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Keywords: 'foodways' (this phrase)
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FT-278756-21

Tai Elizabeth Johnson
Longwood University (Farmville, VA 23909-1800)
Shifting Nature: Agriculture, Environment, and Health on the Hopi Indian Reservation since 1882

Research for a book on how economic and environmental forces have affected ecological and human health on the reservation of the Hopi Tribe in northern Arizona.   

Shifting Nature: Agriculture, Environment, and Health on the Hopi Indian Reservation since 1882 is the first book to analyze how economic and environmental forces transformed one of North America’s oldest and most biologically diverse food systems, disrupting human and environmental health in the process. Intertwining archival research with oral histories conducted collaboratively with the Hopi Tribe, the book asks questions at the heart of environmental humanities: How do communities lose or maintain control of the cultural, economic, and environmental resources in which their subsistence is rooted? How does the erosion or resilience of traditional foodways shape human and ecological health? And how can oral history help us understand historic shifts in indigenous food systems, disease, and the environment? The project illuminates these questions by using the Hopi story as a microcosm through which to explore shifting histories of subsistence, ecology, and health in modern America.

Project fields:
Native American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 6/30/2022


AKA-279429-21

Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Anna Zeide (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Letisha Brown (Co Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Saul Halfon (Co Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Mark V. Barrow (Co Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Danille Christensen (Co Project Director: May 2021 to present)
Developing a Humanities-Focused Food Studies Minor

A one-year planning grant to develop new courses in food studies and create a food studies minor.

Virginia Tech proposes a new humanities-focused food studies minor that brings the insights and methods of the liberal arts to the critical study of foodways and food systems. The minor requirements will include a new Introduction to Food Studies course; electives from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences; one-credit hands-on courses, and a capstone course with an experiential learning component. We will begin the planning grant period by holding a workshop guided by directors of other food studies programs. Over the course of the year, the planning committee will continue monthly virtual discussions with these consultants and others as we craft collaborative course proposals and the minor proposal. By the end of the year we will have submitted paperwork for the new courses and minor, created a plan for recruiting students, and developed a shared community around these aims.

Project fields:
History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Social Sciences, Other

Program:
Humanities Connections Planning Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$34,993 (approved)
$34,993 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 5/31/2022


GA-276101-20

Hindman Settlement School, Inc. (Hindman, KY 41822-0844)
Jason Brashear (Project Director: May 2020 to present)
Emergency Relief for Foodways Series and Appalachian Literary Imprint

The salaries of a number of staff and advisers to create a series of programs and publications on Appalachian regional culture.

To support the continued development and execution of two humanities initiatives, which are at-risk of major delay and/or cancellation as a result of the Coronavrius pandemic, at the historic Hindman Settlement School. The humanities initiatives needing emergency relief include: Agrilachia, an ongoing lecture, conversation, and workshop series that documents, studies, and explores the diverse food cultures of the evolving central Appalachian region, and Fireside Industries, a literary imprint that documents the stories, traditions, and other aspects of the social experience in central Appalachia through the publication of new works from diverse voices alongside vital texts from the region’s past.

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Public Programs)

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$45,488 (approved)
$45,488 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 4/30/2021


RZ-271209-20

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Jia-Chen Fu (Project Director: December 2019 to present)
Chinese Foodways in the Modern World (19th C. - Present): Reexamining Culinary Continuity and Change

Planning and holding a conference on Chinese food and food culture in the modern world, from the 19th century to the present. (12 months)

We are applying for an NEH Collaborative Research grant to host a major international conference on modern Chinese food and foodways. This conference will serve as the first step in organizing and writing a critical volume of essays that will frame and define the field of modern Chinese food studies. We will be bringing together scholars working in and between fields such as history, anthropology, food studies, rural sociology, ethnic studies, film and literature, and media and communication studies to discuss issues surrounding the central themes of modern Chinese foodways, including politicization, industrialization of food production and consumption, scientific rationalization, migration and global circulation, and identity formation.

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2021 – 7/31/2023


TR-266369-19

Southern Documentary Fund (Durham, NC 27702-3622)
Samuel Parker (Project Director: January 2019 to August 2019)
Cynthia Hill (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
South by Somewhere

Production of a series of programs that examine the foodways, history, and culture of the American South.

South by Somewhere [working title] is a television series starring chef Vivian Howard, a best-selling author and chef who appears on the Peabody and Emmy award-winning television show, A Chef's Life, which aired for five seasons on PBS and reached 4 million viewers per episode. In the new series, Howard aims to show the diverse cultures found in the rural South through common dishes served on her neighbors and friends’ tables. While learning to make other communities' versions of hand pies, dumplings, and porridge, Vivian will hear the stories of her native and immigrant neighbors, digging into complexities of the past and present while celebrating the beauty of its cultures through the dishes Vivian and her neighbors all share. South by Somewhere will show that the rural South is more than cornbread and collards, but also tamales, hummus, kimchi, and a whole lot more.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Rural Studies

Program:
Media Projects Production

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$600,000 (approved)
$600,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


ZR-256706-19

Vulcan Park Foundation (Birmingham, AL 35209-1214)
Phillip Warren Ratliff (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Birmingham Industrial Heritage Trail

The Birmingham Industrial Heritage Trail and a mobile app that will interpret five anchor sites as well as pathways between the sites through audio stories triggered by GPS location. The free app will also allow users to access historic photos, music, and lengthier oral histories to deepen the knowledge about Birmingham’s industrial past.

The Birmingham Industrial Heritage Trail is a collaboration between five public sites in the Birmingham metropolitan area: Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark; Vulcan Park and Museum; Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park; Railroad Park; and Ruffner Mountain Nature Preserve. Together, the five sites host 1.5 million visitors annually. Tannehill is the lead applicant and fiscal agent for this grant. Birmingham Industrial Heritage Trail seeks to encourage visitors to any one of the anchor sites to visit other sites, when possible, along new corridors emerging in the Birmingham metropolitan area. The Birmingham Industrial Heritage Trail will interpret the anchor sites and the pathways in between them, to consider architecture, music, foodways, and general cultural and industrial history.

Project fields:
African American History; Immigration History; Urban History

Program:
Creating Humanities Communities Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (offered)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 1/31/2021


ZR-256707-18

Hindman Settlement School, Inc. (Hindman, KY 41822-0844)
Abby Huggins (Project Director: February 2017 to December 2020)
Sarah Kate Morgan (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Appalachian Heritage Food & Dance Trail

The development of a regional folklife festival and trail that accurately depicts the cultural and historical nuances of central Appalachia.  

The Heritage Food & Dance Trail will map the venues, restaurants, farms, and other cultural heritage sites that authentically represent the stories, people, places, and experiences from central Appalachia's past and present. In collaboration with partner institutions, Hindman Settlement School will host a series of asset mapping sessions at locations throughout the region to engage artisans, citizens, historians, community leaders, businesses, and others with an interest in the project; gather information and historical context; and identify individuals for further discussion during formal oral history interviews. These oral histories and asset maps will serve as the basis for the development of a trail and series of events designed to engage the public in thinking critically about their Appalachian roots and encourage further engagement in regional traditions focused on foodways and dance.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Dance History and Criticism; Rural Studies

Program:
Creating Humanities Communities Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (offered)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 1/31/2022


RA-259339-18

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Kevin Young (Project Director: August 2017 to April 2020)
Brent Hayes Edwards (Project Director: April 2020 to present)
Long-term Research Fellowships at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

18 months of stipend support (2-3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The Schomburg Scholars-in-Residence Program (SIR) is one of The New York Public Library’s (NYPL) landmark research Fellowship programs. This project will bring three Fellows annually to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture during the 2019-2022 academic years. During 6-month residential fellowships, these SIR Fellows will have the opportunity to use the Schomburg’s renowned collections in their research into the history and cultures of the peoples of Africa and the African Diaspora, fostering the creation of new humanities publications in the fields of African, African American, and African Diaspora studies. NYPL is requesting National Endowment for the Humanities support from the FPIRI program to support 18 months’ worth of Fellowship stipends each year, totaling 54 months of support over the grant period, along with selection expenses for the 2019-2020, 2020-2021, and 2021-2022 cohorts.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$245,712 (approved)
$245,712 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2022


PY-258723-18

Perkins Center for the Arts (Moorestown, NJ 08057-2725)
Karen Boelter Abdul-Malik (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)
Tastefully South Jersey

Three digitization days and one culminating exhibit of the materials gathered to showcase the historical and cultural foodways of South Jersey residents, to include the tools, recipes, and cookbooks they use and preserve among their families, along with an interactive storytelling concert. The digitization events would be hosted in three different counties in South Jersey, at the Burlington County Library, the Gloucester County Library, and the Homestead Youth Association in Camden County. Staff of the Folklife Center at the Perkins Center for the Arts, the lead organizer, would partner with other local organizations in the tri-county area—the Haitian Society of Willingboro, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority in Glassboro, the Polish American Society, the Caribbean Festival Organization, and the Boys and Girls Club of Camden—to encourage participation among the region’s diverse communities. A digital data curator from Rutgers University Library and a folklorist and foodways professor from Goucher College would advise the project team in planning and implementing the events and exhibit.

Tastefully South Jersey Family Heritage Preservation Project and public programming explores culture through the lens of food traditions in three southern counties of New Jersey. An event will be held in each county for community members to preserve heritage artifacts such as recipes, foodways tools, photographs, documents, and pottery through digitization. Communities targeted through fieldwork are West African influenced and Southern African-American, Dominican Republican, Haitian, Cuban, Polish, Ukrainian, Turkish, Mexican, Peruvian, and Guatemalan. The project includes audiovisual documentation of stories and contextual information. Participants receive a free digital copy. Permission will be requested to exhibit digitized items at the culminating exhibition, shared on our website and be housed in New Jersey State Libraries Digital Collections. The project explores topics on the importance of foodways in expressing identity, maintaining community cohesion, and performing ritual.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Arts, Other; Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


ZR-256761-18

Appalshop, Inc. (Whitesburg, KY 41858-0743)
Elizabeth Barret (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
These Roots Run Deep: Connecting Communities Through Foodways

A series of community forums, events, and workshops that promote and educate the public about Appalachian local foodways.

Appalshop is seeking support for programming that links the present to the past as expressed through foodways in eastern Kentucky. The lead applicant and project partners will seek to engage citizens in the further exploration of cultural heritage through the lens of local traditions, with a special focus on food growing, preparation, and our strong relationship to the land and place. The wealth of knowledge among local citizens, grassroots and educational institutions, and scholars will be a catalyst for discovering and interpreting the food culture that we share. This unifying topic will also activate discussion within the humanities regarding the importance of local heritage, the human diversity and complexity that shapes our traditions and community identity, as well as sustainability and health in a changing economy.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; Rural Studies

Program:
Creating Humanities Communities Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (offered)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 1/31/2022


ZR-256776-18

Vermont Farmers Food Center (Rutland, VT 05701-2851)
Gregory Cox (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Root Words

An oral history project that will collect and present the stories of rural Vermont.

In partnership, the Vermont Farmers Food Center (VFFC), Shrewsbury Institute for Agricultural Education(SAGE), and the Shrewsbury Historical Society will create the Root Words project; a forum for collecting and presenting the stories of rural Vermonters. The sharing and study of great works of poetry and literature will inspire our participants and guide our process as we consider the elements that make a story powerful and accessible. Collaboratively, we will host a series of live storytelling events that will culminate in an audio visual story series shown at SAGE’s Russellville Schoolhouse and made publicly available on all participating organization’s websites. Community members will have ongoing access to our work through a permanent, interactive, historic photo installation at VFFC. This program will solidify our position as leaders in the community who understand our past, honor the individual while considering the whole, and create new histories from this thoughtful position.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Labor History; Rural Studies

Program:
Creating Humanities Communities Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (offered)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 7/31/2021


ZR-256701-18

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Jane Ellen Przybysz (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
FOLKFabulous at the South Carolina State Fair

FolkFabulous at the South Carolina State Fair, a 12-day series of narrative stage performances, facilitated dialogues, and “pop-up-museums” that focus on an expanded and deeper understanding of the cultural and geographic specific traditions of the Southeastern United States.

McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina proposes partnering with the South Carolina State Fair (SCSF) and the Eastern Cherokee, Southern Iroquois & United Tribes of South Carolina to transform a signature one-day event--FOLKFabulous--into a twelve-day program series through which we aim to significantly enhance and deepen the educational dimension of SCSF offerings, while broadening, building, and energizing the emergent humanities community McKissick has built over the past 40 years. Building on our annual Diverse Voices exhibit themes, these activities shine a light on tradition bearers representing South Carolina’s diverse cultural landscape—storytellers, material culture artists, musicians, dancers, and foodways specialists, among others—who will demonstrate or perform, conduct hands-on workshops and participate in narrative stages. Interactive “Pop-up museums,” are a new feature, in which the pubic brings their own artifacts to share and interpret with others.

Project fields:
African American History; Folklore and Folklife; Native American Studies

Program:
Creating Humanities Communities Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (offered)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2017 – 12/31/2022


PY-258570-18

Florida Gulf Coast University (Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565)
Clay Motley (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Beyond the Blues: Discovering and Preserving Clarksdale Mississippi's History

A week-long community digitization event and a public program to document the history of Clarksdale, Mississippi, known as the “birthplace of the blues.”  Through the digitization of photographs, legal documents, family recipes, maps, personal letters, business records, visual art, and audiovisual materials, the project would preserve Clarksdale’s history.  The proposed events aim to increase awareness especially of the “non-blues” history of this Mississippi Delta city, including the Civil Rights Movement, regional foodways, the Mississippi River and environment, religious practices, agricultural heritage, literary achievements, and Chinese, Lebanese, Jewish, and Italian immigration to the region.  The project involves collaboration with Clarksdale Carnegie Public Library, whose staff would run the digitization event, and Coahoma County Higher Education Center, where a community event highlighting notable items and describing their historical and cultural context would be held.  After the project, the library would make digitized materials available via a Common Heritage website.

Clarksdale, Mississippi, is one of the most culturally significant cities in the Mississippi Delta and is internationally famous as the "birthplace of the blues." However, important non-blues aspects of its history are often overlooked. The significance of its people and events as well as the ways in which normal citizens have contributed to the Delta's rich culture have not been documented. This project will be the first systematic opportunity for the citizens of Clarksdale to contribute to preserving their city's history through the digitizing and archiving of historical materials.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,760 (approved)
$7,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PY-258638-18

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Molly Kruckenberg (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Drill Rigs and Grain Silos: Harvesting Food History to Capture the Culture of a Community in Change

Two digitization days and a public lecture aiming to document local history and culture through foodways in Richland and Roosevelt counties in Montana. The project would focus on documenting foodways through family recipes, cookbooks, photographs of celebrations, picnics and fairs, records of homemaker clubs, and artifacts related to food preservation and preparation. Outreach events would explore local history and cultural influence, using such foodways as a lens to better understand local history and immigration. The effort to collect local history materials comes amidst the social and economic changes brought by the current boom in natural gas. The counties are also home to land that the Assiniboine consider their ancestral home, and nineteenth-century waves of immigration saw arrivals from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Russia, and Germany. Contributed items would complement existing collections of Montana cookbooks already digitized by the Montana Historical Society, which include few materials from these rural areas of the state. The project would, with permission, make digitized items accessible via Montana Memory, the state’s digital library portal.

Richland and Roosevelt counties in eastern Montana have long been subject to a boom and bust cycle, from homesteading to oil. The Baaken oil field spills into this rural area and the effects of the boom have brought profound changes. As communities here struggle with change, surviving food traditions provide continuity. Through a partnership of heritage institutions and Extension offices, this project will gather digital reproductions of food-related items that tell the history of the foodways of the area, with the digitized materials made available on the Montana Memory Project. Using those materials Montana food historians will present a public program that will interpret Montana food history and the food customs specific to eastern Montana. The program will improve the community’s understanding of their heritage by demonstrating the centrality of food to traditions and examining the role of food as a benchmark during times of upheaval and in bringing people together.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$8,466 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


PG-258296-18

Trinity College (Hartford, CT 06106-3100)
Richard J. Ring (Project Director: April 2017 to December 2017)
Sally S. Dickinson (Project Director: December 2017 to June 2019)
Watkinson Library Almanac Preservation

The purchase of preservation-quality supplies to rehouse 1,700 American almanacs, predominantly published in the 19th century. Many are loosely stitched together with no covers, making them too fragile to be handled by researchers. A collecting priority for the library, the almanacs represent American popular science, and once they are rehoused, scholars and students would be able to study them in a variety of disciplinary contexts: environmental history, American literature and print culture, and early American cookery and foodways. A number of current faculty are involved in developing courses focused on the almanacs.

The Watkinson Library at Trinity College, a public research library containing rare books and special collections, contains over 2,000 American almanacs as part of a larger holding of materials that document the history and culture of pre-colonial America through the early 20th century. This collection offers a rich source of information about many aspects of day-to-day American life: astronomical and calendric calculations, astrological predictions, religious and moral advice, science, history, poetry, mathematics and business data, geography, politics, medicine, cooking, weather, and more. The almanacs are not accessible to users because they are susceptible to damage without structural support. Funds from this grant will purchase acid-free, lignin-free, buffered pamphlet binders to house and protect the collection from damage and deterioration. Stabilizing these articles will allow students, professors and the public to use them for research, classroom projects and general viewing.

Project fields:
American Studies; Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


AC-253445-17

Galveston College (Galveston, TX 77550-7496)
David Shane Wallace (Project Director: June 2016 to November 2019)
Michael P. Berberich (Co Project Director: March 2017 to November 2019)
Coastal Culinary: Exploring Food Narratives

A two-year project for faculty to study and develop courses on food studies.

The “Coastal Culinary: Tasting Food Narratives” project is a two-year (25 month) effort to strengthen the teaching and study of humanities within the Galveston region, specifically at Galveston College, a small Hispanic serving community college. The humanities topic of focus is food studies, food pathways, and the use of personal narratives informed by family recipes – story-telling focused on food. Twelve faculty participants in addition to the Director and Co-Director (n=14) will engage in a four-phase professional development sequence of (1) group study, (2) curriculum re-design, (3) implementation, and (4) assessment of practice through self-study.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric; Ethnic Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,429 (approved)
$88,458 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 5/31/2019


PG-252919-17

University of Mississippi, Main Campus (University, MS 38677-1848)
John T. Edge (Project Director: May 2016 to May 2018)
Southern Foodways Alliance General Assessment

The hiring of an audiovisual preservation consultant to conduct an assessment of 800 oral histories and 102 documentary films that include approximately 700 hours of raw interview footage.  The materials were collected over the course of 25 projects documenting the diverse food cultures of the American South.  Footage from the collection has already contributed to several publications in the series entitled Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People, and Place; a quarterly academic journal called Gravy; and documentary films.  So far, the oral histories have been organized along four culinary trails—tamales, boudin, barbecue, and gumbo—with additional specialty topics ranging from Greek restaurants in Birmingham, Alabama, to the Southern food traditions that traveled north to Chicago during the Great Migration.

The Southern Foodways Alliance (SFA), based at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (CSSC), will use the NEH Preservation Grant to hire the consulting firm AV Preserve to review primary source materials, both physical and digital archives, to assess their condition and offer recommendations for preservation as the first steps of creating a new and central SFA archive housed at the CSSC, which will be able to be accessed via research visits and a website. The SFA collection offers a window into the American South through its changing foodways, amassing primary resource materials important to academic work in humanities fields that include U.S. economic, social, and political history; immigration history; labor history; cultural studies, gender studies, race studies, studies, geography, and cultural anthropology. The SFA collection includes 802 completed digital oral histories and 102 documentary films including 700 hours of raw interview and b-roll footage.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Folklore and Folklife; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FA-233327-16

Andrew Barclay Chittick
Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, FL 33711-4700)
The Jiankang Empire in Chinese and World History, 200-600 CE

The writing of a book-length history of the Jiankiang Empire in China, 200-600 CE.

This project studies the evolution of the ethnic identity of the Han Chinese by focusing on a vitally important period in its development, the early medieval era (200-600 CE) which followed the fall of the Han Empire. Using insights from critical Han studies as well as GIS-based spatial analysis, I will analyze the environmental, cultural, military, and political genesis of the Jiankang Empire, a southern successor to the Han Empire which was one of the great Asian empires of its time. Its history has been submerged by traditional historiography’s focus on the political and military history of northern China, and the emphasis on cultural and ethnic unity. The resulting book will demonstrate the contingency of the evolution of a Han Chinese ethnicity and polity, the very real prospect of alternative ethnogenesis in East Asia, and the significance of this development for Chinese, East Asian, and world history.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Medieval History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


GI-228537-15

Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-3102)
Annie Polland (Project Director: August 2014 to present)
103 Orchard Street Exhibit

Implementation of a historic site tour and interactive media that would tell the stories of immigrants who settled in New York City after 1945.

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum requests a $400,000 Implementation Grant to create the tour content and interactive media for an exhibit that will tell the stories of immigrants who settled in New York City after WWII. The Museum will install this exhibit in a recently acquired 1888 tenement at 103 Orchard Street. This project will draw on humanities scholars whose expertise spans such themes as ethnic succession, pluralism, lived religion, immigrant foodways, the garment industry, and immigration. The project's principal deliverable is a dynamic exhibit telling three stories of contemporary immigration through: 1) an interactive and multi-layered apartment; 2) Storylines, an interactive subway map; 3) educator instruction, provided by humanities scholars, and scholar-produced essays that will be used as training material; and, 4) a series of public programs under the auspices of the Museum's free evening lecture series, Tenement Talks.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2015 – 4/30/2018


RA-228581-15

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Khalil Gibran Muhammad (Project Director: August 2014 to October 2017)
Kevin Young (Project Director: October 2017 to March 2021)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

18 months of stipend support (3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The New York Public Library and its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture respectfully request a grant to support stipend and selection expenses for its Scholars-in-Residence Program from January 1, 2016 through June 30, 2019. For nearly 30 years, the Scholars-in-Residence Program has nurtured and supported scholarship in the fields of African, African American and African Diasporan studies by offering six month fellowships to scholars whose work can benefit from extended immediate access to the rich resources of the Schomburg Center and NYPL's system-wide resources. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$247,800 (approved)
$236,334 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


AC-50194-14

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Todd Romero (Project Director: July 2013 to June 2021)
The History of Food Production and Consumption in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region

A six-semester program designed to enhance teaching, scholarship, and community engagement through the study of food and its role in the Gulf Coast region's history, economy, and cultural life.

The Gulf Coast Food Project: Humanities Research and Curriculum is a six semester program to enhance humanities teaching, scholarship, and community engagement through food studies at the University of Houston. It consists of a faculty reading and curriculum development group designed to enrich food studies teaching and develop new courses; a series of public lectures and faculty workshops to catalyze humanities-based foodways scholarship and teaching; and a public conference on race and ethnicity in foodways. The programming will support participating faculty in creating a new interdisciplinary curriculum in Food Studies, including an undergraduate minor and graduate certificate in Food Studies at UH. A growing area of study, food studies resonates with special meaning for humanities scholars who explore the cultural dimensions of food production and consumption, as food is fundamental to identity, labor, economy, culture, and history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,929 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2014 – 2/28/2019


RZ-51748-14

Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
N. Parker VanValkenburgh (Project Director: January 2014 to May 2021)
Imperial Spaces: Forced Resettlement, Diet and Daily Life at Carrizales, Peru

Archaeological survey and excavation at two sites in Peru's Zaña valley, historical research in Peru and Spain for preparation for scholarly monographs, and a public interactive website. (30 months)

This proposal seeks funding to support archaeological and historical research on Spanish colonial forced resettlement (reducción) in Peru's lower Zaña valley -- specifically, through archaeological excavations and artifact analysis at two sites (Carrizales and Conjunto 125), as well as archival research in Peru and Spain. In particular, through the study of domestic space and foodways at Carrizales and Conjunto 125, we seek to understand how this Early modern social engineering project took shape in quotidian spaces and how indigenous communities adapted to the challenges of life in new settlements, under a new political-economic regime. Our proposed research incorporates two months of additional archaeological excavations, extensive archival research and artifact analysis, and the publication and presentation of results to both public and scholarly audiences, through digital and printed media.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$145,888 (approved)
$145,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 3/31/2018


PW-51583-14

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Helen Veit (Project Director: July 2013 to August 2017)
What America Ate: U.S. Foodways of the Great Depression

The digitization of primary sources about the history of food in the United States from 1930 to 1942, including surviving materials created by the Works Progress Administration, 200 community cookbooks, and a selection of commercial food advertising and packaging. These written materials, photographs, and recipes will be made openly accessible through "What America Ate," a digital archive on American eating and foodways during the Great Depression.

Michigan State University (MSU), in cooperation with two other university libraries and three state archives, will create a digital archive on the history of American eating during the Great Depression. The What America Ate archive will feature a range of digitized culinary sources from 1930 to early 1942, including papers from the original Works Progress Administration America Eats project, housed at the U.S. Library of Congress, Montana State University Library, and the state archives of New York, North Dakota, and Kentucky, and 200 community cookbooks produced around the country during the Depression, held in the MSU Library's Special Collections and the University of Michigan Library's Janice Bluestein Longone's Culinary Archive. The digital archive will also include over 700 rare advertisements, food packaging materials, and commercial cookbooks produced by food companies in the 1930s from MSU's Alan and Shirley Brocker Sliker Culinary Ephemera Collection.

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$299,771 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017


AC-50166-13

CUNY Research Foundation, Queensborough Community College (Bayside, NY 11364-1432)
Megan Joanna Elias (Project Director: July 2012 to October 2015)
The Foodways and Humanities Project

A multi-year collaboration between humanities and culinary arts faculty and students exploring Latino history and culture through foodways.

The Food and Humanities Project is a multi-campus learning community which links humanities and culinary arts courses at the City University of New York to develop an understanding of Latin American history and culture. Students in history courses are guided by an expert in the field to conduct primary research in Latin American food history. The recipes they select as reflective of important moments in the region’s development will be created in the kitchens of a culinary arts program. This process will be filmed and the resulting videos first shown to the participating history students during the course of the project and then made public as teaching resources through the project’s permanent web site.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,937 (approved)
$74,937 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2015


PG-51926-13

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Mary C. Suter (Project Director: May 2012 to September 2014)
Preservation of Archeological Artifacts from Northwest and Northeast Arkansas

The purchase of archival quality storage supplies to complete the rehousing of 223,928 inventoried archaeological artifacts from 12 counties in northwest Arkansas and 16 counties in northeast Arkansas in the collections of the University of Arkansas Museum. These artifacts represent the legacy of Archaic period peoples through the mound-building Mississippian culture and span the period from 5,000 BCE to CE 1,500. They include stone tools and pottery shards, 5,244 fragile whole ceramic vessels, and organic artifacts including moccasins and baby cradles.

The project would provide an object-level preservation environment for the University of Arkansas Museum's archeological collections from northwest Arkansas bluff shelters and northeast Arkansas mound sites. The bluff shelter sites are unique in that they include preserved organics such as cane, grass, wood, and seeds, materials not normally preserved in archaeological contexts. The mound sites represent the material culture of the populous Mississippian peoples in present-day Arkansas that DeSoto met in 1541 on his march through the American southeast. Both of these collections are used to better understand the culture, lifeways, foodways, and religion of these Precolumbian peoples. These collections are currently stored in acidic boxes and trays. The purchase of storage supplies would allow us to transfer the collections into archival-quality boxes and trays for improved object preservation and access.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,797 (approved)
$5,477 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


BH-50596-13

Historic London Town & Garden (Edgewater, MD 21037-2120)
Lisa Robbins (Project Director: March 2013 to June 2015)
Secret Culture, Public Lives: Slavery in the Colonial Chesapeake

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of slavery in the Chesapeake Bay region during the eighteenth century.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of slavery in the Chesapeake Bay region during the eighteenth century. Historic London Town and Gardens, the site of an eighteenth-century tobacco port, offers two one-week workshops that address the experiences and cultures of newly arrived slaves in the Chesapeake Bay region by focusing on the direct slave trade with Africa and its relationship to manifestations of distinctive, yet often hidden, cultural expression practiced by slaves. This approach is warranted by new research revealing that slaves arrived in the region, not from all across western Africa, but in fair concentration from specific areas, which allowed for greater cultural continuity than has previously been assumed. Led by Lisa Robbins, an anthropologist who is Historic London Town's director of public programs, the workshop begins with discussion of the Chesapeake's tobacco economy and the development of slavery in the region before turning to foodways, material culture, religion, and the evolution of African-American culture. Finally, participants consider ways that slavery and African-American culture have been interpreted in museums and ways that these subjects can be taught. In addition to sessions held at Historic London Town and Gardens, participants also visit Sotterly Plantation, Historic Annapolis, the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, and an archaeological dig at the site of King's Reach, a colonial tobacco plantation. Along with Robbins, scholars include Philip Morgan (Johns Hopkins University), Michael Twitty (independent scholar), Kym Rice (George Washington University), Lorena Walsh (Colonial Williamsburg), and Psyche Williams-Forson (University of Maryland), as well as staff from the cultural institutions participants visit. Readings are drawn from works by such scholars as Ira Berlin, David Eltis, Peter Hatch, Patricia Samford, Allan Kulikoff, Lonnie Bunch, Rex Ellis, and Faith Davis Ruffins, as well as works by the visiting scholars. Participants spend considerable time working with primary sources from the Maryland State Archives, with the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, and with archaeological artifacts in order to incorporate such resources in the development of teaching materials.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,814 (approved)
$174,443 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


RA-50117-12

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Khalil Gibran Muhammad (Project Director: August 2011 to February 2017)
Scholars-in-Residence Program

Eighteen months of stipend support a year for three years at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and help defray expenses related to the selection of fellows.

The New York Public Library and its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture respectfully request a grant of $327,000 to support stipend and selection expenses for its Scholars-in-Residence Program from January 1, 2013 through June 30, 2016. Since 1986, the Scholars-in-Residence Program has encouraged emerging scholarship in the fields of African, African American, and African Diaspora studies by offering fellowships of six-months or a year to scholars whose work can benefit from extended access to the rich resources of the Schomburg Center and NYPL's three other research centers. With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Program will support the fellowships of its 2013-2014, 2014-2015, and 2015-2016 classes of Fellows.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$251,400 (approved)
$213,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


RZ-51427-12

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Donald C. Haggis (Project Director: December 2011 to September 2016)
The Azoria Project Excavations: A Study of Urbanization on Crete, 700-500 B.C.

Archaeological excavation and analysis at Azoria, an early Archaic Greek city, located on the island of Crete. (36 months)

The Azoria Project is the excavation of an Archaic Greek city (7th-6th century BCE) on the island of Crete in the Aegean, with the aims of studying the process of urbanization and the changing sociopolitical and economic organization of an emergent urban community in the transition from the Early Iron Age (1200-700 BCE) to Archaic periods (700-600 BCE). The project explores the material correlates for emerging social and political institutions, addressing the historical and archaeological problem of an apparent hiatus or discontinuity in the archaeological record of Crete in the 6th century BCE. The hypothesis of the Azoria Project is that the Archaic period represents a critical threshold of culture change and, rather than a phase of collapse, a period of rapid urban growth, the development of new political centers, and the restructuring of cultural landscapes.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016


RZ-51154-10

University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
Barbara J. Heath (Project Director: November 2009 to May 2016)
Engaging the Piedmont: Transitions in Virginia Slavery 1730-1790

Excavation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological remains of 18th-century slave communities in three locations in the Virginia Piedmont. (36 months)

Funding is requested over three years for collaborative, interdisciplinary archaeological research to document the material culture of slavery in the piedmont and to address the processes of community formation. Through an analysis of domestic space, foodways, environmental evidence, and artifacts, this project will critically examine how, over a 60-year period, a single community of enslaved men, women and children belonging to John Wayles and Thomas Jefferson materially expressed aspects of community life. How did enslaved communities form in the 18th-century piedmont? Did strategies for shaping the material and social worlds change over time? Did a distinctive regional culture develop? Three piedmont sites associated with this community will be investigated: Indian Camp, Wingos, and the North Hill quarter. New field and laboratory work will be initiated at Indian Camp, research will continue at Wingos, and final analyses will be completed for North Hill data.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$240,000 (approved)
$238,781 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 9/30/2015


BC-50555-10

Wyoming Humanities Council (Laramie, WY 82072-3459)
Jennifer A Ingram (Project Director: May 2010 to September 2014)
We the People: Food and Foodways in Wyoming

To support research and publication of a Wyoming cookbook documenting Wyoming food traditions and history, a new theme in the Reading Wyoming book discussion program and the film discussion series dealing with food and foodways, and a one-day tour to Salt Lake City to explore the impact of immigrant groups on American food traditions. These programs will complement the Wyoming tour of the traveling exhibition, "Key Ingredients: America by Food".

The programs in We the People: Food and Foodways in Wyoming lead up to and take place during the Wyoming tour of Key Ingredients: America by Food, the Museum on Main Street traveling exhibit about American cuisine through regional traditions and international influences. These programs will explore American food traditions and encourage examination of our own regional food traditions.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals:
$76,470 (approved)
$76,470 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2010 – 4/30/2013


GI-50177-10

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Karen Falk (Project Director: August 2009 to October 2012)
Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity

Implementation of a traveling exhibition and related publication, programs, and online resources examining Jewish American foodways.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM) requests NEH support for a major exhibition and related publications, programs, and robust web-based resources titled Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity. For Jews, as for other Americans, food is never just about consumption: food is a means to observe and to celebrate, to maintain tradition and to mark transition, to preserve memory and to produce new meaning. American Jewish foodways, in short, open up a host of conversations about the history and experience of being ethnic and American in the 21st century. After opening at the JMM in Baltimore, the exhibition will be traveled to New York, Atlanta, and Portland, OR. By incorporating historical and cross-cultural perspectives, the Chosen Food project will demonstrate how the humanities reveal the extraordinary in the everyday, bringing to diverse public audiences a new understanding of history and culture through a close examination of food and foodways.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2010 – 6/30/2012


BH-50303-09

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2009 to June 2011)
The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, Culture, and History in the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination.

We propose two six-day workshops that will introduce participants to major heritage themes in the Mississippi Delta, a place with a history that is simultaneously unique and quintessentially American. Participants will learn how the Place of the Delta has affected its culture, specifically in regard to its settlement and ethnic composition, its music and art, its civil rights struggles, its foodways, its literature, and its contributions to American popular culture. The workshop will be highly experiential, giving participants the opportunity to learn how to use Place to both learn about culture and facilitate learning by their own students.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$159,985 (approved)
$158,785 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BH-50293-08

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2008 to April 2010)
Place as Text in the Most Southern Place on Earth

We propose two six-day workshops that will introduce participants to major heritage themes in the Mississippi Delta, a place with a history that is simultaneously unique and quintessentially American. Participants will learn how the Place of the Delta has affected its culture, specifically in regard to its settlement and ethnic composition, its music and art, its civil rights struggles, its foodways, its literature, and its contributions to American popular culture. The workshop will be highly experiential, giving participants the opportunity to learn how to use Place to both learn about culture and facilitate learning by their own students.

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,975 (approved)
$149,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 12/31/2009


GE-50072-08

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Karen Falk (Project Director: January 2008 to March 2010)
Chosen Food: Adaptation, Identity, and Debate in American Jewish Foodways

Planning for a traveling exhibition, a catalog, a website, and educational and public programs examining Jewish foodways as expressions of tradition and adaptation.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM), a leading center of American Jewish history and culture, requests NEH support to research and plan an interpretive project titled Chosen Food: Adapation, Identity, and Debate in American Jewish Foodways. This grant will provide funds for a team of humanities scholars adn design consultants to help JMM staff and its institutional partners plan an integrated intitiative consisting of a 2,000 square-foot exhibition which will travel to at least three venues across the United States, an exhibition catalog and interpretive brochure, public programs, educational activities, and an interactive website. "Chosen Food" will interpret the many meanings of Jewish foodways to a large, multicultural audience across the country. For Jews, as for other Americans, food is never just about consumption: food is a means to observe and to celebrate, to maintain tradition and to makr transition, to preserve memory and to produce new meaning.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 1/31/2010


GE-50026-08

Atlanta History Center (Atlanta, GA 30305-1380)
Michael Rose (Project Director: September 2007 to November 2009)
Barbecue Nation

Planning of an exhibition that examines the relationship of barbecue to regional and national culture and how themes of race, politics, social class, religion, and concepts of community and identity can be recognized and celebrated with food.

The Atlanta History Center (AHC) seeks support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for the proposed exhibition, Barbecue Nation. Utilizing a distinct American food, the exhibition examines the relationship of food to regional and national culture and how themes of race, politics, social class, religion, and concepts of community and identity can be recognized and celebrated with food. AHC has been considering the concept of a barbecue-based foodways exhibt for nearly 10 years and we have assembled a distinguished panel of advisors composed of leading experts in the fields of history, sociology, foodways, culinary arts, journalism, and barbecue cooking to provide a strong scholarly and culinary base for the exhibition. Barbecue Nation is founded in the concept of place by which the culture of a region ? or a nation - is expressed by a product of the region?s character - how the foodways characteristics of place can be used to describe place, community, and existence.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2008 – 7/31/2009


RA-50040-06

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
G. Kenneth Sams (Project Director: September 2005 to March 2010)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: March 2010 to June 2011)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities in Turkey

The equivalent to 1.5 full-time fellowships per year for three years.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totaling eighteen months per grant period, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. Also requested are funds for a portion of the costs of publicity and selection of the NEH ARIT fellows, beginning in July 2006.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$198,000 (approved)
$198,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 12/31/2010


BC-50306-06

Ohio Humanities Council (Columbus, OH 43215-3857)
Gale E. Peterson (Project Director: March 2006 to May 2009)
We the People in Ohio - 2006-2007

To support the 2006-07 Chautauquas on "war and peace"; the Gateway to History website and a conference for K-12 history teachers; a teachers institute and programs on the Key Ingredients exhibit; and a cultural tourism initiative.

The Ohio Humanities Council will utilize We the People funds for several programs: 2006 and 2007 Ohio Chautauquas on the themes of "war and peace" and World War II; maintaining the Gateway to History Website and a conference for pre-collegiate history teachers; a teachers institute and other programs on Midwestern Foodways in conjunction with touring the Key Ingredients exhibit; and a Cultural/Heritage/Civic Tourism Initiative to help Ohio communities assess and establish tourism priorities.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$158,040 (approved)
$158,040 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 12/31/2008


FB-51796-05

Carole Marie Counihan
Millersville University (Millersville, PA 17551-1800)
Women's Stories of Food, Gender, and Land in Colorado's San Luis Valley during the Twentieth Century

My project contributes to understanding the United States’ diverse Latino population by focusing on Hispanic women’s stories of food and family in the Upper Rio Grande region in southern Colorado. It uses transcriptions of food-centered life history interviews gathered over eight summers from fifteen women to write a book grounded in the insights of ethnography, Latina feminism, and ecology. Women’s descriptions of foodways reveal their work, their family roles, their connections to the land, and their subjective reflections on their lives. Their stories point toward a sustainable future for the people and the land.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 7/31/2006


GM-25757-97

Historic Hudson Valley (Pocantico Hills, NY 10591-5591)
Jennifer Anderson-Lawrence (Project Director: December 1996 to December 1998)
Reinterpretation of Philipsburg Manor

To support planning for the reinterpretation of Philipsburg Manor with emphasison enslaved African Americans, with public programs, interpreters, concerts, museum theater, foodways, demonstrations, and education programs.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,587 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1997 – 8/31/1998


GY-*1013-80

Wendy S. Wolfe
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Navajo Foods and Foodways: Cultural and Nutritional Changes with Acculturation

To support research and writing on the effects of acculturation on Navajo food preparation, habits, beliefs and diet.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1980 – 12/31/1980