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Funded Projects Query Form
288 matches

Keywords: 'archaeology' (this phrase)
Division or office: Research Programs*
Sort order: Award year, descending

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Angela Calcaterra
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

FEL-282383-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

Indigenous People and Stories of Gun Violence in Early America and Today

Writing a book that traces the record of Native American perception of human-weapons relations through material and literary culture.

This book project is a literary and cultural archaeology of American gun violence that examines the significance of guns in a vast archive of literature, materials, and political documents centered on Indigenous-European relations. Focused on connections between early and nineteenth-century America and today, it argues that Native American story, political theory, and cultural practice have long confronted an issue at the core of gun violence: the relationship between humans and the objects they bear. The legislative and judicial documents scholars study to understand past and present American gun usage erase these Indigenous perspectives. By recovering Native approaches to weapons that predate and challenge American legal frameworks for gun ownership, and by considering literary and cultural representations that offer granular illuminations of human-gun interactions, the book sheds important new light on the vital yet deadlocked conversation about American gun violence.

Maurizio Forte
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)

FEL-282998-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2022 – 9/30/2022

Publishing Archaeology in 3D: Waterscapes in Etruscan and Roman Times (Vulci)

Research and writing of a digital publication on water infrastructures at Vulci, an ancient Etruscan site in Italy (10th c. BCE- 5th CE).

The aim of this proposal is to publish a digital study of water infrastructures in the ancient city of Vulci based on 3D archaeological data: artifacts, monuments, maps and landscape reconstructions. Vulci (Viterbo, Italy, fl. 10th C. BCE- 5th C CE) was one most important cities of ancient Etruria, where thermal and mineral waters were considered to have healing properties. The Duke University’s 7-year fieldwork program has yielded a uniquely extensive collection of 3D models and remote sensing data. The digital publication will examine and interpret changes in the water infrastructure and water culture as they developed from Etruscan to Roman times, and the publication will share in accessible format the 3D data pertinent to the narrative in an integrated, multimodal format providing a holistic view unique in archaeology. It will expand knowledge of the Etruscan and Roman world and serve as a model for other publications with potential for broad impact in the humanities and beyond.

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: August 2021 to August 2022)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: August 2022 to present)

RA-285327-22
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

Totals:
$191,700 (approved)
$191,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 6/30/2026

Long-Term Advanced Research Fellowships at the American Research Institute in Turkey Overseas Research Centers

12 months of stipend support (1–3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The ARIT NEH fellowship program aims to support scholars who conduct long-term interdisciplinary research in the humanities in Turkey. Their fields of study include art, archaeology, literature, linguistics, musicology, religion, and all aspects of cultural, social, and political history. The ARIT centers in Istanbul and Ankara offer unique research resources. The directors facilitate access to institutions and colleagues in the country. ARIT long term fellows interact with Turkish, U.S, and other scholars at the ARIT research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, where their intellectual exchange helps promote increased understanding of ancient and modern Turkey and the region. This program will enable ARIT-NEH fellows to produce groundbreaking research that is shared with the public through teaching and community outreach. For its NEH FPIRI program, ARIT requests 12 months total fellowship funding per year for 3 years, supporting 1 to 3 fellows annually.

Mario A. Rivera
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Oak Creek, WI 53154-2152)

FT-285682-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Arid Land Stories. Archaeology of the Atacama Desert

Research and writing leading to a book on the prehistory of the southern Andes and the Atacama Desert.

“Arid Land Stories. Archaeology of the Atacama Desert” is a book that contains the experience of Aymaras and Atacamenos people through time. It is a prehistory of the South Andes, a region that deserves better knowledge in American archaeology, fulfilling the lack of an English version. It contains results of multidisciplinary research that details the circumstances by which human society adapted to the hyper-arid environment. This development reveals surprising projections when obtaining results that describe complex situations of our ancestor’s ways of life. Arid Land Stories reflects my own philosophy regarding peoples experiences from which one can learn to plan. I believe in the potential of anthropological and archaeological research, due to the essence of the research itself that provides better alternatives and paths for those peoples of today who live in such harsh and extreme conditions.

Dan A. Zborover
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Englewood, CO 80113-3188)

FT-286395-22
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

A World of Strangers: A Historical Archaeology of the Mexican Pacific Coast (11th-17th centuries CE)

Research and writing leading to a book on the southern Pacific coast of Mexico between 1000 CE and 1700 CE.

The NEH Summer Stipend will support archival research in the Indigenous Chontal town of San Pedro Huamelula, Mexico. This will contribute to two chapters of my in-progress monograph, A World of Strangers: A Historical Archaeology of the Mexican Pacific Coast. Building on a critical reconfiguration of historical archaeology and a transhistorical perspective, the book focuses on the deep roots of long-term colonialism and incipient globalization on the Mexican Pacific coast. I argue that in order to fully understand these regional and global processes as a continuum, we must first reconstruct the Indigenous geopolitics in the region starting from the 11th through the 16th centuries, and which later laid the groundwork for European incursions and colonization. The book will highlight the Indigenous peoples’ impact on the transpacific world, and contribute to contemporary debates on Decoloniality and the Postcolonial critique, Indigenous agency, and re-writing alternative histories.

Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1698)
Heather Hurst (Project Director: September 2021 to present)

RFW-286709-22
Archaeological and Ethnographic Field Research
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$105,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2025

Murals in Landscape: An investigation of human-nature relationships in Maya myth and design at San Bartolo, Guatemala

Ethnographic and archaeological research on murals, carved monuments, and a recently discovered road system at the ancient Mayan site of San Bartolo in Guatemala (36 months).

Allison Mickel
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)

FEL-273171-21
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 7/31/2022

Turning over the Spade: Startup Approaches to Transforming Labor Relations in Jordanian Archaeology

Research and writing leading to a book on how two Jordanian non-profits are developing cultural heritage management capacity among local archaeological laborers.

My ethnographic research project examines a current and significant movement in the practice of Jordanian archaeology, toward building local capacity and increased local representation in cultural heritage management in Jordan. In 2016, two startup nonprofit corporations emerged in Jordan with the aim of building local capacity to document, conserve, protect, and make decisions about the future of archaeological sites in Jordan. These corporations, if successful, will transform entrenched archaeological labor management strategies with more than 200 years of history. I am following these companies for five years in order to advance current discussion across the fields of archaeology, critical cultural heritage, science studies, and sustainable development. This fellowship will support five months of ethnographic fieldwork and seven months to complete a book manuscript.

Lisa Marie Bitel
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)

FEL-273265-21
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 5/31/2022

Unseen: The Religious Supernatural in the Earliest Middle Ages

Research and writing leading to a book on religious conversion to Christianity in early medieval Britain and Ireland.

My book project is about religious change in Ireland and Britain between ca. 400-800 C.E.. Most scholars treat the Christianization of these islands as a story of sudden epiphanies, drawn from Christian-authored medieval histories and hagiographies. I propose instead to explain changes in the religious habits and landscapes of ordinary people in relation to the unseen forces that surrounded them. The source base includes neglected texts across written genres in both Latin and the vernaculars, as well as a growing body of recent archaeological evidence that contradicts traditional histories. I use this evidence to show how people in the region gradually shifted their interactions with the religious supernatural, including the triune Christian God. They chose what to see among possible religious realities, then negotiated with family members, allies, and authorities to find efficacious ways of dealing with the supernatural. Eventually, they learned to look like Christians.

Lorelle Denise Semley
College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)

FEL-273714-21
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$35,000 (approved)
$35,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 7/31/2022

Bordeaux, Forgotten Black Metropolis: A French Port City since the Era of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Research and writing leading to a book on the transatlantic history of Bordeaux’s former slave population and the transnational community of people of color from the 18th to the 20th centuries.

"Bordeaux, Forgotten Black Metropolis" examines how people of color in Bordeaux, France, formed a unique transnational community during the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. Bordeaux is an architecturally rich city that drew its wealth from its vigorous role in the Atlantic slave trade. However, my research reveals diverse and changing positions that people of color played in the city and surrounding countryside. Tracing the ongoing and shifting economic and familial ties to the Antilles, West Africa, North America, and other parts of Europe reveals the stories of ordinary enslaved and free women, men, and families of color as they have rarely appeared in Atlantic history – as a force in the history of a French city, the nation, and its empire.

Sinclair Wynn Bell
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)

FEL-273797-21
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2023

Race and Representation in the Roman Empire: Images of Aethiopians in Imperial Visual and Material Culture

Research and preparation of a book on the representation of Africans in ancient Roman art.

This book project investigates how artists and their social patrons conceptualized racial difference in the Roman empire (c. 100 BCE-200 CE). In particular, it seeks to understand how the social roles and status of Aethiopians and their perception by Romans were communicated through visual representations in "art" (e.g., statues, reliefs, mosaics) and material culture (e.g., amulets, earrings, perfume jars). The aim is to study the character, incidence, and contexts of these representations in cultural historical perspective: their formal qualities; their original viewing contexts and geographical distribution; their kinship with and differences from representations of “Others” (non-Romans) generally (e.g., Gauls); and the larger cultural understandings that underwrite them (e.g., "lightness" vs. "darkness"). This project is therefore interdisciplinary in its aims and methodology, as it sits at the intersection of African studies, Classical Studies, archaeology, and art history.

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: August 2020 to May 2021)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: May 2021 to present)

RA-278159-21
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

Totals:
$63,900 (approved)
$63,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Long-Term Advanced Research Fellowships at the American Research Institute in Turkey Overseas Research Centers

12 months of stipend support (2 - 3 fellowships) per year for one year and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The ARIT NEH fellowship program aims to support scholars who conduct long-term interdisciplinary research in the humanities in Turkey. Their fields of study include art, archaeology, literature, linguistics, musicology, religion, and all aspects of cultural, social, and political history. ARIT long term fellows interact with Turkish, U.S, and other scholars at the ARIT research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, where their intellectual exchange promotes a broad-based understanding of the ancient and modern Middle East. This scholarly interaction has enabled former ARIT-NEH fellows to produce groundbreaking publications that have been shared with the public through their teaching and community outreach programs. ARIT center directors in Istanbul and Ankara facilitate access to research resources and colleagues in the country. For its NEH FPIRI program, ARIT requests 12 months total fellowship funding per year. Research tenures may cover 4 to 12 months, supporting 1 to 3 fellows annually.

Hallie G. Meredith
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)

FT-278418-21
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/16/2022 – 7/15/2022

Fragmentary and Unfinished Art: Documenting Undocumented Late Roman Art and Process

Research and writing leading to a monograph on late Roman carving techniques through the study of incomplete stone sculptures.

This project investigates the unfinished work of anonymous Roman artists in order to document their artistic processes. The research focuses on the third to seventh centuries AD, a period not only representing a zenith in late Roman carving but for which numerous excavated production sites are extant. This research is vital for two core reasons. First, no written sources exist documenting production by anonymous artists. Second, the Roman practice of concealing evidence of carving has led to fundamental gaps in our knowledge concerning production. This award will support research at archaeological sites and on related objects. The approach will enable unfinished pieces to take center stage by accessing fundamentally important – but obscured – visual information. This project will make a significant interdisciplinary contribution to discourse in archaeology, ancient history, art history, classics, craft history and theory, and economic studies, among other fields of study.

Jacqueline Meier
University of North Florida (Jacksonville, FL 32224-7699)

FT-278594-21
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/18/2021 – 8/17/2021

Animals of a Late Bronze Age Household at Mycenae, Greece

Research and writing two articles on the use and treatment of animals in Late Bronze Age Mycenae in Greece.

Animals played vital roles as symbols, resources and individuals in Late Bronze Age societies. My research uses a context-based approach to elucidate human-animal interactions at Mycenae, Greece in the Late Bronze Age. I employ zooarchaeology to study how ceramic artisans lived with and used animals at the height of the palatial period at Mycenae (LHIIIA2, 14th c. BCE). I focus on faunal remains recovered from a well in the craft-producing household of Petsas House. The well remains are a significant source of evidence about animal lives, as texts and household evidence of animals are rare at Mycenae. With NEH support, I will write two articles to clarify how animal and human lives were intertwined in a Mycenaean household. I will use a life history approach to study household management of animals and domestic faunal refuse. This will challenge current views of human-animal boundaries at Mycenae and reveal how animals were a part of the household in life and death.

Christopher Ryan Green
Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)

FN-279286-21
Dynamic Language Infrastructure-Documenting Endangered Languages - Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 8/31/2022

Documentation and description of Jarawan languages

Research leading to publication of a grammar sketch, a lexicon, and narratives of three undocumented Jarawan languages (Mbat, Galamkya, and Duguri), a group of African Bantu languages.

This proposal seeks funds to support full-time research on Jarawan languages over Summers 2021 and 2022. These languages are essentially undocumented and represent a gap in the linguistic record. What little is known suggests they occupy a place that is intermediate between Narrow Bantu and Southern Bantoid, a longstanding point of divergence in the Bantu expansion from West-Central Africa. The project will focus on data collection and analysis of three Jarawan languages - Mbat (iso:bau), Galamkya, and Duguri (iso:dbm) - and will produce a grammar sketch, lexicon, and narratives aimed both at elucidating their place in the classificatory record and at providing a foundation for their maintenance and preservation. Materials produced will be stored in the Endangered Language Archive (ELAR)

University of Hawaii at Manoa (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
John A. Peterson (Project Director: September 2020 to present)

RFW-279332-21
Archaeological and Ethnographic Field Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$149,979 (approved)
$149,979 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2023

A Pattern of Islands: Ethnography, Remote Sensing, and Community Archaeology in Kosrae and Pohnpei, Micronesia

Investigation of the settlement pattern in Pohnpei and Kosrae in Micronesia using modern technology (drones), and by comparing the findings with oral tales collected from the community.

We propose to connect archaeological data in Pohnpei and Kosrae in Micronesia with village ethnography and active participation of villagers in the archaeological survey of their own communities. We propose to use drone-mounted lidar that can produce very highly detailed images and that can eliminate vegetation and modern construction from the view. These will help to visualize homescapes and coastal terrain in new ways of viewing the landscape. Villagers will meet in ethnographic sessions to apply their cultural knowledge of their island’s settlement and migration throughout the region. Archaeological knowledge will complement community knowledge. The project will contribute to current scholarship on indigenous knowledge in the face of western and colonial interpretation, and will provide a forum for islanders and western scholars to compare and contrast archaeological and ethnographic data as a space within which to co-produce knowledge of their migration history in the region.

American Center of Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
John D. M. Green (Project Director: December 2020 to September 2021)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: September 2021 to present)

RZ-279826-21
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$199,914 (approved)
$199,914 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023

The Temple of the Winged Lions Publication Project

Preparation of a print manuscript and digital archive detailing the American excavations at Petra in Jordan (1973-present). (24 months)

The American Center of Research (ACOR) will bring together more than twenty-five contributors to complete a final report on the Temple of the Winged Lions (TWL), an important Nabataean ritual complex within Petra, Jordan, dated to the 1st to 4th century CE. This manuscript preparation project will present the findings of the American Expedition to Petra (1973-2005), and the work of ACOR through the Temple of the Winged Lions Cultural Resource Management Initiative (from 2009). An editorial and advisory team will support specialists in archaeology, geology, and cultural heritage to conduct research using archives, artifacts, and site visits within Jordan. Collaborative research conducted online and in person will relate to the archaeological themes of ritual, economy and society, empire, and local communities, opening up new comparative research directions. In addition to completion of a final manuscript, scholarly and public facing outputs will raise awareness of the final publication.

Peter Der Manuelian
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)

FT-270021-20
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020

The Man who Dug the Pyramids: A Biography of American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942)

Research and writing leading to a biography of the influential American Egyptologist George A. Reisner (1867-1942).

Most archaeological biography projects do not reflect the broad brushstrokes of international relations and global change. But the individual currently under study—George A. Reisner (1867–1942, Harvard AB 1889)—is exceptional in several ways. Not only did Reisner pioneer crucial aspects of modern archaeological method as we understand them today, but he did so on an international stage, as an American expatriate working primarily in Arab countries (Egypt, Sudan) dominated by British political control and a French antiquities service. His story covers nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, the birth of scientific archaeology, the history of Harvard and of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the discovery of ancient art masterpieces and their ultimate museum destinations (under the partage system), and the issues of repatriation and cultural patrimony before they became the “hot topics” they are today. It is time that Reisner’s story, and his impact on the archaeological world, was told.

Allison Manfra McGovern
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)

FT-270716-20
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/8/2020 – 8/10/2020

Long Island Dirt: Recovering our Buried Past through Historical Archaeologies

Research and writing the introduction of a book on the historical archaeology of Long Island, New York.

The purpose of this book is to demonstrate, through recent historic and archaeological research, how historical archaeology can reveal dynamic and multi-faceted views of the past. Specifically focused on Long Island, New York, this book explores site-based histories through archaeology, material culture, landscape studies, and archival research to highlight the many unexplored aspects of history that can yet be discovered, and to re-examine some historic sites for new insights into past lives and experiences. The book project is scholarly in method, but publicly accessible in tone, as it demonstrates to scholarly and public audiences the contributions that archaeology can make to understanding broad patterns in American history in general and New York history in particular, and emphasizes the importance of preserving our past.

Heather Wholey
West Chester University of Pennsylvania (West Chester, PA 19383-0001)

FT-270748-20
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/25/2021 – 3/25/2021

Cultural Heritage Futures: Narrating Loss and Legacy along the Delaware Bay

Development of an interactive digital map combining environmental and archaeological data from around the Delaware Bay.

Climate driven sea level rise (SLR) threatens cultural heritage resources in coastal areas. The Delaware Estuary is the second largest on the U.S. Atlantic coast and is experiencing some of the gravest effects from SLR along the eastern seaboard. Archaeological and historical evidence reveal the area’s rich heritage, including thousands of years of Native American occupations; 17th century Swedish and Dutch settlements; a colonial maritime tradition; early18th century resort towns; and, extant World War II defensive installations. The shoreline is fringed by salt marshes, which are being assaulted by storm surge, and converted into mudflats or open water at an alarming rate. The Delaware Bay Climate and Archaeology project has yielded decadal level, site specific projections of SLR threats until the year 2100. This project will use maps, photographs and digital reconstructions to translate science-driven research into a humanities-oriented visual narrative of compelling case studies.

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Michael David Carrasco (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Joshua D. Englehardt (Co Project Director: January 2020 to present)

RZ-271159-20
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$249,850 (approved)
$247,217 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2023

The Origins of Writing in Early Mesoamerica

Preparation of a print monograph and digital archive detailing the origins of writing in Mesoamerica (1500-300 BCE). (36 months)

This book project charts the origins and development of writing in Mesoamerica to explore the critical time in the Early and Middle Formative Periods (ca. 1500–300 BCE) when Mesoamerican peoples developed a number of writing systems from sophisticated iconography. Further, it examines the continuous dialogue between these ancestral artistic systems and later scripts, such as those of the Maya and Zapotec cultures, as well as how writing influenced visual culture. Building on a range of theoretical models, new discoveries, and recent field research, this book project elucidates the transition from a shared foundational iconography to phonetic writing. The aim is to craft a robust understanding of the emergence of writing and contextualize it in the rich visual culture of Mesoamerica, thereby contributing to a better theoretical conception of the origins and role of writing in early civilizations.

David Pettegrew
Messiah College (Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-6706)

FZ-272289-20
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

The Archaeology of the Early Christian World: History, Methods, Evidence

Research and writing for a book on the archaeological history of Early Christianity.

This project explains how archaeological approaches, practices, and evidence shape historical interpretations of the early Christian world. Scholars have often viewed archaeology as a tool for generating extraordinary discoveries to authenticate, challenge, or illustrate the histories and theologies of the early church. This work considers how the more common but less spectacular findings of archaeological field research, including ceramic assemblages, stratified deposits, and surface remains, are gradually changing our picture of the social and economic life of Christian communities of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East between the first and seventh centuries CE. In its emphasis on processes and practices, the book fills a gap in Anglophone scholarship for a critical explanation of the archaeology of this world religion and an accessible introduction to a subject often sensationalized in popular media.

David Frederic Overstreet
College of Menominee Nation (Keshena, WI 54135-1179)

HB-267584-20
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 1/31/2021

Seeking Kiash Matchitiwuk (The Ancient Ones)-The Menominee Struggle for Ethnic Identity

Writing an archeological monograph describing the pre-history of the Menominee nation of northern Wisconsin.

Vintage archaeological investigations on the Menominee reservation in northeastern Wisconsin linked the resident population to local prehistoric sites, a construct that supported oral traditions and the Menominee creation narrative. The tribe has been historically associated with wild rice harvesting as their Algonquian-derived name implies. By the turn of the 21st century this traditional framework was challenged by a new paradigm stating their claimed homeland may have been elsewhere, but retained their purported life-ways as hunters and gatherers. Multidisciplinary research by the Menominee tribe utilized archaeology, ethno-history, soil science, oral traditions, agronomy, and geography to construct a new paradigm in support of its traditional ethnic identity and culture history. The new model moves the Menominee tribe across history’s doorstep into the past they claim, but with a previously unrecognized adaptation of sustainable organic agriculture.

Archaeological Institute of America (Boston, MA 02108-3614)
Laetitia A. La Follette (Project Director: August 2019 to October 2019)
Jodi Magness (Project Director: October 2019 to March 2020)
Laetitia A. La Follette (Project Director: March 2020 to present)

RJ-269493-19
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Research)
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$652,302 (approved)
$652,302 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 9/30/2023

NEH Archaeology Grants through the Archaeological Institute of America

A small grants program for humanistic archaeological research and writing that supports survey, excavation, and publication.

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is requesting a grant of $500,000 (plus administrative costs) for two years to establish a program that provides small grants to individuals conducting archaeological research around the world. The grants will focus on providing support for a larger number of fieldwork projects that might be thought of as “lean and mean” – i.e., not requiring vast funding outlays to return important results. Just as significantly, these grants will also support post-fieldwork research and publication efforts that are currently underfunded, yet critical to providing a more complete understanding of the communities being studied. The current lack of funding for post-fieldwork efforts often results in long gaps of time between the completion of the project and the dissemination of final reports and publications.

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)

FEL-262890-19
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1910-1940

A book-length study about state-sponsored archeology in Mexico between 1910 and 1940, and its effect on indigenous societies and cultures.

“Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1910-1940” examines the making of archaeological patrimony and an official Indian past during the three decades that followed the outbreak of Mexico's 1910 revolution. The manuscript also looks at how the government's archaeological projects impacted native peoples at the ruins. With the aid of an NEH Fellowship, I will explore this formative stage in Mexican archaeology through research in Mexico City archives. My goal is to spend twelve consecutive months analyzing documents in four archives that are essential to the completion of my manuscript: the National Archive (AGN), Historical Archive of the National Museum of Anthropology (AHMNA), the National Library of Anthropology and History (BNAH), and INAH’s Technical Archive of the Office of Pre-Hispanic Monuments (ATMP).I will also travel to sites related to my study to interview the descendants of people who worked in the government’s archaeological projects.

American Center of Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2018 to March 2020)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)

RA-264472-19
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$165,100 (approved)
$165,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2023

Long-Term Research Fellowships in Jordan at the American Center of Oriental Research

10 months of stipend support (1-2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

ACOR, founded a half century ago, facilitates research concerning Jordan and the broader Middle East. Its thriving fellowship program supports scholars at all stages of their careers. This funding is requested in order to better meet the research needs of postdoctoral scholars, both those new to MENA and those who may know it well. Long-term fellowships would help them complete critical fieldwork, such as interviews and site visits, and provide concentrated research and writing time in ACOR’s exceptional library. This would also allow for more chances for in-depth scholarly exchanges, which are inherent in an ACOR residential fellowship as the center is a natural place to connect with other residents as well as Jordanian academics and international scholars due to its programs. [edited by staff]

Getty Publications (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Alexa Sekyra (Project Director: August 2018 to present)

RA-264488-19
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$260,744 (approved)
$259,144 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 6/30/2023

Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute

16 months of stipend support (2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This application seeks three years of funding to support two residential postdoctoral fellowships for scholars with research backgrounds in art history, architecture, archaeology, anthropology, history, and cultural heritage and historic preservation, among others. The NEH fellowships would complement a diversity of other fellowship opportunities hosted by the GRI, Getty Museum, and Getty Conservation Institute and while in residence, Fellows will be part of the broader community of scholars and research professionals. NEH Fellows would be selected through an independent committee, the members of which chosen from a diversity of institution types and geographical regions across the US. [edited by staff]

Kevin Gibbs
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)

FT-265217-19
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 6/30/2019

The Archaeology of Pottery and Chronology at Jebel Tomat, a 3rd Century BCE Settlement in Modern-Day Sudan

Collections research and preparation of book on the archaeological finds at the site of Jebel Tomat in southern Sudan.

In the early third century BCE the Meroitic kingdom emerged as the most significant and influential state in sub-Saharan Africa. The site of Jebel Tomat (Sudan) sits at the southern margin of the Meroitic world, where little archaeological research has taken place. The site was excavated by the late archaeologist J. Desmond Clark during the early 1970s but much of the recovered material remains unstudied. This project will examine the pottery from the site to understand how it was used by the ancient residents of Jebel Tomat and to investigate potential interaction with other communities, including people living to the south. The project will also generate a detailed chronology of Jebel Tomat by radiocarbon dating unanalyzed charcoal samples that Clark collected during his excavations. The project will result in a chapter of book that examines Jebel Tomat and other sites excavated in the Sudan by Clark in the broader context of African archaeology and the Meroitic kingdom.

Montpelier Foundation (Orange, VA 22960-0551)
Terry P. Brock (Project Director: December 2018 to June 2022)
Matthew B. Reeves (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Mary Furlong Minkoff (Co Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Matthew B. Reeves (Co Project Director: April 2019 to June 2022)
Terry P. Brock (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

RZ-266251-19
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$249,820 (approved)
$249,820 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2020 – 3/31/2023

Understanding the Overseer: Using Archaeology to Examine Status and Identity at James Madison's Montpelier

Field research on the overseer’s house at James Madison’s Montpelier leading to public programs and publications on the social, economic, and racial complexity of 19th-century plantations in the United States. (36 months)

This study will adopt the space/place model to examine the overseer at James Madison’s Montpelier, an early 19th century plantation in the Virginia Piedmont. It will examine the relationship of the overseer to the plantation elite and the enslaved community through an in depth study of the overseer’s space on the landscape, and how they defined that space through household activities. We will examine the space the overseer occupied on the landscape through a spatial analysis of the farm complex in which the overseer’s house was situated, and excavations of the overseer’s home and its surrounding yard space. Archaeologists will examine how the plantation owner situated the overseer in relationship to the rest of the community through building architecture and the spatial proxemics of the overseer's house. Then we will examine how the overseer and his household responded to this position through the organization of his household activities and consumer choices.

Elizabeth Fenn
Regents of the University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80309-0001)

FZ-266572-19
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020

Sacagawea's World: Window on the American West

Research and writing of a history of Native Americans in the Northern Plains and Rockies in the first half of the nineteenth century, structured around the life of Sacagawea, guide for the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Sacagawea’s World uses the signal events and contested dimensions of one Native American woman’s life to convey a new, accessible narrative of the Northern Plains, Northern Rockies, and Pacific Northwest to 1850. Sacagawea provided essential guidance to Lewis and Clark on their 1804–1806 trans-continental journey. But her life also illuminates a world in upheaval as Indigenous peoples engaged with global commerce, new modes of warfare, altered hunting patterns, environmental change, and ever-shifting power dynamics. How puzzling it is that despite Sacagawea’s renown, we know so little about the ways she and those around her experienced and engaged the world. I use a wide array of source material, including archaeology, rock art, landscape, oral accounts, legends, ethnographies, manuscripts, and a plethora of existing scholarship to bring this new narrative to life.

Claudia Lozoff Brittenham
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)

FEL-257427-18
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Unseen Art: Memory, Vision, and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica

A book analyzing the use and meaning of concealed art among the Maya, Olmec, and Aztec cultures.

My book project, Unseen Art: Memory, Vision, and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica, examines the conditions under which ancient art was viewed and experienced, focusing on practices diametrically opposed to the modern paradigm of museum display. In a series of case studies drawn from major Mesoamerican civilizations, I suggest that art could operate beyond the realm of the visual, and explore the ways in which concealed images and esoteric knowledge might be used to maintain power and social difference. Unseen art also pushes us to develop creative ways to explore ancient viewing experiences and the reception of ancient works of art. The insights gained demonstrate the value of contextualized ways of looking at all artworks.

Philip Sapirstein
University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68588-0007)

FEL-257634-18
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

The Ancient Greek Temple of Hera at Olympia: A Digital Architectural History

Preparation of a digital publication on the architectural history and development of the Doric style at the Temple of Hera at Olympia (ca. 600 BCE).

I have recently completed a high-resolution 3D recording of the oldest well-preserved Greek temple in the Doric style, the Heraion at Olympia. The project has revealed significant new insights into the architectural history of the monument. I am now facing a common challenge for researchers working with 3D scans of cultural heritage: how to publish the wealth of digital data. I plan to develop a project website to disseminate the models, reconstructions, and linked texts and images. A lightweight environment built on existing mapping technologies will enable users to navigate visualizations of the remains interactively. The dissemination of the complex 3D models from Olympia through pre-rendered orthographic views will represent a model that might be adapted for many other ancient monuments. The site will allow flexible exploration, but it will also guide visitors through a new argument concerning the architectural history of the temple’s peristyle.

Elaine A. Sullivan
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

FEL-257873-18
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

Visibility and Ritual Landscape at the Ancient Egyptian Necropolis of Saqqara, 2950-350 BCE

Preparation of a digital monograph investigating the ancient Egyptian burial site of Saqqara (2950-350 BCE) comparatively through time and space.

Ancient landscapes are a major focus of study in the field of archaeology, with research centered on the interaction between humans, culture, and the natural and built environment at sites around the world. While clearly of great interest to scholars, these past places remain elusive. The archaeological sites we visit today are palimpsests, the result of thousands of years of change, both architectural and environmental. The born-digital monograph Constructing the Sacred: Visibility and Ritual Landscape at the Egyptian Necropolis of Saqqara addresses ancient ritual landscape from a unique perspective, utilizing emerging 3D technologies to examine development at the complex, multi-period archaeological site of Saqqara, Egypt. Harnessing the temporal layering abilities of the 3D environment, it demonstrates how 3D modeling allows archaeologists to approach questions of meaning and human experience in now-disappeared landscapes in new ways.

Daniel J. Sherman
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)

FEL-257962-18
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Science and Spectacle in the History of French Archaeology, 1890-1940

A book-length study on the history of French archaeology from 1890 to 1940.

My project probes the intertwined histories of archaeology and French culture in the early twentieth century. It focuses on two controversies, over excavations at Carthage in the French Protectorate of Tunisia and about the authenticity of a supposed Neolithic site discovered in central France, as constitutive of a field suspended between scientific ambitions and media attention. Bringing together two sub-fields normally treated separately, classical archaeology and prehistory, the study offers a new ground-level view of the formation of archaeology as at once discipline and spectacle. I ask basic questions about the constitution of the archive and disciplines’ understandings of their own past that allow for reflection across history, my field of study, and archaeology, my object of study. The visual representation and display of archaeology, archaeological finds, and archaeologists receive particular emphasis as a connecting thread between discipline-formation and spectacle.

American Center of Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: August 2017 to March 2020)
Pearce Paul Creasman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)

RA-259220-18
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$30,200 (approved)
$30,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Long-term Research Fellowships at the American Center of Oriental Research

6 months of stipend support (one fellowship) per year for two years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The American Center of Oriental Research (ACOR) in Amman, Jordan. The ACOR-NEH Fellowship contributes significantly to the mission of ACOR’s overall Fellowship Program by supporting the research of a senior scholar who has a well-established and productive research and publication record in Jordan and the Middle East and who also serves as an influential mentor during their ACOR residency. Visiting scholars conduct critical on-the-ground research and take advantage of ACOR’s exceptional library to research and write new scholarly publications. (edited by staff)

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Tania Munz (Project Director: August 2017 to March 2020)
Robert D. Newman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)

RA-259260-18
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals (outright + matching):
$301,454 (approved)
$301,454 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022

Long-term Research Fellowships at the National Humanities Center

30 months of stipend support (3-5 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The National Humanities Center, an independent center exclusively devoted to advanced humanities research, seeks five nine-month fellowships for the next three-year cycle (grant period Jan. 1, 2019-June 30, 2022). Since 1978, NEH has generously supported five NHC fellowships during each granting cycle, excepting the last cycle when it supported three. Designated “NEH Fellows,” recipients of these awards are chosen through a rigorous vetting process and join a vibrant intellectual community of 35-40 total Fellows. Each works on a major research project throughout the academic year with significant support from our library staff and fellowship office. End-of-year evaluations from the roughly 1,400 Fellows who have been in residence generally describe their year at the NHC as the most inspiring and productive of their careers. The NHC focuses attention to diversity in all of its dimensions so that Fellows represent a broad range of disciplines, institutions, backgrounds and perspectives.

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: August 2017 to present)

RA-259286-18
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$167,672 (approved)
$167,672 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022

Long-term Research Fellowships at the American Research Institute in Turkey

12 months of stipend support (1-3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The ARIT NEH fellowship program supports scholars who conduct long-term interdisciplinary research in the humanities in Turkey. Their fields of study include art, archaeology, literature, linguistics, musicology, religion, and all aspects of cultural, social, and political history. NEH fellows interact with Turkish and U.S scholars at the ARIT research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, where their intellectual exchange promotes a broad-based understanding of the ancient and modern Near East. This scholarly interaction has enabled ARIT-NEH fellows to produce groundbreaking publications that have been shared with the public through their teaching and community outreach programs. ARIT center directors in Istanbul and Ankara facilitate access to research resources and colleagues in the country. For its NEH FPIRI program, ARIT requests 12 months total fellowship funding per year. Research tenures may cover 4 to 12 months, supporting 1 to 3 fellows annually.

Denise Eileen McCoskey
Miami University (Oxford, OH 45056-1846)

FT-259751-18
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018

Eugenics and Classical Scholarship in Early 20th-Century America

Research and writing of a scholarly article about the role of eugenics in American classical scholarship prior to World War II.

In this project, I propose to carry out a critical study of the role of eugenic theories in early twentieth-century American classical scholarship. Building on research I conducted for an earlier project, my hypothesis is that the reliance on eugenics was widespread in classical scholarship during the first half of the twentieth century, and I would like to use the NEH Summer Stipend to document and evaluate classicists’ employment of such theories in their interpretations of ancient history, while also weighing the legacy such scholarship continues to have in the field of classics today. The penchant for using Greek and Roman history as a mirror for American life is as old as America itself, and I believe interrogation of the intersections of classical scholarship and eugenics can also provide insight into some of the ways contemporary American debates about race and eugenics were, in turn, bolstered by these interpretations of the ancient world.

J. Cameron Monroe
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)

FT-259941-18
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 8/31/2018

Archaeology at Cana: A West African City of the Atlantic Era, 1600–1894

Completion of an archaeological study and publication of a two-volume monograph on the West African kingdom of Dahomey (1600-1894).

Western perspectives on African cities have long privileged external factors in the rise of cities across the continent. In recent decades, however, archaeologists have revealed the local origins of cities, countering such arguments for the exogenous origins of African civilizations. Yet the global trading networks that engulfed Africa in the second millennium AD had wide-reaching impacts on African urban systems, and we are only beginning to explore how local and global forces articulated. Since 2000, I have explored this question in reference to the kingdom of Dahomey in West Africa, which thrived in the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In the coming year I plan to complete a two-volume monograph summarizing archaeological, documentary, and oral evidence from this research. The monograph will represent one of only a few detailed archaeological studies of a West Africa urban community in this period, providing comparative data for scholars working across the region.

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Christopher J. Ratte (Project Director: December 2017 to present)

RZ-260848-18
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$220,000 (approved)
$220,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2022

Notion Archaeological Research Project: The Biography of an Ancient Greek Urban Community

Excavation and analysis at Notion, an urban site from the Hellenistic and Roman periods, located in western Turkey. (36 months)

Archaeological excavation at Notion will examine how a community living in a port town in western Anatolia responded to developments in Greek urbanism and the expansion of Roman power. Notion lies in ancient Ionia, 15 km north of Ephesus. We focus on the tumultuous era of the 3rd century BCE to 1st century CE, when many cities were radically transformed through local initiative and external coercion. During this period Notion was relocated to a new site, but then abandoned after only a few centuries. Building on the results of archaeological survey, we will examine the historical and social processes enacted in the ultimately unsuccessful reinvention of the city through investigation of its residential areas. Research at Notion on urban development and devolution at the household scale offers a new approach to the study of western Anatolian cities, and contributes to comparative urban studies, household archaeology, landscape biography, and Ionian history.

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Jeffrey Barnet Fleisher (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Kathryn M. de Luna (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Matthew C. Pawlowicz (Co Project Director: January 2018 to present)

RZ-260900-18
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$209,724 (approved)
$209,724 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2023

The Demographics of Pre-History: South Central Africa Through Archaeology and Linguistics

Archaeological and linguistic research leading to a study of migration patterns in central Africa, 500-1500 CE.

The proposed project reconstructs the cultural history of mobility in south central Africa between the 6th and 16th centuries. Language shift and human migration have long served as explanations for the expansions of language families and populations. This project will be the first to study human mobility in such demographic histories as a historical problem in its own right, capturing the motives and contingencies that shaped changing forms of and ideas about mobility and, as a result, actually changed the pace and path of the larger expansion process. Such research on human mobility is only feasible with the creation of an interdisciplinary archive linking archaeological, ecological, ethnohistorical, and historical linguistic data. Each dataset will be developed at research sites in Zambia, a place lacking the traditional archives of humanistic research. The project illuminates the material, political, and cognitive lives of people who shaped the demographic history in this region.

James Romm
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)

FZ-261390-18
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019

The Sacred Band of Thebes and the Last Days of Greek Freedom (379–338 B.C.)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the "Sacred Band," a special infantry unit of the city of Thebes from 379-338 BCE, in the context of ancient Greek history, politics, and philosophy.

The Sacred Band, a Theban infantry unit made up of paired male lovers fighting side by side, is depicted by Greek sources as the pivotal factor in the 4th-century rise of Thebes and overthrow of Sparta. Yet no historical study has looked in depth at the legend of this elite corps. My book will trace the Band through the four decades in which it fought, from its creation in 379 BCE by a cadre of Theban patriots, to its annihilation by Alexander the Great at the Chaeronea in 338 BCE, a battle that brought an end to Greek political autonomy. I will examine the Band's role in Theban victories over Sparta during the 370's, and show that Plato's Symposium, a dialogue that alludes to the Sacred Band in discussing the power of eros, was likely inspired by it. Love's Warriors thus stands at the intersection of Platonic philosophy, military history and the study of Greek sexuality, with a nod to archaeology in its concluding exploration of the Sacred Band's mass grave on the field of Chaeronea.

Maggie Popkin
Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH 44106-4901)

FA-251491-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Object Memory: Souvenirs, Memorabilia, and the Construction of Knowledge in the Roman Empire

A book-length study of ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their role in constructing knowledge and memory in the Roman Empire.

My project investigates ancient Roman souvenirs and memorabilia and their profound role in generating and mediating memory and knowledge in the Roman Empire. In Rome, where literacy was limited and visual communication was essential, souvenirs were a critical means for conveying complex ideas. The Roman Empire produced a rich range of souvenirs and memorabilia commemorating cities, sporting events, monumental statues, and religious pilgrimages. I examine how such objects constructed knowledge in an era before mechanical reproduction. Without access to print or digital media, many Romans learned about various sites, monuments, and events through images on souvenirs. Souvenirs and memorabilia are thus critical to understanding how ancient Romans conceptualized their world. Their study has broad implications for understanding the social functions of images in antiquity and beyond and is relevant to scholars concerned with visual culture’s impact on memory, perception, and knowledge.

Katina T. Lillios
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)

FA-251789-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Prehistoric Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: The Making of a Cultural Mosaic

The completion of a book-length survey of the archaeology of the prehistoric Iberian peninsula.

For my NEH project I will complete a book entitled Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula: From the Paleolithic through the Bronze Age (currently under contract with Cambridge University Press, scheduled for completion in July 2018). The book will document the rich and diverse histories of the peoples who lived on the Peninsula between 1,000,000 and 3000 years ago (the Bronze Age), through their art, burials, tools, and monuments. Despite recent dramatic discoveries at archaeological sites in Portugal and Spain, which have revolutionized our thinking about human history, the rich archaeological heritage of prehistoric Iberia remains largely unknown outside the Peninsula. My book will be the only up-to-date synthesis of Iberian archaeology, in English, accessible to students, scholars, and the interested public.

Chet Adam Van Duzer
Unaffiliated independent scholar

Participating institutions:
Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (Rolling Hills Estates, CA) - Participating Institution

FA-252070-17
Fellowships for University Teachers
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 11/30/2017

Annotation for Education in the Princeton/Brussels Copy of the 1525 Edition of Ptolemy’s Geography

Preparation of a digital edition of the annotations on a 1527 copy of Ptolemy's Geography that illuminate the understanding and teaching of geography in the early 16th century.

I seek a ten-month Mellon Fellowship for Digital Publication to fund the completion of my transcription, English translation, and study of the annotations in a copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy’s Geography that is currently divided between Princeton and a private collection in Brussels. The annotations, written in Latin in about 1527, are extremely profuse, were made for a student, and contain original geographical thought. They are valuable for studies of the reception of Ptolemy’s Geography, of sixteenth-century geographical education, and of European intellectual networks. The only good format in which to publish them is in a digital edition that shows images of the pages and thus the context of each annotation, with a full transcription and English translation, all searchable. Princeton has agreed to host the digital edition on its server in an instantiation of the open-source Mellon-funded Archaeology of Reading platform for digital editions of annotated early modern books.

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)

FT-255150-17
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 8/31/2017

Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940

A book-length study about the connections between archeology and nation-building during the first two decades after the Mexican Revolution.

“Excavating Identity: Archaeology in Revolutionary Mexico, 1920-1940” examines the making of archaeological patrimony and an official Indian past during the first two decades of Mexico's revolutionary regime. The manuscript also looks at how the government's archaeological projects impacted native peoples at the ruins. With the NEH Summer Stipend, I will explore this formative stage in Mexican archaeology through research in Mexico City archives. My goal is to spend two consecutive months analyzing documents in two Mexico City archives that are essential to the completion of my manuscript: the Historical Archive of the National Museum of Anthropology (AHMNA) and the National Library of Anthropology and History (BNAH).

Arizona Board of Regents (Tucson, AZ 85721-0001)
Emma C. Blake (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

RZ-255604-17
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$199,988 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2022

An Archaeological Field Survey in the Trapani Province of Western Sicily

Field survey and interpretation of finds from the coastal area near Marsala, Italy, in order to investigate cultural interaction with North Africa across the Sicilian Channel over the past 7,000 years. (36 months)

This archaeological field survey in Sicily addresses millennia-long interactions with Tunisia, 90 miles across the Sicilian Channel. The project will include two field seasons of artifact collection and one study season for analysis of survey findings. Results will be presented at conferences, in journals, and as a field report. The Channel is one of the busiest crossings for undocumented migrants entering Europe. Current migrations are the latest manifestations of a history of crossings in both directions. Although scholars of particular historical periods have noted the ties linking Tunisia and western Sicily at moments in history, this story of evolving interactions over millennia has never been told. A collaborative project involving intensive field surveys in the corner of Sicily closest to Tunisia is ideal to investigate this complex story. The proposed project will re-construct and explain the Tunisian presence in Western Sicily over time.

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Jane Buikstra (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Eleanna Prevedorou (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

Participating institutions:
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ) - Applicant/Recipient
American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ) - Participating Institution

RZ-255623-17
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,124 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2022

An Archaeological Study of the Ancient Phaleron Cemetery near Athens, Greece

Archaeological study and analysis of 8th-5th-century of the cemetery of Phaleron, the ancient port of Athens, Greece. (36 months)

This study focuses upon the cemetery of Phaleron, at the port of the ancient city of Athens. The cemetery dates to the Archaic - Early Classical period (ca. 750-480 BCE), characterized by major sociopolitical reforms, including changes in ruling tenure, early codification of law, tyranny, and democracy. Phaleron cemetery consists of hundreds of burials, mainly simple pit graves, jar burials of infants, and skeletons with evidence for captivity, violence, and execution. The nature of the cemetery suggests the presence of lower status individuals, such as non-elites, outlaws, and the unwanted. By integrating archaeological and historical information with osteological, biochemical, and genetic data, we will address the identity of the people of Phaleron within what appears to have been a port community of diverse backgrounds. We ask for funding for a three-year project (2017-20) for the in-depth study, interpretation, and publication of the human burials of the Phaleron cemetery.

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Lisa Ann Maher (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Danielle A. Macdonald (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)

RZ-255635-17
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 2/28/2023

Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan

Excavation and analysis of early settlements of hunter-gatherers at the Paleolithic site of Kharaneh in eastern Jordan. (36 months)

The transition from hunter-gather to food-producing societies in southwest Asia was a pivotal shift in prehistory. The 20,000-year-old hunter-gatherer aggregation site of Kharaneh IV exhibits multi-seasonal, prolonged and repeated habitation, making it the largest Paleolithic site in the region and one that evidences emerging sedentism and settlement, economic intensification, and ritual behaviors associated with dwelling, almost 8,000 years earlier than previously known. As a central hub of occupation for groups from throughout the region, this site is uniquely able to inform us about the construction of communities and interaction networks across a broad social landscape by exploring the nature and motivations for aggregation by reconstructing the spatial organization of domestic and symbolic activities, and undertaking comparative analyses of material culture at contemporary sites to trace how the site’s inhabitants were integrated into broader spheres of social interaction.

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001)
Julia A. King (Project Director: December 2016 to present)

RZ-255645-17
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2020

Indigenous Borderlands of the Chesapeake: The Lower Rappahannock Valley Landscape, 200-1850 CE

Excavation and artifact analysis at eleven Native American sites along the lower Rappahannock river in Virginia, leading to the development of interpretive print and online publications and GIS datasets. (26 months)

The project seeks NEH support to develop a baseline history of an understudied but key watershed in the Chesapeake region of North America. The Rappahannock River valley, located between the better known Potomac and James rivers, was, circa 1608, densely populated with well-organized polities, presupposing a dynamic but still unknown history. Using collections- and fieldwork-based methodologies along with GIS technologies, Saint Mary's College of Maryland and its collaborators will explore this borderland river drainage, addressing questions of migration and mobility, political development, the forging of group identities, and responses to colonialism. Our approach is rooted in landscape, the digital humanities, and a perspective that emphasizes the long durée.

St. Mary's College of Maryland (St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001)
Julia A. King (Project Director: December 2016 to March 2021)

RJ-255678-17
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Research)
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$3,913 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 5/31/2017

Conference: American History through the Archaeology of the Potomac River Valley

A conference and edited volume of essays on American history through the lens of archaeology of the Potomac River Valley.

This grant funds a small conference focused on developing an edited book manuscript describing research completed as part of the NEH-funded project, “The Lower Potomac River Valley at Contact, 1500-1720” (RZ-51442-12). This conference will be organized by Dr. Julie King and her co-collaborator, Barbara J. Heath (University of Tennessee), and will be held Sunday, May 14 through Wednesday, May 17, 2017. The book manuscript proposed as an outcome of this project would consist of 14-15 chapters by different authors, all of whom participated in the original sponsored NEH project in one capacity or another. The purpose of this concluding conference would be to review, critique, and better integrate individual essays for a planned peer-reviewed book. The goal is to have a final manuscript ready for submission to an academic press on or about September 1, 2017.