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Keywords: WNYC Audio Preservation (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)
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WNYC Radio (New York, NY 10013-1220)
Andy Lanset (Project Director: July 2014 to May 2018)

PW-228139-15
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2015 – 8/31/2017

WNYC Audio Preservation and Access Project (Part II)

The digitization of up to 680 hours of radio broadcast recordings (1,360 individual recordings) from 1938 to 1970 pertaining to the political, social, and cultural history of New York.

New York Public Radio (NYPR), parent company of public radio stations WNYC and WQXR, respectfully requests a two-year grant of $325,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support Part II of the WNYC Audio Preservation and Access Project. This project will digitize, catalog, and provide wide access to approximately 680 hours of vintage radio broadcast material relevant to a wide range of humanities disciplines, including political science, urban development and sustainability, foreign affairs, arts and culture, and media history.

WNYC Radio (New York, NY 10013-1220)
Andy Lanset (Project Director: July 2009 to August 2013)

PW-50662-10
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$315,000 (approved)
$315,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 4/30/2013

The WNYC Radio Audio Preservation and Access Project

The digitization of 775 hours of recordings from the WNYC Radio Collection that capture civic, cultural, and political life in the New York City area from 1936 to 1970.

WNYC Radio requests a two-year $350,000 grant to work with a 5-member Advisory Board to identify, digitize, preserve, and make available to the public 775 hours of audio recordings from the station's Archival Collection. This material, which documents the civic, cultural, political, and historical events that shaped New York City and the nation, is a trove of rich information about an array of humanities disciplines, including (but not limited to) history, American studies, geography, African-American studies, urban studies, social sciences, and media and culture studies. By preserving these unique recordings for future generations, creating free public access to the recordings, working with an experienced team of humanities-based advisors, and publicizing the availability of these humanities resources, WNYC will support humanities research, teaching, learning, and outreach in research institutions, community-based organizations, schools, and informal learning environments.