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Keywords: 'Ukrainian history' (this phrase)
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Ukrainian History and Education Center, Inc. (Somerset, NJ 08873-1358)
Michael Andrec (Project Director: May 2020 to August 2021)

PB-275233-20
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (P&A)
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$24,439 (approved)
$24,351 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 3/31/2021

Enhancing access to Ukrainian history and cultural heritage through preservation, digitization, and online content

The restoration from furlough of the center’s professional archivist, who would perform core reference services, continue work of digitally reformatting audio recordings, and develop virtual exhibitions, webinars, and podcasts to increase use of the collections.

This project will fund the continuing preservation and accessibility of the Ukrainian History and Education Center’s collections and the creation of online programming through the resumption of work by the UHEC’s furloughed archivist. In addition to routine archives management and reference services, he will complete the rollout of a new digital audio portal on the Center’s website, resume at-home audio digitization work, and develop online resources and public programming derived from the UHEC’s archives and museum collections. The loss of the UHEC’s sole archivist due to the impact of the pandemic has been a major impediment for the institution, as he was the primary person responsible for the UHEC’s humanities-related activities. NEH CARES funding will allow him to resume this work, and will also allow the development of new approaches to connect the public with the UHEC’s collections and expertise, thereby helping to maintain and expand the UHEC’s donor base.

Valeria Sobol
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)

FA-58372-15
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2015 – 7/31/2016

Visions of Empire in Russian Gothic Literature, 1790-1850

Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850, argues that in Russian literature the empire's peripheries are consistently depicted as dangerous, ambiguous places that destabilize the characters' imperial identities. They become sites of the imperial uncanny, a fictional space into which the empire projected its colonial fantasies and anxieties and where, through Gothic tropes, it produced the doubles and monsters that continue to haunt Russia's historical imagination. Haunted Empire focuses on two spaces of internal otherness that figure prominently in the Russian Gothic: the Baltic/Scandinavian "North" and the Ukrainian "South." Bringing together theories of empire and colonialism, canonical and less-studied literary texts, and 19th-century publications on ethnography and imperial geography, I show that Russian Gothic literature enacts deep historical and cultural tensions, exposing the vulnerability of the empire through a popular narrative form.

Valeria Sobol
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)

FT-61594-14
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 7/31/2014

The Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the "Imperial Uncanny," 1793-1844

The Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny asks why Russian Romantic literature consistently portrays the empires peripheries as haunted spaces and the locus of Gothic encounters. I argue that the Gothic mode served as a particularly apt form for "the imperial uncanny" -- the experience of danger and uncertainty in the ambiguous colonial space within Russias borders. Diverging from the prevailing view of the Russian Gothic as an imitation of the Western literary trend, my project reconceptualizes this body of literature as a key genre that dramatizes uniquely Russian imperial anxieties and concerns (e.g., Russias fluid boundaries, cultural dependence on the West, and the clash between imperial and national identities) and offers a powerful critique of empire. The book will be of interest to Russian historians and literary scholars, as well as to a broader audience of scholars of the Western Gothic and those interested in new approaches to empire.

Vladimir A. Solonari
University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)

FT-57973-10
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010

One More "East": Southern Ukraine under Romanian Occupation, 1941-1944

This project proposal requests funding to continue research in Ukraine on a book-length project. In 1941-1944, Romania occupied a south-western part of Ukraine. Between 220,000 and 300,000 Jews and about 10,000 Gypsies, both local and those deported from Romania, perished there as a result of the occupation. The book will cover, for the first time in historiography, the social history of this region during occupation. Its publication will contribute to debates on the wider issues of Romanian and Ukrainian history, such as the aims and dynamic of Romanian anti-Jewish and anti-Roma policy, the role of local Ukrainian population in the persecution of Jews and Roma (Gypsies), and the nature of collaboration and resistance in the occupied Soviet Ukraine. It will likely spur a public debate on those painful episodes from the national pasts of Ukrainians and Romanians, thus contributing to the "healing process" which might help alleviate those societies' deep-seated complexes.