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Keywords: baseball (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Yuriko Gamo Romer (Project Director: August 2021 to present)

TD-285397-22
Media Projects Development
Public Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 2/28/2023

Diamond Diplomacy

Planning for an hour-long documentary on U.S.-Japanese relations through the prism of baseball.

Diamond Diplomacy is an hour-long documentary film for broadcast, about U.S. Japan relations through a shared love of baseball. Two ex-ballplayers, one American & one Japanese will tell their own baseball stories, while key points during a 150-year history (starting in 1872) will be highlighted.

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. (Cooperstown, NY 13326-1160)
Jon Shestakofsky (Project Director: May 2020 to present)

AH-274182-20
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Education)
Education Programs

Totals:
$298,065 (approved)
$294,473 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 12/31/2020

Safe at Home Education Resources

Salaries for museum staff who will create virtual education experiences and access to the museum’s digital collection.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has launched the Safe at Home program to make its educational curriculum and live online education programs available at no cost to parents and students. Additionally, the Museum has continued to provide access and add content to its digital collection, and has undertaken a legacy collections data cleanup project to improve the user experience for students and researchers. This project will support the continuation of these programs, when the need for online educational resources is great than ever.

Salisbury University (Salisbury, MD 21801-6860)
Creston Long (Project Director: May 2018 to October 2022)

PY-263676-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,313 (approved)
$10,978 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Delmarva Baseball: Digitizing the Heritage of 20th-Century Eastern Shore Baseball Leagues

From the early 1920s through the 1970s, residents of Delmarva (Delaware and the Eastern Shore counties of Maryland and Virginia) enjoyed attending games played by town teams that competed in the semi-professional Eastern Shore baseball leagues. Reflecting the broader segregation in American society, white players competed in the Eastern Shore and Central Shore leagues and African American players competed in the Negro League. Towns and communities on the peninsula built stadiums, sponsored teams, and paid players to compete in seasons that ran from spring through the late summer. Baseball on Delmarva was an integral part of cultural and social life in the region during this time. The Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University will host a series of events in 2019 and 2020 to promote awareness of this rich history and to archive digital images of documents, photographs, and memorabilia connected to Delmarva baseball.

Theresa Runstedtler
American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)

FZ-266901-19
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2019 – 8/31/2020

Black Ball: Rethinking the "Dark Ages" of Professional Basketball

Research and writing leading to a book for a popular audience on the history of race, labor, and the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the 1970s.

Playing on the multiple meanings of the expression “Black Ball,” my book recasts the history of the NBA’s “Dark Ages.” According to popular wisdom, the league’s waning profitability and popularity in the seventies was the fault of a new generation of immature, selfish, lazy, and greedy Black players who came to dominate the professional ranks. Only after white league executives and team owners regained control did the NBA rebound in the 1980s. However, the actual history is much more complicated. It is also more revealing about the ongoing significance of anti-Black racism in U.S. sport and society in the post-Civil Rights era. Combining narrative history and cultural analysis, Black Ball argues that the misnamed “Dark Ages” were pivotal years in the rise of the NBA as a profitable powerhouse, thanks largely to the efforts of Black players in fighting for greater compensation and control over their labor and in reshaping the game with aesthetics and ethics of urban Black streetball.

Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation (Indianapolis, IN 46208-5732)
Meaghan Fukunaga (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258627-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,510 (approved)
$11,510 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Everyday Experience: African Americans in Indianapolis

Three digitization events at the Indianapolis Public Library focused on preserving local history materials. Follow-up public outreach events would focus on the area’s African American community, which represents over a quarter of the city’s population, and would highlight such topics as jazz, Negro League baseball, and land ownership. The events would encourage digitization of photographs, family and church records, personal letters, and other documents, with the possibility of digitizing audiovisual materials separately. With donor permission, digitized materials would be made available via Digital Indy, the library’s digital collections and exhibition site.

Everyday Experience: African Americans in Indianapolis will provide opportunities for the digitization of family heritage materials from Indianapolis’ African Americans, while also presenting engaging public programming to both educate and celebrate that heritage with the wider community. The Indianapolis Public Library will hold at least three public scan-a-thons to create a new digital collection focused on the African-American experience. Based on the items digitized, the Library will also host public programming to explore and provide context for the materials collected. Programming topics could include Negro League Baseball, Jazz on Indiana Avenue or an exploration of neighborhood segregation. With the correct permissions, the digitized materials will become part of the Library’s digital collections, available to the public, researchers and more. The project dovetails with the Library’s digitization efforts and creation of a Center for Black Literature and Culture.

Tom Dunkel
Unaffiliated independent scholar

FZ-261342-18
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

White Knights in the Black Orchestra: A True Story of the Nazi Resistance

Research leading to publication of a monograph on a Nazi resistance group that included German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945). 

My project is a book-in-progress under contract with a publisher. This is not biography or military history. I'm writing a narrative nonfiction book geared to a mainstream American audience; an audience largely unaware of one of the great stories of the Nazi resistance. My focus is the years 1938-1945 and a small group of conspirators primarily based at Abwehr, the German foreign intelligence service. Their goal is to obstruct and, hopefully, destroy the Third Reich from within, if necessary by killing Adolf Hitler. The main protagonists are pastor-turned-resister Dietrich Bonhoeffer, his brother-in-law and Abwehr attorney Hans von Dohnanyi, and Admiral Wilhem Canaris, head of Abwehr. This is a story of personal courage in the face of collective tyranny; of inescapable but dangerous moral choices. As Martin Luther King, Jr. noted, "If your opponent has a conscience, then follow Gandhi and non-violence. But if your enemy has no conscience like Hitler, then follow Bonhoeffer."

Withers Collection, Inc. (Memphis, TN 38103-3135)
Carol A McCarley (Project Director: May 2016 to present)

PG-252859-17
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,973 (approved)
$5,973 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

Withers Collection Archive Preservation Project

The purchase of environmental monitoring equipment and rehousing supplies, as well as online training for museum staff, for the collection of photographs, negatives, letters, and records of photojournalist Ernest C. Withers (1922-2007). In the 1950s, Withers helped spur the movement for civil rights with a self-published photo pamphlet on the murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till. Over the next two decades, Withers formed close personal relationships with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers, James Meredith, Ralph David Abernathy, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young and other prominent leaders of the early civil rights movement. Perhaps the best-known of Withers’s photographs from the civil rights period were those of the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike. He also photographed baseball players Satchel Paige, Jackie Robinson, and Willie Mays, as well as W.C. Handy, B.B. King, Elvis Presley, and Bill Clinton. Supplies would be used to rehouse the oldest negatives, prioritized for their historical importance.

The Withers Collection, Inc. /dba/ The Withers Collection Museum and Gallery of Memphis, TN seeks NEH grant funding in support of efforts to archive and preserve the million plus items that comprise the Withers Collection. The Withers Collection is the works of Dr. Ernest C. Withers collected over a 60 year span as a photographer and photojournalist. The historic collection of black and white and also color images reflect the African American community in the Deep South from the 40’s to 2007, and has a visual representation of Civil Rights, Sports, Music, Politics and Life Style. The goal of the Withers Collection, Inc. in seeking NEH funding is to purchase environmental monitoring equipment (dataloggers and e-climate notebook), housing materials (sleeves, boxes, dividers) for negatives of all sizes and select 8x10 prints. The rehousing of our oldest materials is the next phase in our long term preservation efforts.

Matthew Avery Sutton
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)

FZ-250439-17
Public Scholars
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018

Double Crossed: The Missionaries Who Spied for the United States During the Second World War

A book on religious activists and missionaries who served as US spies in China, Germany, Italy, and North Africa during World War II.  Sutton's work tells the stories of John Birch in China; Felix Morlion, a Belgian Catholic who spied for the OSS in the Vatican; William Eddy, a missionary's son who organized intelligence in Northern Africa; and Moe Berg, a Jewish professional baseball player sent behind the lines to interrupt work by German scientists. 

FDR drafted ten million people to serve in World War II. And he drafted God. Or at least some of God’s most valuable earthly agents. During the war the US government sent a small but influential group of missionaries and religious activists around the globe to work in covert operations and espionage. Their stories have remained hidden—until now. This analysis of religion and espionage is significant for the following reasons. (1) It illustrates how religious activists’ entwining of faith and patriotic duty made them some of the nation’s best spies, willing to sacrifice everything to execute their missions. (2) It highlights the little-known role that religion played in World War II. FDR pushed Americans to see global religious freedom as fundamental to American security for the first time. (3) It reveals how the government and the work of religious activists facilitated the rise of a new religious nationalism ostensibly grounded in the championing of global freedom of religion.

Patrick Arden
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Brooklyn, NY 11201-3451)

FZ-250602-16
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017

Stealing Home: A Tale of Two Yankee Stadiums

A narrative history of New York City as reflected in the old and new Yankee Stadiums. The book traces changes in public finance, ethnic politics, and the business of baseball.

"Stealing Home" (Macmillan) is a narrative history of New York City as reflected in the lives of the old and new Yankee Stadiums. The buildings' stories capture the evolution of New York over the last century as well as the changing business of baseball, public finance, and ethnic politics. The book unfolds as three narrative strands--the stories of the South Bronx, the Yankees, and City Hall--are braided into a saga of modern New York. The last half of the book focuses on the ways the preceding history shaped the city in the decade after 9/11, as it chronicles how the world's most expensive stadium project--built with the largest government subsidy ever for a sports arena--took public parkland from the nation's poorest Congressional district.

Colorado History Museum; History Colorado (Denver, CO 80203-2109)
Elisa Phelps (Project Director: January 2016 to August 2018)
Kerry Baldwin (Project Director: August 2018 to March 2019)
Melissa de Bie (Project Director: March 2019 to July 2019)
Shaun Boyd (Project Director: July 2019 to January 2023)

PJ-250167-16
National Digital Newspaper Program
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$648,914 (approved)
$620,255 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2022

Funding details:
Original grant (2016) $200,000
Supplement (2018) $224,000
Supplement (2020) $223,892
Supplement (2023) $-27,637

Colorado Digital Newspaper Project

Digitization of 100,000 pages of Colorado's historic newspapers published between 1859 and 1922, as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).

History Colorado (HC) proposes to digitize 100,000 pages of its state’s historic newspapers, 1859-1922, as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. From the first newspaper printed in 1859, HC’s newspaper collection tells the story of Colorado: communities that evolved from rough mining camps to thriving towns, towns that died out and became ghost towns, conflicts with Native American peoples, the spread of agriculture and ranching, labor unrest and mining, suffrage, exploration and protection of the region’s natural beauty, the discovery of oil, the development of diverse cultures, and more. For this project, HC will collaborate with the Colorado State Library (CSL), a long time partner in providing access to Colorado’s newspapers through the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) website.

Natalia Molina
Regents of the University of California, San Diego (La Jolla, CA 92093-0013)

FZ-250386-16
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Place-Makers and Place-Making: The Story of a Los Angeles Community

A history of the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, the book will highlight the role of six largely Mexican-owned restaurants and their clientele (including movie stars, baseball players, boxers, activists, musicians, and artists) in building a community for immigrants in the 1950s and 1960s. The book will also address gentrification and the loss of historical memory it often entails. 

For decades, outsiders dismissed Echo Park, a neighborhood in the heart of Los Angeles, as just another barrio, dirty and dangerous. In the last ten years, gentrification has transformed it into a trendy, hipster zone. Neither label captures Echo Park’s unique reality as a crossroads where a variety of communities intersected with the wider cosmopolitan city. "Placemakers" examines a century of change in Echo Park’s diverse history. At the heart of the book is an in-depth look at six Echo Park restaurants during the 1950s and 60s that served to form community and preserve memory. "Placemakers" will open new dialogues focusing on the immigrant, urban, multicultural experience, social relations and political structures. These dialogues are urgently relevant for every American neighborhood struggling to maintain its history and identity in the face of the transformational and history-erasing force of gentrification and displacement.

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Gaspar Gonzalez (Project Director: August 2014 to present)

TR-228364-15
Media Projects Production
Public Programs

Totals:
$500,000 (approved)
$390,573 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 2/28/2018

A Long Way from Home: The Untold Story of Baseball's Desegregation

Production of a 90-minute documentary film exploring the long journey towards baseball’s full integration following Jackie Robinson’s breaking the color barrier in major league baseball.

"A Long Way from Home" will chronicle the struggles of the pioneering African American ballplayers who followed Jackie Robinson into white professional baseball, paying particular attention to their experiences in minor-league communities where Jim Crow remained a fact of life well into the 1960s. Indeed, nearly two decades after Robinson's historic debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, there were still professional minor league teams that had never employed a black (or black Latino) player. That historical fact has remained largely obscured by the myth of the integrationist "moment" of Robinson taking the field in Brooklyn. As "A Long Way from Home" will show, the progress of baseball's desegregation was more tortured and more contested--and the actions of those who followed in Robinson's footsteps, more heroic--than is generally known.

Mount Wachusett Community College (Gardner, MA 01440-1378)
Michelle Valois (Project Director: February 2013 to March 2022)

CZ-50349-14
Special Initiatives
Challenge Programs

[Grant products]

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$258,951 (offered)
$122,486 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 7/31/2019

MWCC Humanities Initiative

Endowment for humanities programming and interdisciplinary teaching and research in the humanities to engage MWCC students and the public in the discussion of enduring themes and ideas from the world's rich cultural and intellectual traditions.

The purpose of the MWCC Humanities Initiative Endowment is to support collaborative and interdisciplinary teaching and research in the humanities and to engage MWCC students and the north central Massachusetts region in the discussion of enduring themes and ideas from the world’s rich cultural and intellectual traditions. The endowment will fund common annual themes to be integrated across campus curricula and woven into campus and community humanities programming. The MWCC Humanities Initiative will serve as a model for humanities programming at other two-year colleges. Community college graduates are increasingly being produced in technical and career programs that have little emphasis on a liberal arts education and exposure to the humanities. An emphasis on global issues in general and introductory courses in the humanities curriculum will better prepare all graduates and expose career and technical program students in particular to global issues affecting society and workforce.

Eleutherian Mills Hagley Foundation Inc (Wilmington, DE 19807-2106)
Laura Allean Wahl (Project Director: May 2013 to April 2016)

PG-52270-14
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,560 (approved)
$5,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2015

Rehousing the J. Victor Dallin Aerial Survey Collection

The purchase of archival shelving and the rehousing of the glass plate negatives, oversize prints and lantern slides of the J. Victor Dallin Aerial Survey Collection. Originally trained in aerial photography during World War I, Dallin started his own aerial survey company, which photographed the towns, cities, factories, private estates, golf courses, and special events in the Philadelphia metropolitan area from 1924 to 1941. Subjects included Delaware River waterfront industries such as Campbell Soup, Pusey and Jones Shipbuilding, Ford Motor Company, as well as events such as the 1929 baseball World Series at Shibe Park (known later as Connie Mack Stadium) and the burning of the Hindenburg in New Jersey. Besides compiling the first aerial survey map of Philadelphia, Dallin's work charts in detail the growth of the surrounding suburbs and the spatial relationships among different industries, including manufacturing, refineries and food processing, and transport and distribution systems.

The J. Victor Dallin Aerial Survey Collection arrived in the Pictorial Collections Department at the Hagley Museum and Library in 1970. The collection of more than ten thousand Philadelphia-area aerial images, taken between 1924 and 1941, has become one of Pictorial's most used collections. It documents an important period of urban and suburban growth in the Delaware Valley region. Local and urban historians, genealogists, urban planners, landscape historians, and others make use of the 8,047 unique photographic prints in the collection and the nearly 7,000 scans that are freely available through Hagley's online Digital Archives. The proposed project addresses the collection's 11,785 glass plate negatives, whose images are at risk due to inadequate storage in acidic boxes and rusted flat files. The project shall: a) box the glass plate negatives, b) box the oversize prints and lantern slides, c) rebox the 8x10 prints, and d) replace the treated-wood shelving with steel shelves.

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura R. Nash (Project Director: March 2013 to May 2015)

BH-50600-13
Landmarks of American History and Culture
Education Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$177,340 (approved)
$169,165 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014

Duke Ellington and American Popular Culture

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world. This workshop illuminates the life and music of Duke Ellington (1899-1974) in cultural and historical context, using eight compositions (including "Mood Indigo" and "Take the 'A' Train") as "anchor works" for the week's study. Under the direction of music professor Laura Nash, participants engage with Ellington's work and his world through lectures, discussions, hands-on musical participation, and two all-day visits to historic and cultural sites in New York City. Taking the A train to Harlem, participants visit the Sugar Hill Historic District, where Ellington lived, and are guided on a private tour of the National Jazz Museum by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg. The second day trip to New York features the resources of Jazz at Lincoln Center with curator Phil Schaap. Participants explore the role of Ellington's radio and television broadcasts at the Paley Media Center with Jim Shanahan (Boston University) and learn about Ellington's long form music at Carnegie Hall, where "Black, Brown, and Beige" premiered in 1943. A jazz show at Birdland Jazz Club and a performance of swing dance music conclude the day visits to New York. In Fairfield, historian and director of Black Studies Yohuru Williams provides relevant grounding in twentieth-century African-American history and addresses intersections of race and popular culture. During the days on campus, music professor and bassist Brian Torff leads a specially assembled live big band in presentations and performances to give participants direct experience with the anchor works and with improvisation, as well as opportunities for discussion with band members. Workshop guest faculty include jazz critic and journalist Gary Giddins; educator and composer David Berger (Juilliard), who transcribed and edited the majority of Ellington's works; and Monsignor John Sanders, trombonist and librarian for the Ellington Orchestra, who shares his first-hand knowledge of playing, working, and traveling with Ellington, and of developing the Ellington archives. Prior to and during the workshop, participants read Ellington's Music is My Mistress; Harvey Cohen's Duke Ellington's America; John Edward Hasse's Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington; and Mark Tucker's The Duke Ellington Reader. They also have access to a password-protected website with Ellington recordings, sheet music, and video clips.

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Joseph A. Hurley (Project Director: July 2012 to April 2016)

PW-51290-13
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$210,000 (approved)
$186,409 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 8/31/2015

Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s - 1990s

Creation of a digital collection related to the development of Atlanta during the 20th century. It would be comprised of 1,550 georeferenced city planning maps, 235 city planning publications, 300 photographs, 12 new oral histories, and a demographic dataset for 1955 to 2000.

Georgia State University Library proposes to create a new digital collection, Planning Atlanta: A New City in the Making, 1930s - 1990s, which will consist of 1550 digitized and georeferenced city planning maps, 235 digitized city planning publications, 300 digitized photographs, 12 new oral histories, and a digitized dataset of annual Atlanta demographic data from 1955 to 2000.

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Gaspar Gonzalez (Project Director: August 2012 to July 2016)

TD-50540-13
America's Media Makers: Development Grants
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$35,484 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2013 – 8/31/2014

A Long Way From Home: The Untold Story of Baseball's Desegregation

Development of a two-hour documentary film on the history of pioneering African American baseball players who followed Jackie Robinson and integrated both minor and major league baseball.

"A Long Way From Home" will chronicle the struggles of the pioneering African-American ballplayers who followed Jackie Robinson into white professional baseball, paying particular attention to their experiences in minor-league communities where Jim Crow remained a fact of life well into the 1960s. Indeed, nearly two decades after Robinson's historic debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, there were still professional minor league teams that had never employed a black (or black Latino) player. That historical fact has remained largely obscured by the myth of the integrationist "moment" of Robinson taking the field in Brooklyn. As "A Long Way From Home" will show, the progress of baseball's desegregation was more tortured and more contested--and the actions of those who followed in Robinson's footsteps, more heroic --than is generally known.

National Museum of American Jewish History (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2197)
Josh Perelman (Project Director: January 2013 to February 2015)

GI-50613-13
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants
Public Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 10/31/2014

Chasing Dreams

Implementation of an artifact-based traveling exhibition, a smaller panel version to be displayed in baseball parks, a catalogue, a website, and related public programs.

"Chasing Dreams" will evoke 175 years of opening days as it offers a unique vantage on sport, identity, and American culture. It will be NMAJH’s first original, large-scale exhibition created for the new, landmark building the Museum opened in 2010. The 2000-square-foot exhibit will run at NMAJH from March 21 - October 26, 2014 (baseball season) and subsequently travel with artifacts to peer institutions in Cleveland, Detroit, Baltimore, and possibly Los Angeles, Florida and Louisville. The exhibition will include approximately 150 historic artifacts, images, films, interactive media, and opportunities for visitor participation. It will be supplemented by a scholarly catalogue and a robust microsite featuring exhibition content and educational resources, public programming, and curricula. A scaled down, weather-resistant panel version of the exhibition will be created for travel to smaller venues such as ballparks, local historical societies, libraries, and Jewish Community Centers.

Jacqueline Foertsch
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)

FT-57486-10
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010

Sidebar: Covering the Bomb in the African American Press

This chapter will examine coverage of the atom bomb in the African American press between the years 1945 and 1962. Always in search of the relevant angle on topics it covered, the black press hailed Manhattan Project scientists from its own community, exposed discrimination in the atomic workplace, blamed the bomb for too-rapidly ending the war (and the many jobs it had created), and both accepted and protested the atomic vanquishing of Japan. It railed against segregated preparedness policy (including the prospect of whites-only bomb shelters and evacuation plans) and hailed integrated anti-nuclear protest. It drew upon the rhetorical power of atomic imagery whenever suitable -- for instance, the beloved baseball superstar Jackie Robinson had "atomic" impact -- and read the Soviet Union's success with nuclear technology (its first bomb detonation in 1949, its Sputnik launch in 1957) as a necessary corrective to the white West's arrogant, imperialist mindset.

Illinois State University (Normal, IL 61790-3040)
Ted Schwitzner (Project Director: April 2008 to September 2010)
Chad Kahl (Project Director: September 2010 to present)

LT-50065-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Rochester Public Library (Rochester, NY 14604)
Patricia Uttaro (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50066-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000 square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Carole S. Hinshaw (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50067-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000 square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Augusta State University (Augusta, GA 30904-2200)
Karen L. Aubrey (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50068-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Greenville County Library System (Greenville, SC 29601)
Robert McLean (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50069-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Aurora Public Library (Aurora, CO 80012-1500)
Patti C. Bateman (Project Director: April 2008 to April 2022)

LT-50070-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

"Pride and Passion: the African American Baseball Experience" is a traveling exhibition based upon a permanent exhibition of the same name at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, NY. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) provided major funding to the ALA Public Programs office for the traveling exhibition. Through a cultural timeline of American History, visitors will be able to place the African American baseball story into the larger context of American History from the 1860's to the present. The exhibit will be at each location chosen for a period of six weeks.

Verona Public Library (Verona, WI 53593)
Trudy Kay Lorandos (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50071-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania (Kutztown, PA 19530-9335)
Krista Prock (Project Director: April 2008 to March 2022)

LT-50072-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000 square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Marion Public Library (Marion, IN 46953-1992)
Sue Bratton (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50073-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire (Eau Claire, WI 54701-4811)
Colleen McFarland Rademaker (Project Director: April 2008 to June 2010)
Kathryn Tvaruzka (Project Director: June 2010 to present)

LT-50074-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Chesterfield County Library (Chesterfield, VA 23832-6631)
Thomas Shepley (Project Director: April 2008 to September 2011)
Pam White (Project Director: September 2011 to present)

LT-50075-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

We plan to partner with several regional organizations to bring "Pride and Passion" to a wide audience. We intend to place the display in the main part of our library so that it can be viewed by passers-by as well as the more intentional history and baseball enthusiast. By capitalizing on the strengths of the CCPL and our partners, we will enhance the exhibit by offering several programs on its themes, and by setting up displays of our collections and other related items we expect to find locally. Some of the programming being considered includes guided tours, presentations by scholars, panel discussions with Q&A time to tie in the theme with current events and issues, receptions, autograph signings, and a "Day at the Diamond" where we host an exhibition game and invite surviving Negro Leaguers. We plan an aggressive publicity campaign to ensure awareness of and increase enthusiasm for the program. Please see attached narrative for a more in-depth description of our plans.

Highland Park Public Library (Highland Park, IL 60035-2690)
Beth Keller (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50076-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Birmingham Public Library (Birmingham, AL 35203-2706)
Sandra Lee (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50077-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Hills County Library (Tampa, FL 33602-3704)
Renelda Sells (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50078-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Harper Woods Public Library (Harper Woods, MI 48225)
Bethany Bruns (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50079-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Des Plaines Valley Public Library District (Lockport, IL 60441-3080)
Scott Eric Pointon (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50080-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped,and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards,and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Multnomah County Library (Portland, OR 97205)
Amy Marie Freyer (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50081-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Elmont Public Library (Elmont, NY 11003-2366)
Frank Marino (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50082-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The African American Baseball Experience-A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Mark R. Watson (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50083-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Colorado State University-Pueblo (Pueblo, CO 81001-4901)
Jay Trask (Project Director: April 2008 to April 2009)
Julie Fronmueller (Project Director: April 2009 to present)

LT-50084-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Craven-Pamlico-Carteret Regional Library (New Bern, NC 28560)
Joanne Straight (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50085-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

University of Memphis (Memphis, TN 38152-0001)
Ross M. Johnson (Project Director: April 2008 to June 2014)

LT-50087-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,023 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Towson University (Towson, MD 21252-0001)
Deborah A. Nolan (Project Director: April 2008 to April 2022)

LT-50088-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Cleveland Public Library (Cleveland, OH 44114-1271)
Cindy Lombardo (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50089-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

No project description available

St. Louis Public Library (St. Louis, MO 63103)
Diane G. Freiermuth (Project Director: April 2008 to April 2022)

LT-50090-09
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2009 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the Unites States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Detroit Public Library (Detroit, MI 48202-4093)
Mark Patrick (Project Director: April 2008 to February 2011)
Mark Bowden (Project Director: February 2011 to present)

LT-50001-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Holly Springs Branch Library (Holly Springs, NC 27540)
Elena M. Owens (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50005-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

"Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience" is a collaboration between the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Library Association (ALA), and the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. "Pride and Passion has been designated as part of the NEH's "We the People" initiative, exploring significant events and themes in our nation's history and culture and advancing knowledge of the principles that define America. The story of African Americans in baseball is a remarkable and fascinating slice of American history. It parallels the failures of the greater American society in solving the racial problems resulting from slavery, the Civil War and the confusion of Reconstruction. Baseball is one of America's central institutions, and it has long reflected the complicated and painful history of race in the United States. "Pride and Passion" tells the story of black baseball players in the U.S. over the past century and a half.

Fort Scott Community College Endowment Association (Fort Scott, KS 66701-3141)
Susan Messer (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50006-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Louisville Free Public Library Foundation (Louisville, KY 40203-2257)
Debra Oberhausen (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50009-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters,scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of the segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

DeKalb Library Foundation (Decatur, GA 30030-3413)
Alison L. Weissinger (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50014-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

Natrona County Public Library (Casper, WY 82601)
Kate Mutch (Project Director: April 2008 to present)

LT-50018-08
Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and Passion
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 12/31/2012

Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.