NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
11 matches

Key words: Solzhenitsyn (ANY of these words -- whole words only)
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 1.203 sec

Save this query
Export results to Excel

AQ-50728-12

St. Mary's University of San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78228-5433)
Glenn Arthur Hughes (Project Director: September 2011 to present)
Megan Mustain (Co Project Director: May 2016 to present)

NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What Is Human Dignity?"

The development of an undergraduate course to explore the question, What is human dignity?

Glenn Hughes and Megan Mustain, professors of philosophy at St. Mary's University, develop a course open to all undergraduates on the question, What is human dignity? The course invites students to reflect on the significance of the idea of human dignity as one that is both ubiquitous in the public discourse of our time and also intimately linked to the Catholic liberal arts tradition that informs the vision and culture of St. Mary's University. It is structured around four historical periods: classical, medieval and Renaissance, Enlightenment, and modern/contemporary. The first section raises the central issue of whether dignity should be identified with wealth, status, pleasure, and the trappings of power - and if not, with what characteristics or capacities it should be associated. The second section turns to medieval and Renaissance conceptions of human dignity. In the third section, modern secular articulations of the meaning of human dignity come to the foreground. In the fourth section, students explore how recent political crises have brought the question of human dignity to prominence in various contemporary artistic, political, philosophical and religious responses to it. Readings for the course include the book of Job, Marcus Aurelius's Meditations, Christine de Pizan's Book of the City of Ladies, Pico della Mirandola's Oration on the Dignity of Man, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Martha Nussbaum's Women and Human Development, and Gabriel Marcel's "Techniques of Degradation." To complement the readings, two documentaries, "Eyes on the Prize" and "Shoah," stimulate student discussions about human rights and human dignity.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$24,992 (approved)
$19,883 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2015


FA-55708-11

Golfo Alexopoulos
University of South Florida (Tampa, FL 33620-9951)

A Gulag History: The Violence of Everyday Life

My book project expands the current field of political, economic, and institutional histories of the Gulag, and offers a cultural history of the Stalinist camps. The book is focused on a few select topics that reveal some of the more distinctive, yet largely overlooked, camp practices and features of everyday life. I shift attention from the Gulag's economic rationale and political prisoners, to the Gulag's broad societal impact and systemic violence. Throughout the various chapters, I highlight the ways in which the violence of everyday life proved to be extensive, routine, and inherent in the labor camp system's design. In this way, I situate the Gulag in the broader academic discussions concerning state terror and crimes against humanity.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2012


FA-54424-09

Yuri Slezkine
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)

Moscow's House of Government, 1928-1938

Across the Moscow River from the Kremlin stands a huge gray building known as the House of Government, the House on the Embankment, or the House of the Dead. Built during the First Five-Year Plan as a model of the "Communist organization of daily life" and a shelter for top government officials, poets laureate, and Red Army commanders, it became the most coveted and most dreaded "living space" in Stalin's Russia. I would like to write a history of the first ten years of its existence--as an examination of the physical structure itself; as a collective biography (historical ethnography) of the people inside; and as a metaphor for the life and death of the first generation of Soviet rulers (and the Russian Revolution).

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 6/30/2010


FB-53760-08

Adele Lindenmeyr
Villanova University (Villanova, PA 19085-1478)

The Lives of Sofia Panina, Russian Citizen-Countess, 1871-1956

My project uses biography to understand the generation that made the Russian Revolution. Sofia Panina was one of Russia's greatest heiresses and a pioneering social reformer. She rose to unusual political prominence in 1917 when she became the only woman minister in the Provisional Government, then the defendant in the Bolsheviks' first political trial. Fleeing Russia in 1920, she contributed to the development of international refugee relief and emigre institutions. My book is the first scholarly effort to reconstruct Panina's life from widely scattered archival sources in Russia, Europe, and the U.S. I analyze her significance as a woman who constructed innovative institutions while resisting social and gender conventions. My book also examines why she has been appropriated as a political symbol at times of transition, both in the past and in Russia today. The audience for my book includes historians of Russia, women, and reform movements, and general readers.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 5/31/2009


RP-20817-86

Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
Mary L. Lincoln (Project Director: October 1985 to present)

Moral Apostasy in Russian Literature: Studies of Works by Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoi, Gorki, Pasternak, & Solzhenitsyn

To support the publication of a study of the moral issues raised in six classicworks of Russian literature.

Project fields:
Slavic Literature

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$4,973 (approved)
$4,973 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1986 – 9/30/1987


GY-21544-85

Allegra S. Goodman
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar

A Comparison of Tolstoy's and Solzhenitsyn's Philosophies of History

To support a research and writing project on "A Comparison of Tolstoy's and Solzhenitsyn's Philosophies of History."

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Slavic Literature

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$1,800 (approved)
$1,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1985 – 8/31/1985


FS-10416-76

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
John G. Garrard (Project Director: September 1976 to present)

The Novel in Russia from Pushkin to Solzhenitsyn

A study of selected Russian novelists since the time of Pushkin, with a view toward describing both the particularly Russian characteristics of this literature and its qualities as a bridge between nations and generations.

Project fields:
Russian Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$39,900 (approved)
$39,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1976 – 8/31/1977


FT-13026-76

Gary W Kern
University of Rochester (Rochester, NY 14627-0001)

Literature and Philosophical Analysis of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

To study Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's tendency to write in code through an examination of his first work, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, revealing the code and the pressure of Soviet censorship.

Project fields:
Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1976 – 8/31/1976


FS-10196-76

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
John G. Garrard (Project Director: January 1976 to present)

The Novel in Russia from Pushkin to Solzhenitsyn

A study of selected Russian novelists since the time of Pushkin, with a view toward describing both the particularly Russian characteristics of this literature and its qualities as a bridge between nations and generations.

Project fields:
Russian Literature

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$38,894 (approved)
$38,894 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1976 – 10/31/1976


FB-12190-74

John B. Dunlop
Hoover Institution (Stanford, CA 94305-2235)

Soviet Neo-Slavophilism

To research the topic of Soviet Neo-Slavophilism, treating nationalist thought (and, in particular, religious-based nationalism) during the period 1962 to the present. Particular attention would be devoted to writers of a religio-nationalist tendency, such as the novelists Solzhenitsyn, Siniavskii, and Maksimov. Such a book would help to diminish a general ignorance of Neo-Slavophilism, although it is a powerful current of thought within the Soviet Union.

Project fields:
Russian History; Russian Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$11,250 (approved)
$11,250 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1974 – 8/31/1975


FT-10936-71

Laszlo M. Tikos
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)

Solzhenitsyn: A Monograph

No project description available

Project fields:
Russian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$1,500 (approved)
$1,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1971 – 8/31/1971