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Key words: 'Langston Hughes' (this phrase)
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RA-259260-18

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Tania Munz (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

Long-term Research Fellowships at the National Humanities Center

30 months of stipend support (3-5 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The National Humanities Center, an independent center exclusively devoted to advanced humanities research, seeks five nine-month fellowships for the next three-year cycle (grant period Jan. 1, 2019-June 30, 2022). Since 1978, NEH has generously supported five NHC fellowships during each granting cycle, excepting the last cycle when it supported three. Designated “NEH Fellows,” recipients of these awards are chosen through a rigorous vetting process and join a vibrant intellectual community of 35-40 total Fellows. Each works on a major research project throughout the academic year with significant support from our library staff and fellowship office. End-of-year evaluations from the roughly 1,400 Fellows who have been in residence generally describe their year at the NHC as the most inspiring and productive of their careers. The NHC focuses attention to diversity in all of its dimensions so that Fellows represent a broad range of disciplines, institutions, backgrounds and perspectives.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$298,500 (approved)
$298,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


PY-253084-17

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Sophia Sotilleo (Project Director: May 2016 to present)

Preserving the History of Lincoln University Village

A digitization day to help chronicle the history of Lincoln University, the first university for African Americans, and of Hinsonville, Pennsylvania, the town founded by free Blacks where it resides.  Many of the university’s alumni were involved in important historical moments, such as the Civil War and the Philadelphia trolley boycott.  Lincoln University would work with the Chester County Historical Society to hold the “Heritage Day.”  All digitized content would be made available to the public through the University’s website.  Public events would include walking tours of the campus, lectures by notable historians such as Henry Louis Gates, a community-wide reading campaign, and a culminating exhibit to showcase the digitized content.

This proposal addresses the critical need to document the personal, professional, and civic experiences of the people whose lives contributed to the founding of Lincoln University, PA. Descendants of residents of Hinsonville, an early settlement of free African American landowners and farmers, now Lincoln University, will be invited to bring family memorabilia—including photos, funeral programs, articles, Bibles and other family documents—to be digitized and catalogued. This "Heritage Day" will be open to the public and held in the Langston Hughes Memorial Library. It will provide participants with free digitized copies of family memorabilia and of oral interviews conducted by program consultants and students trained in oral history interview procedures. Heritage Day will be integrated with a series of genealogy and oral interview workshops, a Heritage Speakers Series, Heritage Walking tours of Lincoln University's campus and surrounding areas, and a community wide reading campaign.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


RQ-255711-17

American Musicological Society (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Amy Beal (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

MUSA: Music of the United States of America

Editorial work on four volumes in the series Music of the United States of America. (12 months)

Applying the principles of critical editing to a variety of American idioms, including jazz, psalmody, popular song, nineteenth- and twentieth-century symphonic and chamber music, art song, Native American ceremony, and the Broadway show, MUSA (Music of the United States of America) is devoted to expanding the legacy of American music available for study and performance. MUSA is publishing a 40-volume series of scholarly editions of American music. In addition to musical notation, each volume includes a substantial essay and a critical editorial apparatus. By bringing notated music and scholarly interpretation together in the same volume, each MUSA volume seeks to place the sounds of music making in the United States within the context of the nation's cultural life. Founded in 1988, MUSA is a collaborative venture administered by the American Musicological Society through its Committee on the Publication of American Music (COPAM) and is published by A-R, Editions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


TD-235038-16

Lawrence Arts Center (Lawrence, KS 66044-3042)
Randal Maurice Jelks (Project Director: August 2015 to present)

I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled

Development of a two-part, 100-minute documentary about Langston Hughes’s life and art.

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) achieved renown for being the first African American to make a living solely from his writing. Consequently, Hughes’s aesthetic and personal reputations have undergone intensive scholarly scrutiny, resulting in a number of interpretations of his public and private selves—including a few that have been featured in documentary films. Many of these representations have fostered the mistaken impression that Hughes was primarily a Harlem Renaissance-era poet. The Dream Documentary Collective, formed to create a two-part documentary film about Hughes’s life and art, dispels this overly simplistic view of Hughes’s voluminous career. In collaboration with the Lawrence Arts Center, we propose to explore the multiple ways in which Hughes constructed his identity, participated in the international arts scene, and engaged the American Dream in a documentary film entitled, I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Media Projects Development

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


PG-233754-16

Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19103-6510)
Katherine H. Haas (Project Director: May 2015 to present)

Environmental Monitoring Upgrades for Historic Rosenbach Collections

Upgraded environmental monitoring equipment for the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia.  The Rosenbach, which affiliated with the Free Library of Philadelphia in 2013, holds the personal collection of rare book, manuscript, and art dealers Dr. A.S.W. and his brother Philip Rosenbach, who helped to build the holdings at the Folger and Huntington Libraries.  Notable items include the sole surviving copy of Benjamin Franklin’s first Poor Richard’s Almanac; the manuscript of James Joyce’s Ulysses; the papers of modernist poet Marianne Moore; Bram Stoker’s notes for Dracula; rare editions of books by Herman Melville, Charles Dickens, and Lewis Carroll; and art objects including Egyptian sculpture, English furniture, and American portraiture.  The museum hosts many activities for the public, including regular exhibitions, hands-on tours, reading groups, a Bloomsday celebration, and research hours.  The organization has also partnered with local elementary schools, inspiring projects such as studying the Yellow Fever epidemic, learning about poetry through the letters of Langston Hughes, and military base students writing to their own deployed family members after reading Civil War soldiers’ letters to their families.  A 2006 PAG supported the purchase of environmental monitoring equipment, but those data loggers are no longer accurate and cannot be recalibrated.  This equipment would be replaced with new models and a calibrator, based on recommendations from a 2011 risk assessment.

The Rosenbach was founded in the first half of the twentieth century by Dr. A.S.W. Rosenbach and his brother Philip, preeminent dealers in rare books. The brothers' personal collection features treasures that they were unable to part with, including the only surviving copy of Benjamin Franklin's first Poor Richard's Almanac and the manuscript of James Joyce's Ulysses. The Rosenbach is home to a collection of nearly 400,000 rare books, manuscripts, and fine and decorative art objects, including some of the best-known literary and historical objects in the world. The Rosenbach requests funds to improve environmental monitoring equipment, including new data loggers to monitor temperature and humidity, and testing equipment. These tools will help maintain appropriate and stable environmental conditions for the objects in the collection. Monitoring environmental conditions has a direct impact on the long-term preservation of the Rosenbach's collections and the ability to exhibit them safely.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$3,715 (approved)
$3,715 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


ES-250805-16

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Shawn Leigh Alexander (Project Director: February 2016 to present)

Teaching the "Long Hot Summer" of 1967 and Beyond: Racial Disturbances in Recent US History

A three-week summer institute for thirty schoolteachers on the urban riots of 1967, placed in a broad historical context.

The Langston Hughes Center proposes a three-week institute in June 2017 for thirty secondary teachers to study race, urban communities, and civil disturbances in historical context. It will feature a broad humanities outlook to place events in 1967 in perspective, utilizing an interdisciplinary faculty with differing viewpoints and diverse racial and gender identities, making connections between prior incidents and today. The institute will encourage teachers to think about the events and issues affecting their students from multiple viewpoints, becoming familiar with primary and secondary texts as well as innovative humanities-based strategies for engaging critical subject matter about race and conflict. Under the guidance of institute scholars, participants will develop web-based portfolios that include lesson plans suitable for their home institutions.

Project fields:
African American History; History, General; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$180,247 (approved)
$180,247 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


PG-52529-15

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Sophia Sotilleo (Project Director: May 2014 to present)

Preservation Plan for the Lincoln University Special Collection and Archives

The purchase of preservation supplies to hold materials from the university’s Rare Books Room, including the historical Langston Hughes Collection; and the purchase of environmental monitors and a light meter to help regulate temperature, humidity, and lighting in the library.  The project would focus on preserving the university’s African American special collections: rare books, periodicals, unclassified government reports, serials, pamphlets, recordings, photographs, and paintings. Highlights include materials on Kwame Nkrumah, a 1939 Lincoln University graduate who was the first president of Ghana, and personal papers of other notable alumni such as Thurgood Marshall and Langston Hughes.  The consultant who provided a recent preservation assessment of the collection would return to conduct a workshop on basic preservation issues for university staff.

The Lincoln University (LU) requests funds to purchase preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment to begin the process of preserving and organizing the University’s Special Collections and Archives department. LU’s Special Collections and Archives department holds several significant collections of extreme importance for understanding African American history and culture, as well as the relationship between LU, the nation, and the African continent. Within these collections are numerous rare books, unbound periodicals, video and music recordings, and other items dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. These collections have been used for a wide variety of educational activities and exhibitions. A consultant has conducted a preservation site survey to assess the condition of the building, collection and storage area, and recommended preservation policies and procedures. Our request for funds is based on the consultant’s final report submitted March 2014.

Project fields:
African American History; African American Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,893 (approved)
$5,893 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


AQ-51033-14

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Olivera Jokic (Project Director: September 2013 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Nature of Friendship

The development of an undergraduate course on friendship.

The development of an undergraduate course on friendship. Olivera Jokic, an assistant professor of English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, develops and teaches a course that examines the nature of friendship from a variety of perspectives. The course begins by looking at how writers from several time periods and cultures have represented friendship and then considers whether friendships are a function of culture. Next, the course turns to the question of whether friendship is a common good or is motivated by self-interest, and examines the ways that gender and gender roles might influence friendship. The final section of the course investigates the relationship between friendship, difference and equality, and distance, including the role that technologies like Facebook play in developing and maintaining friendships. Course readings include Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Plato's Phaedrus and Lysis, The Epic of Gilgamesh, Jane Austen's Persuasion, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, Oscar Wilde's De Profundis; essays by Vine Deloria, John Stuart Mill, and Michel de Montaigne; and poetry by Sappho, Li Bai and Du Fu, William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Langston Hughes. Readings are supplemented by the viewing and discussion of such films as Some Like it Hot, 4 Months 3 Weeks 2 Days (from Romania), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Thelma and Louise, and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Throughout the course, students keep a journal of their reactions to the readings, produce midterm analytical projects related to course readings and discussions, and create final exhibits about friendships that are displayed on campus.

Project fields:
Gender Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; International Studies

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$22,000 (approved)
$21,994 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


PG-52272-14

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Sophia Sotilleo (Project Director: May 2013 to present)

Preservation Plan for The Lincoln University Special Collections and Archives

A preservation assessment and development of a preservation plan for the special collections and archives of Lincoln University, the oldest historically black university in the United States. The university's rare books, periodicals, government documents, pamphlets, video and music recordings, photographs, paintings, and other materials document African American and United States history. Examples include a significant Pan-Africanism collection of 7,742 books, 5 musical scores, 18 serials, and numerous photographs and audiovisual materials on efforts to unite African peoples throughout the diaspora, as well as archives of prominent Lincoln alumni, such as a collection of over 4,000 items on the poet Langston Hughes.

The Lincoln University requests funds to hire Thomas F.R. Clareson as a consultant to develop a preservation plan for the University's Special Collections and Archives, which hold several significant collections of extreme importance for understanding African American history and culture as well as the relationship between Lincoln, the nation, and the African continent. Within these collections are numerous rare books, unbound periodicals, unclassed government reports, serials, pamphlets, video and music recordings, photographs, paintings, and other items dating from the mid-nineteenth century through present day. These collections have been used for a wide variety of research, scholarship, educational activities, and exhibitions. Mr. Clareson will conduct a preservation site survey to assess the building condition, review the condition of the collection and storage, and consult on preservation policies and procedures for the collection.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


BH-50600-13

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura R. Nash (Project Director: March 2013 to present)

Duke Ellington and American Popular Culture

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world. This workshop illuminates the life and music of Duke Ellington (1899-1974) in cultural and historical context, using eight compositions (including "Mood Indigo" and "Take the 'A' Train") as "anchor works" for the week's study. Under the direction of music professor Laura Nash, participants engage with Ellington's work and his world through lectures, discussions, hands-on musical participation, and two all-day visits to historic and cultural sites in New York City. Taking the A train to Harlem, participants visit the Sugar Hill Historic District, where Ellington lived, and are guided on a private tour of the National Jazz Museum by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg. The second day trip to New York features the resources of Jazz at Lincoln Center with curator Phil Schaap. Participants explore the role of Ellington's radio and television broadcasts at the Paley Media Center with Jim Shanahan (Boston University) and learn about Ellington's long form music at Carnegie Hall, where "Black, Brown, and Beige" premiered in 1943. A jazz show at Birdland Jazz Club and a performance of swing dance music conclude the day visits to New York. In Fairfield, historian and director of Black Studies Yohuru Williams provides relevant grounding in twentieth-century African-American history and addresses intersections of race and popular culture. During the days on campus, music professor and bassist Brian Torff leads a specially assembled live big band in presentations and performances to give participants direct experience with the anchor works and with improvisation, as well as opportunities for discussion with band members. Workshop guest faculty include jazz critic and journalist Gary Giddins; educator and composer David Berger (Juilliard), who transcribed and edited the majority of Ellington's works; and Monsignor John Sanders, trombonist and librarian for the Ellington Orchestra, who shares his first-hand knowledge of playing, working, and traveling with Ellington, and of developing the Ellington archives. Prior to and during the workshop, participants read Ellington's Music is My Mistress; Harvey Cohen's Duke Ellington's America; John Edward Hasse's Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington; and Mark Tucker's The Duke Ellington Reader. They also have access to a password-protected website with Ellington recordings, sheet music, and video clips.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$177,340 (approved)
$169,165 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


FT-60655-13

Babacar Mbaye
Kent State University (Kent, OH 44242-0001)

Black Diasporan and West African Francophone Intellectuals, 1914-1966

My book explores the connections between a selected group of black diasporan and West African Francophone intellectuals whose published and (or) archived writings allow us to study their little-known involvement in major historical forces such as World War I, World War II, the 1955 Bandung Conference, the 1956 Congress of Black Writers in Paris, and the 1966 World Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar. Studying these writings, I trace the roots of black diasporan and West African Francophone solidarity against colonialism and racism between 1914 and 1966. Focusing on the African Americans (W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Mercer Cook), Caribbeans (Marcus Garvey and Aime Cesaire), and Francophone West Africans (the Senegalese Blaise Diagne, Leopold S. Senghor, and Alioune Diop, the Beninese Kojo T. Houenou, and the Ivorian Bernard Dadie), I show how the historical experiences tested the resilience of the black thinkers against oppression and their ties with one another.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2013


AB-50120-12

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Marilyn Button (Project Director: July 2011 to present)
Chiekde Ihejirika (Co Project Director: December 2011 to present)

Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy: a Humanities Initiative

A two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty would conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage.

"Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy" consists of a two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty members conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage. This project seeks to revive the humanities at what has become an increasingly science-dominated institution. It does so by shaping a program that harnesses Lincoln University's distinctive history as the first institution of higher learning for African Americans (1854), ample legacy of prominent graduates, and ongoing connections with Africa and the Caribbean. Lincoln University taught Liberian boys beginning in 1873 and, nearly a century later, students from the Caribbean and emerging African nations. It graduated the first president of independent Nigeria and the first prime minister of Ghana. Lincoln University's distinctive humanities alumni include Langston Hughes of the Harlem Renaissance; the late writer and musician Gil Scott Heron; Larry Neal, founder of the Black Arts Movement; and film historian Donald Bogle. The program opens with a four-day summer institute with topics including "Lincoln University poets and their impact on the world; the University's impact on African history and Africa's impact on the University; the University and the Civil Rights Movement; and Frederick Douglass as a catalyzing figure for humanities studies." Sessions also introduce faculty to the university's online archives and collection of African art. During the following academic year, ten core faculty, selected through competition, conduct research and develop course modules that build on the institute topics and university resources. They present this work at a two-day humanities conference in the fall of 2013. Though the summer institute and fall conference are be open to all faculty and the general public, priority for the core faculty would be given to those who teach first-year students in order to maximize the program's impact.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


FB-55474-11

Liesl Marie Olson
Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)

Chicago Makes Modernism

My book places Chicago at the center of a new modernist geography. Based upon archival research, my book focuses on writers, artists, institutions, and cultural advocates during the early twentieth century when Chicago was a center for the production of modernist art and literature. I examine key publications launched in Chicago like Harriet Monroe's POETRY magazine and Margaret Anderson's LITTLE REVIEW and I also take account of equally important yet overlooked figures, many of them women, who helped expose modernism to a wide public audience. These figures (among many) include Alice Roullier, a curator who coolly negotiated radical and challenging exhibits, and Fanny Butcher, the longtime literary editor of the Chicago Tribune. I consider why Chicago's "middlebrow" readers embraced the most experimental writers and artists of the era. I show how Chicago has always maximized connections between art and industry, becoming a city where lines of track merged to meet and make modernism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011


BH-50462-11

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Kenneth T. Jackson (Project Director: March 2011 to present)
Karen E. Markoe (Co Project Director: July 2011 to present)

Empire City: New York from 1877-2001

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate local and national history since 1877.

"Empire City: New York from 1877-2001" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate major themes in local and national history since 1877. The workshops use lectures, discussions, and site visits to situate New York City within broader urban history and American history. Co-directors are Kenneth Jackson (Columbia University) and Karen Markoe (State University of New York, Maritime College). The program opens with consideration of Manhattan's rise to national dominance after the Civil War, followed by a walking tour of Central Park and visit to the New-York Historical Society, where Sandra Trenholm (Gilder Lehrman Collection) guides participants in working with primary documents. Day two's focus on Gilded Age New York includes prizewinning biographer David Nasaw (Graduate Center of City University of New York) on "Andrew Carnegie and His Gospel of Wealth," and a visit to magnate Henry Clay Frick's mansion. To explore immigration, participants read Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives and E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, then experience immigrant neighborhoods including Five Points, Little Italy, and Chinatown. The program also addresses the "Black Metropolis," including visits to Harlem and the Bronx as well as readings from Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison. On the final day of the workshop, Joshua Freeman (Queens College) covers the transition from industrial to service and residential use, as seen in the Meat Packing District. Concluding the site visit at Ground Zero, project director Kenneth Jackson discusses the local and national effects of 9/11.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$158,969 (approved)
$158,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


BH-50464-11

Chicago Metro History Education Center (Chicago, IL 60610-3305)
Lisa Oppenheim (Project Director: March 2011 to present)
Erik Gellman (Co Project Director: July 2011 to present)

Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s.

"Renaissance in the Black Metropolis: Chicago, 1930s-1950s" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s to 1950s. The workshops explore the cultural, social, economic, and political experience of Chicago's "Black Metropolis" and are led by Chicago Metro History Education Center's Lisa Oppenheim. NEH Summer Scholars learn about Great Depression Chicago and significant figures such as Margaret Burroughs, Charles White, Langston Hughes, John Johnson, Claude Barnett, Vivian Harsh, and St. Clair Drake. Historian Darlene Clark Hine (Northwestern University) leads off the scholarly program by setting out the context for and significance of the Chicago Black Renaissance. In a session at the Chicago Bee's former offices, Adam Green (University of Chicago) discusses the role of black journalism in the community. The South Side Community Art Center provides both site and subject for a lecture by Andrea Barnwell Brownlee (Spelman College Museum of Fine Art), followed by a visit to the DuSable Museum. Co-director Erik Gellman (Roosevelt University) and Lionel Kimble (Chicago State University) address labor and politics, with sites including the former United Packinghouse Workers union office and the Pullman Porters Museum, where participants learn about the predominantly African-American Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. The end of the week features Jacqueline Goldsby (New York University) on literature, including writers Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, and Gwendolyn Brooks; Davarian Baldwin (Trinity College) on the meaning of Chicago's music; and an extended afternoon of archival work at the Harsh Collection for AfroAmerican History and Culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$176,592 (approved)
$176,345 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


RA-50080-09

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Howard Dodson (Project Director: August 2008 to August 2011)
Khalil Gibran Muhammad (Project Director: August 2011 to present)

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture - Scholars in Residence Program

The equivalent of four fellowships each year for three years.

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of The New York Public Library (NYPL) requests a grant of $316,400 over four years from the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions to support its Scholars-in-Residence Program. Such a grant, in addition to cost share provided by the Library, will allow the Schomburg Center to make six- and twelve-month residency fellowships available to at least twelve scholars over three years.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$312,900 (approved)
$312,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013


FA-53972-08

David Evan Chinitz
Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)

Langston Hughes's Middle Way

I propose to complete a book manuscript on the African-American poet Langston Hughes. The book will show how, with regard to various aesthetic problems and ethical dilemmas that confronted him, Hughes strove to navigate between extremes that threatened his art, his integrity, and his unique public status as the literary voice of ordinary African Americans. My project thus lies at the intersection of ethics and aesthetics. Chapters address Hughes's ambivalent mastery of political compromise; his interventions in the shifting definition of "authentic blackness"; his engagement with the popular primitivism of the 1920s; and his effort to satisfy together the sometimes-conflicting demands of poetry and folk art.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2008


PG-50144-07

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Susan Pevar (Project Director: May 2006 to present)

General Survey and Pilot Project--Lincoln University Audiotape Collection

A preservation survey of a collection of 200 audiotapes that document the Civil Rights Movement and other activities from the 1950s through the 1980s at Pennsylvania's only historically black university, founded in 1854.

This project will be the first step in preserving and broadening access to Lincoln University's collection of audiotapes of campus events housed in Special Collections of the Langston Hughes Memorial Library. Lincoln University of Pennsylvania was founded by whites in the mid-nineteenth century, before emancipation, to educate free black men. During its first century Lincoln University was the alma mater of poet Langston Hughes, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, and African leaders Kwame Nkrumah and Nnamdi Azikiwe, among others. It shifted to coeducational in the mid-twentieth century, in the wake of national desegregation. The audiotapes complement materials in the Lincoln University archives such as print publications and manuscripts.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$1,600 (approved)
$1,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FA-53201-07

Penny Marie Von Eschen
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)

Black Artists on a World Stage

"Soul Call" explores the transnational and cross-genre artistic collaborations of a generation of black artists including choreographer and anthropologist Katherine Dunham, jazz composer and band leader Duke Ellington, and writer Langston Hughes. Drawing on Michael Warner’s Public and Counter Publics, I argue that the generative performances of these artists helped call into being a new public culture of modernity over decades of the circulation of their art through multiple venues and various shifting industries, from clubs through Hollywood films and shorts. Exploring the transnational as well as cross-genre collaborations of these artists offers another way of imagining interdisciplinary work at an earlier stage.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


CH-50421-07

American Musicological Society (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Anne W. Robertson (Project Director: May 2006 to present)

Publishing Musicologal Research in the 21st Century

Endowment for publication subventions and an award program in musicology as well as fund-raising costs.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Grants

Total amount offered:
$240,000

Grant period:
12/1/2005 – 7/31/2011


RA-50050-07

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Grossman (Project Director: September 2006 to November 2011)
Daniel Greene (Project Director: November 2011 to present)

NEH Fellowships at the Newberry Library

Three fellowships a year for two years.

This proposal requests funding for three years of publicity and three years of fellowships to continue a highly successful program of residential humanities fellowships at the Newberry Library. Over three decades, this program has generated a rich and documented harvest of humanities scholarship while serving as a catalyst for the creation of a dynamic intellectual community within this research institution. The proposal details the achievements and impact of the program and outlines the library's procedures for publicity, selection, and orientation of fellows.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$252,000 (approved)
$252,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 8/31/2010


FB-52226-06

Marcy S Sacks
Albion College (Albion, MI 49224-1887)

Joe Louis at the Crossroads of America

Joe Louis's life story illuminates many of the profound social transformations of twentieth-century America, including the Great Migration, industrialization, the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Black Power movement. My study will become the first comprehensive biography yet written about Joe Louis, a man who not only provided hope to millions of black Americans but who became a hero (perhaps the first black hero) of white America. Yet his story reveals the intractability of race; even as an icon to whites, Louis could not overcome the persistent white belief in black inferiority.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 5/31/2007


FB-51868-05

Lesley Madeleine Wheeler
Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA 24450-2116)

Sound and Presence in American Poetry, 1925 to the Present

The metaphor of voice haunts American poetry and criticism, yet no consensus exists on its meaning. This study, ranging from the margins of modernism to the twenty-first century, proves the term’s resonance and clarifies the debate. Voice remains a crucial word in the poetic vocabulary not despite but because of its ambiguity—poets and readers deploy it to conjure community, emphasize the pleasures of sound, and manipulate the promise of original expression. I investigate the construction and subversion of voice through the works of Edna St. Vincent Millay, Langston Hughes, James Merrill, Denise Duhamel, Maureen Seaton, and others. Framing chapters read live performances and probe the relationship between oral and print cultures.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2006


FT-52660-04

David Evan Chinitz
Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)

Langston Hughes's "Bricks of Compromise"

I propose to develop an article on Langston Hughes’s negotiations with political and ethical compromise. Always ambivalent about the virtue of compromise, Hughes nevertheless developed into a master of that unglamorous art, and my essay will show the effects of compromise in his poetry and prose as he responded to the challenges he faced as an African-American public intellectual. This essay draws together my published articles on Hughes and a piece now in progress, all of which show how Hughes labored to steer between various extremes. Ultimately I intend to synthesize this work in a book on Hughes’s "middle way" in ethics and aesthetics.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 7/31/2004


GP-50042-03

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: February 2003 to present)

Speaking of Rivers: Taking Poetry to the People

Implementation of poetry and book discussion programs and a website examining the writings and legacy of Langston Hughes at 20 sites in nine states and the District of Columbia.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$224,959 (approved)
$224,959 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2003 – 12/31/2005


ED-50241-03

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Ana Maria Hernandez (Project Director: April 2003 to present)

The African Roots of Latin Music

The development of curricular modules that explore the integration of African musical traditions into Caribbean culture and their influences on American music in the twentieth century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$24,576 (approved)
$24,576 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2003 – 6/30/2004


GP-22256-01

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc. (Lawrence, KS 66045-3101)
Maryemma Graham (Project Director: February 2001 to present)

Speaking of Rivers: Taking Poetry to the People

Planning for a series of programs focusing on the poetry of Langston Hughes to take place in 2002 in commemoration of the centennial of his birth.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$40,500 (approved)
$40,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2001 – 2/28/2002


FB-36115-99

Emily E. Bernard
Smith College (Northampton, MA 01063-6304)

Black Anxiety, White Influence: Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1999 – 6/30/2000


RA-20189-98

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Howard Dodson (Project Director: October 1996 to present)

Scholars-in-Residence Fellowship Program at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

To support two fellowships at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture each year for two years.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$92,383 (approved)
$92,383 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1997 – 6/30/2001


FT-43122-98

David Chioni Moore
Macalester College (St. Paul, MN 55105-1899)

Recovering Langston Hughes' 1934 Moscow-Published Book A NEGRO LOOKS AT SOVIET CENTRAL ASIA

No project description available

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1998 – 9/30/1998


GL-21358-95

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Emery Wimbish (Project Director: November 1994 to present)

Language and Performance in the Poetry and Drama of Langston Hughes

To support planning for a conference, lecture series, and performance discussion about the relationship of folklore and performance to the African- American experience as reflected in the works of Langston Hughes, 1902-67.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Libraries and Archives, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$12,000 (approved)
$7,406 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1995 – 1/31/1996


FI-27845-95

Cleofus Grant
Secondary School

Artist and Citizen: The Two Worlds of Langston Hughes

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Total amounts:
$2,100 (approved)
$2,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1995 – 8/31/1995


FI-26624-94

Alyssa P. Wright
Secondary School

The Blues Tradition in the Poetry of Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, and Michael Harper

No project description available

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Total amounts:
$2,100 (approved)
$2,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1994 – 8/31/1994


ER-21825-93

Michele M. Rodgers
Secondary School

Temples for Tomorrow: The Artistry of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston

No project description available

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
NEH Teacher-Scholar Program

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$30,500 (approved)
$25,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1993 – 6/30/1994


FI-25982-93

Gail S. Bayarin
Secondary School

In the Struggle Lies the Joy: Reflections of William H. Johnson and Langston Hughes

No project description available

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Total amounts:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1993 – 8/31/1993


FI-26111-93

Mendi D. S. Lewis
Spelman College (Atlanta, GA 30314-4399)

The Black Experience in the Voices of Nicolas Guillen and Langston Hughes

No project description available

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Total amounts:
$2,400 (approved)
$2,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1993 – 1/31/1994


GL-21107-91

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Emery Wimbish (Project Director: March 1991 to present)

Langston Hughes: The Man and the Writer: Conference and Lecture-Discussion Series

To support a variety of programs that will examine the life and work of African-American poet and author Langston Hughes.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Libraries and Archives, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$70,000 (approved)
$69,979 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1991 – 11/30/1993


ER-21461-91

John E. Murphy
Heman G. Stark Youth Training School (Chino, CA 91710-9148)

Visible Men: The Artistry of Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, and August Wilson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
NEH Teacher-Scholar Program

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$28,500 (approved)
$28,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1991 – 6/30/1992


GL-21032-90

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Emery Wimbish (Project Director: March 1990 to present)

Langston Hughes: The Man and the Writer

To support planning for three symposia, an exhibition, and discussion programs based on the life and work of Langston Hughes, using as texts dramatic, musical, and film productions and books by and about Hughes.

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Libraries and Archives, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$15,000 (approved)
$11,819 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1990 – 12/31/1991


RA-20063-90

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
W. Robert Connor (Project Director: December 1988 to present)

Fellowships at the National Humanities Center

To support 12 postdoctoral fellowships in the humanities each year for three years.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$900,000 (approved)
$896,541 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1989 – 6/30/1993


FT-29713-87

Tish Dace
University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)

Langston Hughes: The American Critical Reception

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$3,500 (approved)
$3,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1987 – 9/30/1987


GN-22504-86

New York Center for Visual History (New York, NY 10013-3152)
Lawrence O. Pitkethly (Project Director: March 1985 to present)

Voices and Visions

To support the production of one film on Langston Hughes as part of a 13-part series for PBS on the world and work of American poets.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Media, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$425,000 (approved)
$425,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1985 – 9/30/1986


GN-22094-84

New York Center for Visual History (New York, NY 10013-3152)
Lawrence Pitkethly (Project Director: February 1984 to present)

Voices & Visions: The World and Work of American Poets (Scripting: TV Documentary)

To support the scripting for three individual one-hour television documentarieson American poets Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and Robert Lowell and a one- hour composite program on Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Robert Hayden.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Media, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 6/30/1986


FT-22994-82

Yves Auguste
Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ 07079-2697)

The Impact of Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance on Black Francophone Literature, with Emphasis on Haiti

No project description available

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1982 – 9/30/1982


GN-*0492-81

Faith Berry and Associates (McLean, VA 22102)
Faith D. Berry (Project Director: July 1980 to present)

The Legacy of Langston Hughes

To support a 90-minute film treatment on the life, work and legacy of the American author Langston Hughes emphasizing the connections between his life and work and placing him within the context of American and European cultural development of the time.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature

Program:
Media, Humanities Projects in

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$29,030 (approved)
$27,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/1981 – 7/31/1981


FT-12504-75

Ronald B. Miller
Haverford College (Haverford, PA 19041-1392)

"To Be a Composer": Theme, Imagery, and Structure in Langston Hughes

Study will be an important contribution to Black American letters. To date there is only one book--James Emanuel's--which focuses on Hughes. It is an extremely condensed analysis of the writer. Hughes authored more than 35 books. To write three articles in a series that will include eventually five: (1) "No Crystal Stair":Archetype Unity, and Symbol in Hughes's Poems on Women," (2) "To Be a Composer,": Hughes and the Triumph of Music and Art," (3) "Done Made Us Leave Our Home": Functions of Hughes's Traditional Image," (4) The Rock and the Bible: Hughes's Christian and Folk Myth," and (5) "As I Grew Older": Hughes and a Romantic Opposition--Innocence and Experience.

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1975 – 8/31/1975


FF-10288-74

Carolyn Fowler
Atlanta University (Atlanta, GA 30314-4358)

Langston Hughes, Jacques Roumain and Nicolas Guillen: A Study in Comparative Black Literature

To make a comparative study of the works of the three Black writers: Langston Hughes, the American poet, novelist and playwright, Jacques Roumain, the Haitian poet and novelist, and Nicholas Guillen, the Cuban poet and journalist. The field of comparative Black literature has been relatively unexplored.

Project fields:
African American Studies; American Literature; Literature, Other

Program:
Special Fellowships Programs

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Total amounts:
$8,750 (approved)
$8,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1974 – 8/31/1975


FA-10738-73

Arna W. Bontemps
Fisk University (Nashville, TN 37208-3051)

Authorized Biography of Langston Hughes

To write the biography of Langston Hughes, Black American novelist, playwright and essayist. P.I. has been co-author of several works with Mr. Hughes and was delegated in Mr. Hughes' will to write the authorized biography.

Project fields:
American Literature; Cultural History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$18,000 (approved)
$18,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1973 – 8/31/1974