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Funded Projects Query Form
266 matches

Keywords: 'archaeology' (this phrase)
Division or office: Research Programs*
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HB-267584-20

David Frederic Overstreet
College of Menominee Nation (Keshena, WI 54135-1179)
Seeking Kiash Matchitiwuk (The Ancient Ones)-The Menominee Struggle for Ethnic Identity

Writing an archeological monograph describing the pre-history of the Menominee nation of northern Wisconsin.

Vintage archaeological investigations on the Menominee reservation in northeastern Wisconsin linked the resident population to local prehistoric sites, a construct that supported oral traditions and the Menominee creation narrative. The tribe has been historically associated with wild rice harvesting as their Algonquian-derived name implies. By the turn of the 21st century this traditional framework was challenged by a new paradigm stating their claimed homeland may have been elsewhere, but retained their purported life-ways as hunters and gatherers. Multidisciplinary research by the Menominee tribe utilized archaeology, ethno-history, soil science, oral traditions, agronomy, and geography to construct a new paradigm in support of its traditional ethnic identity and culture history. The new model moves the Menominee tribe across history’s doorstep into the past they claim, but with a previously unrecognized adaptation of sustainable organic agriculture.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Ethnic Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021


FT-270021-20

Peter Der Manuelian
Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
The Man who Dug the Pyramids: A Biography of American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942)

Research and writing leading to a biography of the influential American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942).

Most archaeological biography projects do not reflect the broad brushstrokes of international relations and global change. But the individual currently under study—George A. Reisner (1867–1942, Harvard AB 1889)—is exceptional in several ways. Not only did Reisner pioneer crucial aspects of modern archaeological method as we understand them today, but he did so on an international stage, as an American expatriate working primarily in Arab countries (Egypt, Sudan) dominated by British political control and a French antiquities service. His story covers nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, the birth of scientific archaeology, the history of Harvard and of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the discovery of ancient art masterpieces and their ultimate museum destinations (under the partage system), and the issues of repatriation and cultural patrimony before they became the “hot topics” they are today. It is time that Reisner’s story, and his impact on the archaeological world, was told.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FT-270716-20

Allison Manfra McGovern
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Long Island Dirt: Recovering our Buried Past through Historical Archaeologies

Research and writing the introduction of a book on the historical archaeology of Long Island, New York.

The purpose of this book is to demonstrate, through recent historic and archaeological research, how historical archaeology can reveal dynamic and multi-faceted views of the past. Specifically focused on Long Island, New York, this book explores site-based histories through archaeology, material culture, landscape studies, and archival research to highlight the many unexplored aspects of history that can yet be discovered, and to re-examine some historic sites for new insights into past lives and experiences. The book project is scholarly in method, but publicly accessible in tone, as it demonstrates to scholarly and public audiences the contributions that archaeology can make to understanding broad patterns in American history in general and New York history in particular, and emphasizes the importance of preserving our past.

Project fields:
American Studies; Archaeology; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/8/2020 – 8/10/2020


FT-270748-20

Heather Wholey
West Chester University of Pennsylvania (West Chester, PA 19383-0001)
Cultural Heritage Futures: Narrating Loss and Legacy along the Delaware Bay

Development of an interactive digital map combining environmental and archaeological data from around the Delaware Bay.

Climate driven sea level rise (SLR) threatens cultural heritage resources in coastal areas. The Delaware Estuary is the second largest on the U.S. Atlantic coast and is experiencing some of the gravest effects from SLR along the eastern seaboard. Archaeological and historical evidence reveal the area’s rich heritage, including thousands of years of Native American occupations; 17th century Swedish and Dutch settlements; a colonial maritime tradition; early18th century resort towns; and, extant World War II defensive installations. The shoreline is fringed by salt marshes, which are being assaulted by storm surge, and converted into mudflats or open water at an alarming rate. The Delaware Bay Climate and Archaeology project has yielded decadal level, site specific projections of SLR threats until the year 2100. This project will use maps, photographs and digital reconstructions to translate science-driven research into a humanities-oriented visual narrative of compelling case studies.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/25/2021 – 3/25/2021


FZ-272289-20

David Pettegrew
Messiah University (Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-6805)
The Archaeology of the Early Christian World: History, Methods, Evidence

Research and writing for a book on the archaeological history of Early Christianity.

This project explains how archaeological approaches, practices, and evidence shape historical interpretations of the early Christian world. Scholars have often viewed archaeology as a tool for generating extraordinary discoveries to authenticate, challenge, or illustrate the histories and theologies of the early church. This work considers how the more common but less spectacular findings of archaeological field research, including ceramic assemblages, stratified deposits, and surface remains, are gradually changing our picture of the social and economic life of Christian communities of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East between the first and seventh centuries CE. In its emphasis on processes and practices, the book fills a gap in Anglophone scholarship for a critical explanation of the archaeology of this world religion and an accessible introduction to a subject often sensationalized in popular media.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; History of Religion

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021


RJ-269493-19

Archaeological Institute of America (Boston, MA 02215-2006)
Laetitia A. La Follette (Project Director: August 2019 to October 2019)
Jodi Magness (Project Director: October 2019 to March 2020)
Laetitia A. La Follette (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
NEH Archaeology Grants through the Archaeological Institute of America

A small grants program for humanistic archaeological research and writing that supports survey, excavation, and publication.

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is requesting a grant of $500,000 (plus administrative costs) for two years to establish a program that provides small grants to individuals conducting archaeological research around the world. The grants will focus on providing support for a larger number of fieldwork projects that might be thought of as “lean and mean” – i.e., not requiring vast funding outlays to return important results. Just as significantly, these grants will also support post-fieldwork research and publication efforts that are currently underfunded, yet critical to providing a more complete understanding of the communities being studied. The current lack of funding for post-fieldwork efforts often results in long gaps of time between the completion of the project and the dissemination of final reports and publications.

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Research)

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$564,418 (approved)
$564,418 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 9/30/2021


FEL-262890-19

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1910-1940

A book-length study about state-sponsored archeology in Mexico between 1910 and 1940, and its effect on indigenous societies and cultures.

“Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1910-1940” examines the making of archaeological patrimony and an official Indian past during the three decades that followed the outbreak of Mexico's 1910 revolution. The manuscript also looks at how the government's archaeological projects impacted native peoples at the ruins. With the aid of an NEH Fellowship, I will explore this formative stage in Mexican archaeology through research in Mexico City archives. My goal is to spend twelve consecutive months analyzing documents in four archives that are essential to the completion of my manuscript: the National Archive (AGN), Historical Archive of the National Museum of Anthropology (AHMNA), the National Library of Anthropology and History (BNAH), and INAH’s Technical Archive of the Office of Pre-Hispanic Monuments (ATMP).I will also travel to sites related to my study to interview the descendants of people who worked in the government’s archaeological projects.

Project fields:
Archaeology; Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


RA-264472-19

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2018 to March 2020)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in Jordan at the American Center of Oriental Research

10 months of stipend support (1-2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

ACOR, founded a half century ago, facilitates research concerning Jordan and the broader Middle East. Its thriving fellowship program supports scholars at all stages of their careers. This funding is requested in order to better meet the research needs of postdoctoral scholars, both those new to MENA and those who may know it well. Long-term fellowships would help them complete critical fieldwork, such as interviews and site visits, and provide concentrated research and writing time in ACOR’s exceptional library. This would also allow for more chances for in-depth scholarly exchanges, which are inherent in an ACOR residential fellowship as the center is a natural place to connect with other residents as well as Jordanian academics and international scholars due to its programs. [edited by staff]

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$165,100 (approved)
$165,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2023


RA-264488-19

Getty Research Institute (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Alexa Sekyra (Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute

16 months of stipend support (2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This application seeks three years of funding to support two residential postdoctoral fellowships for scholars with research backgrounds in art history, architecture, archaeology, anthropology, history, and cultural heritage and historic preservation, among others. The NEH fellowships would complement a diversity of other fellowship opportunities hosted by the GRI, Getty Museum, and Getty Conservation Institute and while in residence, Fellows will be part of the broader community of scholars and research professionals. NEH Fellows would be selected through an independent committee, the members of which chosen from a diversity of institution types and geographical regions across the US. [edited by staff]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$260,744 (approved)
$259,144 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2023


FT-265217-19

Kevin Gibbs
Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
The Archaeology of Pottery and Chronology at Jebel Tomat, a 3rd Century BCE Settlement in Modern-Day Sudan

Collections research and preparation of book on the archaeological finds at the site of Jebel Tomat in southern Sudan.

In the early third century BCE the Meroitic kingdom emerged as the most significant and influential state in sub-Saharan Africa. The site of Jebel Tomat (Sudan) sits at the southern margin of the Meroitic world, where little archaeological research has taken place. The site was excavated by the late archaeologist J. Desmond Clark during the early 1970s but much of the recovered material remains unstudied. This project will examine the pottery from the site to understand how it was used by the ancient residents of Jebel Tomat and to investigate potential interaction with other communities, including people living to the south. The project will also generate a detailed chronology of Jebel Tomat by radiocarbon dating unanalyzed charcoal samples that Clark collected during his excavations. The project will result in a chapter of book that examines Jebel Tomat and other sites excavated in the Sudan by Clark in the broader context of African archaeology and the Meroitic kingdom.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019


RZ-266251-19

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Terry P. Brock (Project Director: December 2018 to present)
Mary Furlong Minkoff (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Matthew B. Reeves (Co Project Director: April 2019 to present)
Understanding the Overseer: Using Archaeology to Examine Status and Identity at James Madison's Montpelier

Field research on the overseer’s house at James Madison’s Montpelier leading to public programs and publications on the social, economic, and racial complexity of 19th-century plantations in the United States. (36 months)

This study will adopt the space/place model to examine the overseer at James Madison’s Montpelier, an early 19th century plantation in the Virginia Piedmont. It will examine the relationship of the overseer to the plantation elite and the enslaved community through an in depth study of the overseer’s space on the landscape, and how they defined that space through household activities. We will examine the space the overseer occupied on the landscape through a spatial analysis of the farm complex in which the overseer’s house was situated, and excavations of the overseer’s home and its surrounding yard space. Archaeologists will examine how the plantation owner situated the overseer in relationship to the rest of the community through building architecture and the spatial proxemics of the overseer's house. Then we will examine how the overseer and his household responded to this position through the organization of his household activities and consumer choices.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$249,820 (approved)
$249,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2020 – 3/31/2023


FZ-266572-19

Elizabeth Fenn
University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)
Sacagawea's World: Window on the American West

Research and writing of a history of Native Americans in the Northern Plains and Rockies in the first half of the nineteenth century, structured around the life of Sacagawea, guide for the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Sacagawea’s World uses the signal events and contested dimensions of one Native American woman’s life to convey a new, accessible narrative of the Northern Plains, Northern Rockies, and Pacific Northwest to 1850. Sacagawea provided essential guidance to Lewis and Clark on their 1804–1806 trans-continental journey. But her life also illuminates a world in upheaval as Indigenous peoples engaged with global commerce, new modes of warfare, altered hunting patterns, environmental change, and ever-shifting power dynamics. How puzzling it is that despite Sacagawea’s renown, we know so little about the ways she and those around her experienced and engaged the world. I use a wide array of source material, including archaeology, rock art, landscape, oral accounts, legends, ethnographies, manuscripts, and a plethora of existing scholarship to bring this new narrative to life.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


FEL-257427-18

Claudia Lozoff Brittenham
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Unseen Art: Memory, Vision, and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica

A book analyzing the use and meaning of concealed art among the Maya, Olmec, and Aztec cultures.

My book project, Unseen Art: Memory, Vision, and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica, examines the conditions under which ancient art was viewed and experienced, focusing on practices diametrically opposed to the modern paradigm of museum display. In a series of case studies drawn from major Mesoamerican civilizations, I suggest that art could operate beyond the realm of the visual, and explore the ways in which concealed images and esoteric knowledge might be used to maintain power and social difference. Unseen art also pushes us to develop creative ways to explore ancient viewing experiences and the reception of ancient works of art. The insights gained demonstrate the value of contextualized ways of looking at all artworks.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Art History and Criticism; Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


FEL-257634-18

Philip Sapirstein
Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)
The Ancient Greek Temple of Hera at Olympia: A Digital Architectural History

Preparation of a digital publication on the architectural history and development of the Doric style at the Temple of Hera at Olympia (ca. 600 BCE).

I have recently completed a high-resolution 3D recording of the oldest well-preserved Greek temple in the Doric style, the Heraion at Olympia. The project has revealed significant new insights into the architectural history of the monument. I am now facing a common challenge for researchers working with 3D scans of cultural heritage: how to publish the wealth of digital data. I plan to develop a project website to disseminate the models, reconstructions, and linked texts and images. A lightweight environment built on existing mapping technologies will enable users to navigate visualizations of the remains interactively. The dissemination of the complex 3D models from Olympia through pre-rendered orthographic views will represent a model that might be adapted for many other ancient monuments. The site will allow flexible exploration, but it will also guide visitors through a new argument concerning the architectural history of the temple’s peristyle.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Architecture; Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


FEL-257873-18

Elaine A. Sullivan
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Visibility and Ritual Landscape at the Ancient Egyptian Necropolis of Saqqara, 2950-350 BCE

Preparation of a digital monograph investigating the ancient Egyptian burial site of Saqqara (2950-350 BCE) comparatively through time and space.

Ancient landscapes are a major focus of study in the field of archaeology, with research centered on the interaction between humans, culture, and the natural and built environment at sites around the world. While clearly of great interest to scholars, these past places remain elusive. The archaeological sites we visit today are palimpsests, the result of thousands of years of change, both architectural and environmental. The born-digital monograph Constructing the Sacred: Visibility and Ritual Landscape at the Egyptian Necropolis of Saqqara addresses ancient ritual landscape from a unique perspective, utilizing emerging 3D technologies to examine development at the complex, multi-period archaeological site of Saqqara, Egypt. Harnessing the temporal layering abilities of the 3D environment, it demonstrates how 3D modeling allows archaeologists to approach questions of meaning and human experience in now-disappeared landscapes in new ways.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


FEL-257962-18

Daniel J. Sherman
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Science and Spectacle in the History of French Archaeology, 1890-1940

A book-length study on the history of French archaeology from 1890 to 1940.

My project probes the intertwined histories of archaeology and French culture in the early twentieth century. It focuses on two controversies, over excavations at Carthage in the French Protectorate of Tunisia and about the authenticity of a supposed Neolithic site discovered in central France, as constitutive of a field suspended between scientific ambitions and media attention. Bringing together two sub-fields normally treated separately, classical archaeology and prehistory, the study offers a new ground-level view of the formation of archaeology as at once discipline and spectacle. I ask basic questions about the constitution of the archive and disciplines’ understandings of their own past that allow for reflection across history, my field of study, and archaeology, my object of study. The visual representation and display of archaeology, archaeological finds, and archaeologists receive particular emphasis as a connecting thread between discipline-formation and spectacle.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Cultural History; European History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


RA-259220-18

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2017 to March 2020)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Long-term Research Fellowships at the American Center of Oriental Research

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies; Social Sciences, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,200 (approved)
$30,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


RA-259260-18

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Tania Munz (Project Director: August 2017 to March 2020)
Robert D. Newman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Long-term Research Fellowships at the National Humanities Center

30 months of stipend support (3-5 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The National Humanities Center, an independent center exclusively devoted to advanced humanities research, seeks five nine-month fellowships for the next three-year cycle (grant period Jan. 1, 2019-June 30, 2022). Since 1978, NEH has generously supported five NHC fellowships during each granting cycle, excepting the last cycle when it supported three. Designated “NEH Fellows,” recipients of these awards are chosen through a rigorous vetting process and join a vibrant intellectual community of 35-40 total Fellows. Each works on a major research project throughout the academic year with significant support from our library staff and fellowship office. End-of-year evaluations from the roughly 1,400 Fellows who have been in residence generally describe their year at the NHC as the most inspiring and productive of their careers. The NHC focuses attention to diversity in all of its dimensions so that Fellows represent a broad range of disciplines, institutions, backgrounds and perspectives.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$301,454 (approved)
$301,454 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


RA-259286-18

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: August 2017 to present)
Long-term Research Fellowships at the American Research Institute in Turkey

12 months of stipend support (1-3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The ARIT NEH fellowship program supports scholars who conduct long-term interdisciplinary research in the humanities in Turkey. Their fields of study include art, archaeology, literature, linguistics, musicology, religion, and all aspects of cultural, social, and political history. NEH fellows interact with Turkish and U.S scholars at the ARIT research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, where their intellectual exchange promotes a broad-based understanding of the ancient and modern Near East. This scholarly interaction has enabled ARIT-NEH fellows to produce groundbreaking publications that have been shared with the public through their teaching and community outreach programs. ARIT center directors in Istanbul and Ankara facilitate access to research resources and colleagues in the country. For its NEH FPIRI program, ARIT requests 12 months total fellowship funding per year. Research tenures may cover 4 to 12 months, supporting 1 to 3 fellows annually.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$167,672 (approved)
$167,672 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


FT-259941-18

J. Cameron Monroe
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Archaeology at Cana: A West African City of the Atlantic Era, 1600–1894

Completion of an archaeological study and publication of a two-volume monograph on the West African kingdom of Dahomey (1600-1894).

Western perspectives on African cities have long privileged external factors in the rise of cities across the continent. In recent decades, however, archaeologists have revealed the local origins of cities, countering such arguments for the exogenous origins of African civilizations. Yet the global trading networks that engulfed Africa in the second millennium AD had wide-reaching impacts on African urban systems, and we are only beginning to explore how local and global forces articulated. Since 2000, I have explored this question in reference to the kingdom of Dahomey in West Africa, which thrived in the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In the coming year I plan to complete a two-volume monograph summarizing archaeological, documentary, and oral evidence from this research. The monograph will represent one of only a few detailed archaeological studies of a West Africa urban community in this period, providing comparative data for scholars working across the region.

Project fields:
African History; Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018


RZ-260848-18

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Christopher J. Ratte (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Notion Archaeological Research Project: The Biography of an Ancient Greek Urban Community

Excavation and analysis at Notion, an urban site from the Hellenistic and Roman periods, located in western Turkey. (36 months)

Archaeological excavation at Notion will examine how a community living in a port town in western Anatolia responded to developments in Greek urbanism and the expansion of Roman power. Notion lies in ancient Ionia, 15 km north of Ephesus. We focus on the tumultuous era of the 3rd century BCE to 1st century CE, when many cities were radically transformed through local initiative and external coercion. During this period Notion was relocated to a new site, but then abandoned after only a few centuries. Building on the results of archaeological survey, we will examine the historical and social processes enacted in the ultimately unsuccessful reinvention of the city through investigation of its residential areas. Research at Notion on urban development and devolution at the household scale offers a new approach to the study of western Anatolian cities, and contributes to comparative urban studies, household archaeology, landscape biography, and Ionian history.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$220,000 (approved)
$220,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


RZ-260900-18

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Jeffrey Barnet Fleisher (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Kathryn M. de Luna (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Matthew C. Pawlowicz (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)
The Demographics of Pre-History: South Central Africa Through Archaeology and Linguistics

Archaeological and linguistic research leading to a study of migration patterns in central Africa, 500-1500 CE.

The proposed project reconstructs the cultural history of mobility in south central Africa between the 6th and 16th centuries. Language shift and human migration have long served as explanations for the expansions of language families and populations. This project will be the first to study human mobility in such demographic histories as a historical problem in its own right, capturing the motives and contingencies that shaped changing forms of and ideas about mobility and, as a result, actually changed the pace and path of the larger expansion process. Such research on human mobility is only feasible with the creation of an interdisciplinary archive linking archaeological, ecological, ethnohistorical, and historical linguistic data. Each dataset will be developed at research sites in Zambia, a place lacking the traditional archives of humanistic research. The project illuminates the material, political, and cognitive lives of people who shaped the demographic history in this region.

Project fields:
African History; Anthropology; Linguistics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$209,724 (approved)
$209,724 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


FZ-261390-18

James Romm
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
The Sacred Band of Thebes and the Last Days of Greek Freedom (379–338 B.C.)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the "Sacred Band," a special infantry unit of the city of Thebes from 379-338 BCE, in the context of ancient Greek history, politics, and philosophy.

The Sacred Band, a Theban infantry unit made up of paired male lovers fighting side by side, is depicted by Greek sources as the pivotal factor in the 4th-century rise of Thebes and overthrow of Sparta. Yet no historical study has looked in depth at the legend of this elite corps. My book will trace the Band through the four decades in which it fought, from its creation in 379 BCE by a cadre of Theban patriots, to its annihilation by Alexander the Great at the Chaeronea in 338 BCE, a battle that brought an end to Greek political autonomy. I will examine the Band's role in Theban victories over Sparta during the 370's, and show that Plato's Symposium, a dialogue that alludes to the Sacred Band in discussing the power of eros, was likely inspired by it. Love's Warriors thus stands at the intersection of Platonic philosophy, military history and the study of Greek sexuality, with a nod to archaeology in its concluding exploration of the Sacred Band's mass grave on the field of Chaeronea.

Project fields:
Classics; Gender Studies; Military History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


FA-251491-17

Maggie Popkin
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)
Object Memory: Souvenirs, Memorabilia, and the Construction of Knowledge in the Roman Empire

A book-length study of ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their role in constructing knowledge and memory in the Roman Empire.

My project investigates ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their profound role in generating and mediating memory and knowledge in the Roman Empire. In Rome, where literacy was limited and visual communication was essential, souvenirs were a critical means for conveying complex ideas. The Roman Empire produced a rich range of souvenirs and memorabilia commemorating cities, sporting events, monumental statues, and religious pilgrimages. I examine how such objects constructed knowledge in an era before mechanical reproduction. Without access to print or digital media, many Romans learned about various sites, monuments, and events through images on souvenirs. Souvenirs and memorabilia are thus critical to understanding how ancient Romans conceptualized their world. Their study has broad implications for understanding the social functions of images in antiquity and beyond and is relevant to scholars concerned with visual culture’s impact on memory, perception, and knowledge.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-251789-17

Katina T. Lillios
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Prehistoric Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: The Making of a Cultural Mosaic

The completion of a book-length survey of the archaeology of the prehistoric Iberian peninsula.

For my NEH project I will complete a book entitled Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: From the Paleolithic through the Bronze Age (currently under contract with Cambridge University Press, scheduled for completion in July 2018). The book will document the rich and diverse histories of the peoples who lived on the Peninsula between 1,000,000 and 3000 years ago (the Bronze Age), through their art, burials, tools, and monuments. Despite recent dramatic discoveries at archaeological sites in Portugal and Spain, which have revolutionized our thinking about human history, the rich archaeological heritage of prehistoric Iberia remains largely unknown outside the Peninsula. My book will be the only up-to-date synthesis of Iberian archaeology, in English, accessible to students, scholars, and the interested public.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-252070-17

Chet Adam Van Duzer
Unknown institution
Annotation for Education in the Princeton/Brussels Copy of the 1525 Edition of Ptolemy’s Geography

Preparation of a digital edition of the annotations on a 1527 copy of Ptolemy's Geography that illuminate the understanding and teaching of geography in the early 16th century.

I seek a ten-month Mellon Fellowship for Digital Publication to fund the completion of my transcription, English translation, and study of the annotations in a copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy’s Geography that is currently divided between Princeton and a private collection in Brussels. The annotations, written in Latin in about 1527, are extremely profuse, were made for a student, and contain original geographical thought. They are valuable for studies of the reception of Ptolemy’s Geography, of sixteenth-century geographical education, and of European intellectual networks. The only good format in which to publish them is in a digital edition that shows images of the pages and thus the context of each annotation, with a full transcription and English translation, all searchable. Princeton has agreed to host the digital edition on its server in an instantiation of the open-source Mellon-funded Archaeology of Reading platform for digital editions of annotated early modern books.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Geography; Renaissance History; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 11/30/2017


FT-255150-17

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940

A book-length study about the connections between archeology and nation-building during the first two decades after the Mexican Revolution.

“Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940” examines the making of archaeological patrimony and an official Indian past during the first two decades of Mexico's revolutionary regime. The manuscript also looks at how the government's archaeological projects impacted native peoples at the ruins. With the NEH Summer Stipend, I will explore this formative stage in Mexican archaeology through research in Mexico City archives. My goal is to spend two consecutive months analyzing documents in two Mexico City archives that are essential to the completion of my manuscript: the Historical Archive of the National Museum of Anthropology (AHMNA) and the National Library of Anthropology and History (BNAH).

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017


RZ-255604-17

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Emma C. Blake (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
An Archaeological Field Survey in the Trapani Province of Western Sicily

Field survey and interpretation of finds from the coastal area near Marsala, Italy, in order to investigate cultural interaction with North Africa across the Sicilian Channel over the past 7,000 years. (36 months)

This archaeological field survey in Sicily addresses millennia-long interactions with Tunisia, 90 miles across the Sicilian Channel. The project will include two field seasons of artifact collection and one study season for analysis of survey findings. Results will be presented at conferences, in journals, and as a field report. The Channel is one of the busiest crossings for undocumented migrants entering Europe. Current migrations are the latest manifestations of a history of crossings in both directions. Although scholars of particular historical periods have noted the ties linking Tunisia and western Sicily at moments in history, this story of evolving interactions over millennia has never been told. A collaborative project involving intensive field surveys in the corner of Sicily closest to Tunisia is ideal to investigate this complex story. The proposed project will re-construct and explain the Tunisian presence in Western Sicily over time.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classics; Cultural History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,988 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2022


RZ-255623-17

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Jane Buikstra (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Eleanna Prevedorou (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)
An Archaeological Study of the Ancient Phaleron Cemetery near Athens, Greece

Archaeological study and analysis of 8th-5th-century of the cemetery of Phaleron, the ancient port of Athens, Greece. (36 months)

This study focuses upon the cemetery of Phaleron, at the port of the ancient city of Athens. The cemetery dates to the Archaic - Early Classical period (ca. 750-480 BCE), characterized by major sociopolitical reforms, including changes in ruling tenure, early codification of law, tyranny, and democracy. Phaleron cemetery consists of hundreds of burials, mainly simple pit graves, jar burials of infants, and skeletons with evidence for captivity, violence, and execution. The nature of the cemetery suggests the presence of lower status individuals, such as non-elites, outlaws, and the unwanted. By integrating archaeological and historical information with osteological, biochemical, and genetic data, we will address the identity of the people of Phaleron within what appears to have been a port community of diverse backgrounds. We ask for funding for a three-year project (2017-20) for the in-depth study, interpretation, and publication of the human burials of the Phaleron cemetery.

[Grant products]

Participating institutions:
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ) - Applicant/Recipient
American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ) - Participating Institution

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,124 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2021


RZ-255635-17

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Lisa Ann Maher (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Danielle A. Macdonald (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan

Excavation and analysis of early settlements of hunter-gatherers at the Paleolithic site of Kharaneh in eastern Jordan. (36 months)

The transition from hunter-gather to food-producing societies in southwest Asia was a pivotal shift in prehistory. The 20,000-year-old hunter-gatherer aggregation site of Kharaneh IV exhibits multi-seasonal, prolonged and repeated habitation, making it the largest Paleolithic site in the region and one that evidences emerging sedentism and settlement, economic intensification, and ritual behaviors associated with dwelling, almost 8,000 years earlier than previously known. As a central hub of occupation for groups from throughout the region, this site is uniquely able to inform us about the construction of communities and interaction networks across a broad social landscape by exploring the nature and motivations for aggregation by reconstructing the spatial organization of domestic and symbolic activities, and undertaking comparative analyses of material culture at contemporary sites to trace how the site’s inhabitants were integrated into broader spheres of social interaction.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 2/28/2021


RJ-255678-17

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001)
Julia A. King (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Conference: American History through the Archaeology of the Potomac River Valley

A conference and edited volume of essays on American history through the lens of archaeology of the Potomac River Valley.

This grant funds a small conference focused on developing an edited book manuscript describing research completed as part of the NEH-funded project, “The Lower Potomac River Valley at Contact, 1500-1720” (RZ-51442-12). This conference will be organized by Dr. Julie King and her co-collaborator, Barbara J. Heath (University of Tennessee), and will be held Sunday, May 14 through Wednesday, May 17, 2017. The book manuscript proposed as an outcome of this project would consist of 14-15 chapters by different authors, all of whom participated in the original sponsored NEH project in one capacity or another. The purpose of this concluding conference would be to review, critique, and better integrate individual essays for a planned peer-reviewed book. The goal is to have a final manuscript ready for submission to an academic press on or about September 1, 2017.

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Research)

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 5/31/2017


RZ-255760-17

Archaeology Southwest (Tucson, AZ 85701-1107)
Aaron Wright (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Archaeology and Oral Histories along the Lower Gila River in Southwestern Arizona, 600-1830 AD

Artifact survey at 43 Native American sites in the Gila River Valley in Arizona, leading to the development of interpretive print and online publications, lectures, and a book. (36 months)

The Lower Gila River Ethnographic and Archaeological Project (LGREAP) is an interdisciplinary, collaborative research program that is exploring and interpreting the relationship between cultural identity and migration along the lower Gila River in southwestern Arizona from 600 A.D. to 1830 A.D. through a Native American lens. In particular, LGREAP aims to couple archaeological and tribal interpretations of the past to yield a comprehensive, multiple narrative history on the dynamics of cultural identity in contexts of religious difference and migration. LGREAP has avid support from the four tribes with whom ethnographic research will be carried out. Furthermore, the Arizona State Historic Preservation Office has determined that the proposed archaeological fieldwork will not have an adverse affect on the historic properties, as regulated by Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Project deliverables include at least four peer-reviewed articles and a documentary film.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Comparative Religion; Native American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$175,000 (approved)
$175,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2021


FT-248929-16

Jamieson Clifford Donati
Unknown institution
Urban Spaces and Social Realities in the Peloponnese (700-100 BCE)

An article on the development of ancient Peloponnesian urbanization based on a synthesis of existing fieldwork and digital mapping.

This research project explores how the relationships between Greek urban forms and sociocultural and political realities shaped the worlds in which people lived in the Peloponnese (Southern Greece) from 700-100 BCE. Its methodological approach moves beyond conventional procedures by forming an interdisciplinary rapport between Archaeology and novel technologies. Notably, research incorporates a vast collection of new geophysical data from fieldwork recently completed at three Classical period settlements in the Peloponnese (Elis, Heraia, and Mantinea). This original material gives a comprehensive overview of the spatial characteristics of these Greek cities on an impressive scale, and, along with contextual evidence from excavations, field survey, and historical sources, it forms the basis for a broader survey of the diverse urban landscapes of the Peloponnese.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 6/30/2016


RZ-249777-16

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Justin Leidwanger (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
The Marzamemi Church Wreck

Excavation and analysis at the underwater shipwreck site of Marzamemi in Sicily. See website at https://marzamemi.stanford.edu/.

With its immense and well-preserved cargo that includes prefabricated 6th-century religious architectural and decorative elements, the famous Marzamemi "church wreck" off Sicily raises critical questions about interrelated issues of private commercial and directed exchange, local and imperial patronage and propaganda, urban and provincial religious life, and maritime connectivity more generally. The site's unique material assemblage, its location astride some of the busiest Mediterranean sea lanes, and its historical context amid the twilight of the Roman Empire provide an ideal opportunity to evaluate the role of communication and exchange in these profound transformations of the ancient world. This proposal seeks funding to support a three-year multidisciplinary research program of excavation, digital modeling, and analysis as a window into this remarkable site.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 3/31/2021


RZ-249831-16

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
William Henry Honeychurch (Project Director: December 2015 to present)
Joshua Wright (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)
Chunag Amartuvshin (Co Project Director: January 2016 to present)
Innovative Disruptions: The Archaeology of Nomadic Statehood in Eastern Mongolia

The Dornod Mongol Survey (DMS) will excavate, analyse, and publish findings on archaeological sites in the Sukhbaatar region of eastern Mongolia, looking to answer questions about Mongolia's political traditions, the rise of the Great Wall, and the rivalry between the civilizations of China and Inner Asia.

This proposal requests support for a three year archaeological survey and excavation project (2017-2020) to test a new model for Xiongnu state emergence. The Dornod Mongol Survey (DMS) project seeks to test this model in a part of Mongolia where archaeological research is still greatly under-represented, specifically in the southeastern steppe region of Sukhbaatar province. Our study not only adds significantly to knowledge of Mongolia’s political heritage, but to a fuller understanding of the development of East Asia as a vast territory composed of diverse political traditions alternately in competition and alliance over millennia. Study of these processes helps to explain the making of the Xiongnu state, the rise of the Great Wall frontier, and the enduring legacy of rivalry between the very different civilizations of China and of Inner Asia.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$221,059 (approved)
$219,918 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


FA-232662-16

Enrique R. Rodriguez-Alegria
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
The Material Worlds of 16th-Century Colonial Mexico City

The writing of a book on the material culture of 16th-century Mexico City.

The proposed project reevaluates the social and cultural strategies of Spanish colonizers in Mexico City, in light of recent studies that have shown that indigenous people maintained much power in the colonial period. It focuses on more than 11,000 belongings of 39 Spanish colonizers found in probate inventories, and on artifacts and architecture excavated in Spanish houses in Mexico City. The study includes analysis of how the city transformed, the use of indigenous and Spanish technologies, clothing, food, and how the material aspects of daily life were part of political and social strategies for obtaining power. The main theoretical contribution will be a vision of colonialism not just as an act of ethnic separatism, but also a process of interethnic recognition, alliance formation, and conflict. In this case, class differences were not entirely the same as ethnic difference, and in many occasions, class differences guided the strategies of colonizers more than ethnic differences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology; Latin American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-232741-16

Carolina López-Ruiz
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Phoenician Networks in the Mediterranean from Greece to Iberia, ca. 700-500 BCE

A book-length study on the impact of Phoenician traders and colonists in the Mediterranean region during the late Iron Age, from about 700-500 BCE.

Between the eighth and early sixth centuries BCE, flourishing cultures from Greece, Italy, and Iberia engaged in a process of contact and adaptation of Near Eastern styles and technologies known as the "orientalizing" phase or "orientalizing revolution." These include tangible as well as non-material cultural capital (literacy among them). The Phoenicians in particular, in their mercantile and colonial expansion in this period, were crucial agents in this story of encounters, offering and exploiting the "oriental" models of the urban, sophisticated, complex societies of the Near East. This novel monograph will offer the first systematic, comparative treatment of this transformative period across the Mediterranean, focusing on the process through which Iron Age societies entered the first transnational cultural and economic network. It will also call into question our stark, artificial historical division between "classical" and Semitic cultures and their respective civilizing roles.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Classics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


HB-50575-15

Keith M. Jordan
California State University, Fresno Foundation (Fresno, CA 93740-0001)
Pre-Columbian Art of the Western and Northern Frontiers of Mesoamerica

I seek NEH funding to improve the quality/scope of a new art history class surveying West/North Mexican pre-Columbian art by replacing the current visual aids with new digital slides of architecture and artifacts, and increasing the breadth/depth of content by field research in Mexico (Sinaloa, Durango, Zacatecas, and Jalisco). My project is a step towards rectifying a major gap in education about Mexico’s cultural heritage and reclaiming neglected indigenous art traditions from the margins to which they have been historically relegated in the field of art history. While these regions receive most of their scant coverage in archaeology publications, this course explores them using the methods of art history: iconographic analysis, social and economic contextual approaches, and select application of structuralist, poststructuralist, feminist, etc., perspectives. While drawing on archaeology for background, it is the first to approach the subject from within the humanities.

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$8,400 (approved)
$8,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FA-58336-15

Robert Michael Morrissey
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
The Illinois and the Edge Effect: Bison Algonquians in the Colonial Mississippi Valley

This is a new history of the middle of the North American continent from the standpoint of the Native American people who controlled it from well before contact through the early 19th century. Beginning in the 1400s, the Illinois rose to power by exploiting unique social and ecological opportunities in-between the woodlands of the east and the plains of the west. Becoming North America's only "bison Algonquians," they built power based on bison hunting and the slave trade, and settled the largest population center on the continent in the 1680s. This book will be the first narrative ethnohistory and environmental history of the Illinois. Moreover, it will use the lens of human-animal studies, as well as archaeology, linguistics, and material culture, to tell early American history in new way. In time for the celebration of Illinois' state bicentennial in 2018, this book will bring to light the history of Native power in the heart of America.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


RA-228502-15

American Research Center in Egypt (Alexandria , VA 22314-1891)
Gerry Dee Scott (Project Director: August 2014 to February 2018)
Louise Bertini (Project Director: February 2018 to April 2020)
Yasmin El Shazly (Project Director: April 2020 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in Egypt at the American Research Center in Egypt

10 months of stipend support (1 to 2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

ARCE administers research fellowships for postdoctoral scholars and professionals affiliated with North American universities and research institutions with funding from the NEH. These fellowships are awarded for periods ranging from 4-10 months. Pre-doctoral scholars are funded through a grant from the U.S. State Department. The ARCE Fellowship Program enables fellows to reside in Egypt in order to conduct research, and build and expand professional networks with Egyptian scholars. Upon return to their home institutions, NEH-funded Fellows integrate their research experience into their academic courses. Further dissemination of results occur through active engagement in local, national, and international symposia and scholarly publications thus contributing to academia and a deeper understanding between cultures.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$141,000 (approved)
$141,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 9/30/2019


RA-228592-15

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Paul J. Erickson (Project Director: August 2014 to September 2016)
Susan Forgit (Project Director: September 2016 to December 2016)
James David Moran (Project Director: December 2016 to May 2017)
Nan Wolverton (Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

28 months of stipend support (3-7 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The American Antiquarian Society is an independent research library of early American history, literature, and culture through 1876 located in Worcester, MA. Founded in 1812, the Society's collections include over four million items--the largest collection of early American printed materials anywhere in the world. Building on decades of support from the Endowment, the AAS is applying for renewal funding for its program of long-term fellowships, to run from 1/1/2016 through 6/30/2019, for thirty fellowship months per year, enabling scholars from around the country and a variety of career stages to visit AAS to conduct sustained research for a period of 4 to 12 months. These fellowships are crucial to the Society's robust set of scholarly programs, and to its mission of fostering innovative humanities research of the highest quality that presents the unique holdings of the Society's library to a broad set of audiences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$373,800 (approved)
$373,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2019


RA-228605-15

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: August 2014 to February 2017)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the American Research Institute in Turkey

12 months of stipend support (1 to 3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities affiliated with ARIT centers in Istanbul and Ankara, Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for 2016, 2017, and 2018. Also requested are funds for a portion of the expense of selecting the fellows, beginning in January 2016. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Near and Middle Eastern History; Turkish Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$172,200 (approved)
$172,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


RA-228627-15

American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Minna M. Lee (Project Director: August 2014 to April 2016)
Mary E. Darlington (Project Director: April 2016 to June 2017)
Alicia M. Dissinger (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2018)
Jenifer Neils (Project Director: March 2018 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in Greece at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens

20 months of stipend support (2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies (ASCSA) provides US-based postdoctoral scholars with research opportunities at the ASCSA's outstanding facilities in Greece, including the Blegen and Gennadius Libraries, School Archives, and the study centers in the Athenian Agora and Ancient Corinth, as well as access, by permit, to other research materials and the monuments and sites of Greece. Fellowships are awarded to scholars pursuing pure research on humanities topics related to Greece in all periods, from prehistory to the present day. NEH Fellows also benefit from the stimulating interaction with a diverse community of students and scholars at the ASCSA, and take part in a rich array of lectures, conferences and workshops in Athens. For 19 years the ASCSA has hosted NEH Fellows. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Area Studies; Classical History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$273,000 (approved)
$273,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


FT-229347-15

Julia A. Hendon
Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
Archaeological Studies of Technology as a Social Process

Summer reading and writing on Archaeology, History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and Medicine.

How can we understand technology from a humanistic perspective? My book answers this question by focusing on the craftswomen and craftsmen who worked in ancient societies. My previous work on Aztec and Maya weaving traditions and my own experiences as a weaver using the same kinds of looms and tools have brought home to me the importance of looking at crafting from the perspective of the practitioners themselves. Rather than assuming that technology is best defined as the application of scientific principles to practical uses, I employ a definition of technology that is better suited for humanists working in historical and non-Western contexts: technology as a set of relationships among people and between people and the materials with which they work. I illustrate my argument with four case studies, weaving, Roman pottery production, Moche metal-working, and glass-blowing in Israel during the Byzantine era.

Project fields:
Archaeology; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FT-229664-15

Kristine Megan Trego
Bucknell University (Lewisburg, PA 17837-2005)
The Plainware Pottery and Utilitarian Items from the Tektas Burnu Classical Greek Shipwreck

Summer research and writing on Ancient History, Archaeology and Classics.

This project analyzes and prepares for publication the corpus of crew materials on board the Classical Greek merchant ship that wrecked at Tektas Burnu, Turkey in the late fifth century B.C.E. The corpus includes cooking pots, dining and drinking vessels, fishing equipment, and gaming pieces. In addition to providing evidence on the size of the crew and possible ports of call, the study of these artifacts and their archaeological context on the seabed sheds light on shipboard life and the adaptation of social customs for life at sea. This stipend will support my travel and summer residency in Bodrum, Turkey as I work in the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology to measure, photograph, sample, and record some seventy artifacts that are housed and protected at the museum. These artifacts are the last objects to be studied and included in the chapters on plainware pottery and utilitarian objects which I am authoring for the final publication of theTektas Burnu shipwreck excavation.

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology; Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 8/31/2015


RZ-230366-15

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Anna M. Prentiss (Project Director: December 2014 to present)
Household Archaeology at Bridge River, British Columbia: The Early Floors of Housepit 54

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of a single dwelling with fifteen superimposed floors occupied from 300 A.D. over a period of 1,400 years in British Columbia and the preparation for publication of two books. (24 months)

The Bridge River Archaeological Project, a partnership of The University of Montana and the Bridge River Indian Band, will complete excavations of Housepit 54 at the Bridge River site in southern British Columbia. Housepit 54 is a deeply stratified housepit within a village of 80 such houses. This particular house offers the extraordinary opportunity to examine household history on an inter-generational basis spanning a period in which the greater village more than doubled in size, developed socio-economic inequality, suffered economic turmoil, and was eventually abandoned.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$142,271 (approved)
$142,271 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 4/30/2019


RZ-230425-15

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Gordon H. Chang (Project Director: December 2014 to May 2017)
Shelley Fisher Fishkin (Co Project Director: January 2015 to May 2017)
Chinese Railroad Workers in North America: A Conference

An international scholarly conference on Chinese Railroad Workers in North America, to take place in April 2016 at Stanford University. (12 months)

This grant is requested to hold the "Culminating Conference of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project at Stanford University." Between 1865 and 1869, 10,000-15,000 Chinese migrants toiled at a grueling pace and in perilous working conditions to help construct America's first transcontinental railroad. The labor of these Chinese workers was pivotal to the development of the United States and to the founding of Stanford University. The Project seeks to recover and interpret the work of the Chinese railroad workers to remedy major historical neglect and lacunae in Chinese as well as U.S. history. The conference will be trans-national and multidisciplinary. Thirty scholars from North America and Asia will present original scholarship, based on four years of research. In addition, conference participants will take a three-day field trip to the Sierra high country to visit sites where Chinese railroad workers labored to build the railroad.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
American Studies; Asian American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$65,000 (approved)
$61,688 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


RZ-230461-15

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
David Landon (Project Director: December 2014 to present)
Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts: Archaeology and Geophysics

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of new sites and existing artifacts in collections in connection with the original 17th-century settlement of Plymouth, Massachusetts. (36 months)

This project is for collaborative research focused on the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. It comprises three years of geophysical survey, pollen coring, archaeological excavation, and laboratory analysis focused on the original 17th-century settlement in downtown Plymouth and surrounding sites. This work will increase our understanding of the creation of the English colonial landscape, the environmental context and ecological consequences of colonization, and the interactions between Colonists and Native people. The Plymouth Colony will be the subject of intense public attention in the lead up to the 400th anniversary of the Colony in 2020. This NEH project will be the linchpin for building an academic understanding of the Plymouth settlement and portraying its importance to the broader public.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2020


FZ-230918-15

Eric Cline
George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Digging up Armageddon: The Story of Biblical Megiddo from Canaanites to Christians

A book-length study of the archaeology and history of ancient Megiddo in northern Israel, the site referred to as Armageddon in the Book of Revelation.

Few people today realize that Armageddon is a real place, but it certainly is. It is the ancient site of Megiddo in northern Israel, where the remains of 20 cities lie buried one on top of another within a 70-foot-tall mound. James Michener's book "The Source," published to worldwide acclaim in 1965, featured the fictitious site of Makor, which was a compilation of the archaeological sites of Megiddo and Hazor. "Digging up Armageddon" turns fiction into fact, for it is the real story of Megiddo, told in a way that has never been done before. Written as narrative non-fiction in an unprecedented contribution to the humanities by the current co-director of the Megiddo Expedition, "Digging up Armageddon" is a compelling reconstruction of Megiddo's archaeology and history down through the ages, including both the excavations and the excavators, set within the larger context of the development of western civilization from the Neolithic Revolution through the end of classical antiquity.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Archaeology

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


FA-57612-14

Elizabeth Stinette Bolman
Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt

Conservation in Upper Egypt has revealed a unique and previously overlooked Late Antique church. This spectacular monument was built circa 500, at a site called the Red Monastery. Its dramatic triconch sanctuary includes tiers of niches framed by columns, supporting three huge semidomes. The interior is enlivened by a polychromed skin of painted figures and ornamental patterns, including the earliest surviving decorated apse in a church. I have been directing a conservation project there for the last decade, and have invited specialists in late antique monasticism, the Coptic language, the liturgy, archaeology and conservation to collaborate with me on an illustrated, multi-disciplinary volume on the church. The book will be a scholarly study but one that is also accessible to the general public. I have made significant progress on my editorial work, but not on my own contributions, which comprise about half of the volume. This fellowship application is for funding to complete them.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History of Religion; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FA-57757-14

Carole Paul
University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
The Museo Capitolino and the Origins of the Public Art Museum

Opened in 1734, the Museo Capitolino on the Capitoline Hill, or Campidoglio, in Rome was the earliest institution of international significance to manifest the most essential characteristics of the public art museum as it has evolved into the present day. Despite the obvious importance of the Capitoline, there exists no comprehensive account of this seminal institution, which preceded by some sixty years the opening of the Louvre, conventionally regarded as the archetypal public art museum. The book that I propose to write will examine the origin and growth of the Capitoline and its influence on the development of modern museums from the formation of the oldest civic collection on the Campidoglio in 1471 to 1869, when the city government of Rome was radically restructured with the unification of Italy.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


FA-57961-14

Karen B. Stern
CUNY Research Foundation, Brooklyn College (Brooklyn, NY 11210-2850)
Jewish Graffiti in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Hundreds of examples of ancient graffiti of Jewish cultural provenance have been discovered in significant archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean. To this point, historians have ignored these graffiti, which have appeared too commonplace for serious consideration. My research project, 'Graffiti and the Forgotten Jews of Late Antiquity,' argues, by contrast, that a systematic review of graffiti can illuminate otherwise lost evidence for the diversity of Jewish cultures in the Greco-Roman world. Receipt of an NEH fellowship would allow me to complete two penultimate phases of this research: first, to travel to specific archaeological sites to complete my photography of graffiti for a project database, and second, to complete drafts of the final three chapters of my related monograph-in-progress, tentatively entitled, 'Writing on the Wall: Graffiti and the Forgotten Jews of Late Antiquity,' which is presently under contract review with a major university press.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient History; History of Religion; Jewish Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2014 – 1/31/2015


FB-57824-14

Rachel Corr
Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton, FL 33431-6424)
Transformations in Race Relations and the Creation of Ethnic Identity in 18th-Century Ecuador

I seek to uncover changes in eighteenth century race relations and ethnic identities in the Audiencia de Quito (Ecuador), specifically among peoples in the town of Pelileo. Although the population of modern Pelileo is predominantly white-mestizo with one distinct, indigenous ethnic enclave, colonial Pelileo was a multiethnic, multiracial town. I aim not only to rectify assumptions about historical isolationism between "racial" groups, but also to understand people's varied responses to historical pressures through the creation of new identities. The research contributes to two growing bodies of scholarship in Latin American ethnohistory: (1) cooperative relations among Africans, indigenous people, Spaniards and mestizos, and (2) people's varied responses to historical contingencies, including the creation of a new ethnic identity whose origin has long baffled ethnohistorians.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 7/31/2015


RA-50137-14

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2013 to December 2019)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in Jordan at the American Center of Oriental Research

6 months of stipend support (1 to 2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The project will award three (3) six-month and three (3) four-month fellowships to established senior scholars during the grant period. There will be one (1) six-month and one (1) four-month award given during each of the three years of the grant period. The project will take place at the institute in Amman, Jordan and will support senior scholars with new research initiatives or those with ongoing research and/or publication projects in the humanities relating to Jordan and the Middle East. The combined cost of the proposed two (2) annual awards each will be $47,600, which includes stipend, travel, accommodations, and research funds.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Area Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$91,800 (approved)
$72,433 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


RA-50140-14

W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (Jerusalem 9711049 Israel)
Matthew J. Adams (Project Director: August 2013 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in Israel at the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem

14 months of stipend support (1 to 3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of funds.

The W.F. Albright Institute is applying for the equivalent of 24 stipend months for a total of $100,800 per year, for each of the academic years 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-18, plus related selection costs at $9,000 per year. Funds would be used annually to support up to six (from 4 to 12 months) continuous, residential fellowships at the Institute in Jerusalem. Fellows pursue a research project, give a public lecture to the academic community while in residence, and participate in the activities of the Institute's scholarly community. The fellows' research projects culminate in a scholarly publication(s). The impact of this research, transmitted through the Albright's hundreds of alumni to institutions all over the world, has had a profound effect on the understanding of the humanities, western civilization, and its origins in the ancient Near East. The Albright supports scholarly work in Near Eastern studies from prehistory through the early Islamic period.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$197,400 (approved)
$197,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


FT-61649-14

Ben Wallace Fallaw
Colby College (Waterville, ME 04901-8840)
Between the Maya and the Mexican Revolution: Bartolome Garcia Correa (1893-1978) and Mestizo Politics in Yucatan

Ethnobiographies (slave narratives, Rigoberta Menchu's) usually explore racism and ethnic self-discovery, central themes in the human experience of the Americas. My ethnobiography of Bartolome Garcia (1893-1978), mestizo (mixed race) governor of Yucatan, Mexico, reveals his conflictive public and private relationship with indigeneity, a dilemma shared by mestizos across the hemisphere. Garcia pioneered mestizo politics, celebrating a romanticized Maya past in architecture, archaeology, literature, even opera, while promoting the assimilation of contemporary indigenous people. To analyze his life and its historical context, I engage interdisciplinary discussions of indigeneity, mestizaje (racial and cultural mixing), state formation, modernity, and the politics of cultural production. By exploring the Maya's struggle to preserve community and culture, the book will contribute to the ethnohistory of the Americas as well.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 7/31/2014


RZ-51672-14

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (Carbondale, IL 62901)
Gretchen R. Dabbs (Project Director: January 2014 to present)
Anna Stevens (Co Project Director: January 2014 to present)
The North Tombs Cemeteries at Amarna, an Abandoned City of Ancient Egypt

Archaeological excavation and bioarchaeological analysis at the North Tombs Cemeteries (14th-century BCE) at Tell el-Amarna, Egypt. (36 months)

This proposal seeks funding for the excavation and analysis of the North Tombs Cemeteries at the New Kingdom Egyptian site of Amarna, capital city during Akhenaten's religious revolution. The goal of this project is to address the growing discord between the research outputs of bioarchaeologists who study human remains and of archaeologists who focus upon the material culture used and spaces inhabited by people in the past and offer a pioneering case study of social archaeology that places research on ancient material culture, urban space and human remains within a collective narrative that focuses on the greater elucidation of human experiences as they relate to personal life histories, the relationships between the body and person, the place of the individual in society, and the inhabited urban context.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$253,817 (approved)
$253,817 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2019


RZ-51674-14

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Krysta Ryzewski (Project Director: January 2014 to December 2019)
Caribbean Colonial Interactions and Dynamic Island Communities: A Diachronic Archaeology of Montserrat, 1000-1730 AD

An archaeological survey and excavation on Montserrat, and preparation for publication of peer-reviewed articles and an illustrated book on the island's archaeological history. (36 months)

This proposal seeks NEH support for a three-year collaborative study focused on the archaeology of the Caribbean island of Montserrat during the period between ca.1000 and 1730 AD. Our objective is to understand the culture history and social dynamics of Montserratian communities during centuries spanning European arrival through a focus on three archaeological sites: Blake's Estate, Valentine Ghaut, and Thatch Valley. We will employ multiple archaeological, historical, and geophysical methods to achieve this objective. Our resulting data will allow us to consider how and why Montserrat's inhabitants maintained, negotiated, and adapted to circumstances of both immediate and incremental change during the period's processes of colonization.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$205,840 (approved)
$197,194 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 4/30/2019


RZ-51699-14

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Meredith Slater Chesson (Project Director: January 2014 to present)
John E. Robb (Co Project Director: January 2014 to present)
The Political Logic of a Mediterranean Landscape: Southernmost Calabria from 6000 BC to the Present

Anthropological and archaeological fieldwork at Bova Marina in Calabria (Italy), analysis of samples, and preparation of a multi-author monograph. (36 months)

How have the human landscapes of the Mediterranean changed through the millenia? What is the historical fact behind the stereotypical images of the "traditional" Italian countryside? This project traces dramatic historical changes over the last 8,000 years in how humans have settled the landscape of rural Calabria, a rugged territory at the tip of the Italian peninsula. Inaccessible hilltop towns, isolated farmsteads, coastal villas, brigand camps, shifting hamlets: Neolithic and Bronze Age people, Greeks, Romans, and medieval people all chose very different, and sometimes to us completely counter-intuitive ways of occupying this challenging and marginal landscape. In bringing to publication almost twenty years of achaeological and historical research, this project shows how historical landscapes integrate ecologies, political order, and the everyday strategies people use to get by, create self-sufficiency and resilience, and protect their political autonomy.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$222,273 (approved)
$222,273 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2018


RZ-51748-14

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Nathaniel Parker VanValkenburgh (Project Director: January 2014 to present)
Imperial Spaces: Forced Resettlement, Diet and Daily Life at Carrizales, Peru

Archaeological survey and excavation at two sites in Peru's Zaña valley, historical research in Peru and Spain for preparation for scholarly monographs, and a public interactive website. (30 months)

This proposal seeks funding to support archaeological and historical research on Spanish colonial forced resettlement (reducción) in Peru's lower Zaña valley -- specifically, through archaeological excavations and artifact analysis at two sites (Carrizales and Conjunto 125), as well as archival research in Peru and Spain. In particular, through the study of domestic space and foodways at Carrizales and Conjunto 125, we seek to understand how this Early modern social engineering project took shape in quotidian spaces and how indigenous communities adapted to the challenges of life in new settlements, under a new political-economic regime. Our proposed research incorporates two months of additional archaeological excavations, extensive archival research and artifact analysis, and the publication and presentation of results to both public and scholarly audiences, through digital and printed media.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$145,888 (approved)
$145,888 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 3/31/2018


RZ-51768-14

California State University, Northridge, University Corporation (Northridge, CA 91330-8316)
Owen Patrick Doonan (Project Director: January 2014 to present)
Origins and Development of the Black Sea Colonial System: Excavations in the Early Greek Colony of Sinope, Turkey

Archaeological excavation and analysis at the Black Sea port of Sinop, Turkey. (36 months)

The Sinop Regional Archaeological Project will carry out three seasons of excavation and restoration in the heart of the ancient city of Sinope (modern Sinop), the most strategic port in the Black Sea region from the early first millennium BCE until the Crimean war. The site preserves a unique pre-colonial to early colonial sequence in one of earliest and likely best-preserved early Ionian colony sites in the Black Sea (Pontic) region. The purpose of these three seasons of excavation is to test the proposition that a highly developed system of trans-Pontic interaction was active before the arrival of the Ionian colonists in the seventh century BCE by stratigraphic excavation of a pre-colonial Iron Age settlement featuring intrusive North Pontic ceramics and architecture at the site of the early colony of Sinope. The excavation is designed to integrate with the systematic archaeological survey carried out by our team in the hinterland of Sinope from 1996-2000 and 2010-12.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Classical History; Classics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2020


RQ-50869-14

California State University, Sacramento (Sacramento, CA 95819-2694)
Nikolaos Lazaridis (Project Director: January 2014 to June 2016)
Salima Ikram (Co Project Director: January 2014 to June 2016)
Ancient Travelers' Inscriptions from Kharga Oasis, Egypt

Work toward publication of eighty-four inscriptions that were carved between 2000 BC and 400 AD on the surface of sandstone rocks, located along routes connecting the Egyptian western desert to the Nile Valley and North Sudan. (12 months)

The project aims at publishing 84 ancient inscriptions that have been discovered in the Egyptian western desert by the North Kharga Oasis Survey team. The inscriptions under study were carved between 2000 BC and 400 AD on the surface of 15 sandstone rocks, situated along a well-trodden network of desert routes that during that period connected the Egyptian desert oases to the Nile Valley and North Sudan. By making available for the first time these previously unrecorded rock inscriptions to both scholarly and lay audiences, this project contributes greatly to the study of ancient travel practices and to the understanding of the ways in which ancient cultures experienced and utilized hostile desert environments, like that in Kharga Oasis. In addition, the recording and study of these inscriptions are very important as they salvage antiquities whose very existence has for a long time been under the threat of destruction by harsh environmental conditions and illicit human activity.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient History; Ancient Languages; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$109,557 (approved)
$107,792 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


RZ-51417-13

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Patricia L. Crown (Project Director: December 2011 to present)
Chocolate, Cylinder Jars, and Ritual in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

The excavation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological remains for further evidence about the ritual use of cylinder jars in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico between 1000 and 1140 AD. (36 months)

Recently discovered chocolate residues in cylinder jars raise questions about ritual activity in Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon. Project activities include reexcavation of Room 28 in Pueblo Bonito to obtain dates and residues from the room that held a cache of over 60 percent of all known cylinder jars, and reanalysis of museum collections removed from that room in 1896. The project addresses the Bridging Cultures initiative by exploring ritual and cultural interaction in the past.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$123,828 (approved)
$123,828 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 5/31/2017


FB-56856-13

Jonathan Best
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Redating Early Korean and Japanese History based on the 12th-Century "Samguk sagi," Korea's Oldest Surviving Chronicle

The 12th-century Samguk sagi is the oldest surviving history of Korea. Compiled at royal command, it chronicles three early kingdoms—Silla, Koguryo, and Paekche—that tradition holds were founded in the 1st century BCE and that came to an end ca. 665. Archaeological evidence and data from earlier Chinese and Japanese sources reveal, however, that Silla and Paekche only emerged as royal states in the 4th century. To fill the historiographic voids created by the fragmentary records still extant and the incredibly early foundations credited to these kingdoms, the text’s editors systematically ‘redated’ entries from the few surviving records. By comparative historical analysis and comparison with the archaeological record, I have ascertained the system whereby this redating was done—and thus am able to return the anachronistic entries to their original dating and thereby create a more accurate history of early Korea and its relations with Japan than has been available for over 850 years.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013


FB-56857-13

Adam Arenson
University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, TX 79968-8900)
Back from Canada: African North Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction

Back from Canada is the first comprehensive study of African North Americans, those men and women redefined by having spent time in both the United States and Canada. When struggling for access to social and political participation in the United States, these individuals had a reference point in a similar but distinct Anglo-American society with a different history of slavery, emancipation, and claims for equal rights. By reconsidering African North American soldiers, political actors, and cultural advocates within a transnational context, Back from Canada provides a new understanding of U.S. history from the beginnings of the Underground Railroad to the death of the emancipation generation (c. 1830-1920), expanding African American history, and Civil War and Reconstruction studies northward. Back from Canada will document how these African North Americans saw both countries anew, and will use their experience to deepen our understanding of the U.S.-Canada border in world history.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 8/31/2014


FB-57302-13

Heping Liu
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
The Relation between Painting and Empire in Early Northern Song China, 960-1063

The first century of the Song dynasty (960-1279) marked a turning point in Chinese history when the concept of empire underwent a fundamental change. The rise of the imperial cult brought about new modes of patronage, new expectation for painters, and high achievements in the art of painting. The Song Painting Academy, founded in 984 as the world’s first of its kind, was closely tied to the life of the early Song Empire from its conception. My book is the first in-depth study to investigate the complex relationship of empire and painting in the early Song. It consists of eight chapters: The emperor; The allure of the Academy; Outside the academy; The eunuchs; Yu the Great controlling the flood; The Temple of Jade Purity; Empress Liu’s Icon of Maitreya; and Four events of the Jingde Era. All explore the various dimensions of a central question: How did the practice of painting, in and outside the Academy, contribute to the formation, legitimacy, and propagation of the new empire?

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


FT-60454-13

Bonnie Effros
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
Walking in the Footsteps of the Romans: French Colonial Archaeology in Algeria, 1830-1900

Following the conquest of Algiers in 1830, the French army mined hundreds of ancient Roman monuments for stone to construct barracks, defensive structures, and roads. The destruction of these sites disturbed the classically trained officers who took a lead role in preserving a record of impressive Roman structures by copying ancient inscriptions, sketching desert ruins, and conducting informal excavations. Although these antiquarian activities were known to French administrators overseeing the conquest of Algeria, study of the ancient Roman past in North Africa remained haphazard. This project thus offers a nuanced view of the role of the Roman past in French narratives of the Algerian occupation and the building of a new settler identity linked to its soil. It emphasizes the importance of colonial archives from French-occupied Algeria for rewriting the history of the discipline of archaeology, since archaeological endeavors in colonial and metropolitan France were deeply intertwined.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2013


RZ-51555-13

North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
S. Thomas Parker (Project Director: December 2012 to present)
Megan Perry (Co Project Director: December 2012 to present)
Reimagining Urban Space: Petra in the 1st - 4th Centuries A.D.

Archaeological excavation and analysis of first through fourth century materials at the North Ridge of ancient Petra, Jordan. (36 months)

Diverse writers throughout history have commented on the overcrowded, dangerous, disease-ridden, and rubbish- and vermin-filled nature of urban life. Ancient cities in particular have been seen as demographic drains on rural populations, depending on immigrants from the rural countryside to sustain their population. Immigrants, less exposed to diseases supported by large populations or bringing with them their own disease pathogens, would profoundly impact the urban ecosystem. To what extent does this ecological model fit urban centers in antiquity? This project explores the urban ecosystem of Petra, an ancient city in Jordan, through analysis of human health, disease, diet, domestic space, and public health infrastructure. These data will be generated through the excavation of 1st century A.D. tombs and 1st - 4th centuries A.D. domestic structures on Petra's North Ridge.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$304,759 (approved)
$304,759 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 10/31/2018

Funding details:
Original grant (2013) $290,000
Supplement (2017) $14,759


RZ-51556-13

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Christina M. Luke (Project Director: December 2012 to May 2018)
Christopher H. Roosevelt (Co Project Director: December 2012 to May 2018)
Bronze Age Cultural Dynamics, Sustainability, and Landscapes in the Marmara Lake Basin, Gediz Valley, Western Turkey

Archaeological excavation and analysis of a second millennium BCE site at Kaymakçi in the Marmara Lake Basin, Western Anatolia, Turkey. (36 months)

Our research question focuses on the establishment and maintenance of regional authority in the Marmara Lake Basin, the likely core of the Seha River Land, in the context of social and cultural hybridization of Aegean, central Anatolian, and local traditions. We hypothesize the following: (1) that the 2nd-millennium BCE network of citadels in the Marmara Lake Basin reflects hybrid responses to Aegean and central Anatolian traditions of residential, administrative, and fortification design and organization indicative of increasingly centralized socio-political authority; (2) that shared Anatolian ritual traditions of libation were performed near citadels and sacred locales as a means of reifying authority; (3) and that long-standing and local subsistence practices and risk-management strategies enabled its sustainability.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$281,645 (approved)
$281,645 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2017


RZ-51575-13

Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1698)
Heather Hurst (Project Director: December 2012 to May 2018)
Assembling the Mayan Mural Fragments from San Bartolo, Guatemala

The reassembly, interpretation, and dissemination of early Mayan murals discovered among the first-century construction rubble at the Ixim temple at San Bartolo, Guatemala. (30 months)

Recently discovered Maya murals at San Bartolo, Guatemala revealed an elaborate artistic program of mythology and texts from the Preclassic period. However, the majority of these artworks were intentionally broken into fragments and concealed by the ancient Maya. The San Bartolo Mural Fragments Project proposes a multidisciplinary three-year collaborative research program, Murals in Motion, to reassemble wall paintings from fragments recovered in archaeological excavations. The project will re-discover the lost murals from the Ixim temple (ca.100 B.C.) by piecing together a jigsaw puzzle of over 3000 fragments of painted figures, deities, texts, and animals. Through iconographic, epigraphic, and materials analysis, the project will address: What roles did image, myth, and art-making play in the process of urban growth and early state formation in the Maya lowlands? Murals in Motion balances research, cultural heritage preservation, and education/outreach in its design and outcomes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$185,000 (approved)
$185,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2013 – 2/28/2017


RQ-50742-13

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
Paul Joseph Grant-Costa (Project Director: December 2012 to May 2017)
The New England Indian Papers Series: State of Connecticut Collection, 1783-1869

Preparation for online publication of a critical edition of primary source materials about Native Americans in Connecticut from 1783 to 1869. (36 months)

Organized to address a lack of published records on New England Indians, The Yale Indian Papers Project is a scholarly editing endeavor to publish thousands of primary source documents on the region's Native peoples and communities. Its electronic archives offers new modes of access to significant historical information, bringing together otherwise dispersed material into one critical body of work for the purposes of investigation, analysis, and teaching. Merging innovative technology, modern editing practices, and current scholarly insight from multiple disciplines and communities, the Project brings the study of New England Indians into the 21st century. By this proposal, Yale University requests a Scholarly Editions & Translation Grant for the editorial preparation and electronic publication of The State of Connecticut Collection, 1783-1869, which comprises materials written for, about, and by Connecticut Indians from the American Republic up through the Civil War.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$225,000 (approved)
$224,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


RZ-51422-12

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Richard G. Lesure (Project Director: December 2011 to June 2017)
John Edward Clark (Co Project Director: December 2011 to June 2017)
Michael Blake (Co Project Director: October 2012 to June 2017)
Origins of Ancient Mesoamerican Civilizations: Early Formative Archaeology of the Soconusco Region of Mexico

The preparation for publication of two volumes (print and online) on pre-Olmec and Olmec archaeology (1900-900 BCE) in the Soconusco region of Mexico. (30 months)

In studies of the origins of ancient Mesoamerican civilization, the Formative period is the crucial era of interest, since it begins with the earliest settled villages and ends with fully developed urban societies. The work proposed here will lead to the publication of two data-rich monographs on the still-poorly-known Early Formative period (1900-900 BCE). The monographs will report on investigations concerning the pre-Olmec and Olmec archaeology in the Soconusco region of Mexico. Each monograph will be associated with a digital component, to be produced in conjunction with the paper publication. The web components will include comprehensive data at a level of detail beyond what can be included in the paper version, and the components will go online with open access at the time of publication of the relevant volume. Further, we are proposing to post the volumes themselves online, with open access, starting five years after initial publication.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$185,000 (approved)
$180,613 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 3/31/2017


RZ-51427-12

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Donald C. Haggis (Project Director: December 2011 to September 2016)
The Azoria Project Excavations: A Study of Urbanization on Crete, 700-500 B.C.

Archaeological excavation and analysis at Azoria, an early Archaic Greek city, located on the island of Crete. (36 months)

The Azoria Project is the excavation of an Archaic Greek city (7th-6th century BCE) on the island of Crete in the Aegean, with the aims of studying the process of urbanization and the changing sociopolitical and economic organization of an emergent urban community in the transition from the Early Iron Age (1200-700 BCE) to Archaic periods (700-600 BCE). The project explores the material correlates for emerging social and political institutions, addressing the historical and archaeological problem of an apparent hiatus or discontinuity in the archaeological record of Crete in the 6th century BCE. The hypothesis of the Azoria Project is that the Archaic period represents a critical threshold of culture change and, rather than a phase of collapse, a period of rapid urban growth, the development of new political centers, and the restructuring of cultural landscapes.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016


RZ-51442-12

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001)
Julia A. King (Project Director: December 2011 to June 2016)
Colonial Encounters: The Lower Potomac River at Contact, 1500-1720 AD

The creation of a collections-based comparative study and online database consisting of material culture recovered from 33 Potomac River archaeological sites occupied between 1500-1720 AD. (24 months)

St. Mary's College of Maryland seeks NEH support for a collections-based archaeological study of the lower Potomac River Valley between c. 1500 and 1720 AD. By taking material culture as our point of departure and incorporating the rich ethnographic evidence found in documents into our analysis, we plan to explore the forms colonial encounter took in this area of the Atlantic World and how what transpired here contributed to the profound renegotiation of identity that continues apace at the beginning of the 21st century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$190,000 (approved)
$190,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 1/31/2016


RZ-51445-12

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Aaron Alexander Burke (Project Director: December 2011 to December 2019)
Martin Peilstöcker (Co Project Director: December 2011 to December 2019)
Insurgency, Resistance, and Interaction: Archaeological Inquiry into New Kingdom Egyptian Rule in Jaffa

Archaeological excavation and analysis of an Egyptian fortress from the New Kingdom (15th century BCE) in the Canaanite city of Jaffa, Israel. (36 months)

The current proposal is for a three-year multidisciplinary archaeological research project covering field work and study seasons conducted during 2013, 2014, and 2015 in Jaffa, Israel on the south side of Tel Aviv. With Aaron A. Burke (UCLA) as PI it entails a collaboration among a variety of specialists from the US, Israel, and Europe under the umbrella of the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project, which has operated in Jaffa since 2007. Through archaeological exploration it addresses questions of insurgency and social interaction between Egyptians and Canaanites at the site during the Late Bronze Age, when Egypt maintained an imperial fortress as part of the Egyptian strategy for controlling the region. The effort is aimed at increasing the resolution of sampling from Late Bronze Age contexts in Jaffa, as well as improving our understanding of the chronological context of the various levels from which these finds derive through other techniques.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,713 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2013 – 9/30/2017


RZ-51493-12

University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
Michael Basil Cosmopoulos (Project Director: December 2011 to May 2017)
Early State Formation and Expansion in Greece: Iklaina, A Secondary Center of the Mycenaean State of Pylos

Archaeological excavation and analysis at the Mycenaean settlement of Iklaina, Greece, from the 15th to 13th century BCE, and publication of previous excavation results. (36 months)

Archaeologists agree that the first states of the Greek mainland were formed through the unification of previously independent regional polities, sometime at the beginning of the Mycenaean period (ca. 1650-1100 BCE). Traditionally, the driving force behind the formation of those states was thought to have been hierarchy, but recent models have shifted our focus from the center to the hinterland and highlighted the need for a systematic investigation of non-palatial settlements. In the present project we apply a "bottom-up" approach to the study of state formation and expansion in early Greece. Through the interdisciplinary investigation of Iklaina, a secondary center of the Mycenaean state of Pylos, we seek to produce the datasets necessary to test existing models about the emergence of Mycenaean states; investigate the dynamic relationship of centers to hinterlands; and develop cross-cultural models useful in understanding the processes of state formation in other parts of the world.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 9/30/2016


RZ-51497-12

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Mary DeLand Pohl (Project Director: December 2011 to present)
Christopher L. von Nagy (Co Project Director: December 2011 to present)
Rochelle Marrinan (Co Project Director: March 2015 to present)
Rochelle Marrinan (Co Project Director: March 2015 to present)
Origins of the Mesoamerican City: Ritual and Polity at La Venta, Tabasco, Mexico

The excavation, analysis, and creation of a website dedicated to the findings on social, economic, and ritual practices of the neighborhood populations living near the Olmec city of La Venta (800-400 BCE). (36 months)

The Olmec civilization was one of the earliest to develop in the Americas. The city of La Venta (800-400 BCE) was the prototypical sacred urban template on which later Maya and Aztec rulers modeled their cities. Yet knowledge of the internal social and economic dynamics of the La Venta polity is lacking. Excavation data come almost entirely from limited areas of the central elite core of the ceremonial city. We seek to understand the evolution of La Venta within the context of the neighborhood populations living in a changing riverine landscape. We hypothesize that La Venta's ritual practices structured the underlying cultural framework that organized politics, economics, social status, and warfare within the polity. The research encompasses the disciplines of art history, archaeology, anthropology, geosciences, and religion.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$280,000 (approved)
$280,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2012 – 6/30/2018


FB-56147-12

Chip Colwell
Colorado Museum of Natural History (Denver, CO 80205-5732)
Museums, Native America, and the Repatriation Debate

I am seeking a NEH Fellowship to complete a book on one of the most important debates for museums and Native America over the last century: who owns Indian bodies and the sacred objects of Native American cultures? This book examines the repatriation debate through the lens of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, as it collected and then returned cultural objects and human remains from the Tlingit of Alaska, Zuni of New Mexico, Arapaho of Oklahoma, and Seminole of Florida. Based on a funded 12-month ethnographic research project, this book reveals how different social actors construct and negotiate concepts of heritage, property, law, ethics, science, and justice. Written for an academic and popular audience, Opening the Skeleton Closet goes beyond the polemical, legal, and anecdotal analyses that predominate the current literature to address how both museums and Native Americans are struggling to come to terms with history and find a common future.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 5/31/2014


FB-56514-12

Martin D. Gallivan
College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
A History of Space, Place, and Power in the Algonquian Chesapeake, A.D. 200-1644

Beginning with Jamestown’s settlement, the history of Native societies in the Chesapeake has been framed largely by colonial documents produced for European audiences. The proposed book aims at a different perspective on Tidewater Algonquians’ past by emphasizing the archaeology of prominent settlements from AD 200 to 1644. In this shift, archaeology provides a landscape history and a basis for reassessing colonial accounts. Investigations at the Powhatan town of Werowocomoco and within Chickahominy settlements supply the primary source materials. The study will contribute to conversations in the humanities concerning social and political landscapes, Native and English colonial histories, and contemporary American Indians’ efforts to reclaim their pasts. Currently, the principal touchstone for the Native past in the Chesapeake is John Smith’s Map of Virginia. A landscape history that crosses the historic/prehistoric divide would offer other reference points in a deeper history.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 7/31/2013


RA-50108-12

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: August 2011 to February 2017)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: February 2017 to April 2017)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities at ARIT Centers in Turkey

Twelve months of stipend support a year for three years at the American Research Institute in Turkey. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and help defray expenses related to the process of selecting fellows.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities affiliated with the ARIT centers in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totaling 36 months per grant year, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015. Also requested are funds for a portion of the expense of selecting the ARIT NEH fellows, beginning in January 2013.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$175,500 (approved)
$175,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


RA-50111-12

American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Irene Bald Romano (Project Director: August 2011 to March 2012)
Mary Emerson (Project Director: March 2012 to April 2014)
Minna M. Lee (Project Director: April 2014 to April 2017)
The NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Two ten-month fellowships a year for three years at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and expenses related to the process of selecting fellows.

The NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) provides US-based postdoctoral scholars with research opportunities at the ASCSA's outstanding facilities in Greece, including the Blegen and Gennadius Libraries, the Archives, and the study centers in the Athenian Agora and Ancient Corinth, as well as access, by permit, to other research materials and the monuments and sites in Greece. Fellowships are awarded to scholars pursuing research on humanities topics related to Greece in all periods, from prehistory to the present day. NEH Fellows also benefit from the stimulating interaction with a diverse body of students and scholars that forms the community at the ASCSA, and take part in a rich array of lectures, conferences and workshops in Athens. For 16 years the ASCSA has hosted NEH Fellows. The ASCSA is requesting support for the continuation of this program with funding of $277,500 for the period of January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$277,500 (approved)
$277,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


RA-50112-12

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Paul J. Erickson (Project Director: August 2011 to September 2016)
Susan Forgit (Project Director: September 2016 to April 2017)
NEH Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

Twenty-four months of stipend support a year for three years at the American Antiquarian Society. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and help defray expenses related to the process of selecting fellows.

This application seeks continued funding for the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) under the NEH's initiative supporting Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions. Previous grants since 1975 have helped support a rich and growing body of scholarship in fields including American history, literature, religious history, art history, musicology, and the history of the book. The funding requested reflects the increased level of NEH fellowship stipends, and would include funds to award three full-year fellowships at the maximum stipend annually for three years. For more than three decades, the AAS-NEH fellowship program has made AAS's unparalleled resources for the study of American history, literature, and culture through 1876 accessible to scholars from throughout the nation, has fostered a culture of collegiality and scholarly interaction among fellows and staff, and has enabled AAS to more effectively promote humanistic scholarship in and about the United States.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$315,150 (approved)
$312,509 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


HB-50124-11

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1877-1910

With the support of an NEH Fellowship, I will complete the last three chapters of a book manuscript titled "The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico (1877-1910)." This study examines the ways in which the Mexican government took control of the nation’s pre-Hispanic remains and used them for the purposes of state and nation building during the Porfiriato, the regime of Porfirio Díaz. It argues that the Porfirian regime was the first in Mexico to develop a concerted project to gather, preserve, and display pre-Hispanic antiquities. It underscores how this project stemmed from an elite counterimperial consciousness that sought to shape and defend Mexico’s national image. At the same time, however, it also reveals how the process of making the national archaeological patrimony reinforced patterns of domination.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


FA-56075-11

J.P. Dessel
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Acting Locally: Rethinking the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age I From a Village Perspective

This project will explore a long neglected topic in the archaeology of the Southern Levant, the nature of village life in the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age I (1,550-1,000 BCE). Much of what is known about the Late Bronze Age is derived from the excavation of urban settlements, from ancient archives, and the Hebrew Bible. Based on these sources, the Late Bronze Age is traditionally portrayed as a period of sophisticated internationalism, bustling international trade, and a hierarchical city-state organization. Missing from all these interpretations is a consideration of multi-period village sites. Recent excavations have confirmed the existence of these villages, which will provide a corrective to the urban bias in the current archaeological and historical interpretations of these periods. This "bottom up" approach will allow us to recognize that many forms of social, political and economic change and vibrancy often take place at the local level.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 7/31/2012


FB-55318-11

Gregory S. Aldrete
University of Wisconsin, Green Bay (Green Bay, WI 54311-7003)
Riots in Ancient Rome

This project is a comprehensive study of the frequent riots that broke out in ancient Rome during the Roman Republic and Empire. The resulting book will be the first to compile a database of all incidents of violent urban collective behavior at Rome, and will analyze their frequency, causes, characteristics, and effects. Particular attention will be paid to investigating issues of leadership, organization, and participation. In contrast to a traditional top-down scholarly perspective in which riots at Rome are often viewed as threats to public order that must be suppressed, this study will focus on their role as a means of communication for the urban populace and as manifestations of popular opinion. While the resultant scholarly book will be a specific case study, given that urban riots permeate all periods of history and continue to plague cities today, this project should have both broad appeal and relevance.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ancient History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 5/31/2013


FB-55526-11

Samuel Joseph Liebhaber
Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Bedouin Without Arabic: Language, Poetry, and the Mahra of Southeast Yemen

My project will explore the sociolinguistic conundrum presented by the Mahri tribes of Southeast Yemen. On one hand, the Mahra embody the essence of “Arab authenticity” (asála) due to their preservation of a semi-nomadic lifestyle along the southern edge of the Empty Quarter. On the other hand, the Mahra do not speak Arabic, a key ingredient of “Arabness," but rather one of the few substrate languages left on the Arabian Peninsula: mehríyyet. Whereas scholarship on sociolinguistics and language diversity in the Arab world tends to focus on variation within the Arabic language community, my project will examine a rare situation in which indigenous language variation in the Middle East occurs outside of the Arabic language. Using Mahri poetry as my chief platform for analysis, I will investigate how the Mahra perceive themselves within contemporary discourses of “Arabness” and the strategies that they employ to negotiate their status as Arabs and citizens of the Republic of Yemen.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


RA-50102-11

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2010 to June 2016)
Fellowships in the Humanities at the American Center of Oriental Research

One six-month fellowship a year for three years.

The project will award three (3) six-month fellowships to scholars who have completed their professional training. The project will take place at the institute in Amman, Jordan, and will support scholars with new research initiatives or those with ongoing research and/or publication projects in the humanities relating to Jordan and the Middle East. Each annual award will be a maximum of $36,600, which includes stipend, travel, accommodations, and research funds.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$78,600 (approved)
$78,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 8/31/2015


RA-50103-11

Getty Research Institute (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Katherine Zelljadt (Project Director: August 2010 to May 2011)
Alexa Sekyra (Project Director: May 2011 to June 2016)
NEH Postdoctoral Residential Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute

Two ten-month postdoctoral fellowships a year for three years.

This application seeks funding for the Getty Research Institute (GRI) to award three postdoctoral fellowships of ten months duration at a stipend of $45,000 annually for three years. For more than two decades, the Scholars Program has made the GRI's extensive resources for the study of art, art history, architectural history, archeology, the humanities, and social sciences available to scholars from throughout the nation and abroad, has fostered a productive culture of collegiality among fellows and staff, and has enabled the GRI to enhance its services to advance scholarly research and general understanding of the visual arts and visual culture taken in their widest possible significance in a multidisciplinary context.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$267,150 (approved)
$267,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


FT-58658-11

William Ringle
Davidson College (Davidson, NC 28036-9405)
The Toltec Arrangement: A Study of an Early Mesoamerican City

This study argues that Tollan, paradigmatic city of Mesoamerica and home of the Toltecs, was recentered many times during antiquity, reflecting the spread of elite notions of rulership and militarism symbolized by the feathered serpent. Beginning with Teotihuacan, this study will analyze the development of this tradition through comparative examination of the archaeology of broader Tollan, including rites of investiture, military and governmental organization, mortuary evidence, and residential patterns, supplemented by ethnohistorical and iconographic evidence. It will demonstrate that rather than an ethnicity, Toltec identity was at heart adherence to an ideology which endured and evolved over the course of 1500 years.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 2/28/2012


FT-59223-11

Cynthia Colburn
Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA 90263-0002)
Exotic Imports in the Social and Political Development of Prepalatial Crete (ca. 3000-1900 BC)

An NEH Summer Stipend will support my current book project, Exotica and the Politics of Performance in Prepalatial Crete. This study brings to the fore the critical role of exotic imports in the social and political development of Prepalatial Crete (ca. 3000-1900 B.C.). Specifically, I will explore the use and display of exotic imports as emblems in the hands of an emergent elite to effect social and political distancing within Prepalatial society through the emulation of Eastern rulers. As many of these imports functioned as bodily adornment, they were highly visible and may have taken on a performative role, especially during ceremonies and rituals. Such performances were likely used by emergent elites to display and reinforce their nascent and perhaps tenuous social power. An NEH Summer Stipend will provide me with the resources to conduct research at libraries, sites, and museums in Athens and Crete, Greece, and move toward the completion of this project.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 10/31/2011


FT-59240-11

Jeremy Hartnett
Wabash College (Crawfordsville, IN 47933-2484)
Society on Stage: Streets and Urban Life in Pompeii and Herculaneum

This interdisciplinary study examines the Roman street as a social arena. Among Roman urban spaces, streets were the most inclusive and least predictable, bringing everyone from slave to senator into spontaneous, face-to-face contact. Consequently, they offered an environment where social boundaries were challenged and, therefore, the performance of status was key. This project unites material evidence from Pompeii and Herculaneum with legal, historical, and literary sources to describe the push and pull among various players as they used this stage for self-aggrandizing display and the negotiation of social and political tensions. In exchanges mediated through architecture, images, ritual, and informal movements, streetlife profoundly affected how individual Romans conceived of the social hierarchy and their place within it. This monograph should find a broad readership among scholars and students of classics, archaeology, art and architectural history, and urban studies.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2011 – 9/30/2011


FT-59316-11

Michael Ashley
Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
A Digital Reconstruction of the Archaeological Site Documents from Catahöyük, a Neolithic Settlement in Turkey

The aim of the project "Last House on the Hill" (LHotH) is to holistically reconstitute the rich multimedia and primary research data with the texts of the printed final report of the Berkeley Archaeologists at Çatalhöyük, a Neolithic site in Turkey. The final monograph of the project, published by the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, contains 22 chapters, with as many authors, and over 500 figures and tables. Last House on the Hill is the digital mirror of the monograph that we are creating in order to bring together the full publication and the complete collection of primary sources, some 40,000 images, movies, graphics, and maps with their rich metadata records, as a coherent and dynamic digital resource. The elaboration of LHotH is very advanced, and the monograph is in peer review. The NEH Summer Stipend will give me the possibility to focus on completing the coherent publishing of the digital version, providing direct access to the voluminous primary media content.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 8/31/2011


RZ-51287-11

University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
Anna M. Prentiss (Project Director: November 2010 to May 2016)
Household Archaeology at Bridge River, British Columbia

An excavation, analysis, and interpretation of a single semi-subterranean dwelling with 13 superimposed floors occupied between 1450 and 1150 years ago in present day British Columbia. (36 months)

The Bridge River Project will engage in excavation research and subsequent laboratory investigations of a single housepit within the Bridge River housepit village. Housepit 54 offers a well preserved record of at least 13 superimposed occupation floors separated in places by seven buried roof deposits recording processes of change and continuity between the dates of 1450 and 1150 years ago on the temporal scale of roughly 25-year generations. This combination of intact occupation surfaces and exceptionally well preserved artifacts, features and food remains offers the very rare opportunity to look in a fine grained manner at a range of questions about cultural and ecological change at a critical time in Pacific Northwest ancient history. The project will offer contributions in the humanities to scholars and the general public in the areas of First Nations history, anthropological archaeology, and paleoecology.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$240,976 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2012 – 8/31/2015


RZ-51319-11

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Nicola Terrenato (Project Director: November 2010 to March 2015)
The Gabii Project, Italy

Archaeological excavation and analysis at Gabii, east of Rome, Italy. (36 months)

The Gabii Project is the first stage of a decade-long excavation of a major Latin city near Rome. The work is conducted by the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology at the University of Michigan, under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological Service and in collaboration with the American Academy in Rome. The purpose is to investigate the early phases of Italian urbanism, currently only known through field survey and limited soundings. The Project addresses scholarly issues and holds considerable teaching, museum and outreach significance. Over fifty students each year will participate. As the only continuing large-scale North American urban excavation in Italy, Gabii could provide a dependable source of practical experience in Roman Archaeology--all periods and at all levels--and dissertation topics for American students and young scholars. Furthermore, long-term loans of archaeological finds could provide a laboratory of artifact and museographic research at the University of Michigan.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 12/31/2014


RZ-51388-11

Institute of Nautical Archaeology (College Station, TX 77841-5137)
Deborah N. Carlson (Project Director: November 2010 to June 2015)
Archaeological Excavation of an Ancient Shipwreck at Godavaya, Sri Lanka

The excavation and analysis of a second-century B.C. ship off the coast of Sri Lanka to better understand the history of maritime trade in the ancient world. (36 months)

The recent discovery of an ancient shipwreck off the southern coast of Sri Lanka, five miles from the site of Godavaya, may revolutionize our knowledge about the history of maritime trade in South Asia. In fall 2008, divers recovered examples of locally-produced ceramics, as well as cobalt glass ingots probably of Egyptian or Mesopotamian origin. These artifacts suggest that the Godavaya shipwreck may date as early as the 3rd or 2nd century B.C., making it the oldest ever found in the Indian Ocean. This proposal seeks funding to enable an international team of researchers to pursue the excavation of this important wreck over three separate winter campaigns. The potential impact of this project is tremendous, not only in terms of enhancing scholarly understanding of ancient commercial networks in the Indian Ocean, but also as a means of showcasing how archaeological excavation can foster awareness of cultural heritage in a region devastated by civil war and natural disaster.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$215,000 (approved)
$215,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2014


RA-50088-10

W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (Jerusalem 91190 Israel)
Seymour Gitin (Project Director: August 2009 to April 2016)
Post-Doctoral Fellowships in Middle Eastern Archaeology

The equivalent of two twelve-month fellowships a year for three years.

The W.F.Albright Institute is applying for 2 fellowships at $50,400 each, for a total of $100,800 per year, for each of the academic years 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, plus related costs for publicity and selection in the amount of $6,000 per year. These would be continuous, residential fellowships at the Institute, which is located in Jerusalem. Fellows are expected to pursue a research project, give a public lecture to the academic community while in residence, and participate in the activities of the Institute's scholarly community. The fellows' research projects should culminate in a scholarly publication(s). The impact of this research, transmitted through the Albright's hundreds of alumni to institutions all over the world, has had a profound effect on the understanding of western civilization and its origins in the ancient Near East. The Albright supports scholarly work in Near Eastern studies from prehistory through the early Islamic period.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$376,800 (approved)
$374,490 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2015

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $320,400
Supplement (2014) $54,090


RZ-51141-10

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Matthew B. Reeves (Project Director: November 2009 to July 2016)
Unearthing A Community of Households: Archaeology of the Early 19th-Century Enslaved Community at James Madison's Montpelier

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of slave habitation sites at Montpelier, home of James Madison. (36 months)

Archaeology of the enslaved community at Montpelier offers the opportunity to examine three different groups that existed at President Madison's home: house slaves, field slaves, and skilled slaves. With the homes of these slaves being abandoned in 1844 and never plowed, the archaeological deposits within serves as a virtual time capsule. The past ten years of archaeology at Montpelier have provided an intimate understanding of the mansion landscape that has given us detailed insights into the Madisons' lifestyle. This study will show how this lifestyle intersected with the various groups within the Montpelier enslaved community with differences being measured through household goods, housing architecture, and organization of yard space. This comparative study will not only allow the complex dynamics of the Montpelier community to be evaluated, but will also serve as a valuable comparison to other studies of enslaved households in the African Atlantic World.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,562 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2014


RZ-51147-10

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Nadine Moeller (Project Director: November 2009 to May 2016)
Uncovering a Provincial Settlement in Egypt: The Tell Edfu Project

Archaeological excavation and analysis at Tell Edfu in Upper Egypt, between Luxor and Aswan. (36 months)

The remains of what once had been the provincial capital of the second Upper Egyptian nome can be found at Tell Edfu, which is one of the best-preserved ancient towns in Egypt. This site is one of the rare examples where almost three thousand years of ancient Egyptian history are still preserved in the stratigraphy of a single site and therefore provides enormous potential for increasing our understanding of ancient urbanism in Egypt, a topic that is still poorly understood since it relies almost entirely on archaeological data. The excavations at Tell Edfu provide an abundance of completely new data, thus shedding a fresh light on the development and character of a naturally grown urban center and the relation to its hinterland.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013


RZ-51154-10

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Barbara J. Heath (Project Director: November 2009 to May 2016)
Engaging the Piedmont: Transitions in Virginia Slavery 1730-1790

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological remains of 18th-century slave communities in three locations in the Virginia Piedmont. (36 months)

Funding is requested over three years for collaborative, interdisciplinary archaeological research to document the material culture of slavery in the piedmont and to address the processes of community formation. Through an analysis of domestic space, foodways, environmental evidence, and artifacts, this project will critically examine how, over a 60-year period, a single community of enslaved men, women and children belonging to John Wayles and Thomas Jefferson materially expressed aspects of community life. How did enslaved communities form in the 18th-century piedmont? Did strategies for shaping the material and social worlds change over time? Did a distinctive regional culture develop? Three piedmont sites associated with this community will be investigated: Indian Camp, Wingos, and the North Hill quarter. New field and laboratory work will be initiated at Indian Camp, research will continue at Wingos, and final analyses will be completed for North Hill data.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$240,000 (approved)
$238,781 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 9/30/2015


RZ-51162-10

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Aleydis M. Van de Moortel (Project Director: November 2009 to May 2016)
Mitrou Archaeological Project

Documentation and analysis of the archaeological site at Mitrou, Greece, to understand the development and disintegration of the first state-level society on the European continent. (36 months)

The prehistoric site of Mitrou in central Greece was excavated in 2004-2008, and a first study season was held in 2009. Funding is sought for three more years of study in preparation for publication. Our main goals are to study the formative and fully developed stages of the Late Bronze Age Mycenaean palatial society--the first state-level society that appeared on the European continent--as well as to investigate its disintegration and reversion to a village-level society at the transition from the Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age. Mitrou provides rare and excellent opportunities for our investigations, having considerable remains from these periods. It has the earliest elite complexes and organized settlement of the Late Bronze Age mainland. It is also one of a few settlements in Greece that was never abandoned at the Bronze Age-Iron Age transition. Our research relates to two fundamental issues in social archaeology: the rise and collapse of state-level societies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013


RZ-51171-10

East Tennessee State University (Johnson City, TN 37614-1710)
Richard D. Kortum (Project Director: November 2009 to January 2014)
Rock Art and Archaeology: Investigating Ritual Landscape in the Mongolian Altai

Excavation and documentation of the Biluut petroglyph complex, a recently discovered Iron and Bronze Age rock art site in the Altai mountains of western Mongolia. (36 months)

The Biluut petroglyph complex is one of the most important rock art and archaeological localities in Inner Asia. Situated at sweet-water Khoton Lake on the Altai Mountain flanks bordering China, Kazakhstan, and Russia, Biluut has been an historic crossroads rich in game, domesticated animals, art, and history since glacial retreat released its glistening, polished rock surfaces 10,000 years ago. Biluut rock art is associated with a dense concentration of archaeological sites that offer opportunities to integrate art and history in ways rarely accomplished elsewhere. Radiocarbon dating and RTI imaging will be combined with advanced GIS mapping and excavations. Special focus will be given to Bronze and Iron Age periods where linkages between deer stones, khirigsuur and Pazyryk burials, and petroglyphs can be established. Among expected outcomes are new theories about the foundation of Scythian art and Mongolia's little-known role in pre-Genghis Asian history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$210,000 (approved)
$210,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013


RZ-51219-10

American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
Daniel Sayers (Project Director: November 2009 to January 2015)
Nineteenth-Century Tidewater Resistance Communities: The Forgotten Social History of the Great Dismal Swamp

Archaeological and historical research on the Great Dismal Swamp, located on the border of Virginia and North Carolina, leading to scholarly articles and presentations, a website, and a documentary film. (36 months)

From 1700 to 1860, thousands of maroons, or escapees from slavery, settled in the Great Dismal Swamp of North Carolina and Virginia. The Great Dismal Swamp Landscape Study (2002-2009), an archaeology-centered program, demonstrated that maroons formed communities during this period, mostly in the swamp interior. After 1800, social and economic transformations occurred in interior maroon communities, likely instigated by the rise of corporate interests in the swamp. However, we do not fully grasp the precise natures of these community transformations and what their impacts were on community life. This collaborative 3-year, multidisciplinary expansion (7/2010-6/2013) of the Great Dismal Swamp Landscape Study will explore these maroon community transformations to determine their natures and impacts. The results of this research will be important to several humanities disciplines including, history, African American studies, cultural geography, anthropology, and historical archaeology.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$176,893 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2014


RZ-51234-10

Lori Khatchadourian
Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Empire in the Everyday: Archaeological Investigations of Tsaghkahovit (Armenia) Under Persian Rule (ca. 550-330 BC)

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of a site in central Armenia first occupied in the Bronze Age and rebuilt as a town of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (ca. 550-330 BC), exploring the role of conquered communities in maintaining empires. Read Imperial Matters: Ancient Persia and the Archaeology of Empires at http://www.luminosoa.org/site/books/detail/13/imperial-matter/

This proposal seeks support for archaeological investigations at a town of the Persian Empire, one of the world's earliest empires that ruled much of the Near East and eastern Mediterranean from 550 to 330BC. This research will take place in the Republic of Armenia, at a site called Tsaghkahovit. In partnership with Armenian archaeologists, our purpose is to study the everyday lives of the town's inhabitants and the workings of hegemonic power, as traced through architecture, pottery and other artifacts. We will examine the ways in which subjects adopted social conventions of the Persian Empire while also incorporating into their daily routines local traditions from their pre-conquest past. This research is important for the contribution it makes not only to the study of ancient Persia, but also to wider inquiries in the humanities into the nature of power within empires, ancient and modern. It also advances efforts to build collaborative ties between US and post-Soviet scholars.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$80,000 (approved)
$79,443 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 12/31/2012


FB-54201-09

Michael Basil Cosmopoulos
University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
Bronze Age Eleusis and the Origins of Ancient Greek Secret Cults

The project investigates the origins of one of the most influential ancient Greek Secret Cults, the Eleusinian Mysteries. Extensive archaeological excavations at the sanctuary of Demeter at Eleusis have brought to light thousands of Bronze Age finds, which remain unpublished in the basement of the local museum. With this project, I seek to publish those finds fully and reconstruct the stratigraphy and chronology of early Eleusis. On the basis of this analysis of the material record, I will reconstruct the sociopolitical, economic, and religious organization of Eleusis in the third and second millennia BC and study the problem of the existence of a Bronze Age cult and its possible continuity into the Dark Age. Finally, through the comparative study of the evidence from Eleusis and other sanctuaries with Mystery cults, I will seek to reach an understanding of the genesis and early development of the phenomenon of ancient Greek Secret Cults.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2009 – 1/31/2010


FA-54688-09

Nancy P. Appelbaum
SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton (Binghamton, NY 13902-4400)
Mapping the "Country of Regions": Agustin Codazzi and the 19th-Century Colombian Chorographic Commission

Book manuscript on the Chorographic Commission, a geographic expedition in Colombia led by Agustin Codazzi throughout the 1850s. The book will analyze the Commission's maps, images, and documents as well as the fieldwork processes that produced these materials. I argue that a fundamental tension existed between the racial diversity that the Commission encountered in its fieldwork and the national unity for which its members yearned. The Commission attempted to resolve this apparent contradiction by portraying the nation as undergoing a beneficial process of racial mixture that absorbed ostensibly lesser races. In its texts and visual materials, the Chorographic Commission characterized some regions of the nation as "civilized" and others as "backward" based on the degree of racial mixture along with factors such as climate and economics. The Commission thus attributed national progress with race mixing while at the same time it reinforced racial and social inequalities.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 8/31/2010


FA-54868-09

Vazira Zamindar
Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Archaeology, Islam, and the Making of Gandhara Art in Divided South Asia

This project investigates the colonial and postcolonial history of a World Heritage Gandharan Buddhist monastic complex from the 3rd century, called Takht-e-Bahi, which is located in a predominantly Muslim region in northern Pakistan. Engaging contemporary questions around Islam's relationship to non-Islamic material culture, this study examines in local and historical specificity 1) the transformations in the meaning of this site, 2) as well as the changing relationship of the Muslims of the region to this very site. It traces these transformations through the discursive and institutional interventions of colonial and postcolonial archaeology, but pays specific attention to the 'small histories on the ground' in which local Muslim actors participated in the making of archaeological knowledge, and which enabled the indigenous 'owning' of this Buddhist heritage.

Project fields:
South Asian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2010


RA-50078-09

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
G. Kenneth Sams (Project Director: August 2008 to March 2010)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: March 2010 to November 2014)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities in Turkey

The equivalent of one and a half fellowships per year for three years.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities affiliated with the ARIT centers in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totalling 18 months per grant year, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013. Also requested are funds for a portion of the costs of publicity and selection of the ARIT NEH fellows, beginning in July 2009.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$244,800 (approved)
$244,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2014


RZ-50986-09

University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60607-3320)
Joel W. Palka (Project Director: November 2008 to May 2016)
Archaeological Sites, Indigenous Frontiers, and Unconquered Maya Culture at Lake Mensabak, Chiapas, Mexico

An archaeological and historical study of the origins and cultural transformation of the Lacandon Maya in Chiapas, Mexico.

While research has focused on colonized Maya, little is known about unconquered Maya in the rainforests of Chiapas, Mexico, including their origins. This project involves the Lacandon Maya and experts in archaeology, history, and anthropology. The Lacandon are believed to be descendant from the ancient Maya or Yucatec Maya migrants who only recently experienced change. The clarification of their origins and cultural transformations are important topics for research on ethnogenesis or the creation of indigenous cultures. The investigators hypothesize that Lacandon ethnic formation occurred when different Maya groups entered the remote rainforests escaping European colonization. We will acquire archaeological, archival, and Lacandon cultural information regarding their origins. The findings will be compared to studies of ethnogenesis to understand the similarities and differences in cultural origins in colonized versus unconquered regions.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013


RZ-50992-09

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Shannon Lee Dawdy (Project Director: November 2008 to July 2013)
The Roots of Creole New Orleans: Archaeological Investigations at St. Louis Cathedral and Ursuline Convent

Investigation of the interactions among Native Americans, French colonists, and African Americans in colonial period New Orleans through archaeological excavations of the gardens associated with St. Louis Cathedral and the Ursuline Convent. (36 months)

Funding is requested to support a 3-year archaeological research project to investigate the French colonial foundations of New Orleans at two of its most significant historic complexes, St. Louis Cathedral and Ursuline Convent. The proposed work will extend excavations begun in the garden behind the cathedral in 2008 and incorporate the findings into a broader comparative framework that includes new fieldwork at the nearby Ursuline Convent Garden as well as specialized laboratory analyses. The study addresses how African, Native American, and European residents were exchanging knowledge and practices related to architecture, agriculture, cuisine, and medicine, and how these material practices contributed to the creation of New Orleans' unique creole culture. This project represents the first multi-site archaeological research program undertaken in the French Quarter.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$230,000 (approved)
$230,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2012


RZ-51027-09

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
David Schloen (Project Director: November 2008 to December 2013)
Excavations at Zincirli

Archaeological excavations and interpretation at the Iron Age city of Sam'al, located in modern-day Zincirli, Turkey.

This archaeological project explores the 40-hectare (100-acre) site of Zincirli in southeastern Turkey, near the northeastern corner of the Mediterranean Sea, on the eastern side of the Amanus Mountains. Zincirli was the site of ancient Sam'al, an important walled city of the later Iron Age (ca. 900-600 B.C.) and capital of an independent kingdom. Previous excavations have produce many impressive finds and a good picture of the Iron Age royal citadel in the center of the site. Funds are sought to expand excavations at the site, especially in the large lower town, which was not previously investigated. There are very few Iron Age sites in the Levantine region at which large horizontal exposures of coherent architectural phases has been achieve, and Zincirli is ideally suited for this, promising to provide a qualitative leap in our understanding of Iron Age urbanism as a result of the quantitative expansion of excavation to cover entire urban neighborhoods.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2012


RZ-51107-09

Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Tamara L. Bray (Project Director: November 2008 to June 2013)
Imperial Inca Statecraft and the Architecture of Power: The Late Imperial Site of Inca-Caranqui, Northern Highland Ecuador

Archaeological investigations at Caranqui on the northern frontier of the Inca empire to address questions about imperial architecture as a strategy of Inca statecraft. (30 months)

This is a proposal to conduct collaborative archaeological investigations at the recently discovered site of Inca-Caranqui on the northern frontier of the Inca empire. The rise and fall of ancient empires has long been a source of public fascination, and the New World example of the Inca defies many common stereotypes. The proposed project focuses on imperial architecture as a material strategy of Inca statecraft and will consider how such strategies evolved as a function of time and distance from the imperial center at Cuzco. Using a combination of remote-sensing, excavation, and archival research, the international team will elucidate the history, function, and significance of this important site. The proposed research will make a significant contribution to our knowledge of the imperial agenda at the outer edges of control, provide insights into Inca statecraft during the "mature" phase of empire, and document the role and evolution of state architecture in the frontier context.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$122,093 (approved)
$122,092 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2012


RA-50065-08

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: September 2007 to July 2013)
Fellowships in the Humanities

One six-month fellowship a year for three years.

The project will award three six-month fellowships to scholars who have completed their professional training. The project will take place at the institute in Amman and will support scholars with new projects or those with ongoing research and/or publication projects in the humanities relating to Jordan and the Middle East. Each award will be $27,800.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$86,400 (approved)
$86,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 8/31/2012


FT-55694-08

Vazira Zamindar
Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Archaeology, Islam and the Making of Gandhara Art in Modern South Asia

This project investigates the colonial and postcolonial history of a World Heritage Gandharan Buddhist monastic complex from the 3rd century, called Takht-e-Bahi, which is located in a predominantly Muslim region in northern Pakistan.The study sheds light on contemporary questions around Islam's relationship to non-Islamic material culture by examining in local and historical specificity 1) the transformations in the meaning of this site, 2) as well as the changing relationship of the Pathan Muslims of the region to this very site. It traces these transformations through the interventions of colonial and postcolonial archaeology and art history, but pays specific attention to the 'small histories on the ground' in which Pathan Muslim and other Indian actors participated in the activities of the Archaeological Survey of India, and enabled the indigenous 'owning' of this Buddhist heritage. The NEH Summer Stipend will support archival research on the colonial period of this project.

Project fields:
South Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 8/31/2008


RZ-50866-08

University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
Michael Basil Cosmopoulos (Project Director: November 2007 to July 2009)
Michael L. Galaty (Project Director: July 2009 to December 2009)
Michael Basil Cosmopoulos (Project Director: January 2010 to June 2012)
The Emergence of States and Social Complexity in Greece: The Pylos Excavation Project

Excavation, technical analysis, and interpretation of archaeological finds at Bronze-Age Iklaina on the southern Peloponnesus. (36 months)

The project examines the emergence of states and social complexity in Greece, through a systematic interdisciplinary investigation of the earliest recorded state, that of Pylos. We seek to analyze the specific mechanisms that led to the unification of regional centers of power (chiefdoms) into the centralized state of Pylos during the beginning of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1600-1100 BC). This will be done through the study of one of those chiefdoms-turned districts of the state of Pylos and its relation to the main capital of the state.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2011


RZ-50902-08

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
McGuire Gibson (Project Director: November 2007 to June 2012)
Nippur Monograph

The preparation for publication of six volumes documenting and interpreting the excavations at the Mesopotamian sites of Nippur and Abu Salabikh in Iraq. (36 months)

This proposal seeks funding to prepare for publication the five remaining archaeological monographs on Nippur, the religious center of Mesopotamia, and one on the related site of Abu Salabikh. This backlog in publishing has accumulated in part due to the death of some of the authors (e.g., R. C. Haines). In other cases, career changes dictated different archaeological projects (George Dales, Donald P. Hansen) or the abandonment of archaeology (D. McCown). For staff members who have taken on the Nippur excavations since 1972, continuing commitments to teaching and new field research have meant that publications fell steadily behind. But because a number of the scholars who are collaborating in this project are retired or are nearing retirement, and their teaching or curatorial duties are reduced or have ended, there is a window of opportunity to complete these volumes, but the work must be done efficiently and with dispatch.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 9/30/2011


RZ-50924-08

University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000)
Ernestine S. Elster (Project Director: November 2007 to June 2013)
The Scaloria Cave Project: Ritual and Landscape in the Mediterranean Neolithic

Preparation for publication of a technical and interpretive work on the Scaloria Cave, a Neolithic cult and burial site in the Puglia region of southern Italy. (16 months)

The Scaloria Cave Project is an interdisciplinary, international, collaborative project focused on the analysis and interpretation of unpublished data from a series of explorations of Grotta Scaloria, a double-chambered cave located on the edge of the Tavoliere Plain, Italy. The compilation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological and archival data from the Scaloria project will contribute significantly to studies of Italian prehistory and also to a broader understanding of Neolithic settlement and social relations, specifically to the role of cult, ritual and burial among early farming and herding populations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2008 – 12/31/2012


RZ-50941-08

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
John Clarke (Project Director: November 2007 to February 2011)
The Oplontis Project: Excavation, Study, and Publication of Villa A at Torre Annunziata, Italy, 50 BCE-CE 79

Analysis, mapping, interpretation, and preparation for publication of archaeological finds at the Roman villa of Oplontis, including a digital reconstruction of the building. (18 months)
eBook available at http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=acls;idno=heb90048.0001.001

The Oplontis Project, a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Archaeological Superintendency of Pompeii, has as its goal the study and definitive publication of the largest and best-preserved villa excavated in the area buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE. It is an international, interdisciplinary project aimed at understanding the villa's history in relation to its owners and inhabitants through stratigraphic excavation, chronological tools (analysis of masonry, pavements, and frescoes), and digital modeling. It will provide a multi-authored monograph on the villa and its finds; a complete digital archive of records, photographs, and previous scholarship all linked to a navigable virtual computer model of the existing state of the site; and a meticulously-researched hypothetical reconstruction of the villa and its contents. The model will be the first to permit research with avatars, testing the social and functional uses of the villa's spaces.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2009 – 7/31/2010


FB-53465-07

Beryl Barr-Sharrar
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
Greek Bronze Vessels, Archaic to Late Hellenistic

The Bronze Vessels of Ancient Greece, Archaic to Late Hellenistic. A handbook. The tradition of bronze craftsmanship in ancient Greece: development of metal vessel shapes, casting, hammering and chasing techniques, chronological changes in form and ornamentation that reveal both conservation of traditional ideas and invention demanded of craftsmen to satisfy new consumer taste. Comparison to pottery surrogates examines the relationship of two important ancient Greek crafts. Useful for colleagues working in decorative or minor arts, students of these subjects in Greek art history and archaeology, and readers interested in the Greek crafts, Greek bronzes, techniques of bronze production, vessels crafted of bronze and/or how they are made.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 9/30/2008


FA-53142-07

Brian S. Bauer
University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL 60607-3320)
The Chanka and the Development of Native Lords in the Andes

A fellowship is requested to analyze archaeological and historical data for a book on the development of the Chanka ethnic group in the Andean highlands (Andahuaylas, Peru). The Chanka, one of the most important prehistoric cultures of South America, remain unstudied and the cultural processes that led to their development are not well understood. The first half of the book is based on a three-year archaeological field investigation of the Chanka heartland. The second half is based on archival work in Peru and Spain. The results are relevant to understanding the prehistory of Andean peoples, as well as to broader anthropological issues concerning the processes of state development and indigenous responses to conquests.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2008


RA-50055-07

American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Irene Bald Romano (Project Director: September 2006 to June 2012)
NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

The equivalent of two fellowships a year for three years.

The ASCSA seeks a total of $258,000 for a three-year program to continue support of two to four fellowships per year of five to ten months in duration, in a wide range of disciplines of the Greek world from prehistory to the present. The NEH Fellowship program aims to make the unique resources of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens accessible to a wider scholarly constituency: Blegen Library, devoted to Greek antiquity; the Gennadius Library, a collection of post-ancient Greek culture; and the primary materials accessible at the ASCSA's archaeological research centers in ancient Corinth and at the Athenian Agora. NEH Fellows add immensely to the intellectual life of the School, broadening and enriching the experience of students and scholars in the ASCSA community.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$258,000 (approved)
$258,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2011


FT-54956-07

Chip Colwell
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc. (New York, NY 10017-5621)
Inheriting the Past: Arthur C. Parker and the Making of Archaeology's Moral Community

Arthur C. Parker (1881-1955) was the first Native American professional archaeologist, although his contributions to archaeology have been neither closely studied nor widely recognized. And yet, Parker’s experiences directly inform contemporary debates about the control and representation of Native American archaeological heritages--heated debates over the last two decades about questions of privilege, ownership, authorship, and participation. An interdisciplinary study of archaeology’s historical formation through the prism of Parker’s life, this work illuminates how the difficult choices scholars made more than a century ago built a community of archaeologists which continues to shape the discipline today.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 7/31/2007


RZ-50680-07

Brown University (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Stephen Douglas Houston (Project Director: November 2006 to February 2012)
In the Shadow of a Giant: Archaeology of El Zotz, Guatemala

Archaeological investigation of the creation, character, and decline of the ancient Maya kingdom of El Zotz, near ancient Tikal, in present-day Guatemala. (36 months)

An enduring problem in studies of history and society is the question of political domination over people and landscape: how was such control achieved, and what were its varieties? An ideal setting to investigate this problem is the ancient Maya kingdom of El Zotz, Guatemala, which flourished in the middle years of the first millennium CE. At El Zotz, preliminary evidence indicates the sudden creation of a dynastic seat, with all the palatial and mortuary facilities associated with Maya rulership. The city appears to result from geopolitical strategy: (1) it was placed close to the immense Maya city of Tikal, with historical evidence of support from long-standing enemies of the Tikal dynasty; (2) it controlled a key route connecting two major regions of the Maya world; and (3) it flourished precisely when Tikal was weakened by surrounding dynasties of hostile intent. The proposal seeks funding to test whether these conditions applied and to augment understanding of past governance.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$120,000 (approved)
$120,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2011


RZ-50804-07

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Cynthia Robin (Project Director: November 2006 to March 2011)
Chan: The 2,000 Year History of an Ancient Maya Farming Community

Analysis and interpretation of archaeological material from the ancient Maya farming community of Chan, Belize, in order to gain a fuller understanding of life at this site throughout its 2000-year period of occupation. (24 months)

The Chan project will investigate the over 2000 year history of an ancient Maya farming community in Belize. The Chan site was occupied between 900 B.C. and A.D. 1250. Its ancient inhabitants constructed a productive landscape of agricultural terraces across Chan's hilly terrain. By bringing together an international team of US and Belizean archaeology professionals, graduate and undergraduate students to study the extensive collections of artifacts and ecofacts from the Chan site we will be able to investigate the founding, development, long sustainability, and ultimate demise of an ancient agrarian community. Our collaborative research brings together expert archaeological analysis of traditional categories of "macro-artifacts" (ie., ceramics, lithics) with more recent assessments of "micro-remains" (ie., micro-artifacts, carbonized plants, and soils) to develop a fuller understanding of life in an ordinary community in ancient times.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$120,000 (approved)
$120,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2010


RZ-50818-07

Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)
R. Alan Covey (Project Director: November 2006 to June 2010)
Inca and Spanish Imperial Transformations: Toponyms and Regional Settlement Patterns in Cuzco, Perú

Archival research, the systematic collection of place names, and a regional environmental study to consider the impact of the Inca empire and then the Spanish empire on local populations in the Cuzco area of present-day Perú. (28 months)

The Hanan Cuzco Toponym Survey will use NEH funds to conduct an interdisciplinary research project in Cuzco, Peru. This region was the heartland of the Inca empire, and local farming and herding populations experienced two waves of imperial transformation between AD 1400-1650. The Inca empire reshaped the economic, political and ethnic landscape of the region to facilitate the administration of its provinces, while the Spanish empire restructured the region as it was converted from an imperial core to a provincial region of their empire. The proposed project will conduct archival research, systematic collection of place-names, and a regional environmental study to consider the impacts of imperial policies on local farming populations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 10/31/2009


FN-50016-07

John G. Fought
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
Archiving a Linguistic Corpus of Chorti, Yocotán, and Tumbalá Chol Mayan: Audio Recordings, Field Notes, and Photographs

The project will create and deposit digital copies of analog data on three modern Mayan languages: Chorti, Yocotan, and Chol. The data consist of audio tape recordings, written field notes and transcripts, and photographs. It must be borne in mind that endangerment has both cultural and linguistic dimensions. These languages were, and to some degree still are, repositories of what cultural riches remain from the early history of these Mayan peoples. The materials will contribute to further research, reconstruction and preservation of their histories and cultures, as well as to the comparative reconstruction of the history of the Mayan language family and to the decipherment of Mayan hieroglyphic writing. The materials to be preserved in this project were collected 35 to 40 years ago and could not be duplicated today. Rapid cultural changes have eroded traditional knowledge, but adults are teaching children Chorti in village elementary schools and some of the materials will be made available to them for that effort. Archiving these materials and making them accessible to scholarship will be a significant contribution to historical and comparative Mayan linguistics, folklore studies, Mayan epigraphy (and thus archaeology) and linguistic typology. (Edited by staff)

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 3/31/2009


FA-52724-06

Jack L. Davis
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
The Institutionalization of Classical Archaeology: Archaeology in Greece Between World War I and World War II

This project constitutes one important component of a larger program of research that examines the roles of major academic institutions in the United States in promoting a Classical archaeology in the Mediterranean that has emphasized the primacy of the ancient Greek world, particularly those parts of it that lie within the boundaries of the modern Greek state, and that has privileged the study of urban elite culture over that of rural areas. Such attitudes towards Classical archaeology in the western academy reflect a long-standing commitment to the tenets of Hellenism ("the idealization of ancient Greece as the birthplace of a European spirit") and also to the national discourse of the modern Greek state.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2006 – 8/31/2007


FB-52250-06

Nancy A. Winter
American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Decorative Systems of Etruscan Terracotta Roofs, 640-510 BCE

The fired clay roofs of the Etruscans are technically advanced and among the most visually exciting roofs in the ancient world, often providing evidence for buildings that leave no other traces. Painted sculpture and relief friezes, added to functional elements, give these roofs an exceptionally decorative quality. At least five major decorative systems dating 640-510 b.c.e. have been identified. For the first time, all roof elements are collected, discussed and illustrated as parts of individual roofs rather than as isolated objects, and placed within their architectural, chronological and historical context. A new picture emerges that impacts our understanding of the daily life and religion of this important ancient culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006


FB-52836-06

William Henry Honeychurch
Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA 17325-1483)
The Archaeology of Mongolia and Nomadic Civilizations

This proposal requests support for the writing of a monograph on the archaeology of early Inner Asian nomadic states. The sources of information include recent archaeological data from northern Mongolia and historical sources from China, Monglia, and Siberia. The project argues for a new framework in which to understand the political tradition of nomadic polities based upon long-term expertise in mobility, long distance relationships, and spatial networks.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 8/31/2009


RA-50041-06

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Adele Chatfield-Taylor (Project Director: September 2005 to March 2011)
Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellowships in the Humanities

Two fellowships per year for three years.

The American Academy in Rome requests an NEH grant of $258,000 in support of Rome Prize Fellowships in the humanities for postdoctoral scholars (two fellowships each year for a total of six fellowships) during the years 2007-08, 2008-09, 2009-2010, and for publicity and selection costs for the fellowship completion. Rome Prize Fellowships are at the core of the Academy's mission to advance and foster excellence in the arts and humanities. NEH funds will help provide term support for the selected Fellows' stipends, room and board for three years as the Academy continues to seek to build its endowment and expand its outreach and service to qualified artists and scholars.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$258,000 (approved)
$258,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 8/31/2010


RZ-50575-06

University of South Florida, St. Petersburg (St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5016)
John W. Arthur (Project Director: November 2005 to September 2006)
Kathryn J. Weedman (Project Director: September 2006 to present)
An Ethnoarchaeological Study of the Gamo Caste System in Southwestern Ethiopia

An ethnoarchaeological and archaeological study of the Gamo caste system, which will include mapping and inventorying different caste households, conducting oral history interviews, and excavating archaeological villages. (36 months)

Caste societies present in Africa and Asia have a profound affect on the marriage relations, status, occupation, settlement patterns, ritual purity, diet, and burial placement. However, there has been little archaeological research, especially in Ethiopia or Africa, which addresses the identification, origin, and development of caste societies. The Gamo of southwestern Ethiopia offer a unique context to study a present-day African society, which has a strict caste system. This three-season ethnoarchaeological and archaeological study of the Gamo caste system will use ethnoarchaeology, archaeology, and oral history to reveal an understanding of the origins and development of a non-western state system, caste.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$149,489 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 7/31/2009


RZ-50625-06

Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
William Henry Honeychurch (Project Director: November 2005 to August 2009)
The Survey Archaeology of Northern and Southern Mongolia: A Diachronic Study of Nomadic Polities and Landscapes in Transition

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation at archaeological sites in the Eurasian steppe to study social and political organization among pastoral societies during the Mongolian Empire. (24 months)

Archaeological studies of pastoral nomadic societies have been invigorated by recent collaborative research projects across the Eurasian steppe zone. This research contributes an important perspective on the forms of socio-political organization practiced among mobile groups. We propose a novel approach to understanding the organizational techniques and methods of finance that supported large scale imperial polities of eastern Eurasia, specifically those centered on the Mongolian steppe. Using archaeological survey data from the northern Mongolian valley of Egiin Gol and the Middle Gobi desert, we evaluate the latest historical explanations for the rise and fall of these polities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$90,000 (approved)
$90,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


RA-50046-06

W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (Jerusalem 91190 Israel)
Seymour Gitin (Project Director: November 2005 to June 2012)
Joan R. Branham (Co Project Director: April 2010 to June 2012)
Post-Doctoral Fellowships in Ancient Near Eastern Studies

The equivalent to 1.5 fulltime fellowships per year for three years.

The W.F. Albright Institute is applying for one twelve-month and one six-month post-doctoral fellowship for each of the academic years 2007-08, 2008-09, 2009-10. These would be continuous, residential fellowships at the institute, which is located in Jerusalem. Fellows are expected to pursue a senior level research project, give a public lecture to the academic community while in residence, and participate in the activities of the institute's scholarly community. The fellows' research projects should culminate in a scholarly publication(s). The Albright is dedicated to pursuing research across the entire gamut of ancient Near Eastern Studies, from pre-history through the early Islamic Period. The impact of this research, transmitted through its hundreds of alumni to institutions all over the world, has had a profound effect on our understanding of the growth of western civilization and its origins in the ancient Near East.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$279,600 (approved)
$279,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 6/30/2011

Funding details:
Original grant (2006) $198,000
Supplement (2008) $81,600


FA-51733-05

Patricia Ann McAnany
Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Economic Process in Ancient Maya Societies

This proposal seeks funding for research/writing time that culminates in the first comprehensive book on ancient Maya economic process. Proposed study highlights the entanglement of economic practices with political, social, and ideological activities. Epigraphic information about Maya royalty is integrated with archaeological materials that are sensitive to the agency of those living beyond the shadow of the pyramid. A social practice approach facilitates focus on the performance of economic activities. Featured topics include the origins of corvée labor; gendered labor and the political economy of feasting; landscape cognition and land use; tributary obligations expressed in hieroglyphic texts; and the circulation of desired goods.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 12/31/2005


FA-52121-05

Janet Richards
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Individual and Society in Ancient Egypt: Deciphering Weni the Elder

Integrating archaeological, documentary, and pictorial evidence, this book will explore how ancient Egyptians crafted notions of the individual and identity, the relationship of individuals to politics and society, and the operation of social memory in sacred landscapes. Using as an example the third millennium BCE official Weni of Abydos in southern Egypt, I will set this particular person within a network of other individuals of his period elsewhere in Egypt; and explore the archaeology of individuals as practiced in colonial and post-colonial settings, and the effect that different archaeologists, their own places and intellectual baggage, and a flowering indigenous Egyptology had and have on how we write ancient social history.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2006


RA-50022-05

W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (Jerusalem 91190 Israel)
Seymour Gitin (Project Director: September 2004 to May 2008)
Post-Doctoral Fellowships in Middle Eastern Archaeology

One and one-half full-year humanities fellowships, for one year.

The W. F. Albright Institute is applying for one twelve-month and one six-month post-doctoral fellowship for each of the academic years 2006-7, 2007-08, 2008-09. These would be continuous, residential fellowships at the Institute, which is located in Jerusalem. Fellows are expected to pursue a senior level research project, give a public lecture to the academic community while in residence at the Albright, and participate in the activities of the Institute's scholarly community. The fellows' research projects should culminate in scholarly publication. The Albright is dedicated to pursuing research across the entire gamut of ancient Near Eastern Studies, from pre-history through the early Islamic Period. The impact of this research transmitted through its hundreds of alumni to institutions all over the world, has had a profound effect on our understanding of the growth of western civilization and its origins in the ancient Near East.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$66,000 (approved)
$66,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2008


RA-50028-05

American Research Center in Egypt (Alexandria , VA 22314-1891)
Gerry D. Scott (Project Director: September 2004 to September 2010)
NEH Post-Doctoral and Professional Fellowships at the American Research Center in Egypt, Inc.

The equivalent of two full-year humanities fellowships a year, for each of two years.

The American Research Center in Egypt requests an NEH grant of $258,000 over a four year peiod to support an average of three long-term humanities fellowships for each of three years in a variety of disciplines including history, Islamic studies, literature, art history, Egyptology, political science, and the humanistic social sciences. ARCE also proposes to continue to offer two short-term multiple-year fellowships for museum curators in Islamic art; Coptic art; and Egyptian, pre-dynastic and pre-historic materials. Thse funds will provide scholars with living expenses and round-trip air transportation. ARCE also requests $6,000 for three years to publicize these opportunities and to support the selection of grantees.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$172,000 (approved)
$172,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2005 – 8/31/2009


RA-50029-05

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: September 2008 to February 2011)
Fellowships in the Humanities

One four-month humanities fellowship a year for each of three years.

The project will award three (3) four-month fellowships to scholars who have completed their professional training. The project will take place at the institute in Amman and will support scholars with new projects or those with ongoing research and/or publication projects in the humanities relating to Jordan and the Middle East. Each award is $20,000.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$64,560 (approved)
$64,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2005 – 8/31/2009


RA-50033-05

American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Catherine deG. Vanderpool (Project Director: September 2004 to August 2006)
Irene Bald Romano (Project Director: August 2006 to January 2009)
NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

The equivalent of two full-year humanities fellowships a year, for each of two years.

The ASCSA seeks a total of $257,100 for a three-year program to continue support of two to four fellowships per year of five to ten months in duration, in a wide range of disciplines of the Greek world from prehistory to the present. The NEH Fellowship program aims to make the unique resources of the School accessible to a wider scholarly constituency: Blegen Library, devoted to Greek antiquity; Gennadius Library, a collection of post-ancient Greek culture; and the primary materials accessible at the School’s archaeological research centers in Ancient Corinth and at the Athenian Agora. NEH Fellows add immensely to the intellectual life of the School, broadening and enriching the experience of students and scholars in residence.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$172,000 (approved)
$172,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2005 – 5/31/2008


RZ-50334-05

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Donald C. Haggis (Project Director: October 2004 to March 2011)
The Azoria Project: A Study of Urbanization in Early Iron Age and Archaic Crete

To support research on the development of a nascent Cretan polis and of cultural exchange in the Greek Aegean during the Early Iron Age. (36 months)

The project is the archaeological excavation of the Iron Age town of Azoria on the island of Crete in the Greek Aegean, exploring the development of the settlement from its Early Iron Age foundations (ca. 1200-700 B.C.) until its establishment as an urban center in the Archaic period (700-500 B.C.). This component of the project relates material patterns of crop processing and animal husbandry to models of land use and power relationships in order to identify corporate groups and to define the structure of the emerging Greek city-state (polis). The plan of work sets out to examine how the civic center was organized, how agricultural and pastoral production was managed on household and public levels, and what archaeological contexts of food storage, processing, and distribution can reveal about the social organization of the early city. The project's main objectives are to examine archaeological correlates for household and civic organization, establishing conceptual links between agricultural and pastoral production and economic structure and group identity. . . .

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$140,000 (approved)
$105,246 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 3/31/2009


RZ-50350-05

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Bernard D. Frischer (Project Director: November 2004 to January 2014)
Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome

Adding GIS data and expanding a freely accessible and fully interactive inventory of Roman hydraulic infrastructure from the early Christian era through the early modern period. (24 months)

Aquae Urbis Romae is a research project and web-based archive of original research and cartographic materials related to the history of Roman water infrastructure and urban development over a 2,700 year period. The project is both interdisciplinary and interactive, bringing together data from archaeology, urban history, geography, classics and the history of technology. It systematically incorporates archeological, archival, literary, and epigraphic evidence in original chronological and thematic topographic maps of Rome. The site is a significant tool for scholars and students to study social, cultural, aesthetic and technological issues related to water distribution, and is a unique and valuable model for understanding water infrastructure and its impact on urban development in Rome and in other cities. To date, the materials available on the project's web site covers the period 753 B.C. to 312 C.E. NEH funds are requested to continue original research, expanding the maps and inventory for the period 360 to 1700 C.E. We will also work to improve the site's maps and cartographic functions by converting existing map data into new typological and chronological map layers of water infrastructure features that are geo-referenced to real world coordinates. . . .

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Urban Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 12/31/2007


RZ-50420-05

Sweet Briar College (Sweet Briar, VA 24595-5001)
Lynn Rainville (Project Director: November 2004 to June 2010)
Investigating Historic African-American Mortuary Traditions in Central Virginia

Archaeological and archival research into the mortuary traditions of African Americans living in the Virigina Piedmont from the 18th to the mid-20th centuries. (36 months)

This proposal requests three years of funding to research African-American mortuary variability in central Virginia, from the 1770s to the 1950s. An interdisciplinary team of scholars will contribute to our understanding of enslaved, Free Black, and twentieth-century African-American gravestones, cemetery landscapes, and mourning practices. The results will be disseminated via an on-line database. This project is particularly timely because many historic black cemeteries are not documented on county maps, resulting in unintentional destruction during new construction. This research will help raise awareness about African-American burial grounds and increase our understanding of a rarely studied aspect of African-American culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2005 – 8/31/2009


RZ-50423-05

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Jeffrey Quilter (Project Director: November 2004 to June 2010)
Archaeology and History at Sta. Magdalena de Cao Viejo: Cultural Encounters at a 16th Century Church & Town in Northern Peru

Three major field seasons at the site accompanied by analysis and writing. (36 months)

We will investigate the ruins of a church and town, Magdalena de Cao Viejo, in northern coastal Peru, occupied ca. 1566-1609 when the seeds of modern Peru began to sprout as the conquest period waned and the colonial period began. We will combine archaeological and archival studies to complement and inform each other. No research of this kind has been done before and little is known in the Andes of the everyday lives of people at this critical time. The exceptional preservation qualities of the coastal desert combined with a short occupation span further enhance this unique opportunity to study an important example of how two foreign cultures met, interacted, and transformed into a new phenomenon.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$80,000 (approved)
$80,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 11/30/2010


RZ-50431-05

Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
Elizabeth Stinette Bolman (Project Director: November 2004 to April 2008)
Archaeological and Multidisciplinary Investigation of the White Monastery Federation, near Sohag, Egypt

Excavation and analysis of an important Coptic architectural complex (fourth through thirteenth century, C.E.) that promises to yield valuable evidence bearing on late antique monasticism. (36 months)

This is a request for funding for the archaeological survey, excavation, conservation, analysis and publication of a uniquely well-attested monastic settlement outside of Sohag, Egypt. The prolific author and early monastic leader St. Shenoute of Atripe (346-465) established a monastic federation comprised of two men’s monasteries, a nunnery, and some hermitages. Uniquely at this site, materials and texts from all major categories of evidence have survived. The site is now at great risk. A Consortium of scholars has been studying the site from several disciplinary perspectives. With the results of the proposed excavations, at this remarkably rich site, we will be able to increase our understanding of early monasticism exponentially.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research