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Keywords: 'Walt whitman' (this phrase)
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PW-269321-20

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Matt Cohen (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Walt Whitman Archive Infrastructure Revitalization

Revitalizing the digital architecture of the Walt Whitman Archive to make it easier to search and use the materials on the website.  Specific improvements would include changing the programming framework, creating a machine-readable interface for the website’s code, images, and metadata, revising files to improve the metadata, and leveraging existing metadata through a new search engine.

The Walt Whitman Archive (https://whitmanarchive.org) is one of the most prominent open-access digital archives, with hundreds of thousands of visitors annually, many from secondary and post-secondary schools. Now nearing its 25th year, the Archive is the leading resource for scholars of Whitman and a model for digital editions. Its depth has enabled its success, but has also created an infrastructure that is showing its age. We propose a critical redevelopment of the project's technical framework for both broad access and long-term sustainability, overhauling its information architecture, access framework, and public interface. Such a rebuild will make it easier for users to search, organize, and re-use our materials and to access it from mobile devices, and will allow more flexibility for future development. It will also serve as a model for other major scholarly resources whose digital infrastructure needs preservation, lest past investments of money, time, and energy be lost.

Project fields:
English

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,856 (approved)
$349,856 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 5/31/2023


RZ-271305-20

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Walt Whitman's Journalism: Finding the Poet in the Brooklyn Daily Times

Computational linguistic research to establish the unattributed journalism of American poet Walt Whitman (1819-1892) at the Brooklyn Daily Times newspaper. (36 months)

Our proposed project will use a tested computational linguistic author attribution model to determine the beginning and end of Walt Whitman's editorial tenure at the Brooklyn Daily Times in the 1850s—a matter of longstanding debate in Whitman studies—as well as to determine which editorials he authored during that span. These editorials will then be transcribed, encoded, annotated, and made freely available on the Whitman Archive site. In addition to bringing clarity to a hazy portion of Whitman's biography and offering access to a new trove of understudied Whitman-authored documents, we hope that our method can bring a new tool to the study of authorship attribution and serve as a model for other scholars or projects confronted with similar cases of uncertain authorship, even when only a relatively small sample size of text is available.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,941 (approved)
$249,941 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023


PR-253389-17

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Heather Marie Richards-Rissetto (Project Director: June 2016 to May 2019)
Keeping Data Alive: Supporting Reuse and Repurposing of 3D Data in the Humanities

A project to develop 3D architectural models of Mayan cities in an open source database for reuse and repurposing in other architectural reconstructions, leading to the creation of an open source platform to host, deliver, and visualize 3D models linked to descriptive data.

The goals of this one year project are to develop workflows to: (1) generate, store, and make accessible 3D models of architecture in an open source database that scholars can (re)use and repurpose to create their own multi-scalar reconstructions ranging from individual buildings to entire cityscapes and (2) host, deliver, and visualize 3D models, linked to metadata, paradata, and descriptive data, in an open source 3D visualization environment. The project includes front-end and back-end deliverables that will contribute to data sustainability and accessibility in the humanities. Front-end deliverables include a project website hosting workflows with tutorials and a proto-database for beta-testing and capturing user feedback. Back-end deliverables include "white paper" describing the initial database design, data structuring, initial findings, ongoing challenges, and next steps.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Architecture

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$74,368 (approved)
$71,719 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


PW-253797-17

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Matt Cohen (Project Director: July 2016 to March 2021)
Walt Whitman's Annotations

The addition of 1,400 new documents, updates to the database of Whitman’s reading, and creation of curated theme portals for the Walt Whitman Archive.

America's most famous poet, Walt Whitman, left behind an unusual and extraordinary collection of marginalia and annotations. This hitherto uncollected and largely unpublished set of extraordinarily diverse and sophisticated documents shows America's most famous poet in-the-making. With NEH support, we published 800 pages of these documents in 2015, and for the first time, by way of the freely accessible Walt Whitman Archive, students, scholars, and casual readers are now able to explore Whitman's self-education, through his reactions to the literature, history, science, theology, and art of his time. Having achieved our goals for that grant, we now apply for NEH funding to preserve and give free public electronic access to more of Walt Whitman's manuscript annotations. We apply for two years of implementation funding to publish 1400 more pages of documents, update our database of Whitman's reading, and create curated thematic subsections to draw more attention to the project.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$126,301 (approved)
$120,273 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


FT-249295-16

Michael Gerard Devine, PhD
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Plattsburgh (Plattsburgh, NY 12901-2637)
Poetry, Film, and the Battle for a National Art, 1895-1930

Research and writing leading to a book-length study of the connections between poetry and cinema in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

My book project offers a timely prehistory of writing in an age of new media. It tells the story of poetry’s crisis in the early twentieth century—a machine age not unlike our own—when many considered the humanities doomed to disappear. Poetry, instead, became startlingly visible through films like Vitagraph’s The Battle Hymn of the Republic (1911), which deeply influenced boosters of a modern and American art. Interdisciplinary in scope, my project shows the revitalizing interplay between poetry and film: both poetry’s transformation on the screen and page and the efforts of Walt Whitman’s disciples—poets, but also painters, photographers, and filmmakers—to shape film into a mode of national expression. An archival account of how the humanities reemerged in the cinematic public square a century ago, my project explores what the NEH calls The Common Good—a primer for understanding our current moment when new media technologies promise again to transform the arts.

Project fields:
American Literature; American Studies; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


RQ-249901-16

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Ed Folsom (Co Project Director: February 2016 to present)
Unearthing The "Buried Masterpiece" of American Literature: A Digital Variorum of the 1855 Leaves of Grass

Preparation for online publication of 19th-century American author Walt Whitman's first edition of Leaves of Grass, as part of an existing digital archive devoted to Whitman. See website at http://www.whitmanarchive.org.

The Walt Whitman Archive seeks NEH support to edit the first edition of Leaves of Grass and the constellation of draft documents that contributed to it by developing a digital variorum of this edition of Leaves from manuscript and notebook beginnings through its many variations in print. Whitman wrote the poetry, designed the book, and set some of the type, and his first Leaves was stunning both as verse and as a material object. This project will entail careful work on at least ninety-nine manuscripts contributing to the volume. Our goals are to advance understanding of this paradigm-shifting book and to enable future scholarship by drawing on some of the opportunities for representation unique to digital editing.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


FZ-250348-16

Brenda Wineapple
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (New York, NY 10024-2902)
The Impeachers and America

The political circumstances of President Andrew Johnson's impeachment in 1868 are in the history books, but what was the reaction to it beyond the halls of Congress? This book explores American thought at the time about impeachment and the future of the republic, drawing on a wide range of sources including the cartoons of Thomas Nast and the writings of  Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, and reformer Lydia Maria Child.

In 1868, the House of Representatives voted to impeach the sitting president, Andrew Johnson. Never before had such an event occurred in America, and it remains an extraordinary moment about which we know far too little. My project studies the impeachment proceeding and its major participants, both for and against, in Congress and on the street, especially in the South, to determine what happened and why. To many, the outcome, acquittal by one vote, squandered the result of the recent war insofar as the war aimed to secure equal rights for all; to others it protected the executive from political chicanery. In a sense, both are true. But the country stood at a crossroads, which included a path to justice, one insufficiently argued, or that was not yet seen for what it was: fair and decent. And so impeachment's ramifications helped shape our definition of Reconstruction (itself not adequately understood) and the racial politics of the next century, and our own.

Project fields:
American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$43,050 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


AQ-51021-14

West Chester University of Pennsylvania (West Chester, PA 19383-0001)
Margarete J. Landwehr (Project Director: September 2013 to October 2016)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on Cultural and Scientific Understandings of Empathy

The development of an undergraduate course on empathy.

The development of an undergraduate course on empathy. The director, a professor of German at West Chester University, develops a course that examines the question, What is empathy? through eastern and western philosophy and religion, evolutionary biology, psychology, and the arts. In the first section, students read works by Mencius, the Dalai Lama, Khalil Gibran, and Rumi as they consider the ways that Eastern religious and philosophical thinkers have conceived of empathy. They then turn to the Western religious and philosophical tradition, reading selections that include excerpts from the Bible, Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature, Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, Max Scheler's The Nature of Sympathy, and Martin Buber's I and Thou. In the third section, students read selections from Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, Frans de Waal's Age of Empathy, Marc Behoff's The Emotional Lives of Animals, and Marco Iacoboni's "Neural Mechanisms for Empathy in Primate Brains" to learn how biologists view empathy. They then take up psychology, reading essays by William James, Alvin Goldman, and Pinchas Noy. The final section of the course explores some of the ways that the arts have dealt with empathy, with readings that include Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol, selections from Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and Ivan Turgenev's Sportsman's Notebook, Friedrich Schiller's "The Stage as a Moral Institution," Martha Nussbaum's Love's Knowledge, Aristotle's Poetics, and poems by Shelley, Wordsworth, Maya Angelou, Pablo Neruda, and Walt Whitman. Students also view and discuss several films, including To Kill a Mockingbird, Oliver Twist, Salaam Bombay (India), Central Station (Brazil), and The Lives of Others (Germany), and visit local museums and theatrical performances. Students write research papers and critical responses to the readings.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$21,970 (approved)
$21,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 6/30/2016


BH-50639-14

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2014 to May 2016)
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers that use the Hudson River for a study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

This workshop focuses on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. By focusing on art, literature, and architecture alongside the developments in commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, the workshop reveals the several ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, discussions, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. Participants begin by considering the mouth of the Hudson as an estuary and economic gateway; they survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving, visit his home, Sunnyside, and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. A session on "Race, Labor, and the Landscape" illuminates the stories of African Americans in the Hudson River Valley. Finally, an afternoon boat trip--enhanced by readings in period guidebooks--enables participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Judith Richardson (English and American studies, Stanford University), Myra Young Armstead (history and Africana studies, Bard College), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in translating the Hudson River workshop to other local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,734 (approved)
$169,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


HG-50047-13

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Malte Rehbein (Project Director: October 2012 to May 2013)
Brett Barney (Project Director: May 2013 to April 2016)
Diachronic Markup and Presentation Practices for Text Editions in Digital Research Environments

Using three case studies -- the Walt Whitman Archive; an edition of James Joyce's Ulysses; and an edition of J.W. Goethe's Faust -- the proposed project will experiment with methods of advanced TEI markup, create methods for detailed scholarly queries currently unavailable, and develop user interfaces to best display the variants exposed through diachronic markup. The German partner, the University of Frankfurt, is requesting 139,634€ from DFG.

The project is situated in the Digital Humanities area of literary criticism and textual scholarship, in particular the analysis of literary works in diachronic depth, that is: under perspectives of the genesis of their texts. Here, only the digital medium allows substantial future research and education in literary studies. In this context, the project addresses three major desiderata: 1. testing, improving, and making usable diachronic markup, that is the digital representation of document sources (based on TEI), 2. tools to operate on this data under the light of research requirements, and 3. means to publish and visualize the results of these operations. The project promises to develop and publish such tools and to provide best practices for a wide range of use cases. It does so by bringing together three leading projects in digital literary studies, covering different eras of German, US, and British literature: J.W. Goethe, Walt Whitman, and James Joyce.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$165,005 (approved)
$165,001 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


BH-50544-13

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor (Project Director: March 2013 to March 2015)
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois. These workshops at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (SIUE) focus on three central themes of Abraham Lincoln's public life: nationalism, leadership, and emancipation and race. Teachers study the Civil War era; Lincoln, slavery, and race; Lincoln and the Constitution; Lincoln, the radicals, and Emancipation; Walt Whitman and Lincoln; visual art on Lincoln and the war, using images from the NEH's Picturing America portfolio; African-American women's experiences as an example of racial issues; and Lincoln's legacy. Participants visit several sites in Springfield: the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the Lincoln Home, Lincoln's Law Office, the Lincoln Tomb, and the Old State Capitol, as well as the nearby historical reconstruction of New Salem Village, where Lincoln began his study of law and became involved in politics. At the Old State Capitol, for example, participants discuss the "House Divided" speech, which Lincoln delivered there in 1858. They consider how Lincoln's earlier experiences as a Whig in the state legislature shaped his sense of America's national destiny and opposition to slavery that characterized his political career. They read writings by Lincoln, including the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and selected letters; writings by African-American women; and secondary works by Eric Foner, David Donald, John Stauffer, James McPherson, Philip Shaw Paludan, Barry Schwartz, Garry Wills, and Lerone Bennett, Jr. In addition to project director Caroline Pryor (education) and her fellow SIUE faculty members Stephen Hansen (history), Jason Stacey (history), and Ivy Cooper (art history), project scholars include Iver Bernstein (Washington University), Sowande' Mustakeem (Washington University), Louis Gerteis (University of Missouri, St. Louis), and Graham Peck (Saint Xavier University), as well as site and museum personnel. The participants attend lecture/discussion sessions and work on lesson plans that are to be posted on a project website.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$174,205 (approved)
$165,663 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


PW-51082-12

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: July 2011 to April 2016)
An Integrated Guide to Walt Whitman's Literary Manuscripts

Creation of finding guides to Walt Whitman's prose manuscripts held at more than 70 repositories together with images of the documents. The project would also develop an integrated guide that relates each manuscript to the work to which it contributed.

The Walt Whitman Archive (whitmanarchive.org) seeks a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create item-level finding guides to Walt Whitman's prose manuscripts, which are held at more than seventy individual repositories. The finding guides will be written in Encoded Archival Description (EAD) format, and we will associate with each description high-quality digital images of the manuscript material. These individual guides, linked to digital images, will then be dynamically joined in an integrated guide, using a system of identification that relates each prose manuscript to the conceptual "work" to which it contributed. When joined with the Archive's similarly implemented, award-winning guides to Whitman's poetry manuscripts, the EAD records created for Whitman's prose manuscripts in this project will provide unprecedented documentation of and access to the literary manuscripts of a major literary figure.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 7/31/2015


AQ-50723-12

Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
William Robert (Project Director: September 2011 to April 2014)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What Is Belief?"

The development of a lower-division undergraduate course to investigate multiple perspectives on the question, What is belief?

William Robert, an assistant professor in the department of religion, proposes to "explore a wide range of forms, stakes, and effects of belief as an abiding, perhaps even fundamental human phenomenon." The capacious framing of the primary question raises other questions - Is belief necessary? Is it beneficial? Is religious belief different from other kinds of belief? What happens when belief conflicts with scientific evidence or with personal experience? The course unfolds around four major themes: Belief as Human Activity, Belief as Cognitive Function, Belief as Meaningful Orientation, and Belief as Embodied Practice. The readings in each section are drawn from diverse times and cultures in order to put contemporary perspectives in the company of ancient or more traditional sources. As an example, in the second unit on the cognitive dimension of belief, students encounter Anselm of Canterbury's ontological arguments for the existence of God and Kant's extension of this rational tradition, as well as two recent books by contemporary writers, The End of Faith: Religion, Terror and the Future of Reason, by "New Atheist" Sam Harris, and, giving the theme a final modern twist, Michael Shermer's The Believing Brain, which contends that the need for belief is brain-based and quintessentially human. Also studied are works by Augustine of Hippo, Euripides, Plato (Phaedrus), Aquinas, Anne Bradstreet, Walt Whitman, Kierkegaard, Michel de Certeau, John Cottingham, and Judith Butler, along with passages in the Qur'an, the Dhammapada, writings of early Christian monks, and the Yoga Sutras. To foster a sense of community, Professor Robert relies extensively on smaller discussion groups and asks that students post and respond to posts on a course blog on a weekly basis. A wide-ranging bibliography engages the applicant in forays into unfamiliar disciplines and related investigations during the development phase.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$24,526 (approved)
$24,526 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


RQ-50658-12

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: December 2011 to June 2021)
Ed Folsom (Co Project Director: December 2011 to June 2021)
Walt Whitman as an Author Before Leaves of Grass

The preparation for online publication of a selection of 19th-century American author Walt Whitman's early published and unpublished writings as part of an existing digital archive devoted to Whitman. (36 months)

The Walt Whitman Archive, a digital archive that makes Whitman's vast work easily and conveniently accessible to scholars, students, and general readers alike, seeks to expand its content to include Whitman-authored materials written before the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass. This "foreground" period consists of Whitman's novel, Franklin Evans (1842); his roughly two dozen short stories and vignettes initially published between 1841 and 1848 in news and literary papers; his unpublished pre-1855 prose manuscripts; his pre-Leaves of Grass notebooks; and a significant selection of Whitman's journalism in which he develops a persona across multiple articles. The Whitman Archive proposes to gather, edit, and annotate Whitman's early materials for digital publication and will offer, for the first time, a seamlessly integrated presentation of Whitman's literary contributions in the lead-up to his masterpiece, Leaves of Grass.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$330,000 (approved)
$329,846 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2013 – 1/31/2017


BH-50481-12

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
Stephen P. Rice (Co Project Director: August 2012 to November 2014)
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America. Ramapo College offers a workshop on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. The study of art, literature, and architecture, alongside the developments of commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, reveal the diverse ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. The workshop begins by considering the mouth of the Hudson as estuary and economic gateway; participants survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving; visit his home, Sunnyside; and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded-Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. Finally, a morning boat trip-enhanced by readings in period guidebooks-enable participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Roger Panetta (Curator of the Hudson River Collection, Fordham University), Judith Richardson (English, Stanford University), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in the translation of the Hudson River workshop to local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,876 (approved)
$176,276 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


PG-51371-11

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Thomas Michael Kelly (Project Director: May 2010 to December 2012)
Preservation Training Workshops

Preservation workshops to train Frost Library staff to better care for the college's collections of rare books, literary manuscripts, artifacts, and natural history collections, including the papers of William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost, for whom the library is named. The workshop would also be attended by staff from the Center for Russian Culture, the Mead Art Museum, and the Emily Dickinson Museum.

Archives & Special Collections (ASC) of the Frost Library of Amherst College seeks a $5,810 Preservation Assistance Grant from the NEH. Funding will pay for three preservation training workshops to be held at Amherst College. A previous NEH Preservation Assistance grant supported a collection survey by a consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in February 2010. The consultant strongly recommended we invest in preservation training. Three specific training areas were identified: storage techniques for archival materials, care of photographs, and preservation of scrapbooks (see attached executive summary of the consultant’s report). As a small facility without any professional conservators on staff, the Frost Library of Amherst College lacks any in-house preservation expertise. There are currently seven employees in the department, only three of whom are professionals. Everyone in the Archives will benefit from this training.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,810 (approved)
$5,810 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2011 – 8/31/2012


PW-50772-11

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Matt Cohen (Project Director: July 2010 to July 2014)
Walt Whitman's Annotations

Creation of an online archive of Walt Whitman's manuscript annotations, which would allow users to explore Whitman's reactions to the literature, history, science, theology, and art of his time.

This project aims to preserve and give free electronic access to Walt Whitman's manuscript annotations. This hitherto uncollected and largely unpublished set of documents shows America's most famous poet in-the-making. From classical writings to Tennyson, from Persian poets to phrenological journals, the influences on Whitman's work were manifold. For the first time, students, scholars, and casual readers will be able to explore Whitman's self-education, through his reactions to the literature, history, science, theology, and art of his time. The annotations will be published at the Walt Whitman Archive, allowing us to link these annotated documents to later ones they influenced. We will also offer a database of Whitman's reading. Finally, using a customized search engine and the interface created in this project, we will offer analytical tools for archive users that will help researchers shed new light on Whitman's writing in the broad context of 19th century literature and culture.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$168,519 (approved)
$143,590 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2011 – 4/30/2014


FW-50359-11

Jeffrey Einboden
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
Arabic Slave Writings and the American Canon

Exploring the literary foundations of early America, NIU's ENGL 331 "American Literature 1830-1860" has traditionally surveyed the nation's most iconic texts, from Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature to Herman Melville's Moby Dick, to Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass. Consistent with NEH's Bridging Cultures initiative, I propose to revise and expand the curriculum for this core course, introducing NIU undergraduates to the cross-cultural and multi-lingual texture of America's first decades. Specifically, I aim to integrate into ENGL 331 my own research concerning a pivotal, yet largely unrecognized, element of U.S. literary history: personal writings by African slaves of Muslim descent, composed during their captivity in America, authored in Arabic.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Teaching Development Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$21,000 (approved)
$21,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 11/30/2011


BH-50415-11

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Caroline Pryor (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2014)
Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois.

"Abraham Lincoln and the Forging of Modern America" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on Abraham Lincoln and his role in American history, using sites in and near Springfield, Illinois. The program investigates four central themes of Abraham Lincoln's public life: nationalism, power, freedom, and race. The project considers such subjects as nationalism and politics in the Civil War era; Lincoln, slavery, and race; Lincoln and the Constitution; Lincoln, the radicals, and Emancipation; Walt Whitman and Lincoln; visual art on Lincoln and the war, using images from the NEH's Picturing America portfolio; African-American women's experiences as an example of racial issues; and Lincoln's legacy. Participants visit the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the Lincoln Home, Lincoln's Law Office in Springfield, Illinois, and the historical reconstruction of New Salem Village, where Lincoln began his career. Teachers also explore the exhibit "Lincoln and the Constitution," on display at the Lovejoy Library. Participants read writings by Lincoln, including the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and selected letters; writings by African-American women; and secondary works by Eric Foner, David Donald, John Stauffer, James McPherson, Philip Shaw Paludan, David Potter, Barry Schwartz, Garry Wills, and Lerone Bennett, Jr. The staff includes project director Caroline Pryor (education, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville [SIUE]); historians Stephen Hansen (SIUE), Iver Bernstein (Washington University), Leslie Brown (Williams College), Jason Stacey (SIUE), and Laura Milsk-Fowler (SIUE); art historian Ivy Cooper (SIUE); and site and museum personnel.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,518 (approved)
$155,149 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


BI-50151-11

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Richard Hanley (Project Director: March 2011 to May 2014)
Along the Shore: The Landmarks of Brooklyn's Industrial Waterfront

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for fifty community college faculty members to study the diverse and historically rich Brooklyn waterfront through the changing lens of historic preservation.

"Along the Shore: The Landmarks of Brooklyn's Industrial Waterfront" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for fifty community college faculty members on the diverse and historically rich Brooklyn waterfront through the changing lens of historic preservation. The program focuses on Brooklyn's waterfront by exploring its preservation history and the questions it raises about the meaning of landmarks. Participants study such prominent sites as Brooklyn Bridge and Coney Island, as well as the architecture of Charles Bulfinch, whose work in the former Brooklyn Navy Yard (now a burgeoning industrial park) exemplifies some of the workshop's complex issues. The group also examines how industrial landscapes, such as the environmentally damaged Newtown Creek, exist alongside diverse and changing neighborhoods, from Greenpoint to Brooklyn Heights. Readings and lectures span architectural and environmental histories, maps, and poetry. Richard Haw, Francis Morrone, and Shelley Smith discuss Brooklyn's diverse architectural history, supported, for example, by Haw's Art of the Brooklyn Bridge and John Kasson's Amusing the Millions: Coney Island at the Turn of the Century. Geoff Zylstra, Roberta Weisbrod, and Daniel Campo address the area's environmental history as participants read articles on specific sites, EPA documents, and NOAA maps. Debby Applegate's biography of Henry Ward Beecher, Joshua Freeman's Working Class New York, and Walt Whitman's "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" illuminate some of the social and literary topics to be treated by Mark Noonan and Carolyn Hellman. This program features access to the Brooklyn Historical Society's extensive manuscript, map, and image collection.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History for Community Colleges, WTP

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$155,400 (approved)
$149,290 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


PG-50975-10

Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
Thomas Michael Kelly (Project Director: May 2009 to December 2011)
General Preservation Assessment

A general preservation assessment of the Archives and Special Collections (ASC) unit that will identify short, medium, and long-term preservation priorities. ASC holds rare books, literary manuscripts, documents, and artifacts that relate to Amherst College and its history.

Archives & Special Collections (ASC) of the Frost Library of Amherst College seeks a $5,275 Preservation Assistance Grant from the NEH. Funding will be used to undertake a general preservation assessment of the collections by a consultant from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC). As a small facility without any professional conservators on staff, the Frost Library of Amherst College requires the experience and expertise of outside professionals to ensure the longevity of the materials in our care. Intellectual control and access to materials in ASC is very good. As our staff continues to improve access for scholars, students, and the public, the resulting increase in use makes the physical care and preservation of these materials an urgent priority. A conservation expert from NEDCC will be brought to the Amherst College campus in western Massachusetts to evaluate the state of the collections. She will produce a report that will serve as the basis for planning future pres

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,275 (approved)
$5,275 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


HD-50866-09

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Matthew K. Gold (Project Director: April 2009 to January 2013)
Looking For Whitman: The Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman - Level 2

The piloting of a series of courses at three institutions that would engage students in online investigations of Walt Whitman's work in geographical context that would conclude with a conference on material culture and Whitman.

This project engages faculty and students at four universities--New York City College of Technology (CUNY), New York University, University of Mary Washington, and Rutgers University-Camden--in a concurrent, connected, semester-long inquiry into the relationship of Whitman's poetry to local geography and history. Each class will explore the relationship between its specific locale and a particular phase of the poet's work. Utilizing open-source tools to connect college classes from multiple institutions, the interdisciplinary project breaks down traditional institutional walls as it creates a collaborative online space in which students can participate in a dynamic, social, web-based learning environment. In its conception and in its dissemination, this project expands the traditional bounds of classroom and institutional space. In doing so, it reflects the central themes of Whitman's career: democracy, diversity, openness, and connectedness.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$33,235 (approved)
$33,235 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 3/31/2012


RQ-50338-08

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: November 2007 to April 2016)
Walt Whitman's Civil War Writings

A comprehensive electronic edition of Walt Whitman's Civil War writings. (36 months)

The Walt Whitman Archive will create a comprehensive edition of the Civil War writings of Walt Whitman, probably the most important literary interpreter of this conflict. Support from the National Endowment for the Humanities will allow us to complete this work by 2011, in time for the observance of the sesquicentennial of the outbreak of the War. The War profoundly shaped Leaves of Grass, the first masterpiece of American poetry, and Whitman extensively depicted and analyzed the Civil War in journals, notebooks, letters, essays, journalism, memoirs, and manuscript drafts. We will electronically edit, arrange, and publish -- often for the first time -- the hundreds of documents that give voice to Whitman's experience of the war. In addition to making these documents freely available, our work will help to model for other scholars best practices in creating, publishing, and sustaining electronic editions.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2011


HD-50537-08

CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)
Matthew K. Gold (Project Director: April 2008 to April 2014)
Looking for Whitman: the Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman

Development of a series of courses at four partner institutions that would engage students in online investigations of Walt Whitman's work in geographical context

This Level 1 Digital Humanities project, " Looking for Whitman: The Poetry of Place in the Life and Work of Walt Whitman," will engage faculty and students at four academic institutions--New York City College of Technology; New York University; University of Mary Washington; and Rutgers University, Camden--in a concurrent, connected, semester-long inquiry into the relationship of Whitman's poetry to local geography and history. Each class will explore the interrelationship between a specific locale and a particular phase of the poet's work. Utilizing open-source tools to connect classrooms, the interdisciplinary project will create a collaborative, online space in which students can participate in a dynamic, social, web based learning environment. In its conception and articulation, this project reflects the central themes of Whitman's work: democracy, diversity, and connectedness.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$24,912 (approved)
$24,042 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2009


CZ-50114-06

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: February 2005 to June 2009)
The Walt Whitman Archive

Endowment for staff and other costs of managing the digital Walt Whitman Archive.

The year 2005 marks the 150th anniversary of the first publication of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass (1855), a declaration of American literary independence and the founding book of American literary democracy. Whitman gave epic voice to our country, memorable articulation to American ideals, and expressed through his art the crisis of Civil War and the cultural possibilities of democracy. Founding principles of our country--freedom and equality--shaped his free verse style, his vernacular usage, and his subject matter. The 150th anniversary of Leaves of Grass is also the 10th anniversary of the Walt Whitman Archive < http://www.whitmanarchive.org > (1995-present). The Archive is providing a complete record of the "American bard," thus giving the general public and scholars at all levels the opportunity to read and study the work of this central spokesman for America. The Archive has begun the unprecedented process of providing free access, via the world-wide web, to the entire corpus of a writer who deepens and enriches our sense of who we are and of what we can become as Americans. We have accomplished a great deal in our initial ten years of long-term undertaking (a projected thirty years of major editorial work along with concurrent and indefinitely ongoing work to foster the scholarship, teaching, and learning the Whitman Archive makes possible). We have produced a large amount of high quality content, garnered grant support from three different federal agencies and a private foundation; established the infrastructure for our work; and built a talented and cohesive team of scholars, technical experts, and library staff. We need, however, to establish secure financial footing. With the support provided by an NEH Challenge Grant, we will create the first fully realized "born digital" edition of a major American writer.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Special Initiatives

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 3/31/2009


GN-50517-05

Film/Video Arts, Inc. (New York, NY 10010-6207)
Patrick J. Long (Project Director: November 2004 to November 2008)
Walt Whitman: Boisterous Voice of America

Production of a two-hour television biography of Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$725,000 (approved)
$725,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2005 – 12/31/2007


FA-50140-04

Clifford Orwin
University of Toronto (Toronto M5S 1A5 Canada)
Pangs of Compassion

My project is to complete a book for the general intellectual public exploring compassion as a fact of modern political life and a theme of modern political thought. Never has the prestige of compassion been higher than it is today. In public as in private life, compassion and such related qualities as "sensitivity," "empathy," and "openness" are praised both in themselves and as needful to the political health of a large, diverse democracy like our own. With the advent of "compassionate conservatism," the moderate right now vies with the left over which is more truly compassionate. Beginning always from this and other current debates, I will explore the issues that they raise through an encounter with great thinkers and writers who have made compassion their theme. In order to place the modern notion of compassion in the proper historical perspective, I will distinguish it from Christian charity, on which it draws but which it diverges and which it seeks to supplant. (In order to introduce a non-Western point of reference, I will also pay some attention to Mahayana Buddhism.) I will go on to consider various aspects of the project to found politics on compassion, embracing foreign affairs as well as domestic ones. Having attempted to articulate both the strongest case in favor of political compassion and the strongest case against it, I will do my best to arbitrate between them. Among the writers discussed will be Montaigne, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Schopenhauer, Dostoevsky, Walt Whitman, Nietzsche, William James, Joseph Conrad, and Stefan Zweig. I will also pay attention to current approaches to these issues by intellectuals such as Richard Rorty, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Ignatieff, and Susan Sontag.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2004 – 6/30/2005


FT-52705-04

Jed E. Deppman
Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH 44074-1057)
Redefining America: Whitman, Dickinson, and Their Dictionaries

Through a comparison of how Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson read and interpreted their dictionaries, this study addresses the question of how major creative artists negotiate with the authoritative words and concepts of their surrounding culture. Responding to a lengthy 19th-century controversy over the nature of lexicography itself, these two poets disputed and literally redefined many key American terms--democracy, nature, consciousness, self, hope, faith--at precisely the time when America was most agonizingly and self-consciously seeking to define its own political, religious, and artistic cultures.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 8/31/2004


BC-50203-04

Ohio Humanities Council (Columbus, OH 43215-3857)
Gale E. Peterson (Project Director: March 2004 to September 2006)
We the People in Ohio

A teachers institute on "Walt Whitman's America," a chautauqua program, radio programs on themes in American history, special programming related to Brown v. Board of Education, and a website for K-12 history teachers.

The Ohio Humanities Council will utilize We the People funding to promote greater knowledge and understanding of American History among Ohio teachers and the general public through: l) a summer teachers institute on Walt Whitman's America; 2) the Ohio Chautauqua; 3) radio programs featuring the works of Ohio authors in cooperation with the Ohioana Library Association; 4) programs commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Brown v Board of Education decision; and 5) development of a website to support K-12 history instruction in cooperation with recipients of Teaching American History grants.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$101,010 (approved)
$101,010 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2004 – 10/31/2005


PA-50169-03

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
Kenneth Price (Project Director: July 2002 to August 2006)
Creating a Digital Archive of the Writings and Manuscripts of Walt Whitman

The development of an electronic archive of Walt Whitman's poetical work, which will contain a unified finding aid to his widely dispersed manuscripts and links to digital images and transcriptions of these documents. The archive will also include the Collected Writings of Walt Whitman and other reference materials.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2003 – 4/30/2006


GN-30218-02

Film/Video Arts, Inc. (New York, NY 10010-6207)
Mark Zwonitzer (Project Director: February 2002 to February 2004)
Walt Whitman: America's Boisterous Voice

Scripting of a two-hour documentary film about the life and literature of Walt Whitman and his America.

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$59,260 (approved)
$59,260 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2002 – 7/31/2003


FA-37312-02

Sandra M. Gustafson
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Speaking Democracy: Civic Performance in the Antebellum United States

No project description available

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2002 – 7/31/2003


PA-23666-00

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association (Huntington Stati, NY 11746)
Barbara M. Bart (Project Director: April 2000 to December 2001)
Purchase Conservation Supplies for Archives

The purchase of archival supplies to rehouse collections that are related to Walt Whitman and that include correspondence, photographs, sculpture, paintings, and scrapbooks.

Project fields:
Museum Studies or Historical Preservation

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,430 (approved)
$4,430 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2000 – 8/31/2001


RZ-20576-00

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Ed Folsom (Project Director: September 1999 to October 2005)
The Walt Whitman Hypertext Archive

To support a comprehensive online hypertext archive of Whitman's LEAVES OF GRASS.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2000 – 8/31/2004


FV-22319-99

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl F. Hovde (Project Director: March 1999 to February 2001)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$87,298 (approved)
$82,044 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1999 – 9/30/2000


FA-34369-97

Vivian R. Pollak
Washington University (St. Louis, MO 63130-4899)
Walt Whitman: Biography, Criticism, and Historical Analysis

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1997 – 7/31/1997


FV-21989-95

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl F. Hovde (Project Director: March 1995 to January 1997)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$78,041 (approved)
$78,041 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1995 – 9/30/1996


FV-21908-94

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl F. Hovde (Project Director: April 1994 to February 1996)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$76,453 (approved)
$74,821 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1994 – 9/30/1995


ES-22481-93

Eastern Kentucky University (Richmond, KY 40475-3102)
Harry Brown (Project Director: December 1992 to February 1995)
Masterwork Study Project on Nature in Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, and Wendell Berry

To support a masterwork study project on the poetry of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Wendell Berry for 15 middle and high school teachers of English from eastern Kentucky.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$18,812 (approved)
$18,812 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1993 – 5/31/1994


FV-21507-92

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl F. Hovde (Project Director: April 1992 to February 1994)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$73,078 (approved)
$70,643 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 9/30/1993


GP-21722-91

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Richard E. Beard (Project Director: March 1991 to February 1993)
Implementation of CELEBRATING DEMOCRACY'S POET: A FESTIVAL OF WALT WHITMAN

To support an array of activities that will examine the life, work, cultural context, and legacy of 19th-century American poet Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$225,400 (approved)
$225,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1991 – 9/30/1992


SO-21111-91

North Dakota Humanities Council (Bismarck, ND 58501-4086)
Kathryn Keiser (Project Director: October 1990 to July 1993)
The American Renaissance: Summer Scholars-in-Residence

To support a tour of dramatic presentations by seven humanities scholars, who will portray Louisa May Alcott, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
State Humanities Councils General Operating Support Grants

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals:
$170,098 (approved)
$170,098 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1991 – 2/28/1993


RO-22261-91

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Ed Folsom (Project Director: October 1990 to March 1995)
Whitman's Influence on World Literature

To support a study of the various aesthetic, political, philosophical, religious, and social responses that Walt Whitman's poetry and prose have inspired among peoples and cultures around the world.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Basic Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$91,000 (approved)
$91,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1991 – 12/31/1994


GP-21635-90

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Richard E. Beard (Project Director: March 1990 to August 1991)
CELEBRATING DEMOCRACY'S POET: A WALT WHITMAN FESTIVAL Planning for Multi-institutional Collaboration

To support planning for an array of activities that will examine the life, work, cultural context, and legacy of Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$20,350 (approved)
$20,350 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1990 – 3/31/1991


FV-21210-90

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl Hovde (Project Director: April 1990 to February 1992)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,615 (approved)
$68,816 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1990 – 9/30/1991


FB-27105-89

David S. Reynolds
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden (Camden, NJ 08102-1405)
Walt Whitman in His Times: LEAVES OF GRASS and American Culture

No project description available

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$27,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1990 – 12/31/1990


FI-22860-89

Melissa B. Hall
Emmanuel College (Boston, MA 02115-5798)
James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman: Responses to Two Periods in American Urbanization

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 8/31/1989


FV-20904-88

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Carl F. Hovde (Project Director: April 1988 to March 1990)
The Poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$61,345 (approved)
$57,501 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1988 – 9/30/1989


RC-21533-88

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Joel A. Myerson (Project Director: November 1987 to April 1993)
Walt Whitman: A Descriptive Bibliography

To support the preparation of a descriptive bibliography of the works of Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Reference Materials - Access

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$77,748 (approved)
$77,748 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1988 – 7/31/1992


FE-21345-87

Terrance Goode
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
The Influence of Walt Whitman's LEAVES OF GRASS on the Architectural Writing of Louis H. Sullivan

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1987 – 8/31/1987


FE-21467-87

Ruth L. Bohan
University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
Walt Whitman's Impact on the American Avant-Garde, 1892-1919

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1987 – 7/31/1987


FB-23802-86

Robert Scholnick
College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
Walt Whitman and Science

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$27,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1987 – 5/31/1988


FE-20115-86

Ruth L. Bohan
University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
Walt Whitman's Impact on the American Avant-Garde, 1900-1925

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1986 – 3/31/1986


FT-26911-85

Karl Keller
San Diego State University (San Diego, CA 92182-0001)
The Connection between Walt Whitman's Homosexuality and His Poetry

No project description available

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1985 – 9/30/1985


FV-20226-84

TRUSTEES OF TUFTS COLLEGE INC (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)
David Cavitch (Project Director: April 1984 to October 1990)
Fiction and Life-Histories

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$51,915 (approved)
$51,915 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 9/30/1985


GN-20968-83

New York Center for Visual History (New York, NY 10013-3152)
Lawrence O. Pitkethly (Project Director: June 1983 to October 1990)
VOICES & VISIONS: The Work and World of the American Poet

To support production of a 60-minute television documentary on Walt Whitman andto support scripting of two additional programs on Emily Dickinson and Hart Crane for a series of eleven television documentaries on the world and work of American poets.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$626,420 (approved)
$320,210 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1983 – 12/31/1983


FV-20067-83

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Ed Folsom (Project Director: April 1983 to October 1990)
Whitman's LEAVES OF GRASS: Interplay Between Poem, Poet, and Place

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$49,101 (approved)
$49,101 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1983 – 9/30/1984


GZ-21666-82

Museum of Long Island Natural Sciences (Stony Brook, NY 11794)
Carolyn M. Hess (Project Director: June 1982 to October 1990)
The Natural World of Walt Whitman

To support a project linking the natural history of Long Island to the study ofWalt Whitman's poetry. There will be an exhibit and pamphlet about Walt Whitman on Long Island.

Project fields:
American Literature; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Projects for Youth

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$24,700 (approved)
$24,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1982 – 8/31/1983


RE-20173-82

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Herbert Bergman (Project Director: October 1981 to October 1990)
The Collected Writings of Walt Whitman. The Journalism, Volumes III-IV.

To support continuing work on volumes III and IV of the edition of THE COLLECTED WRITINGS OF WALT WHITMAN: THE JOURNALISM.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$36,386 (approved)
$36,386 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1982 – 12/31/1984


RP-*1726-80

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Michael L. Probst (Project Director: May 1980 to October 1990)
Walt Whitman: Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts, ed. Edward Grier (3 vols.)

To support publication of "Walt Whitman: Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts," three volumes in an edition of the collected works of the 19th-century American poet.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$23,000 (approved)
$23,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1980 – 10/31/1984


FA-002679-79

David Cavitch
TRUSTEES OF TUFTS COLLEGE INC (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)
Walt Whitman, A Life Study

No project description available

Project fields:
Social Sciences, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$11,750 (approved)
$11,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1979 – 12/31/1979


RP-*1212-78

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Richard Stanley (Project Director: February 1978 to October 1990)
Publication of Variorum Edition of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass

To support a 3 vol. Variorum edition of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass which will make all printed variants of this work available and accessible.

Project fields:

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1978 – 8/31/1979


RP-10021-77

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Robert L. Bull (Project Director: September 1977 to present)
Variorum Edition of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass: Daybooks and Notebooks of Walt Whitman

The project will support publication of the complete writings of Walt Whitman and prior to publication, comparison of holographs and original editions with the document intended for publication in order to assure completeness and authenticity.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$7,500 (approved)
$7,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1977 – 8/31/1978


FA-11376-76

Edward F. Grier
University of Kansas, Lawrence (Lawrence, KS 66045-7505)
Edition of Walt Whitman's Notebooks, Diaries, and Prose Miscellany, Vol. II

Vol. I now being revised for the printer and will be ready for inspection by the Committee on Editions of American Authors and for publication by the New York University Press in the winter of 1975-76. Vol. II will contain about six hundred manuscripts.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1976 – 8/31/1977


FB-12338-74

Catherine H. Zuckert
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
American Literature as American Political Thought

To investigate the considerable and largely unacknowledged contribution to American political thought represented by the works of James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Walt Whitman. Because novels tend to reveal the moral character of the people they portray as well as the complex way in which that morality is related to the context (particularly in American novels the broadly political context of vitually unanimous commitment to equality and liberty), they shed considerable light on the quality and true extent of freedom in America.

Project fields:
American Literature; Political Science, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$10,765 (approved)
$10,765 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1974 – 8/31/1975


FT-11998-74

Jerome M. Loving
Texas A & M University, College Station (College Station, TX 77843-0001)
Walt Whitman: An Edition of teh Civil War Letters of George Washington Whitman

To support the final phase of work on an edition of the Civil War letters of George Washington Whitman, a younger brother of Walt Whitman; that is, completing the index and comparing the galley proofs of the text with the actual manuscript. Since the Civil War had an important impact of the life and post-war writings of Walt Whitman, an annotated record of his own brother's war experiences and personal reactions is relevant to Whitman scholarship.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1974 – 8/31/1974


FB-11295-72

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Mark Krupnick (Project Director: September 1972 to present)
Romanticism and the Psychoanalytic Theory of Narcissism

To relate clinical and theoretical psychoanalysis of the first pre-genital stage to Romantic poetry in England and America, especially the poetry of Walt Whitman.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$11,250 (approved)
$11,250 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1972 – 5/31/1973