions that formed a narrative of royal power and legitimacy throughout Copan’s history. The manuscript, to be delivered in 2024, presents an intensively researched case study of the development, maintenance, and eventual dissolution of an ancient political capital that will inform analyses of archaic states in the Maya area and beyond.

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Nancy Beck Young (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Leandra Zarnow (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279848-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,998 (approved)
$249,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Democratizing Politics: Mapping the Stories and Significance of the 1977 National Women’s Conference

Preparation of an open-access website on the legislative, political, and social impact of the 1977 National Women’s Conference. (36 months)

“Democratizing Politics” is a multi-year, multi-state, multi-institutional effort led by the University of Houston to analyze the thousands of participants at and legacy of the 1977 National Women’s Conference (NWC). Our open-access digital humanities website launches in March, 2021, and our fully-featured website will be complete by 2027, NWC’s 50th anniversary. Congress created the NWC with bipartisan support, appropriating $5 million and mandating a diversity requirement for conference delegates. The NWC stands out in U.S. history as the most diverse and only federally funded convention of American women. In 1977, 2,000 delegates, elected by 150,000 participants at 56 lead-up state and territory meetings, convened in Houston to outline 26 policy action areas to present to President Jimmy Carter. One of the greatest experiments in civic engagement, the NWC modeled democracy in action. The participants offered an expansive agenda to make the nation more inclusive and the U.S. government more responsive.

University of South Dakota (Vermillion, SD 57069-2390)
Joseph John Tinguely (Project Director: December 2020 to present)

RZ-279861-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$98,683 (approved)
$98,683 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Philosophy and Money: A Historical and Interdisciplinary Consideration of Economies and Worldviews

A three-day conference and two edited volumes on the relationship between philosophy and money. (24 months)

“Philosophy and Money” is a two-year Conference Grant proposal in support of a first-of-its-kind interdisciplinary collaboration to survey the role of money in the history of ideas. Although the history of philosophy is rich in discussions of money, the topic has been largely neglected in contemporary academic philosophy. There are practical and moral implications, but this project foregrounds foundational questions concerning the relation between economic practice and the development of philosophical theories. In the first year a team of scholars across the humanities and social sciences convene in workshops hosted by The Toolbox Dialogue Initiative to share feedback on original research and to address methodological challenges to interdisciplinary collaboration. In a second year, participants reflect on the results of the conference to revise individually composed chapters and to co-author section introductions to Volumes One and Two of The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Money.

Miami University (Oxford, OH 45056-1846)
Daniel G. Prior (Project Director: December 2020 to present)

RZ-279862-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,977 (approved)
$24,977 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

Early Modern Kyrgyz Oral-Derived Narrative Sources (EMKONS)

Planning and convening of an international collaboration among scholars of Silk Road literature for two weeks at the National Academy of Sciences of the Kyrgyz Republic. (12 months)

This project will use a Planning International Collaboration Grant to convene six colleagues from the U.S. and Kyrgyzstan in the archives of the Kyrgyz National Academy of Sciences to plan fundamental research on premodern Central Asian Turkic manuscript narratives, and dissemination of our work in electronic and print venues. These narratives were created within networks of changing oral and written genres including history, genealogy, and epic poetry, and thus lie at the nexus of interpretive problems where historians, linguists, paleographers, philologists, and scholars of oral tradition require each other's insights and methods to do sustained work. Scholars and the public can benefit from the project to study ethnic, regional, and Islamic identities; the intertwining of oral and written modes of transmitting knowledge about the past; Central Asian Turkic linguistic fluidities; and Central Asian nomads' experience of the Russian Empire.

Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
Romita Ray (Project Director: December 2020 to present)

RZ-279793-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$23,247 (approved)
$23,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

Taj of the Raj? Decolonizing the Imperial Collections, Architecture, and Gardens of the Victoria Memorial Hall, Kolkata

Planning and holding a workshop and virtual symposium on Indian, British, and American contributions to the architecture, collections, and gardens of Victoria Memorial Hall, Calcutta. (12 months) 

Our collaborative project focuses on the Indian legacy of the Victoria Memorial Hall (VMH), an imperial museum and memorial to Queen Victoria set amidst 64 acres of gardens in Calcutta (Kolkata). While a handful of scholars have discussed the VMH as an imperial museum, the histories of Indian contributions to its imperial legacy remain largely overlooked. Remarkably, these contributions were entangled with British imperial art, architecture, and gardens, as well as with American collections of European art. As such, the VMH represents the confluence of Indian, British, and American networks of art, architecture, and garden-design. Our project investigates how the VMH’s Indian legacy was shaped by these transnational networks, and how that legacy might be analyzed within the broader context of decolonizing imperial histories. This project involves scholars from the United States, the UK, and India, who will participate, first, in an exploratory workshop at the VMH and, next, in a virtual symposium.

Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
Mary Foltz (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Maxine Montgomery (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)
Suzanne Edwards (Co Project Director: September 2021 to present)

RZ-279805-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$89,479 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 3/31/2023

Engaging Black Women’s Archives: Gloria Naylor and Twentieth-Century Literary History

Preparation of two edited volumes and a series of public-facing essays focused on the archive of American author and intellectual Gloria Naylor (1950-2016). (12 months)

This project proposes to produce an edited collection of scholarly essays on archival materials relevant to Naylor’s published novels, a second manuscript of criticism focused on previously unpublished works found in the archives, and a series of public-facing essays that attend to the collected papers and unpublished material of Gloria Naylor, one of the most widely-read authors at the vanguard of contemporary letters. With Naylor’s substantial archives as our focus, we aim to create a robust model for activating black women’s literary archives through interinstitutional, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational collaboration aligned with black feminist practices. Through ground-breaking academic and public-facing scholarship this project communicates the value of archival research for opening up new avenues for understanding black women writers’ intellectual and literary history of the late-20th and early-21st centuries.

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
John D. M. Green (Project Director: December 2020 to September 2021)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: September 2021 to present)

RZ-279826-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$199,914 (approved)
$199,914 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

The Temple of the Winged Lions Publication Project

Preparation of a print manuscript and digital archive detailing the American excavations at Petra in Jordan (1973-present). (24 months)

The American Center of Research (ACOR) will bring together more than twenty-five contributors to complete a final report on the Temple of the Winged Lions (TWL), an important Nabataean ritual complex within Petra, Jordan, dated to the 1st to 4th century CE. This manuscript preparation project will present the findings of the American Expedition to Petra (1973-2005), and the work of ACOR through the Temple of the Winged Lions Cultural Resource Management Initiative (from 2009). An editorial and advisory team will support specialists in archaeology, geology, and cultural heritage to conduct research using archives, artifacts, and site visits within Jordan. Collaborative research conducted online and in person will relate to the archaeological themes of ritual, economy and society, empire, and local communities, opening up new comparative research directions. In addition to completion of a final manuscript, scholarly and public facing outputs will raise awareness of the final publication.

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
John David Deak (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Jonathan Edward Gumz (Co Project Director: February 2021 to present)

RZ-279828-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,859 (approved)
$249,859 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

The First World War and the Fall of the Habsburg Empire

Preparation for print publication of a co-authored monograph on the collapse of the Habsburg Empire in the First World War (1914-1918). (36 months)

We are applying for an NEH manuscript preparation grant in order to complete the research and writing of a co-authored book manuscript and two research articles on the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire in the First World War. Our work will consist of new archival research that focuses on the internal dynamics of the Habsburg State after war is declared and emergency law goes into effect. The project will build on recent trends in Habsburg studies which have brought to light the empire's political vibrancy and adaptability, in place of longstanding traditional narratives of its inevitable decline and fall. As such we hope to offer a critical new explanation for how the Habsburg Empire collapsed during the First World War and, more importantly, show how the story of the Habsburg Empire as a state collapse helps us to understand the political extremism and the fall of the rule of law during the twentieth century in Europe and the world.

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Paul J. Weithman (Project Director: November 2019 to present)

RZ-271100-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$26,725 (approved)
$26,725 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2022

John Rawls's "A Theory of Justice" at Fifty: An Anniversary Conference

Planning and holding a conference on the 50th anniversary of the publication of A Theory of Justice by American philosopher John Rawls (1921–2002). (12 months)

John Rawls was one of the greatest philosophers of the last century. 2021 will bring the 50th anniversary of the publication of his book A Theory of Justice. In September of that year, the University of Notre Dame will host an international conference to mark the anniversary. The University seeks a Convening Grant to support the conference. The interpretation of Rawls's work, the usefulness of his philosophical method and the validity of his conclusions have all been hotly contested in recent years. The Notre Dame conference will bring together approximately thirty of the best political philosophers in the world who engage Rawls's work, some critically and some sympathetically. The conference promises to advance scholarly understanding of his thought and its relevance to contemporary politics. It also promises to advance knowledge of what the NEH calls "America's core principles of government" and thereby to further the purposes of the NEH's initiative "A More Perfect Union".

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Michael David Carrasco (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Joshua D. Englehardt (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)

RZ-271159-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$249,850 (approved)
$247,217 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

The Origins of Writing in Early Mesoamerica

Preparation of a print monograph and digital archive detailing the origins of writing in Mesoamerica (1500-300 BCE). (36 months)

This book project charts the origins and development of writing in Mesoamerica to explore the critical time in the Early and Middle Formative Periods (ca. 1500–300 BCE) when Mesoamerican peoples developed a number of writing systems from sophisticated iconography. Further, it examines the continuous dialogue between these ancestral artistic systems and later scripts, such as those of the Maya and Zapotec cultures, as well as how writing influenced visual culture. Building on a range of theoretical models, new discoveries, and recent field research, this book project elucidates the transition from a shared foundational iconography to phonetic writing. The aim is to craft a robust understanding of the emergence of writing and contextualize it in the rich visual culture of Mesoamerica, thereby contributing to a better theoretical conception of the origins and role of writing in early civilizations.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Alexander Raymond Jones (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Richard Lewis Jasnow (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)

RZ-271167-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$49,998 (approved)
$43,365 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2020 – 11/30/2022

Prescription to Prediction: The Ancient Sciences in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Planning and holding a conference on the ancient sciences in comparative perspective between the Egyptian, Babylonian, Greek, and Roman worlds. (12 months)

The aim of this NEH Collaborative Research Grant is to host a major interdisciplinary conference and workshop on ancient medicine, astronomy, astrology, and divination, in cross-cultural perspective. Particularly, the exchange of scientific knowledge between the ancient Egyptian, Babylonian, and Greek and Roman worlds will be explored, with an emphasis on broadening the scholarly foundation for such inquiries through new research on unpublished primary texts.

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Jia-Chen Fu (Project Director: December 2019 to present)

RZ-271209-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 7/31/2023

Chinese Foodways in the Modern World (19th C. - Present): Reexamining Culinary Continuity and Change

Planning and holding a conference on Chinese food and food culture in the modern world, from the 19th century to the present. (12 months)

We are applying for an NEH Collaborative Research grant to host a major international conference on modern Chinese food and foodways. This conference will serve as the first step in organizing and writing a critical volume of essays that will frame and define the field of modern Chinese food studies. We will be bringing together scholars working in and between fields such as history, anthropology, food studies, rural sociology, ethnic studies, film and literature, and media and communication studies to discuss issues surrounding the central themes of modern Chinese foodways, including politicization, industrialization of food production and consumption, scientific rationalization, migration and global circulation, and identity formation.

Drake University (Des Moines, IA 50311-4516)
Timothy Knepper (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Nathan Loewen (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Gereon Kopf (Co Project Director: April 2022 to present)

RZ-271235-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

Global Philosophy of Religion: Developing New Questions and Categories for Cross-Cultural Inquiry

Planning and holding a two-day conference and the preparation for publication of an essay collection on the topic of a Global Philosophy of Religion. (12 months)

To this day, philosophy of religion remains preoccupied with the Christo-centric questions and categories of its European origins, which simply do not apply to a significant number of the world’s religious traditions. If philosophy of religion is to be relevant to the globalized, 21st-century world, it must develop new questions and categories that are suitable for unbiased cross-cultural inquiry. This convening grant brings together, in a 2-day conference, 17 scholars who collectively specialize in the religious philosophies of S Asia, E Asia, W Asia, Africa, indigenous N America, and Europe too. Each will prepare and present questions and categories for philosophy of religion informed by her own area of study, then test them against and modify them in view of the other proposals. These proposals, assessments, and modifications will be published as essays in an edited volume along with a comparative conclusion by the project director.

University of Mississippi Medical Center (Jackson, MS 39216-4505)
Amy Wiese Forbes (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Patrick D. Hopkins (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Ralph Didlake (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)

RZ-271273-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$249,836 (approved)
$249,836 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2024

An Investigation of the Mississippi Lunatic Asylum as History and Memory

Preparation of a digital archive and print anthology on the history of the Mississippi Lunatic Asylum (1855-1935) and its role in public memory. (36 months)

An interdisciplinary group of scholars at the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) seeks support from the NEH for a collaborative humanities study of the former site of the Mississippi State Lunatic Asylum, its patients, and descendant community in historical and social context, and in memory. The study follows from the 2014 discovery of 7,000 burials of Asylum patients beneath the UMMC campus, and extensive public call for information about the institutions. We argue that the Asylum’s place in professional and lay understandings of mental illness, social exclusion and silences in family genealogies, theories and practices of early modern healthcare, populations of public psychiatric institutions, and post-emancipation racial understanding has been understudied or unknown. We are thus requesting NEH funding to support research time and the costs of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and disseminating information about the Asylum.

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Helen Tilley (Project Director: December 2019 to present)

RZ-271304-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$245,328 (approved)
$245,328 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 9/30/2023

Constructing African Medical Heritage: Legacies of Empire and the Geopolitics of Culture, 1890-1990

Preparation for print publication of a multi-authored monograph on the history of African medical heritage from 1890 to 1990 and preparation of a special issue of Méthod(e)s, an African bilingual peer-reviewed journal (English-French). (36 months)

Constructing African Medical Heritage explores the historical connections among African colonial conquest, ethnographic research, decolonization, and medical and art history in order to answer three related questions: How did decolonization and the Cold War affect newly independent states' debates about African medical heritage; in what ways did laws passed, studies published, and ethnographic objects collected during the colonial era shape the contours of this later work; and what role did transnational institutions such as the Organization of African Unity, the World Health Organization, and UNESCO play in these efforts? An NEH publication grant will allow our group to produce a ground-breaking analysis of how different types of African "medical heritage" came into being with the rise and fall of European empires across the continent.

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: December 2019 to present)

RZ-271305-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,941 (approved)
$249,941 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

Walt Whitman's Journalism: Finding the Poet in the Brooklyn Daily Times

Computational linguistic research to establish the unattributed journalism of American poet Walt Whitman (1819-1892) at the Brooklyn Daily Times newspaper. (36 months)

Our proposed project will use a tested computational linguistic author attribution model to determine the beginning and end of Walt Whitman's editorial tenure at the Brooklyn Daily Times in the 1850s—a matter of longstanding debate in Whitman studies—as well as to determine which editorials he authored during that span. These editorials will then be transcribed, encoded, annotated, and made freely available on the Whitman Archive site. In addition to bringing clarity to a hazy portion of Whitman's biography and offering access to a new trove of understudied Whitman-authored documents, we hope that our method can bring a new tool to the study of authorship attribution and serve as a model for other scholars or projects confronted with similar cases of uncertain authorship, even when only a relatively small sample size of text is available.

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Yasmin Saikia (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Charles Haines (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)

RZ-271307-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,952 (approved)
$249,747 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Unfinished Partitions in South Asia and the Making of Miyahs, Biharis, and Christians into Noncitizens (1947 - the Present)

Preparation of a co-authored volume providing a comparative study of three groups in South Asia marginalized because of their religion and cultural backgrounds. (36 months)

With a publication grant from the NEH’s Collaborative Research Program we will complete research for writing a book on the Miyahs in India, the Biharis in Bangladesh, and the Dalit Christians in Pakistan. Each of these communities are deemed non- or sub-citizens and the target of harsh state and majoritarian discrimination and violence. In our research we ask: What is it like to live as precarious non-citizens in one’s own country and how do these communities create and maintain a sense of belonging? Each of these communities were left behind as borders shifted in South Asia following Partition in 1947 and the creation of Bangladesh from East Pakistan in 1971. As such, their lives are interconnected, providing a unique South Asian history of precarity, belonging, and enduring humanity, contributing to larger academic discussions on what it means to be human in our divided world today.

Anchorage Museum Association (Anchorage, AK 99501-3544)
Kirsten Anderson (Project Director: December 2019 to October 2020)
Julie Michelle Decker (Project Director: October 2020 to present)

RZ-271321-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals (outright + matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 7/31/2023

Alaska Is: A Collaborative History of Alaska, Digital Publication Project

Preparation of an open-access digital history of Alaska. (35 months)

The Anchorage Museum is requesting support for the development of a collaborative, open-source digital textbook for the history of Alaska. The project will create a comprehensive resource that tells Alaska’s history with inclusive, multi-layered narratives and perspectives, broadening an understanding of Alaska’s place in regional, national, and international contexts. Through multimedia links with primary and secondary sources, new research and historic material, the publication will bring together curated content that fosters a robust understanding of Alaska as a place of extremes, as well as a place of constant change and resilience. It will build a foundation that can scale from broad chronological overviews, to the personal story, to archival images and art. It will honor the authentic voices of the state’s history, deepening an understanding of Alaska in the context of place, identity, and adaptation, with scholarship reaching across history, the humanities, and the social sciences.

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
David McKnight (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Rebecca Bowler (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Claire Drewery (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266063-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,336 (approved)
$45,336 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2022

The Papers of British Writer and Suffragist May Sinclair (1863-1946): Creating a Digital Archive of her Manuscripts

A meeting of editors, technology experts, and archivists leading to the preparation of a prototype digital edition of the works of May Sinclair (1863-1946), novelist and philosopher. (12 months)

The General Editors of the May Sinclair Critical Editions Project is interested in applying for an NEH Collaborative Research Grant that will enable editors, archivist and technologists to meet for one week in the Kislak Center to discuss a future digitization grant to create a full text searchable online database of the May Sinclair manuscripts which are in the possession of the Penn Libraries. Editorial, Archival and Text Encoding technologies will be discussed.

Penn State (University Park, PA 16802-1503)
Amara Solari (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Linda Kristine Williams (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266080-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$214,742 (approved)
$182,979 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2023

Maya Christian Murals of Yucatán: Indigenous Catholicism in Early Modern New Spain

Preparation of a co-authored book and supplementary website relating religious murals painted by Christianized Maya artists in Yucatán, Mexico, between 1550 and 1750. (36 months)

Our multidisciplinary project analyzes religious murals painted by Christianized Maya artists in Yucatán, Mexico, between 1550 and 1750. The first study of its kind, we examine the extant corpus of 22 mural cycles to illuminate the processes of intercultural reciprocation, ideological interchange, and economic exchange that defined the “Encounter” between Europe and the Americas. As art historians, we utilize humanistic methodologies in correlation with empirical methods to reconstruct the circulation of the material goods – print culture and painting pigments – necessary for the murals’ production. We center Maya artists in the vast networks of exchange that marked the Counter Reformation, querying how the visual adaptation of pre-Columbian artistic practices impacted the emergence of Maya Catholic identity. Our final products, a scholarly book and a supplementary interactive website, will allow the interested public and scholars access to our research findings.

Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Jose Luis Bermudez Ospina (Project Director: December 2018 to October 2022)
Catherine Conybeare (Co Project Director: February 2019 to October 2022)

RZ-266101-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$48,961 (approved)
$41,611 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021

Reconsidering the Sources of the Self in the Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Periods

A conference and preparation of an edited volume of essays on the influential Sources of the Self: The Making of Modern Identity by philosopher Charles Taylor (1931-). (12 months)

Reconsidering the Sources of the Self aims to reconfigure the historical study of conceptions of selfhood in the Western traditions, focusing on the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Highly interdisciplinary (Philosophy, Literature, Theology, Classics, and History), it will break new ground by (a) including thinkers outside the standard philosophical/theological canon, (b) incorporating medieval conceptions of selfhood, and (c) exploring how ideas of selfhood are articulated in forms and genres besides philosophical and theological treatises. We are seeking funding from an NEH Collaborative Research Convening Grant for a workshop to bring together 15 scholars (13 confirmed). During the funding period (10/1/19 – 9/30/20) we will produce and submit to a major press a book proposal for an edited volume with the workshop papers and an extended introduction. We will produce a website that explains the project and workshop for both scholarly and general audiences.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Julie Greene (Project Director: December 2018 to October 2022)

RZ-266114-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$33,422 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2021

Immigration and the Making of African America

Preparation of a conference and a publication on how immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America have influenced African American culture and society since the mid-20th century. (12 months)

Immigration and the Making of African America will explore the largely untold history of African diasporic immigrants to the United States and their relations with native-born African Americans over the last 150 years. Black immigrants developed distinctive strategies for assimilating, even while maintaining ties with their countries of origin. They have profoundly influenced the social, political, and cultural history of the United States. In exploring these themes and by connecting immigration and African American history and culture, this conference will bring together scholars across the humanities to rethink the standard narratives of both fields, demonstrate that scholars in each area must be in dialogue with one another, and illuminate in new ways the complexity of blackness in historical and contemporary America.

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Sarah Barringer Gordon (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Kevin A. Waite (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266119-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$242,000 (approved)
$242,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2022

The Long Road to Freedom: Biddy Mason (1818-1891) and the Making of Black Los Angeles

Preparation of a co-authored book and website relating to the remarkable story of freedwoman Biddy Mason (1818-1891) and her role in the development of the First African Methodist Church in Los Angeles. (36 months)

The project will result in the first scholarly treatment of freedwoman Biddy Mason's pioneering career and the community she helped build. A book-length study and a robust website, complete with digitized documents and interactive maps of nineteenth-century Los Angeles, will tell the story. For scholars and generalist audiences alike, these publications will reveal a new, continental history of slavery and freedom, as well as the little-known African American origins of one of the nation's most important cities.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Sturt W. Manning (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Brita Lorentzen (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Nikolas Bakirtzis (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266147-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$238,213 (approved)
$208,882 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2023

Medieval Monuments and Wooden Cultural Heritage on Cyprus: Building History with Tree-Rings

Field research to establish a chronology of Late Byzantine and Medieval churches and icons in Cyprus based on tree-ring analysis (dendrochronology). (36 months)

Our Collaborative Research Grant project employs dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) to establish dates for a key set of Byzantine-Medieval buildings and portable art (especially icons) in Cyprus central to the history and art-history of the East Mediterranean and Orthodox worlds. Via dendrochronology and research on the history and preservation of each building and artwork, this interdisciplinary project will provide for the first time an independent time-frame for one of the world's most important sets of Byzantine-Medieval buildings (ten on the UNESCO World Heritage List). Our project will greatly refine and likely rewrite current understanding of this period which at present lacks an independent time-frame. All data will be digitally recorded and archived permanently in conjunction with a scholarly and public publication and communication strategy to ensure that this unique cultural heritage is preserved for the future independent of the monuments and objects themselves.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Rosemary A. Joyce (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Rodrigo Liendo Stuardo (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266160-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$185,399 (approved)
$171,420 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2024

City Life at Classic Maya Palenque, Mexico

Field research at the Maya site of Palenque in southwest Mexico, leading to a scholarly monograph and a publicly accessible website in both English and Spanish. (36 months)

This proposal seeks funding for archaeological research on Palenque, Mexico, a Classic Maya political center. Palenque, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has been the focus of exploration since the 18th century. It was a key place in the decipherment of Maya writing. The well-studied visual and inscriptional record from the city center provides understanding of palace life and dynastic history. Less is known of city life in general. The proposed collaborative research will advance understanding of Palenque as a city. The project on which this proposal builds used contemporary methods to explore a residential compound of a family belonging to the city's elite, showing the potential to illuminate life in the city as a whole. The proposed project will systematically excavate a sample of residential compounds in neighborhoods defined using spatial analysis, to document the way that repeated everyday practices formed Palenque's way of life.

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Christopher Woods (Project Director: December 2018 to May 2021)
Theo P.J. Van den Hout (Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Lisa A. Heidorn (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266161-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$212,388 (approved)
$167,072 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2022

Oriental Institute Nubian Archaeological Expedition Publication Project

Preparation of final monographs of salvage expeditions from sites flooded by the reservoir of the Merowe Dam along the Nile in present-day Sudan. (36 months)

The Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition Publication Project plans to publish results of salvage excavations (2007-2008) at sites flooded by the reservoir of the Merowe Dam at the Fourth Cataract of the Nile, an area previously almost unexplored by archaeologists. The major industrial gold processing center of Hosh el Geruf is earlier than 1550 BCE, although it was believed the Egyptians introduced the process later. The complete, ordered Middle Nubian cemetery of al-Widay (1850-1550 BCE) dates bodies of evidence and reveals interactions with areas both north and south. The excavations and survey on the island of Umm Gebir discovered tombs of local tradition dating to the New Kingdom, and unusual Napatan structures. Major bodies of new evidence will be available to the public and scholarly community, greatly enhancing the study of civilizations along the ancient Nile.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Maya Vinokour (Project Director: December 2018 to present)

RZ-266168-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2023

The Post-Soviet Public Sphere: Multimedia Sourcebook of the 1990s

Preparation of a digital collection of bilingual scholarly essays and an open access website with 500 Russian-language multimedia artifacts created just before and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, between 1986 and 2000. (36 months)

Many features of the present geopolitical moment - from international election hacking to the proliferation of "fake news" and "alternative facts" on social media - trace their roots to the media landscape of the post-Soviet 1990s. A group of seven collaborators headed by the project director seeks NEH funding to improve and expand an existing digital project entitled "The Post-Soviet Public Sphere: Multimedia Sourcebook of the 1990s" (http://www.postsoviet90s.com). The proposed sourcebook will consist of a digital collected volume networked with 500 Russian-language print media, television, Web and radio artifacts dating to the "long 1990s," which began in 1986 with Mikhail Gorbachev's policy of "openness [glasnost]" and ended with the election of President Vladimir Putin in 2000. By investigating the rise and fall of Russia's only public sphere to date, our sourcebook will offer insight into the period's ongoing impact on global media and political history.

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Shachar M. Pinsker (Project Director: December 2018 to May 2022)
Naomi Brenner (Co Project Director: February 2019 to May 2022)
Matthew Handelman (Co Project Director: February 2019 to May 2022)

RZ-266172-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$48,285 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 10/31/2021

Below The Line: The Feuilleton, the Public Sphere, and Modern Jewish Cultures

Two international conferences, a website, and digital resources on Jewish culture and “feuilleton,” a newspaper insert popular throughout Europe from the 19th to the early-20th centuries. (12 months)

This convening grant would fund two conferences to bring together international scholars working on the feuilleton, an important and immensely popular feature in newspapers that has been largely forgotten. Our project proposes the feuilleton as a new area for interdisciplinary and multilingual inquiry, seeing the feuilleton as a critical juncture in the production of modern cultures and the public sphere. It focuses on the unique place of the feuilleton in modern Jewish cultures, which were highly multilingual and transnational. By assembling scholars in literature, history, and communications from North America, Europe, and Israel, we will examine the development of the feuilleton as a new form of media and make key texts accessible online for scholars, students, and the public. We will explore and sharpen the topic of investigation, identify and discuss significant periodicals and feuilletons, and plan subsequent publication in print and digital forms.

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Amy J. Elias (Project Director: December 2018 to March 2022)

RZ-266176-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020

In a Speculative Light: The Arts of Writer James Baldwin (1924-1987) and Painter Beauford Delaney (1901-1979)

A symposium and collection of essays on American author James Baldwin (1924-1987) and visual artist Beauford Delaney (1901-1979). (12 months)

The UT Humanities Center will use this Convening Grant to partner with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, NYC, and the Knoxville Museum of Art (KMA) in Knoxville, TN, to host a symposium about two Black American expatriate artists and close lifelong friends, James Baldwin and Beauford Delaney. To be held Feb. 19-21, 2020 at the University of Tennessee in conjunction with a major KMA exhibition featuring 40+ works by these artists, it will create new knowledge about Black American and Modernist arts such as jazz and abstract painting and will lead to the first analyses of Baldwin's and Delaney's influence on one another and on Black arts today. Speakers will address six research categories: arts history/Black aesthetics; music; ethics/social values; style/form; gender/sexuality; and biography/legacies. The symposium will feature 26-34 renowned scholars in literary, art history, and music studies and will lead to a published collection of essays.

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Karen Detlefsen (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Lisa C. Shapiro (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)

RZ-266202-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 6/30/2022

New Narratives in the History of Philosophy: Women and Early Modern European Philosophy

A conference on the works of early modern women philosophers (1500 to 1850) in preparation for an edited volume of essays. (9 months)

The project will bring together, for a three-day conference, 49 scholars working on the philosophical output of early modern women philosophers, and it will result in a volume of cutting-edge, scholarly papers on this topic. Because of the wide range of genres and methods that women employed in their philosophical writing during these centuries, our project necessarily and meaningfully connects broadly across many humanities disciplines. We thus include humanities scholars beyond philosophers as participants in the conference and as contributors to the volume, a distinctive virtue of this project.

St. Vincent College (Latrobe, PA 15650-2690)
Paul Kadetz (Project Director: December 2018 to September 2019)
Tina Phillips Johnson (Project Director: September 2019 to August 2022)
Paul Kadetz (Co Project Director: September 2019 to August 2022)

RZ-266206-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$39,245 (approved)
$0 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 9/30/2020

Tracing the Historical and Cultural Trajectories of Antimicrobial Resistance in China (1920 - The Present)

A scholarly workshop and conference in preparation of an edited volume on the history, causes, and effects of antibiotic resistance in China during the 19th and 20th centuries. (12 months)

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a global threat to humans, animals and the environment, particularly in China, which has been identified as a leading consumer of antibiotics in humans and livestock, and reflects one of the highest rates of AMR in the world (Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy 2018). Scientific research has identified the global reach of AMR, as well as biomedical and agricultural practices that can fuel its development. Yet, no study to date has examined the historical development of AMR or the sociocultural factors that impact AMR, both of which are essential to better understand and redress this global threat. The sharing of the Convening Project collaborators’ research will offer the first comprehensive analysis of the historical and sociocultural antecedents that have contributed to the rise of AMR in China - from the early cultural translation of biomedicine to the present - and will thereby establish a foundation by which the collaborators can effectively plan a multi-authored publication.

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Terry P. Brock (Project Director: December 2018 to June 2022)
Matthew B. Reeves (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Mary Furlong Minkoff (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Matthew B. Reeves (Co Project Director: April 2019 to June 2022)
Terry P. Brock (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

RZ-266251-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$249,820 (approved)
$249,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2020 – 3/31/2023

Understanding the Overseer: Using Archaeology to Examine Status and Identity at James Madison's Montpelier

Field research on the overseer’s house at James Madison’s Montpelier leading to public programs and publications on the social, economic, and racial complexity of 19th-century plantations in the United States. (36 months)

This study will adopt the space/place model to examine the overseer at James Madison’s Montpelier, an early 19th century plantation in the Virginia Piedmont. It will examine the relationship of the overseer to the plantation elite and the enslaved community through an in depth study of the overseer’s space on the landscape, and how they defined that space through household activities. We will examine the space the overseer occupied on the landscape through a spatial analysis of the farm complex in which the overseer’s house was situated, and excavations of the overseer’s home and its surrounding yard space. Archaeologists will examine how the plantation owner situated the overseer in relationship to the rest of the community through building architecture and the spatial proxemics of the overseer's house. Then we will examine how the overseer and his household responded to this position through the organization of his household activities and consumer choices.