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Keywords: 'Amir Zeldes' (this phrase)
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HAA-261271-18

Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Amir Zeldes (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)
A Linked Digital Environment for Coptic Studies

The creation and expansion of a suite of language processing tools to better analyze documents written in Coptic – the language of first millennium Egypt – and other ancient Near Eastern languages.

Building on our previous work in Natural Language Processing for Coptic, we will capitalize on recent advances in Digital Humanities & Computational Linguistics to strengthen tools & data available for Coptic. Specifically, we will harness Deep Learning methods to handle a variety of source materials, including OCR data & editions with varying orthography, enhance materials via Linked Open Data and automatic Named Entity Recognition, & integrate automatic syntactic analyses into our materials.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$323,767 (approved)
$323,767 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2021


HG-229371-15

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Project Director: September 2014 to November 2019)
Amir Zeldes (Co Project Director: June 2015 to November 2019)
KELLIA: Koptische/Coptic Electronic Language and Literature International Alliance

The Koptische/Coptic Electronic Language and Literature International Alliance (KELLIA), a partnership among leading Coptic scholars and digital humanities experts in the United States and Germany. The project would document best practices for digital Coptic initiatives and would adapt existing open-source tools for linguistic analysis and collaborative annotation. Georg-August University, Göttingen, is requesting 122,610€ from DFG.

KELLIA (the Koptische/Coptic Electronic Language and Literature International Alliance) will promote interdisciplinary collaborations across the Digital Humanities and international standards in Coptic Studies. Coptic, the last phase of the Egyptian language family, flourished in Egypt's Roman and early Islamic periods and reflects over a millennium of history of a multicultural and multilingual Near Eastern society. Coptic documents are fundamental primary sources for diverse scholarly fields, and virtually all DH research in Coptic is conducted by projects anchored in the United States or Germany. This collaboration will enable advances not only in Coptic Studies but also in other fields that use corpus linguistics methods or produce digital text editions. KELLIA will produce international standards for data curation in Coptic, tools that integrate corpus linguistics and digital philology methods, and models using shared corpora from the KELLIA partners.

[White paper][Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Ancient Literature; Linguistics

Program:
NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$192,500 (approved)
$192,467 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 5/31/2019


PW-51672-14

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Project Director: July 2013 to December 2016)
Amir Zeldes (Co Project Director: June 2015 to December 2016)
Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian

Planning for the creation of a digitized corpus of Coptic texts of importance to scholarship in biblical studies, early Christian history, and linguistics. The project would develop a pilot text corpus and establish technical standards to ensure interoperability of the corpus with other digital projects on the ancient world.

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. The Coptic language has proven essential for the decipherment and continued study of Ancient Egyptian and is of major interest for Afro-Asiatic linguistics and Coptic linguistics in its own right. Coptic manuscripts are sources for biblical and extra-biblical texts and document ancient and Christian history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM will advance knowledge in these fields by increasing access to now largely inaccessible texts of historical, religious, and linguistic significance. The project designs digital tools and methodologies and applies them to literary texts, creating a rich open-access corpus.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Classical Languages; Computational Linguistics; History of Religion

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$39,986 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 8/31/2016


HD-51907-14

University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA 95211-0110)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Project Director: September 2013 to May 2017)
Amir Zeldes (Co Project Director: June 2015 to May 2017)
Coptic SCRIPTORIUM:A Corpus, Tools, and Methods for Corpus Linguistics and Computational Historical Research in Ancient Egypt

The development of a user interface and language analysis tools to facilitate interdisciplinary, collaborative research and annotation of digitized Coptic texts.

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM provides the first open-source technologies for computational and digital research across the disciplines as applied to Egyptian texts. The project is developing a digitized corpus of Coptic texts available in multiple formats and visualizations (including TEI XML), tools to analyze and process the language (e.g., the first Coptic part-of-speech tagger), a database with search and visualization capabilities, and a collaborative platform for scholars to contribute texts and annotations and to conduct research. The technologies and corpus will function as a collaborative environment for digital research by any scholars working in Coptic.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Classics; History of Religion

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 9/30/2016