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Keywords: £ (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
Date range: 2021-2022
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HND-284954-22

University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY 82071-2000)
Isadora Helfgott (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Paul Flesher (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Finding a place: advancing digital methods to unlock the use of digitized book illustrations in cultural institutions

A research project on identifying and analyzing patterns in book illustration (c 1750 – 1940) using digitized books from collections in Wyoming, Wales, and England. The UK partner, Cardiff University, is requesting £245,912 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Book illustrations span centuries and represent ideas about identities of people and place from Wales to Wyoming. They foreground complexities of local and foreign, indigeneity, colonized and displaced subjects. Material objects that circulated globally, illustrations were easily accessible and expressed key ideas and subtexts not always conveyed in text. They contain cultural information about the beliefs of those who created and encountered them that can be revealed through digital methods, which expand possibilities for the scope and depth of comparative analysis. Opening this material to new analysis can shape cultural institutions’ strategies for display and interpretation across collections. This research is humanities-driven: it identifies humanities materials neglected by cultural institutions and develops digital methods for identifying and analysing them that reveal marginalized and hidden histories and global connections.

Participating institutions:
University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY) - Applicant/Recipient
Cardiff University (Cardiff, Wales) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History; Literature, Other

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 10/31/2024


HND-284964-22

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
T. Mills Kelly (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Deepthi Murali (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Subaltern Histories of Global Textiles : Connecting Collections, Expanding Engagement

Data collection, analysis, and construction of a prototype website to explore the use of Indian-style textiles in the African diaspora in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The UK partner, the University of Edinburgh, is requesting £58,271 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. 

We propose a born-digital project on the use of Indian and Indian-imitation textiles by the African diaspora in the Americas in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Knitting together material from three collections--Victoria and Albert Museum, London, University of Glasgow Archives & Special Collections, and Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, New York--the project re-centers the locus of global textile trade from White Euro-American markets to African diaspora markets and contributes to decolonization in the humanities while highlighting contributions of under-represented communities to global cultures of fashion. For the exploratory level grant we will produce a design document and proof-of-concept prototype including a stand-alone website with interactive data visualizations, annotated narratives, and dynamic maps built on a networked metadata collection that links partnering institutions.

Participating institutions:
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,999 (approved)
$49,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 4/30/2023


HND-284966-22

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Audrey G. Bennett (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
'I don't see what you mean': Broadening participation through co-created inclusive digital museum audio

The development and testing of a one-day workshop for museum practitioners that will use the Inclusive Co-Created Audio Description model to change how museum workers understand and implement digital accessibility for blind, partially blind, and sighted audiences. The UK partner, the University of Westminster, is requesting £58,525 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project sits within the NEH/AHRC theme: Evolving institutions to face the 21st Century, and aims to develop and rigorously evaluate a 1-day Workshop for Inclusive Co-created Audio Description (WICAD) model, working with diverse blind, partially-blind, and sighted audiences in the UK and US to: 1) Provide museum practitioners with a robust model through which they can enrich and extend their digital provision to engage traditionally marginalized audiences. 2) Improve visitor-facing experiences of online access to a diverse range of artworks for all museum visitors to foster digitally-enabled equitable participation To achieve these goals, we will compare the experiences of experienced and novice museum-goers to address these central questions: 1. What level of guidance do co-creation groups need to produce a draft audio description (AD) within a 1-day workshop? 2. How do groups choose to incorporate different voices, positionality, and identities within a co-created AD?

Participating institutions:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Westminster (London) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$49,116 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 11/30/2022


HND-284967-22

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Carla Klehm (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Angelia Payne (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Malcolm Williamson (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Christopher Angel (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Digital Storytelling on African Urbanisms: A Model to Empower Education Initiatives Across the Global South

The assessment and expansion of the metsemegolgolo digital archive for use in teaching digital storytelling to K-12 and college students in Southern Africa and across the Global South. The UK partner, the University of Cambridge, is requesting £59,948 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project explores how to best empower secondary school and university educators based in the Global South to explore cultural heritage through a digital archive called metsemegologolo, ‘ancient towns’ in Setswana. Metsemegolgolo, co-directed?by Cambridge and based at three South African institutions, is an open source prototype database containing archaeological data, heritage objects, historical maps, oral histories and poetry about precolonial African urbanisms. This project develops a complementary UK-US collaboration among the metsemegologolo developers, digital heritage experts, and southern African educators with the purpose of exploring digital storytelling in low-resourced educational environments across the Global South. Increasing digital representations of marginalised histories is part of the ongoing process of decolonizing the digital humanities and further deepens connections to, and preservation of, cultural heritage sites.

Participating institutions:
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR) - Applicant/Recipient
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge (Cambridge) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
African Studies; Archaeology

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,999 (approved)
$49,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2023


HND-284968-22

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Daniel Barros Domingues da Silva (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Towards a Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades: Unlocking the Records of the South Sea Company

The development of the Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades, an open-access resource that will digitize, transcribe, translate, and semantically link manuscript materials documenting the South Sea Company and its contribution to the trans-Atlantic and intra-American slave trades. The UK partner, Lancaster University, is requesting £249,788 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The outcry for racial justice has spurred a growing demand for accessible information on the Atlantic slave trades’ difficult history. This project meets that demand through the creation of the Digital Archive of the Atlantic Slave Trades (DAAST), a new open-access digital platform that will democratize access to the archives of the Atlantic slave trade. This resource will leverage innovative methods—including AI, machine learning, and research description framework—to digitize, transcribe, translate, and semantically link manuscript materials. DAAST’s foundations will be built by processing the voluminous papers of the South Sea Company (SSC), one of the largest slave trading companies in history. The resulting archive will offer new insights on the Atlantic slave trades’ histories—especially the experiences of the enslaved. This project will thus revolutionize how the archives of the trade are accessed, and transform how cultural institutions display materials related to the traffic.

Participating institutions:
William Marsh Rice University (Houston, TX) - Applicant/Recipient
Lancaster University (Lancaster) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,995 (approved)
$149,489 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025


HND-284973-22

Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
Diane Katherine Jakacki (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Evolving Hands: Building Workflows and Scalable Practices for Handwriting

The development and publication of training materials and documentation for the automatic transcription of historical manuscripts, based on three case studies from the Gertrude Bell Archive, the Records of Early English Drama, and archival collections held at Bucknell University. The UK partner, Newcastle University, is requesting £53,344 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Transcription has evolved dramatically in the 21st century. Originally volunteer-driven, this required pre-existing understanding of terms, subjects, and spellings within digitized collections. Two tools changing this model within digital curation are Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR). OCR is ubiquitous in mass digitisation but has substantial limitations, while HTR is still unfamiliar in cultural institutions. Evolving Hands undertakes 3 case studies ranging across document forms to demonstrate how these tools can be used in curation: handwritten and printed letters, diaries, ethnographies, financial accounts and pedagogical documents from multiple centuries and languages. By covering a wide variety of periods and document forms the project can foster responsible, responsive support for cultural institutions, and establish more effective workflows that fill the gap between digitization, semantic-oriented encoding, and data discoverability.

Participating institutions:
Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA) - Applicant/Recipient
Newcastle University (Newcastle upon Tyne) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Languages, General

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$43,875 (approved)
$43,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024


HND-284975-22

SUNY Research Foundation, Farmingdale State (Farmingdale, NY 11735-1006)
Mary P. Caulfield (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Designing Mixed Reality Heritage Performances to Support Decolonisation of Heritage Sites

The creation of research-based performances and toolkits about the 18th century slave trade in Deerfield, Massachusetts and London for cultural heritage sites in the US and UK. The lead UK partner, Brunel University London, is requesting £247,572 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.?? 

The project asks how digital heritage performance, using in particular Mixed Reality technologies, can aid heritage sites in their endeavour to attract new audiences while critically engaging the public with under-represented voices and viewpoints of troubled European and colonial histories. To achieve this goal, the project will design and develop two innovative immersive heritage experiences combining Mixed Reality, in the form of smart glasses, and live performance at heritage sites in the UK and US focusing on under-represented stories from the 18th-century slave trade in London and Deerfield, Massachusetts. The research will further future transatlantic industry innovation by providing heritage workers, and their creative industry partners, with two toolkits to assist the design, implementation, and staff training for the use of MR immersive heritage experiences.

Participating institutions:
SUNY Research Foundation, Farmingdale State (Farmingdale, NY) - Applicant/Recipient
Brunel University London (Uxbridge, Middlesex) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Arts, Other; British History; U.S. History

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024


HND-284978-22

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Peter Leonard (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Yer Vang-Cohen (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Enriching Exhibition Scholarship: Reconciling Knowledge Graphs and Social Media from Newspaper Articles to Twitter

The development of methodologies and workflows to create structured metadata about art exhibitions and objects from catalogs, historic newspapers, and social media. The UK partner, the University of Edinburgh, is requesting £249,999 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Artwork exhibitions bring diverse cultures together, exposing artists, scholars and the public to new experiences. These interactions affect stylistic trends, art markets, and cultural perceptions, yet are very difficult to study as we lack holistic, structured data about participation of audiences and objects. This project brings together an international and interdisciplinary team of experts in the fields of linked open data (LOD), exhibitions, art history, and AI to create or enhance machine accessible exhibition descriptions. This will be done by combining LOD graphs and cutting edge natural language processing applied to newspaper archives and current day social media. We will extract object identification and audience reactions from social texts across time. We will explore national and international exhibitions using open data from the domain, and detailed knowledge from university art galleries, including engagement with a contemporary Ashmolean exhibition via social media.

Participating institutions:
Yale University (New Haven, CT) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$146,971 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 2/29/2024


HND-284991-22

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Robert D. Goulding (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Scott Weingart (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Unlocking Digital Texts: Towards an interoperable text framework

The development of a proof of concept for an Interoperable Text Framework which will standardize the format of digital texts to make them easier to present, analyze, and reuse. The lead UK partner, the University of Oxford, is requesting £248,433 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Unlocking Digital Texts (UDT) aims to lay the foundation for the creation of the Interoperable Text Framework (ITF). Just as the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) enables users to present, annotate and reuse digital images easily without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure, ITF will empower users to create a richer and more layered approach to the presentation, analysis and reuse of textual resources. Freed from costly technical concerns, users will be able to use the web to construct persistent online narratives that span any number of documents from around the world simply by referencing them appropriately.

Participating institutions:
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN) - Applicant/Recipient
Oxford University (Oxford) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2024


HND-284995-22

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Anuradha Vedantham (Project Director: July 2021 to December 2021)
Christina Lee (Project Director: December 2021 to February 2022)
Anuradha Vedantham (Project Director: February 2022 to March 2022)
Christina Lee (Project Director: March 2022 to present)
Anuradha Vedantham (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)
Christina Lee (Co Project Director: February 2022 to March 2022)
A Digital Repatriation of a Lost archive of the Spanish Pacific: The Library of The Convent of San Pablo (Manila, 1762)

A project to digitize a collection of more than 1500 rare manuscripts, maps, and early printed materials that were taken in the 18th century from the Convent of San Pablo in Manila, Philippines, and dispersed throughout the Philippines, United States, and United Kingdom. The UK partner, SOAS University of London, is requesting £230,982 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project seeks to repatriate books and manuscripts seized from the archives of the Convent of San Pablo during the British occupation of Manila, 1762 to 1764. Using the original index of the archives, and subsequent records related to the sale and dispersal of its contents, the project envisions a virtual reconstruction of the library’s materials, ca. 1762. Beyond the digital reconstitution of the archival corpus, the “return” of the library to its original site, the project reconceptualizes the library’s original systems of knowledge production, modes of access, and use. The project serves as an entry point to the study of Spanish colonialism in the Pacific and the experience of affected communities, especially in the Philippines. Using digital technologies, the regenerated library will include spaces for transcribing, translating and annotating materials. This project envisions creative spaces that produce a more broadly based and participatory scholarly product.

Participating institutions:
Trustees of Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) - Applicant/Recipient
University of London (London, United Kingdom) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$147,399 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2022 – 1/31/2025


HND-284998-22

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Tao Leigh Goffe (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Towards an Integrated Colonial Archive: Humanities, Law and British Indentureship

The creation of an interactive website that brings together collections in the United States and United Kingdom to facilitate scholarship on colonialism and indentureship. The lead UK partner, Birkbeck College, is requesting £58,709 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council

Towards an Integrated Colonial Archive' aims to provide proof-of-concept for the development of an integrated humanities, law and social science archive. By creating a carefully curated, interactive digital website, it aims to increase public engagement with specialist research, generate new interdisciplinary scholarship on colonialism, and provide a method for cultural institutions to frame specialist collections to increase public interest and use of the collections. This project curates various digital and physical holdings of the University of London and Cornell University library systems, in collaboration with public archives and galleries, and aims to demonstrate that, by overlapping and digitally integrating holdings on the indentureship period that would not typically be read or viewed alongside one another--such as maps, statutes, court judgments, land registers, ship logs, indenture contracts, novels, music, studies in linguistics, and oral histories.

Participating institutions:
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) - Applicant/Recipient
University of London (London, United Kingdom) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
African American History; British History; European History

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2024


HND-285001-22

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Jennifer Lei Jenkins (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Indigenous Knowledges: a Digital Residency Exchange and Best Practices Pilot

The development of a reciprocal, consultative model for collaborative digital decolonizing of Indigenous materials between a US tribal college library (Kinyaa’áanii Charlie Benally Library at Diné College) and a UK cultural heritage collecting institution (Wellcome Collection). The UK partner, the University of Kent, is requesting £59,745 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

A collaborative team from Diné College Special Collections and Kinyaa’áanii Charlie Benally Library (Navajo Nation) and working with museum, library and archive professionals from the Wellcome Collection (UK) and supported by scholars from University of Arizona Southwest Center (US), and University of Kent Centre for Indigenous and Settler Colonial Studies, propose to develop a reciprocal, consultative model for collaborative digital decolonizing of indigenous materials. This model pairs a UK cultural heritage collecting institution with a US tribal college library that fulfills plural functions as library, museum, archive, and cultural heritage institution in its community. Kinyaa’áanii Library and Wellcome Collection will exchange three-week residencies on location, followed by digital residencies for the remaining period of the grant, using the open-source content management system Local Contexts Hub.

Participating institutions:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ) - Applicant/Recipient
University of Kent (Canterbury) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Native American Studies

Program:
NEH/AHRC New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$47,884 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2022 – 3/31/2023


HC-278063-21

American Numismatic Society (New York, NY 10013-1917)
Peter Gerritt van Alfen (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Ethan Gruber (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
OXUS-INDUS: A Linked Open Data Resource for Research in Central and South Asian Coinages

Applying linked open data (LOD) approaches to creating a tool for better studying and understanding of the Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek coinage of Central and South Asia (c. 250 BCE to the beginning of the first century CE). The UK partner, Oxford University, is requesting £193,067 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The OXUS-INDUS project is twin-track initiative to push forward the curation of and research into the material culture of Central and South Asia. First, it seeks to produce a much-needed tool for understanding the Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek coinage of Central and South Asia at a formative stage of the transfer of monetary technology into this region. Through the creation of a new typology of this coinage, and the linking to that of multiple specimens from multiple public collections it will enable this important body of evidence to be studied as never before. Second, the project seeks to apply recent advances in Linked Open Data (LOD) approaches that have been developed in other branches of numismatics to an important new area. In the fields of Greek and Roman numismatics, such approaches, focused on the implementation of the nomisma.org Knowledge Organization System, have led to wholesale changes in methods of working, both for Researchers and Curators of Collections.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


HC-278111-21

Southern University at New Orleans (New Orleans, LA 70126-0002)
Haitham Eid (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
3 by 3: Modelling New Digital Leadership in Museums

A collaborative research project on digital adoption and transformation in museums that will also produce professional development resources on digital leadership for the cultural heritage field. The UK partner, University of Leicester, is requesting £199,938 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

‘3 by 3’ is an 18-month, multi-partner, transatlantic research collaboration, bringing together cultural institutions, academics and professional bodies to open new directions for leading empathetic and equitable digital change in museums at a time of institutional and individual precarity. The project asks what new models of ‘empathic leadership’ might be needed to enable the holistic institutional adoption of (and adaption to) digital, as well as which inequalities exist in the landscape of digital change in museums, and how can these be confronted. In doing so, ‘3 by 3’ attempts to initiate a retelling of what successful digital leadership in museums looks like – in human and not just business and technological terms.

Project fields:
Arts, Other

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,887 (approved)
$149,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 2/28/2023


HC-278112-21

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Gabriel P. Solis (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Adriana Cuervo (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies: Music Information Retrieval and AI Support for Jazz Scholarship in Digital Archives

The development of artificial intelligence and music information retrieval tools and archival workflows to enhance access to archival jazz collections, including those held by the US Institute of Jazz Studies and the Scottish Jazz Archive. The UK partner, City, University of London, is requesting £199,659 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies uses state of the art music information retrieval and artificial intelligence algorithms for the analysis of jazz recordings and linked data to enable novel approaches to co-creative use of materials in the archival collections of the Institute of Jazz Studies and Scottish Jazz Archive. This trans-Atlantic collaboration between jazz historians, technologists, and jazz archivists will expand access to unique materials held in archives and illuminate their musical relationships to more widely studied recordings. This project will create, analyse, and visualize relationships between audio and other materials and create rich research workflows to be shared within the scholarly community as a novel way to support co-creation with cultural institutions. We envision a disciplinary transformation through the discovery of new models for jazz historiography, and a broader, interdisciplinary transformation in methodology for digital humanities

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,031 (approved)
$149,031 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


HC-278116-21

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Kelly McDonough (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Unlocking the Colonial Archive: Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for Indigenous and Spanish American Historical Collections

The transformation of Indigenous and Spanish colonial archives into readable and accessible data using artificial intelligence technologies, including transcribed texts, linked information, and automated search and analysis of pictorial elements. The UK partner, Lancaster University, is requesting £199,910 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project seeks to transform unreadable Indigenous and Spanish colonial archives into accessible data using artificial intelligence technologies. The core project team will consist of interdisciplinary researchers from LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections at the University of Texas at Austin, the Digital Humanities Hub at Lancaster University, and Liverpool John Moores University. We propose three main research areas to (1) expedite the transcription of Spanish American documents using handwritten text recognition technology, (2) automate the identification and linking of information within this corpora using natural language processing techniques and linked open data models, and (3) facilitate the automated search and analysis of pictorial elements in the Spanish colonial archive through computer vision approaches. The research will be based on three digital collections under the aegis of LLILAS Benson and one from the National Archive of Mexico.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,915 (approved)
$149,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 12/31/2023


HC-278118-21

Hispanic Society of America (New York, NY 10032-7597)
Marcus Bruce Burke (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
From Lima to Canton and Beyond: An AI-aided heritage materials research platform for studying globalisation through art

Applying and refining spectral imaging methods to determine the geographic origins of cultural heritage materials, with a broader goal of illuminating historic patterns of global trade and cultural exchange. The UK partner, Nottingham Trent University, is requesting £109,870 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project proposes a humanities-led project to study watercolors commissioned by the colonial powers or made for export to Europe or North America by local artists as a lens to global trade and information exchange networks between the Americas, Asia and Europe ca. 1750-1850. Inspired by the Enlightenment, art was used for cartography and scientific recording of flora and fauna as well as ethnographic recording around the world. Pigments/dyes are expensive commodities, their identity and the way they are used in combination are often traceable to their geographic and cultural origins. These paintings are scattered across the Atlantic in various US and UK museums. The aim of this project is to use modern scientific imaging and analysis techniques to gather data at scale on the artist materials used on these paintings to trace the movements of the artist materials (pigments, dyes, paper etc) and the paintings. An enhanced AI aided heritage materials analysis platform will be developed

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,785 (approved)
$124,538 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


HC-278119-21

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
William R. Newman (Project Director: August 2020 to October 2020)
James R. Voelkel (Project Director: October 2020 to October 2020)
William R. Newman (Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Joel Klein (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
James R. Voelkel (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Digital approaches to the capture and analysis of watermarks using the manuscripts of Isaac Newton as a test case

A research project on identifying and analyzing watermarks in digitized collections using watermarks found in Isaac Newton’s manuscripts as a case study. The UK partner, the University of Cambridge is requesting £199,929 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project combines the expertise of the British National Archives, King's College Cambridge, the Cambridge University Library, the École Nationale des Chartes (Sorbonne), the Huntington Library, the Science History Institute, Peterhouse College Cambridge, and Indiana University in an innovative attempt to devise new methods of digital watermark capture and analysis by means of machine learning, using Isaac Newton's extensive manuscript corpus as a test platform.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,954 (approved)
$120,833 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 8/31/2023


HC-278124-21

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Glen Worthey (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
AEOLIAN (Artificial intelligence for cultural organisations)

A series of meetings and case studies that will bring together a team of experts to develop new approaches to improving access to and use of digital archives that are currently private. The UK partner, Loughborough University, is requesting £47,987.70 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. 

AEOLIAN (Artificial intelligence for cultural organizations) focuses on born-digital and digitized collections with limited access due to privacy concerns (e.g. for email archives), copyright (e.g. for digital libraries), etc. AI shows real potential to address these issues. AEOLIAN’s 3 main objectives are: to make digital collections more accessible; to analyze these collections using innovative AI research methods; and to identify synergies and collaborative avenues between US and UK cultural organizations. AEOLIAN brings together humanists, computer scientists, archivists, librarians and others to transform digital archive access and use with machine learning and AI. We will organize 6 online workshops over 2 years focused on 5 case studies from US and UK cultural institutions, creating an international network of scholars and practitioners working with digital archives, and leading to a major report for an interdisciplinary audience and several agenda-setting publications.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,820 (approved)
$49,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 4/30/2023


HC-278125-21

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Yao-Yi Chiang (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
Machines Reading Maps: Finding and Understanding Text on Maps

The development of a workflow that would use advanced machine learning and annotation tools to extract and annotate text on maps across large historic map collections. The UK partner, The Alan Turing Institute, is requesting £199,942 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Machines Reading Maps aims to transform how humanities scholars and cultural heritage professionals interact with map images. Maps constitute a vast body of global cultural heritage, and only a very small portion has been brought into digital platforms for meaningful search, investigation, and discovery at scale. Our project will create open-source tools and methods that employ machine-learning to enable researchers and cultural institutions to identify text on scanned maps and make that text meaningful via metadata creation and linking to historical gazetteers and other resources. Working with partners at the Library of Congress, British Library, and National Library of Scotland, we will generate and share data and methods from Sanborn, Goad, and OS historical maps and link map text to resources for understanding US and UK social history. Our project will enrich spatial explorations of history and help cultural institutions share map collections more effectively with the public.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,650 (approved)
$135,691 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 10/31/2022