NEH banner

[light] [dark]

Funded Projects Query Form
8 matches

Keywords: £ (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
Date range: 2021-2022
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.078 sec

Export results to Excel
Save this query

HC-278111-21

Southern University and A&M College System (New Orleans, LA 70126-0002)
Haitham Eid (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
3 by 3: Modelling New Digital Leadership in Museums

A collaborative research project on digital adoption and transformation in museums that will also produce professional development resources on digital leadership for the cultural heritage field. The UK partner, University of Leicester, is requesting £199,938 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

‘3 by 3’ is an 18-month, multi-partner, transatlantic research collaboration, bringing together cultural institutions, academics and professional bodies to open new directions for leading empathetic and equitable digital change in museums at a time of institutional and individual precarity. The project asks what new models of ‘empathic leadership’ might be needed to enable the holistic institutional adoption of (and adaption to) digital, as well as which inequalities exist in the landscape of digital change in museums, and how can these be confronted. In doing so, ‘3 by 3’ attempts to initiate a retelling of what successful digital leadership in museums looks like – in human and not just business and technological terms.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,887 (approved)
$149,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


HC-278119-21

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47401-3654)
William R. Newman (Project Director: August 2020 to October 2020)
James R. Voelkel (Project Director: October 2020 to October 2020)
William R. Newman (Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Joel Klein (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
James R. Voelkel (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Digital approaches to the capture and analysis of watermarks using the manuscripts of Isaac Newton as a test case

A research project on identifying and analyzing watermarks in digitized collections using watermarks found in Isaac Newton’s manuscripts as a case study. The UK partner, the University of Cambridge is requesting £199,929 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project combines the expertise of the British National Archives, King's College Cambridge, the Cambridge University Library, the École Nationale des Chartes (Sorbonne), the Huntington Library, the Science History Institute, Peterhouse College Cambridge, and Indiana University in an innovative attempt to devise new methods of digital watermark capture and analysis by means of machine learning, using Isaac Newton's extensive manuscript corpus as a test platform.

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,954 (approved)
$120,833 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 8/31/2023


HC-278116-21

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Kelly McDonough (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Unlocking the Colonial Archive: Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for Indigenous and Spanish American Historical Collections

The transformation of Indigenous and Spanish colonial archives into readable and accessible data using artificial intelligence technologies, including transcribed texts, linked information, and automated search and analysis of pictorial elements. The UK partner, Lancaster University, is requesting £199,910 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project seeks to transform unreadable Indigenous and Spanish colonial archives into accessible data using artificial intelligence technologies. The core project team will consist of interdisciplinary researchers from LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections at the University of Texas at Austin, the Digital Humanities Hub at Lancaster University, and Liverpool John Moores University. We propose three main research areas to (1) expedite the transcription of Spanish American documents using handwritten text recognition technology, (2) automate the identification and linking of information within this corpora using natural language processing techniques and linked open data models, and (3) facilitate the automated search and analysis of pictorial elements in the Spanish colonial archive through computer vision approaches. The research will be based on three digital collections under the aegis of LLILAS Benson and one from the National Archive of Mexico.

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,915 (approved)
$149,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 12/31/2023


HC-278124-21

University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Glen Worthey (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
AEOLIAN (Artificial intelligence for cultural organisations)

A series of meetings and case studies that will bring together a team of experts to develop new approaches to improving access to and use of digital archives that are currently private. The UK partner, Loughborough University, is requesting £47,987.70 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. 

AEOLIAN (Artificial intelligence for cultural organizations) focuses on born-digital and digitized collections with limited access due to privacy concerns (e.g. for email archives), copyright (e.g. for digital libraries), etc. AI shows real potential to address these issues. AEOLIAN’s 3 main objectives are: to make digital collections more accessible; to analyze these collections using innovative AI research methods; and to identify synergies and collaborative avenues between US and UK cultural organizations. AEOLIAN brings together humanists, computer scientists, archivists, librarians and others to transform digital archive access and use with machine learning and AI. We will organize 6 online workshops over 2 years focused on 5 case studies from US and UK cultural institutions, creating an international network of scholars and practitioners working with digital archives, and leading to a major report for an interdisciplinary audience and several agenda-setting publications.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,820 (approved)
$49,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 4/30/2023


HC-278063-21

American Numismatic Society (New York, NY 10013-1917)
Peter Gerritt van Alfen (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Ethan Gruber (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
OXUS-INDUS: A Linked Open Data Resource for Research in Central and South Asian Coinages

Applying linked open data (LOD) approaches to creating a tool for better studying and understanding of the Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek coinage of Central and South Asia (c. 250 BCE to the beginning of the first century CE). The UK partner, Oxford University, is requesting £193,067 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The OXUS-INDUS project is twin-track initiative to push forward the curation of and research into the material culture of Central and South Asia. First, it seeks to produce a much-needed tool for understanding the Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek coinage of Central and South Asia at a formative stage of the transfer of monetary technology into this region. Through the creation of a new typology of this coinage, and the linking to that of multiple specimens from multiple public collections it will enable this important body of evidence to be studied as never before. Second, the project seeks to apply recent advances in Linked Open Data (LOD) approaches that have been developed in other branches of numismatics to an important new area. In the fields of Greek and Roman numismatics, such approaches, focused on the implementation of the nomisma.org Knowledge Organization System, have led to wholesale changes in methods of working, both for Researchers and Curators of Collections.

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


HC-278112-21

University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Gabriel P. Solis (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Adriana Cuervo (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies: Music Information Retrieval and AI Support for Jazz Scholarship in Digital Archives

The development of artificial intelligence and music information retrieval tools and archival workflows to enhance access to archival jazz collections, including those held by the US Institute of Jazz Studies and the Scottish Jazz Archive. The UK partner, City, University of London, is requesting £199,659 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies uses state of the art music information retrieval and artificial intelligence algorithms for the analysis of jazz recordings and linked data to enable novel approaches to co-creative use of materials in the archival collections of the Institute of Jazz Studies and Scottish Jazz Archive. This trans-Atlantic collaboration between jazz historians, technologists, and jazz archivists will expand access to unique materials held in archives and illuminate their musical relationships to more widely studied recordings. This project will create, analyse, and visualize relationships between audio and other materials and create rich research workflows to be shared within the scholarly community as a novel way to support co-creation with cultural institutions. We envision a disciplinary transformation through the discovery of new models for jazz historiography, and a broader, interdisciplinary transformation in methodology for digital humanities

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,031 (approved)
$149,031 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


HC-278118-21

Hispanic Society of America (New York, NY 10032-7597)
Marcus Bruce Burke (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
From Lima to Canton and Beyond: An AI-aided heritage materials research platform for studying globalisation through art

Applying and refining spectral imaging methods to determine the geographic origins of cultural heritage materials, with a broader goal of illuminating historic patterns of global trade and cultural exchange. The UK partner, Nottingham Trent University, is requesting £109,870 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project proposes a humanities-led project to study watercolors commissioned by the colonial powers or made for export to Europe or North America by local artists as a lens to global trade and information exchange networks between the Americas, Asia and Europe ca. 1750-1850. Inspired by the Enlightenment, art was used for cartography and scientific recording of flora and fauna as well as ethnographic recording around the world. Pigments/dyes are expensive commodities, their identity and the way they are used in combination are often traceable to their geographic and cultural origins. These paintings are scattered across the Atlantic in various US and UK museums. The aim of this project is to use modern scientific imaging and analysis techniques to gather data at scale on the artist materials used on these paintings to trace the movements of the artist materials (pigments, dyes, paper etc) and the paintings. An enhanced AI aided heritage materials analysis platform will be developed

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,785 (approved)
$124,538 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


HC-278125-21

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Yao-Yi Chiang (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Machines Reading Maps: Finding and Understanding Text on Maps

The development of a workflow that would use advanced machine learning and annotation tools to extract and annotate text on maps across large historic map collections. The UK partner, The Alan Turing Institute, is requesting £199,942 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Machines Reading Maps aims to transform how humanities scholars and cultural heritage professionals interact with map images. Maps constitute a vast body of global cultural heritage, and only a very small portion has been brought into digital platforms for meaningful search, investigation, and discovery at scale. Our project will create open-source tools and methods that employ machine-learning to enable researchers and cultural institutions to identify text on scanned maps and make that text meaningful via metadata creation and linking to historical gazetteers and other resources. Working with partners at the Library of Congress, British Library, and National Library of Scotland, we will generate and share data and methods from Sanborn, Goad, and OS historical maps and link map text to resources for understanding US and UK social history. Our project will enrich spatial explorations of history and help cultural institutions share map collections more effectively with the public.

Project fields:
History, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,650 (approved)
$135,691 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 10/31/2022