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State: New Hampshire
Date range: 2009-2019
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SO-263445-19

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Ellen Scarponi (Project Director: April 2018 to August 2019)
Wilbur Glahn (Project Director: August 2019 to present)

State Humanities Program

State Humanities Councils General Operating Support

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, General

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$834,507 (approved)
$834,507 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2018 – 10/31/2023


HAA-263803-19

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2018 to present)
John P. Bell (Co Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Understanding Visual Culture through Silent Film Collections

The creation of a large-scale compendium and research platform for silent films that are currently housed in separate collections and a suite of tools to be used by scholars studying the transition of visual culture from stage to screen.

This Level III Digital Humanities Advancement Grant project aims to produce a digital compendium of over 400 films from the silent film era that document the transition of visual culture from stage to screen. It will combine highly-influential and rare works archived in the Paper Print collection of pre-1930 cinema at The Library of Congress with films at the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam to create a digital resource designed for film scholars around the world. The compendium will be built by merging two pieces of software: The Media Ecology Project's Semantic Annotation Tool and the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture's Scalar. The resulting platform will provide an open software and data framework scholars can use to compare disparate types of data in a single interface. This valuable tool will unite a wide and growing variety of data and invite scholars to gather and post ideas, asking and answering new questions about key historical features in the evolution of motion pictures.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$222,438 (approved)
$222,438 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PR-263888-19

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

Accessible Civil Rights Heritage Project

The development of processes and guidelines to facilitate the use of historical film and video from the civil rights era, with a focus on enabling access for blind and visually impaired users.

The Accessible Civil Rights Heritage (ACRH) Tier II proposal seeks to develop processes and guidelines supporting the delivery of annotated archival video to the higher education community with a particular focus on blind and visually impaired (BVI) users. The ACRH project will research the creation, curation, and consumption of online humanities collections by developing a test corpus of culturally significant newsfilm on American civil rights, dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. ACRH will then combine the deep knowledge of experts on the era with the work of archivists and human-cognition researchers to develop new cataloging and access procedures that deliver high-quality, meaningful experiences to BVI users about culturally significant material. The team will produce evidence-based accessibility guidelines and software that will be published as open resources for use by educators and archivists.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$299,863 (approved)
$277,439 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PF-260761-18

Proprietors Portsmouth Athenaeum (Portsmouth, NH 03801-4011)
Thomas Hardiman (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

Planning Sustainable Environmental Improvements for Collections at the Portsmouth Athenaeum

A planning project to conduct comprehensive space reorganization and create a collections storage plan, as well as identify options for upgrading HVAC and fire safety systems.  The Portsmouth Athenaeum, located in three adjacent 1805 historic buildings, possesses an extensive collection documenting the history of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and the Piscataqua River region. It includes 35,000 rare and historic books, 2,490 archive and manuscript collections, 22,000 historic photographs, and 570 artworks and artifacts related to maritime and regional history.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$49,875 (approved)
$49,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 4/30/2020


FS-261503-18

University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Willem A. deVries (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
James R. O'Shea (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)

Philosophical Responses to Empiricism in Kant, Hegel, and Sellars

A four-week seminar for college and university faculty exploring the philosophical responses to empiricism of Kant, Hegel, and the 20th-century American philosopher Wilfrid Sellars, to be held at the University of New Hampshire.

18th century empiricism evoked a radical response from Kant and Hegel, the German Idealists, emphasizing the agency involved in knowledge and experience. 20th century empiricism evoked a parallel response from Wilfrid Sellars that has left its mark on contemporary philosophy. Juxtaposing readings from historical and contemporary sources, the central issues in this seminar concern the nature of sensory experience, the concepts used to make sense of it, the possibility of radical conceptual change, the role of the empirical sciences in ontology, and the sources of the normativity essential to human agency. Participants will also present their work in progress to the group for discussion.

Project fields:
Epistemology; History of Philosophy; Metaphysics

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$109,668 (approved)
$109,668 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


HAA-256086-17

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Exploring Archaeological Landscapes through Advanced Aerial Thermal Imaging

A series of six case studies in locations in the United States and internationally to further methods in aerial thermography, an imaging process that allows non-destructive photography and data collection for archaeological sites.

Archaeologists have known since the 1970s that aerial thermal images can reveal a wide range of ancient cultural features including buried architecture, artifact concentrations, as well as roads, fields, and earthworks. Until recently, technological hurdles have largely prevented aerial thermography from being deployed in archaeological research, but our work on a Level II Start-Up grant brought together a small drone, a lightweight thermal camera, and photogrammetry software to explore new methods for aerial thermal surveys. The proposed project seeks to build on this success by using a newly developed radiometric thermal camera, improved drone technology and new processing methods to undertake a series of aerial thermal surveys at sites in the US, Mexico, Cyprus and Iraq. Results of the project have the potential to transform understanding of the various sites under investigation, and will develop a new set of protocols for collection and processing of thermal imagery in archaeology.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,930 (approved)
$324,930 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2020


ZH-252969-17

St. Anselm College (Manchester, NH 03102-1310)
Daniel Forbes (Project Director: May 2016 to present)

Enhanced Humanities Programming as a Bridge to School Success and College Access

The expansion of the Humanities After School and Creative Writing programs serving immigrant, refugee and underrepresented high school students in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Building on a long-term partnership with the Manchester School District the proposed challenge grant will strengthen the humanities programming within the Access Academy, the Saint Anselm College’s outreach program to refugee, immigrant, and underrepresented high school students. Humanities programming within the Access Academy introduces refugee, immigrant, and underrepresented youth to the richness of cultural contributions of Western cultures and of their native countries or regions. The academy’s humanities programming helps students build academic skills, college readiness and aspirations, and confidence as learners. It also helps them deal with personal issues of culture, identity, and belonging, all via the humanities content. The proposed enhancement will expand humanities courses in philosophy, theology, history, art history, and literature and enrich the creative writing program and attract an additional 60 high school students annually.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Access Grants

Division:
Challenge Grants

Total amount offered:
$100,000

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 9/30/2021


PR-234316-16

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mark J. Williams (Project Director: June 2015 to present)

Semantic Annotation Tool

The development of the Semantic Annotation Tool (SAT), which would facilitate the creation and sharing of time-based media annotations on the Web by researchers, students, and educators.

The Semantic Annotation Tool (SAT) proposal seeks funds to develop and distribute a drop-in module that facilitates the creation and sharing of time-based media annotations on the web. The finished system will be composed of two parts: first, a jQuery plugin that wraps an existing media player to provide an intuitive authoring and presentation environment for time-based video annotations; and second, a linked data server that communicates with the plugin to collect and disseminate user-generated comments and tags using the W3C Open Annotation specification. The goal of building this system is to create an end-to-end open source video annotation workflow that can be used as either an off the shelf or customizable solution for a wide variety of applications. Potential uses include collaborative close reading of video for humanities research, simplified coding of time-based documentation in social science studies, enhancing accessibility for media clips on web sites, and many others

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$74,984 (approved)
$74,984 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PG-233635-16

Proprietors Portsmouth Athenaeum (Portsmouth, NH 03801-4011)
Thomas Hardiman (Project Director: May 2015 to present)

Portsmouth Athenaeum Collections Care and Fire Safety Improvements

Hiring an outside consultant to conduct a fire safety study and the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, including temperature/humidity monitors and a visible light meter.  The Portsmouth Athenaeum maintains an encyclopedic collection of materials related to the history and culture of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Founded in 1816, the Athenaeum holds diverse collections including important materials relating to the 1905 Treaty of Portsmouth, which ended the Russo-Japanese War. Other collection highlights include a 1979 dockyard model of the Portsmouth-built ship H.M.S. America and King George II’s 1737 proclamation settling the boundary between New Hampshire and Massachusetts. This proposal responds to a 2014 collections conservation assessment report identifying fire safety and improvement of the building envelope as a critical priority in the Athenaeum’s long-range collections planning.

The proposed project will support a fire safety study at the Portsmouth Athenaeum, and fund purchase of environmental monitoring equipment. Project activities will take place between January and March 2016. A recent collections conservation assessment identified fire risk and environmental conditions as our top collections care priorities. This project will lay the foundation for creation of an integrated master environmental improvement plan for the Athenaeum. The Athenaeum is steward to an extraordinary collection of manuscripts, objects, art, photographs, and rare and historic books and printed materials. These collections document the cultural, economic and political life of Portsmouth, New Hampshire's only major seaport, which played a significant role in American colonial, Revolutionary, and Early Republican history. Spanning centuries and representing historic cultural encounters worldwide, the Athenaeum's collections are of regional, national and international importance.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PG-233623-16

Star Island Corporation (Portsmouth, NH 03801-4305)
Kyle Belmont (Project Director: May 2015 to present)

Preserving the Collections of the Celia Thaxter Museum on Star Island

Purchase of environmental and light monitoring equipment, as well as installation of light-blocking, UV-filtering blinds and a vapor barrier to reduce humidity. The Celia Thaxter Museum on Star Island was founded in 1960 to preserve archival materials, paintings, and artifacts associated with the history of the Isles of Shoals, to educate visitors through exhibits and interpretive programs, and to support scholarly research. The collections document 400 years of island life and include approximately 600 Native American artifacts; 7,000 photographs and items of ephemera, 19th-century furniture from the island’s Grand Appledore Hotel, and objects owned by and relating to the life of island inhabitant and poet Celia Thaxter.

The Celia Thaxter Museum's collections chronicle more than 400 years of life on the Isles of Shoals, off the New Hampshire coast. The Shoals represent moments fundamental to understanding our American history. Some of the museum's artifacts have distinctive artistic value of more than regional importance; the collections are a national treasure in their representation of American cultural life. A 2014 CAP grant identified top priorities for improving the preservation and management of the collections. This proposed project addresses four of the highest priority recommendations of the CAP assessors: 1) installation of blinds to lessen light exposure in exhibit space; 2) purchase of a foot candle meter; 3) purchase of HOBO software for our HOBO monitors; 4) installation of a vapor barrier to reduce humidity in collections areas. These activities, which will be undertaken in consultation with a conservator, will result in a greatly improved preservation environment for the collections.

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FT-248619-16

Julia Emilia Rodriguez
University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

Nineteenth Century Anthropology and the Scientific Reconquest of the Americas

A history of the development of Americanist anthropology as a collaboration between scientists in Latin America and Europe.

This book project examines the genesis of Americanist anthropology in the late-19th century, a crucial moment in the centuries-old transatlantic enterprise to unearth new knowledge about the fundamental nature of humankind. It follows Americanists' own evidence trail, from physical artifacts to linguistic and cultural evidence, in the context of comparative study of Latin American civilizations. It identifies prominent figures and debates in anthropology on two continents as scientists grappled anew with existential questions -- what are the measures of civilization? Is there a single model of human social development? Can diverse peoples coexist in the same nation? It also explores how Americanist anthropology shaped key aspects of the transnational political culture of the era and outcomes in law locally, for example, practices of integration or exclusion of Native Americans and mixed race groups, the instruction of Native languages, and the return of human remains.

Project fields:
History of Science; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


AV-248436-16

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Kathy A. Mathis (Project Director: September 2015 to present)

Dialogues on the Experience of War

A reading and discussion program for veterans focused on The Odyssey and contemporary literature about war, to be conducted in several locations in New Hampshire.
 

This project recognizes a) the power of storytelling and dialogue to address indirectly and safely the experience of war and the barriers that prevent returning soldiers from fully integrating into society; and b) that veterans are central to training teams, facilitating groups, and evaluating the project. We train three teams of facilitators and organize 14-week series for veterans in four sites. Developed by Roberta Stewart (Classics Department, Dartmouth), the model has operated in New Hampshire for seven years. Each facilitator team consists of a literary scholar, a health care provider and a veteran. Stewart writes that she has “heard remarkable commentary about what it’s like to lead men, and perceptive understandings of what’s lost in war. A combat veteran and a clinical psychologist said to me, ‘Homer offers veterans a map for coming home.’” This proposal combines Homer’s Odyssey with contemporary literature selected by veteran consultants.

Project fields:
American Studies; Classical Literature; Literature, General

Program:
Dialogues on the Experience of War

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$79,590 (approved)
$79,590 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


SO-233948-16

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Robin O. Kenney (Project Director: June 2015 to February 2016)
Stephen P. Barba (Project Director: February 2016 to September 2017)
Ellen Scarponi (Project Director: September 2017 to August 2019)
Wilbur Glahn (Project Director: August 2019 to present)

State Humanities Program

No project description available

Project fields:
Unknown

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$3,049,360 (approved)
$1,935,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2015 – 10/31/2020

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $1,114,210
Supplement (2017) $645,870


CH-233803-16

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Terry Jean Dumansky (Project Director: May 2015 to February 2016)
Deborah Watrous (Project Director: February 2016 to September 2017)
Susan Hatem (Project Director: September 2017 to November 2018)
Anthony Poore (Project Director: November 2018 to present)

Endowing Excellence, Innovation and Access through Humanities to Go

An endowment to redesign and relaunch the “Humanities to Go” (HTG) speakers bureau program.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council will transform its popular Humanities to Go speakers bureau into a portable and accessible “center for the public humanities.” Not a bricks-and-mortar project, this “center” will exist in every city and town in New Hampshire. Through Socratic discussions, experiential opportunities and reinvigorated presentations, NH residents will be given the tools and knowledge that enable them to connect local stories, concerns, and traditions with global questions about the human condition. The infrastructure is in place -- the partnerships; the delivery mechanism; and the statewide credibility now enjoyed by Humanities to Go. The need is for occasions for the public not only to listen but to experience and practice the humanities. This new endeavor promises to deliver the intellectual joy and civic virtue of the humanities throughout NH and far into the future.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Grants

Total amount offered:
$350,000

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 7/31/2019


FA-233481-16

Leslie Butler
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

American Democracy and the Woman Question, 1830-1880

A book-length study of 19th-century transatlantic debates about democratic government and the role of women and the family in the democratic order.
 

American Democracy and the Woman Question, 1830-1880 is a work of intellectual history that explores the conceptual intersection of debates over popular government and over the civic role of women and the family. It contends that using the latter as an angle of access on the former reveals a body of political thought largely untapped by historians, especially as it places in conversation the ideas of woman’s rights proponents, opponents, and the far more numerous who were unaligned. It follows debates as they circulated around transatlantic print networks during a pivotal half-century when democratic government came under intense scrutiny. The book will tell a richly textured story that is enduringly relevant in our own day, when explicit invocations of liberty and individual rights are often accompanied by implicit assumptions about the place of the family in the American polity. This project thus dovetails nicely with the Common Good: Humanities in the Public Square initiative.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


MR-253002-16

Cheshire Childrens Museum (Keene, NH 03431-2455)
Deb Ganley (Project Director: May 2016 to present)

NEH on the Road: Power of Children

Exhibit highlighting the amazing lives of Anne Frank, Ruby Bridges, and Ryan White.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
NEH on the Road

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$1,000 (approved)
$1,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 11/30/2016


GJ-250620-16

Ken Burns
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

2016 Jefferson Lecture: no title

No project description available

Project fields:

Program:
The Jefferson Lecture

Division:
Agency-wide Projects

Total amounts:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2016 – 5/31/2016


FT-229574-15

Edward Garvey Miller
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

Landscapes of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency in Vietnam's Ben Tre Province, 1940-1975

Summer research and writing on East Asian History, Military and U.S. History.

This project challenges existing interpretations of insurgency and counterinsurgency warfare during the Vietnam War. It does so by examining the war in the Mekong Delta province of Ben Tre. Instead of focusing solely on the military theories and strategies employed by U.S. commanders in Ben Tre, this project considers American military operations in the province in conjunction with the actions, decisions, and perspectives of various Vietnamese actors (both communists and non-communists). This project also employs an ecological approach to demonstrate the ways in which Ben Tre's diverse landscapes shaped the wartime activities and experiences of both Americans and Vietnamese. This project will incorporate research in Vietnamese archives and libraries in Ho Chi Minh City, as well as field research in Ben Tre.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; Military History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 8/31/2015


FZ-231049-15

Jason C. Sokol
University of New Hampshire, Manchester (Manchester, NH 03102-8994)

The Heavens Might Crack: The Death and Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

A book on the immediate and long-term effects of King's assassination on culture, race relations, and politics in America.

This is a book about the broader historical impact of Martin Luther King's death. It asks how individual Americans – and others across the globe – experienced King’s assassination, in the days, weeks, and months afterward. It shows how his death unleashed a host of different emotions: devastation and despair, pain and guilt, shock and apathy, bitterness and even satisfaction. I also probe the long-term ramifications of King's death, analyzing the ways it transformed race relations and politics in America. For all of the literature on King, the civil rights movement, and the 1960s, no scholar has explored the larger meaning of his death. As a social history of that seminal event, this book offers a fresh perspective on one of the most written-about figures in American life.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholar Program

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


AQ-228955-15

University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Katherine Gaudet (Project Director: September 2014 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on Definitions of the Criminal

The development and teaching of a new honors course for first- and second-year students on philosophical, legal, and literary perspectives on the criminal.

This course will form part of the UNH's University Honors Program new curriculum, which will be launched in 2014 or 2015. It will be one of four core courses on "Justice and Ethics," a cornerstone theme of the revised curriculum.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$21,507 (approved)
$21,507 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 4/30/2018


FB-58165-15

Sean Doyle Moore
University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

Slavery and the Making of Early American Libraries: British Literature, Political Thought, and the Transatlantic Book Trade

Early American libraries stood at the nexus of two transatlantic branches of commerce--the book trade and the slave trade. This NEH Fellowship project bridges the study of these trades by demonstrating how Americans' profits from slavery were reinvested in imported British books and providing evidence that the colonial book market was shaped, in part, by the demand of slave owners for metropolitan cultural capital. In doing so, it merges the fields of the history of the book, Atlantic studies, and the study of race, arguing that the empire-wide circulation of British books was underwritten by the labor of the African diaspora. The monograph emerging from this research, accordingly, is the first in early American and eighteenth-century British studies to fuse our growing understanding of the material culture of the transatlantic text with our awareness of slavery as an economic and philanthropic basis for the production and consumption of knowledge.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American History; British History; British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


HC-229771-15

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mary D. Flanagan (Project Director: September 2014 to present)
Andrea Wiggins (Co Project Director: December 2014 to present)
Neil R. Fraistat (Co Project Director: December 2014 to present)

Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines

A cooperative agreement to organize a two-day workshop that would encourage the cross-disciplinary exchange of ideas and best practices in crowdsourcing across the humanities and sciences, particularly in libraries, archives, and museums.

Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines is a proposed workshop to be held in May 2015, at the University of Maryland, that would build an important intellectual and networking bridge for crowdsourced humanities projects, supported by a Cooperative Agreement among NEH, Dartmouth College, and the University of Maryland, with additional support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Sloan Foundation. Throughout the workshop, our central concern will be on the question of how institutions might best adopt and employ crowdsourcing strategies for increasing public engagement, integrating data into existing collections, and increasing knowledge in the humanities and related domains. In obtaining support for the workshop from three different funders, with their own distinct communities to bring into the conversation, we will be ensuring a rich cross-disciplinary dialogue, sending a very public signal about the importance of these emerging practices.

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$93,142 (approved)
$93,078 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FB-57402-14

Ada Cohen
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

The Idea of Female Beauty in the Ancient Greek World

My project explores the aesthetic premises of ancient Greek culture as related to women's physical appearance and as communicated through the visual arts and material culture. Although the focus is on conceptions of beauty, attention is also paid to beauty's dialectical opposite, ugliness. Both are topics of great cultural import, not least because of their impact on gender identity formation. I explore how beauty and ugliness are described in images and texts and the interesting range of moral implications they entailed. Among the topics addressed are beauty's intersections with sexual attraction and age as well as contradictions embedded in the Greek understanding of feminine beauty. Examples are drawn from various periods of Greek art in a comparative mode and from various media, including painting, sculpture, mirrors, and jewelry. Key mythological figures and stories implicating physical appearance are examined, but anonymous figures and genre scenes are especially considered.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FB-57703-14

Douglas Haynes
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

Advertising and the Making of the Middle Class in Western India, 1918-1940

I seek NEH funding to write a book on advertising by global firms in western India between 1918 and 1940. Relying upon theories that suggest that advertisement needs to evoke "prior meanings" that resonate among consumers, my book argues that professional advertisers in this region drew upon and transformed notions of modern conjugality already circulating among an emerging middle class. The study will be based upon extensive research in business archives and upon analysis of texts and images in numerous advertisements I have collected in India. The book will be the first full-length study to establish the connection of advertising to key processes of historical change in South Asia, especially the formation of the middle-class family. It will also contribute to recent efforts to place South Asian history in a global framework by discussing how the circulation of commodities and discourses about consumption on a world scale became involved in the making of the Indian middle class.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Gender Studies; South Asian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


PF-50434-14

New Hampshire Historical Society (Concord, NH 03301-6316)
William H. Dunlap (Project Director: December 2013 to present)

Improving Environmental Conditions to Preserve New Hampshire Collections

Improvements to the headquarters of the New Hampshire Historical Society to protect a significant collection documenting New Hampshire history from damaging environmental conditions, while reducing heat loss and energy consumption. Upgrades would include insulating the roof and skylights, protecting the collections from ultraviolet light, and replacing heating and mechanical systems.

The New Hampshire Historical Society proposes a rehabilitation of its National Registered-listed headquarters in Concord, the state capital. The Society's headquarters houses the single most comprehensive collection of the materials of New Hampshire history. Guided by the Secretary of the Interior's standards for Rehabilitation, the project will protect these nationally significant holdings against damaging internal environmental conditions and hazards; reduce heat loss, energy consumption, and the Society's carbon "footprint;" and protect the architectural character of the 1911 building. To accomplish these goals, the project will address current heat loss and gain through the building's roof and skylights, eliminate damaging ultraviolet radiation from natural light, and replace century-old heating and mechanical systems in order to safeguard collections, conserve energy, and maintain levels of temperature and relative humidity appropriate to an archive and museum.

[White paper]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2016


PW-51549-14

University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Siobhan Senier (Project Director: July 2013 to present)

Writing of Indigenous New England: Building Partnerships for the Preservation of Regional Native American Literature

Collaborative planning for creating access, through an online portal, to regional Native American writings held by small tribal archives across New England. Three pilot projects to test workflow for digitizing these materials would be undertaken and protocols and agreements for future collaborative work would be drafted.

The project will convene a group of regional Native American knowledge keepers, humanities scholars, and digitization and intellectual property experts for project and planning activities associated with the online portal, "Writing of Indigenous New England." At present our growing collaboration includes scholars, librarians, web developers and tribal historians from New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. We seek NEH funding to accomplish three initial goals: (1) convene a 2-day editorial board meeting and planning session, from which we will (2) write up our editorial guidelines and priorities, agree on culturally-sensitive intellectual property protocols, and establish technical specifications for the website; and (3) run three pilot projects at the Tomaquag Museum (RI), Indigenous Resource Collaborative (MA), and Passmaquoddy Heritage Center (ME), to help us establish workflow, clarify budget and staffing expectations, and begin drafting some larger funding proposals.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$39,655 (approved)
$39,655 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016


FT-60922-13

Anna Schur
Keene State College (Keene, NH 03435-0001)

Why Literature Can Reveal What Law Cannot: Leo Tolstoy and Gleb Uspensky on "The Hidden Horror of Modern Life"

Leo Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata and Gleb Uspensky's sketch "One on One" (1885) focus on murderous husbands. Whereas Tolstoy's protagonist is fictional, Uspensky examines the-then sensational but now forgotten trial of Vasily Pishchikov who brutally killed his pregnant wife. Despite the different verdicts (an acquittal and a life sentence), both writers are unhappy with the legal proceedings they describe. Their critique of law, however, reverses the common argument that attributes the supremacy of literary imagination over legal reasoning to literature's commitment to human singularity. Law fails not because it deals in abstractions but because it is distracted by details; literature succeeds not due to its heightened attention to particularity of experience but due to its ability to strip this experience of the incidental and unrepeatable. The utopian politics and literary aesthetics the two works advocate depend not on highlighting but on attenuating human unrepeatability.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2013


FT-60785-13

Rachel Trubowitz
University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

The Role of Mathematics on the Prose and Poetry of 17th-century English Poet John Milton

Milton and Mathematics will be the first book-length study to focus on the role of mathematics in seventeenth-century English poet John Milton's prose and verse. The central thesis of Milton and Mathematics is that the poet's mathematical interests enhance rather than dissipate the remarkable, revolutionary power of his writings. In Milton's era, mathematics was at the forefront of innovative thinking, and Milton recognized the revolutionary implications of seventeenth-century mathematics, including such paradigm-shifting discoveries as infinitesimals and analytic geometry. In his poetry and prose, the poet brings the new mathematics into close dialogue with his subversive literary, political, and religious opinions. During the Summer Stipend, I will write two chapters of a projected five-chapter book. [description augmented by staff]

Project fields:
Literary Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 8/31/2013


SO-50548-13

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Sylvia McBeth (Project Director: June 2012 to September 2013)
Robin O. Kenney (Project Director: September 2013 to September 2017)
Ellen Scarponi (Project Director: September 2017 to present)

State Humanities Program

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$1,890,660 (approved)
$1,756,760 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2012 – 10/31/2017

Funding details:
Original grant (2013) $133,900
Supplement (2013) $544,580
Supplement (2014) $599,040


PG-51590-12

Colony Memorial Trust (Keene, NH 03431-3780)
Anita Louise Carroll-Weldon (Project Director: May 2011 to present)

Preservation Needs Assessment of Collections in the Horatio Colony House Museum

A preservation assessment of furniture, fine and decorative arts, photographs, manuscripts, and other archival materials that belonged to three generations of the Joslin/Colony family, prominent industrialists who played important roles in the politics and economy of Keene, New Hampshire. The collections are displayed in the Horatio Colony House Museum's Federal period home, which was occupied by the family for 130 years, and now functions as a historic house museum with the holdings arranged as left by the last family member who lived there until 1977.

The Horatio Colony House Museum, located in Keene, New Hampshire and operated by the Colony Memorial Trust, is applying for assistance for a Preservation Needs Assessment. The predominantly 19th and early 20th century holdings of furnishings and fine and decorative arts comprise the intact home of a regionally prominent industrialist family. These pieces are still located as originally placed and lived with in eight rooms of the house museum. The holdings also include an impressive archival collection of family photographs, letters, diaries, manuscripts, business records and scrap books. All this is augmented by an extensive collection of rare books, music, ceramics, silver, glass and textiles. The collections have been used for college level curriculum by professors of American Literary History and Music History, and by researchers in Religious Studies and Cultural History.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,850 (approved)
$5,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


PG-51631-12

Keene State College (Keene, NH 03435-0001)
Rodney Gorme Obien (Project Director: May 2011 to present)

Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan and Staff Training to Preserve Special Collections and Film Archives

The hiring of a consultant to develop a disaster preparedness and recovery plan and to provide training in emergency response to better care for the college's special collections and archive of historical films relating to New Hampshire filmmaking and the history of the cinema. The college's collections also include the records of the Dublin Art Colony Collection, a late 19th-century art organization established by Abbott Henderson Thayer associated with Rockwell Kent, George de Forest, and Frank W. Benson.

The Wallace E. Mason Library of Keene State College seeks support for a project to (1) create a disaster preparedness and recovery plan for the College’s archives, special collections, and film holdings; (2) provide staff with training in emergency preparedness and response planning; and (3) prepare disaster supply kits. The project fulfills one of the primary recommendations of the 2010 Preservation Needs Assessment conducted by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) for the College. The holdings consist of over 250 linear feet of archival and manuscript material and over 6,000 volumes of print and bound materials, covering predominantly the disciplines of history, literature, poetry, film studies, Holocaust studies, and anthropology. The Film Archives holdings include approximately 1,000 color and black and white motion picture films. Work will be completed over a seven-month period, beginning in January 2012 and ending in July 2012.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,560 (approved)
$5,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


MR-50158-12

Keene State College (Keene, NH 03435-0001)
Maureen Ahern (Project Director: May 2012 to present)

NEH on the Road: Wild Land

Ancillary public humanities programs to accompany the NEH on the Road: Wild Land traveling exhibition.

Keene State College is honored to host the Thomas Cole Wild Land traveling exhibition. Thomas Cole was a significant influence on the artists of the region, especially those from the 19th century Dublin Art colony. Since the early 1800???s, the area around Mount Monadnock, which is in nearby Dublin NH, was a Mecca for artists, writers and other intellectuals. The Monadnock region has a long tradition of landscape painting and the appreciation of the natural world, which continues to this day. This programming grant will allow us to provide supplemental programming to highlight the exhibit and deepen its impact.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
NEH on the Road

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$1,000 (approved)
$1,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 10/31/2012


FT-60391-12

Martin S. McKinsey
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

An Edition and Translation of C.P. Cavafy: The Major Prose

The poetry of Greek-Egyptian C.P. Cavafy continues to attract new readers. There are at present more than ten comprehensive English translations in print, most of them coming over the past ten years. Yet despite such evidence of persistent if not growing interest in the writer whom Joseph Brodsky characterized as the greatest poet of the twentieth-century, Cavafy’s prose writing is little known beyond the world of Cavafy specialists, even in Greece itself. At the invitation of the newly established Harvard Early Modern and Modern Greek Library series from the Harvard Department of Classics, I have undertaken to translate a generous selection of the poet’s work in prose for a bilingual volume entitled "C.P. Cavafy: The Major Prose." The volume will also include my extensive commentary on the texts, locating them in the context of Cavafy’s life and work, and within the cultural and political world in which they were written.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 7/31/2012


FB-56015-12

Marianne Cecilia Gaposchkin
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

Liturgy and the Crusades, 1095-1400

I am at work on a study of the intersections of crusade and liturgy between ca. 1095 and 1400. Liturgy was a "weapon" of crusading warfare, a mechanism of sacralization of holy war, and an expression of the core ideals of crusade. Yet historians of the crusade have yet to fully exploit liturgical and ritual evidence in their exploration of crusading cultures. Through rituals of departure, processions performed on the march and in battle, daily liturgical requests for the destruction of enemies, and prayers for Holy Land relics brought back to Europe, I chart the development in the ideals of devotion, Christianity, and holy war over three centuries. Liturgy itself is not the object of study but the means by which to explore the evolution of crusading mentalités. It was also a vehicle by which the larger project of the crusades helped create "Europe" out of the individual localities of the early medieval west.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 8/31/2014


HK-50021-12

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mary D. Flanagan (Project Director: January 2012 to present)

Metadata Games: Improving Access to Humanities Artifacts

The implementation of a software system that would use game play to allow users to contribute high-quality descriptive information about digital collections of humanities materials held by cultural heritage institutions.

Our team received Level II Start Up funding to create a pilot of Metadata Games (MG), a software system that uses computer games to collect information about artifacts in libraries and archives as they strive to go digital. Games are useful in that they can entice those who might not visit archives to explore humanities content while contributing to vital records, and they create much more metadata than typical staff can do alone in the same timeframe. The system is open-source and is easily customized to meet each institution’s needs. The full project employs new techniques to make the system smarter and more trustworthy. We will also create new game components. MG can be used to enhance knowledge about artifacts in particular disciplines and fields, or with interdisciplinary collections. MG has the potential to unearth new knowledge that could radically enhance scholarship in the humanities, expanding what records we can encounter in our quest to understand the human experience.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$324,872 (approved)
$324,871 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 8/31/2016


HD-51394-11

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Michael A. Casey (Project Director: March 2011 to present)
Mark J. Williams (Co Project Director: March 2011 to present)

ACTION (Audio-visual Cinematic Toolbox for Interaction, Organization, and Navigation): an open-source Python platform

The development of a platform that would support the computational analysis of film and other audio-video materials. The platform would allow such features as the automatic detection of shots and scenes, the analysis of soundtracks, and overall content analysis.

Audio-visual media have become ubiquitous due to the central position that computing has taken. Yet, methodologies and tools for supporting humanities research based on computational techniques, such as automatic shot-boundary detection, are nascent. ACTION seeks to provide free and open-source computational tools, and best-practice documentation, for new media-analytic methodologies based upon machine-vision and machine-hearing algorithms and software. We anticipate that automatic shot-boundary detection, scene-boundary detection, sound-track analysis, structure segmentation, and other methods, will lead to new insights into the development of film editing styles, scene composition, lighting, sound, and narrative construction. Building upon previous open-source frameworks, such as OMRAS2, AudioDB, Sphinx, Bregman, and OpenCV, ACTION will be a platform consisting of worked use-case examples in computational cinematics for future humanities researchers to extend.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 12/31/2013


FB-55568-11

Pamela Crossley
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

The Imperial Origins of 20th-Century National Identities

The late nineteenth-century histories of the Qing, Russian, Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian empires suggest that nationalism was not an independent, opposing force to the empires themselves but was constructed from imperially-imposed identity criteria, mostly focused on language, religion, homeland and ostensible shared ancestry. Careful studies of these empires between about 1880 and 1920 reveals that the process by which communities, whether in the central territories or on the peripheries, accepted or rejected imperial identity criteria related to the longer histories by which communities had lived in conformity with or in opposition to imperial ascription, and foreshadows twentieth-century dynamics of "nationalism" (in the case of accepting communities) and "ethnicity" (in the case of rejecting communities).

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 5/31/2012


HD-51128-10

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mikhail Gronas (Project Director: March 2010 to present)

Mapping the History of Knowledge: Text-Based Tools and Algorithms for Tracking the Development of Concepts

Text analysis of 15 editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica employing natural language processing, network analysis, and information visualization in order test computational methods for tracing changes in formation and evolution of concepts and ideas across domains of knowledge over time.

We propose to map out the History of European thought over last three centuries using as a proxy the history of changes in 15 editions of Encyclopedia Britannica. Editors of each new edition had to build a new consensus on what to include and what to exclude, how much volume a subject deserves, and what are the relations between subjects. These decisions may be captured and analyzed by methods of natural language processing, network analysis, and information visualization, thus providing tools for identification and analysis of various historical trends within and across domains of knowledge, such as discussion of theories and ideas, evolution of concepts, growth of reputations and such.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 9/30/2012


AQ-50221-10

Keene State College (Keene, NH 03435-0001)
Mark Long (Project Director: September 2009 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What is Nature?"

The development of an upper level humanities course focusing on the study of changing concepts of nature from the ancient world to the age of Darwin.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$24,097 (approved)
$24,097 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2010 – 5/31/2012


FT-57451-10

Thomas H. Luxon
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)

The John Milton Reading Room

The John Milton Reading Room (www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/contents) is an online edition of all the poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with annotations linked to thousands of other web resources (encyclopedias, dictionaries, Bibles and concordances, other historical, scientific, and literary web resources) in order to enable anyone to study Milton's poetry and prose with the support of a virtual library online. I would like to improve this resource in the following ways: 1. Supply introductions for ten sonnets currently lacking them. 2. Supply general introductions for two sets of Latin poems which currently lack introductions. 3. Migrate the entire MRR to a newly designed format with searching provided by Google.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


PG-51037-10

Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden (Portsmouth, NH 03801)
Barbara McLean Ward (Project Director: May 2009 to present)

Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Collections Storage

Funding supports the purchase of storage cabinets and consultation with a conservator who will advise the museum on the care of ceramics, archaeological artifacts, early 19th-century floor cloths, and paper-based materials in the collection. The 1763 National Landmark Moffatt-Ladd House opened as a house museum in 1912 and teaches visitors about local, state, and regional history through the lives and possessions of the home's residents during the 18th and 19th centuries.

The Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden, a National Historic Landmark owned and operated by The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of New Hampshire, seeks $6,000 to assist with the purchase and installation of three museum flat files. These storage cabinets will be used to store small ceramics, archaeological fragments, nautical charts, and our comprehensive collection of early floor cloth fragments. The cabinets will be installed in the collections study and storage room that is part of the newly constructed storage lean-to of our restored 18th century Warehouse, which can withstand the weight of cases that cannot be housed in our historic structures. The humidity-controlled collections storage room has been designed in consultation with conservator Marc Williams, who will continue to work with us on the rehousing of collections being stored in this area, as a sealed environment safe for the storage of collections of all types.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2010 – 7/31/2011


PG-51076-10

New Hampshire Institute of Art (Manchester, NH 03104-4826)
Michelle Ray (Project Director: May 2009 to February 2011)
Anastasia S. Weigle (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

Teti Library General Preservation Assessment

A preservation assessment of the library's general collection, Special Collections, and Archives, with particular attention to materials in the history of photography. The Teti Library serves as a regional art library for academic institutions and the general public.

New Hampshire Institute of Art's Teti Library is seeking funding to support a general preservation assessment of the main library, Special Collections and Institute archives. This funding will support a site visit conducted by a Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) consultant who will assess facility issues, library policy, and material condition and housing. The consultant will create a written report that will help the library prepare a short-, medium-, and long-term preservation plan for the collections. Using this information as a point of departure, the library will prepare a formal preservation policy and conduct materials re-housing and other preservation measures as prescribed by the consultant.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,053 (approved)
$5,053 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2010 – 7/31/2011


FA-55319-10

Lucy E. Salyer
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

Crossing Borders: The Fenians and the Crisis over Citizenship

"Crossing Borders" tells the story of the Irish American Fenians, who launched attacks on Canada and traveled to Ireland in the 1860s to foment rebellion -- all in the unsuccessful effort to win Ireland's independence from British rule. The Fenians were arrested and, despite their status as naturalized American citizens, tried for treason as British subjects. The British treatment of the Fenians provoked an uproar in America, and prompted a major change in the history of citizenship law. For the first time, the United States and England explicitly recognized the right of expatriation, that is, the individual's right to give up his citizenship and pledge allegiance to a new sovereign. Expatriation was revolutionary in emphasizing the power of individuals to choose their political homes. Yet, the new laws were also tied to "state-building" campaigns in the United States and Western Europe, as emerging nation states formed new "rules of exit" for their own strategic reasons.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


PG-50809-10

Exeter Public Library (Exeter, NH 03833-1850)
Hope Godino (Project Director: May 2009 to present)

General Preservation Assessment of Exeter Public Library's Historical Collection

Funding supports a general preservation assessment of the library's collection of approximately 1,700 items including town and family histories, city directories, vital records, and published works by Exeter authors.

The Exeter Public Library, Exeter, NH is seeking funding in the form of a $5,050.35 grant for a general preservation assessment of the Exeter Public Library's historical collection. The historical collection is located in its own room off the main part of Adult Services. The assessment would be completed by a consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center in Andover, MA. This would include a general review of the condition of our paper-based historical collection, an assessment of the risks to the collection, an evaluation of the library's policies and procedures as they apply to preservation and recommendations for improving storage and handling practices. The goal for this project is to insure access to the collection and, at the same time, insure its safety.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,050 (approved)
$5,050 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


RQ-50470-10

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Ivy T. Schweitzer (Project Director: November 2009 to present)

Occom Circle: A Digital Edition and Website

Creation of a digital edition and website that will provide free online access to the works of Mohegan Indian leader and intellectual, Samson Occom (1727-1792) and materials pertaining to Occom's associates and activities. (24 months)

"Occom Circle" is a digital edition and website, already underway in prototype, that will provide free on-line access to works housed in Dartmouth College's Libraries of, by, and about Samson Occom (1727-1792), a Mohegan Indian, intertribal leader, public intellectual, and the most important Indian writer in North America in the 18th century. This digital edition uses text encoding to provide accessibility and longevity beyond traditional print and microform editions. Creating clusters of correspondences and networks of associations, this edition evokes the tumultuous "circle" in which Occom lived through annotations and hyperlinks. It facilitates access to documents through search functions, links to other digital archives, makes them available to scholars in many disciplines, as well as teachers, students, institutions, Indian tribes and general readers. Digital technology allows humanists to bring the past to life in order to inform the present and shape the future.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 6/30/2015


SO-50375-10

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
John F. Weeks (Project Director: June 2009 to November 2009)
John D. Herney (Project Director: November 2009 to January 2012)
Sylvia McBeth (Project Director: February 2012 to September 2013)
Robin O. Kenney (Project Director: September 2013 to present)

State Humanities Program

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$1,807,880 (approved)
$1,801,780 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2009 – 10/31/2014

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $6,100
Supplement (2010) $593,290
Supplement (2011) $618,320


BC-50529-10

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Deborah Watrous (Project Director: March 2010 to present)

We The People: Community Conversations in American History & Culture

To support "Humanities to Go" which provides nearly 20,000 New Hampshire residents with opportunities to examine American history and culture through a broad range of lectures and living history presentations in every discipline of the humanities.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$83,940 (approved)
$83,940 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


PG-50766-10

New Hampshire State Library (Concord, NH 03301)
Janet R. Eklund (Project Director: May 2009 to present)

Assessing the Early American Imprints Collection

A preservation survey of early American imprints consisting of approximately 850 New Hampshire and colonial imprints of the 16th through the 19th centuries, item-level examination of selected volumes, and the purchase of protective enclosures as recommended by the consultant.

The New Hampshire State Library is requesting $6,000 to hire a book conservation consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center to conduct a collection level preservation assessment of its special collection of 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century books printed by New Hampshire printers and by colonial and pre-colonial European printers. In 2002, a NEH Preservation Assistance Grant funded a general collection preservation assessment to help the state library develop its current preservation plan. This survey identified the state library's New Hampshire and colonial imprints collections as a priority for a collection specific assessment. The consultant will conduct a two-day on-site survey of the state library's 850 brittle books and pamphlets contained in this special collection that are printed before the 20th century. She will examine the ways the books are stored and utilized in addition to documenting the condition of each item in a written report.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,850 (approved)
$5,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 12/31/2011


FT-56808-09

R. Ward Holder
St. Anselm College (Manchester, NH 03102-1310)

John Calvin and Tradition

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend will fund the preliminary research for and drafting of the fifth chapter of a book length project entitled John Calvin and Tradition: Authority, Continuity and Transformation, under consideration by Brill Academic publishers. In this study, I will examine one of the more famous revolutionaries in theological history, the reformer John Calvin. This study will examine Calvin's use of tradition in his own reforming activities and in his theological considerations.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 8/31/2009


FT-57249-09

Nicholas Jay Smith
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)

Apologies in Law

In 2008 I published I Was Wrong: The Meanings of Apologies with Cambridge University Press. I Was Wrong provides a nuanced framework for the ethical meanings of apologies from individuals and collectives. I have discussed I Was Wrong on NPR (an hour-long interview with Diane Rehm), CNN, BBC, CBC, Philosophy Talk, and various other national and international programs. I now seek support for Apologies in Law (Cambridge University Press). Apologies in Law will apply the framework for the ethical meanings of apologies from I Was Wrong to acts of contrition in civil and criminal law. As a recently tenured J.D./Ph.D. experienced as a litigator in a major Manhattan law firm and as a staff attorney for the U.S. Court of Appeals, I hope to use my upcoming sabbatical to complete a draft of Apologies in Law. I will revise the draft during the summer of 2009.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 7/31/2009


GI-50080-09

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Kathy Smith (Project Director: August 2008 to present)

Fences and Neighbors: New Hampshire's Immigration Stories

Implementation of a three-year, statewide project examining immigration to New Hampshire through a wide variety of formats, including oral histories and reading and discussion programs.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council requests support for ???Fences and Neighbors: New Hampshire???s Immigration Stories,??? a three-year statewide initiative on immigration. The project is designed to create and implement public humanities programs that foreground face to face conversations and also to support grass-roots humanities programming and oral history collection where immigrants and refugees have settled in the densest numbers along the I-93 corridor. Programs will a)increase knowledge about immigrants and refugees and about our immigration policies in general; b) enable collaborations among municipal, legal, civic, and religious organizations that can plan and implement humanities-based public programs on immigration; c)assist immigrants and refugees to acquire language and cultural literacy; d)encourage the exchange of stories among older immigrants and new arrivals to raise cultural awareness for New Hampshire residents.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$225,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2009 – 5/31/2012


AQ-50154-09

St. Anselm College (Manchester, NH 03102-1310)
Kevin M. Staley (Project Director: November 2008 to present)

Liberty and Justice in the Contemporary World

The preparation and teaching of an undergraduate course in liberty and justice in the contemporary world.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011


HD-50849-09

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
Mary D. Flanagan (Project Director: April 2009 to present)

Digital Humanities Start Up Grant: Metadata Games -- An Open Source Electronic Game for Archival Data Systems

Development of an open source computer game for the Internet that would supplement library metadata on holdings in collections with descriptions provided by the public.

Our team proposes a Level II startup project to create a working example of an open source internet-based computer game system for augmenting access to archival records via crowdsourcing. This game software system, Metadata Games, and the funding for the Start Up will allow us to design and build a prototype of Metadata Games for the Rauner Library at Dartmouth College. This pilot is seen as seed for a larger open source initiative that would fully allow for the deployment of the full Open Source Electronic Game for Archival Data Systems at other institutions. Anticipated outcomes of this startup grant will be a technically sound, scalable model for the creation of Metadata Games on an open source platform that would also support later visualization efforts compatible with archival and library standards. How can the strengths of current digital tools enhance the environment and the collection of the archive? Can the use of player choice enhance access to the archive?

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,015 (approved)
$49,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 2/28/2011


BC-50480-09

New Hampshire Humanities Council (Concord, NH 03301-3852)
Deborah Watrous (Project Director: March 2009 to present)

We the People: Community Conversations in American History & Culture

The development of public humanities outreach through the travelling speakers' bureau, "Humanities to Go," the cable television program "Human Ties," and expanded website content. This grant will enable the Council to reach a wider variety of individuals and be an even greater resource for organizations. An attractive new print catalog and a readily-accessible online catalog continues to attract new users, including schools, libraries, historical societies, senior centers, clubs, and civic groups large and small.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Total amounts:
$83,940 (approved)
$83,940 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2010