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Keywords: historiography (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)
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HB-282414-22

Farhana Ferdous
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)
The (pathogenic)-CITY: A Segregated Landscape of Urbanization, Urbanicity, and Wellbeing in the city of Baltimore (1900s to present)

Research leading to the revision of an undergraduate course and a peer-reviewed article on minority health and urban design in Baltimore since 1900.

My project “The (pathogenic)-CITY” is intended as a significant step towards rectifying a major gap in education about the chronological history of racial disparities by focusing on how urbanization, urbanicity, and residential segregation have transformed minority health and well-being in Baltimore since the early 1900s. My proposed course will be a substantial effort to change viewpoints and contribute to the development of new methodological and theoretical notions for a broader interdisciplinary discourse by discussing the role of urban designers, theorists, and town planners. I will study the historiography of urbanization, racial segregation, and its consequence on health disparities in Baltimore, which is a “living archive” and witness its changing urban landscape. This project will expand knowledge by filling the gaps in the multi-discipline arena that is timely and urgent for broader humanities disciplines and HBCU institutions.

Project fields:
African American History; Architecture; Urban Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2024


HC-278112-21

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Gabriel P. Solis (Project Director: August 2020 to present)
Adriana Cuervo (Co Project Director: October 2020 to present)
New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies: Music Information Retrieval and AI Support for Jazz Scholarship in Digital Archives

The development of artificial intelligence and music information retrieval tools and archival workflows to enhance access to archival jazz collections, including those held by the US Institute of Jazz Studies and the Scottish Jazz Archive. The UK partner, City, University of London, is requesting £199,659 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

New Directions in Digital Jazz Studies uses state of the art music information retrieval and artificial intelligence algorithms for the analysis of jazz recordings and linked data to enable novel approaches to co-creative use of materials in the archival collections of the Institute of Jazz Studies and Scottish Jazz Archive. This trans-Atlantic collaboration between jazz historians, technologists, and jazz archivists will expand access to unique materials held in archives and illuminate their musical relationships to more widely studied recordings. This project will create, analyse, and visualize relationships between audio and other materials and create rich research workflows to be shared within the scholarly community as a novel way to support co-creation with cultural institutions. We envision a disciplinary transformation through the discovery of new models for jazz historiography, and a broader, interdisciplinary transformation in methodology for digital humanities

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,031 (approved)
$149,031 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 1/31/2024


RQ-279816-21

Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)
Sarah Ann Queen (Project Director: December 2020 to present)
Translation of the Gongyang and Guliang Commentaries to Spring and Autumn Annals: An Early Chinese Text

Preparation for print and digital publication of an edition and annotated translation of two commentaries to The Spring and Autumn Annals from classical Chinese, written by Confucius (551–479 BCE). (24 months)

Gongyang and Guliang, two of the world’s earliest written commentaries to the Spring and Autumn Annals, have exerted tremendous influence on Chinese political and intellectual life for two millennia. Instrumental in elevating Confucius to the status of one of the greatest sages of Chinese culture, they envision him as author of the Annals, who bequeathed to future generations this court chronicle containing a hidden and esoteric blueprint for world salvation. These commentaries extract from Annals patterns and rules by which to reconstruct the teachings of the True Sage. With their rigorous analytic methodology, they fashion an intricate hermeneutic as well as the world’s first systematic historiography. Through the first scholarly English translation, side-by-side with the original, accompanied by rich introductory and explanatory material, we will make these works readily available for study by early China scholars, comparatists, political scientists, philosophers, and historians.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$199,959 (approved)
$199,959 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2021 – 9/30/2023


FEL-272993-21

Marlene Leydy Daut
University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Awakening the Ashes: An Intellectual History of Haiti

Research and writing leading to an intellectual history of Haiti from 1804 to the 1950s.

In recent years, scholars of historiography have argued the need for a more comparative and capacious understanding of global intellectual history that moves beyond Europe. Awakening the Ashes, which will be the first comprehensive intellectual history of Haiti published in the English language, contributes to this move by placing Haitian writers and politicians within the global history of ideas. Beginning with Haitian independence in 1804 and ending around the time of the second World War, this book is designed to provide an in-depth study of key figures of 19th- and early 20th-century Haitian intellectual history and a broad analysis of what Haitian political, literary, and historical ideas writ large might reveal.

Project fields:
Cultural History; Intellectual History; Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


FT-279061-21

Leslie Louise Marsh
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA 30303-2538)
Black Cinema in Brazil: Rethinking Authorship and Agency

Research and writing of a book on Afro-Brazilian Cinema from the 1960s to the present.

I submit my project, “Black Cinema in Brazil: Rethinking Authorship and Agency” to be considered for support by the NEH. In this monograph, I examine the history of Black Brazilians in audiovisual production and trace changing ideas of race and cultural identity in Brazil. I seek support to complete chapter 2 of this film historiography. In chapter 2, I examine the work of Zózimo Bulbul (1937-2013), who acted in Cinema Novo films before becoming the first Black Brazilian to direct a film. He later advocated for Pan-African film, cinema negro (Black Cinema), and inspired a new generation of Black Brazilian artists. I analyze how Bulbul shaped Afro-Brazilian representation and his significant contributions to Afro-Brazilian intellectual history. This project contributes a humanistic study to a growing body of scholarship on Black Brazilians in the social sciences and will interest scholars of Brazil, Latin America, Latin American Cinemas, Pan-African Cinemas, and the African Diaspora.

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; Latin American History; Latin American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-270527-20

Andrew Konove
University of Texas, San Antonio (San Antonio, TX 78249-1644)
Making Change: Money, Wealth, and Sovereignty in Hispanic America, 1750-1850

Research leading to a book on the history of money in Spanish America during the Age of Revolutions, 1750-1850.

This project offers a new interpretation of the Age of Revolutions in Hispanic America by examining the role of money and monetary reform in the era of Spanish American independence. It follows eighteenth-century reformers’ attempts to introduce fractional currency, or small change, in colonial Spanish America in order to promote commerce and alleviate poverty. It traces those efforts through the wars for independence, when patriot and royalist armies and the new American nation-states experimented with different forms of money in order to build popular support and raise revenue for their regimes. Using published treatises of political economy, archival petitions to royal and national authorities, judicial records, and newspapers, my book project shows that Hispanic Americans saw money and monetary policy as drivers of economic development and nation building. Making Change thus reinserts the history of economic ideas into the historiography of Latin America’s independence era.

Project fields:
Economic History; Latin American History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FEL-268106-20

Kenneth A. Osgood
Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines (Golden, CO 80401-1843)
The CIA’s Crusade for Freedom and the Mobilization of Cold War America, 1950-1971

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of the U.S. domestic Cold War campaign initially known as the Crusade for Freedom and later the Radio Free Europe Fund.

My study examines the longest-running and most consistent source of political propaganda in U.S. history: the Crusade for Freedom. Seeking to stimulate American patriotism and anticommunist fervor, it permeated American civil society from 1950 to 1971. Though initially created by the CIA, powerful entrenched interests in business, advertising, and the media attached their own causes to the Crusade, as did diverse social and political organizations across American life. This mingling of interests helped further the Crusade’s impact, but it also muddied the waters. Differing groups appropriated the intense Crusade messaging for their own ends, often at cross purposes. I seek to enrich public understanding about how ideas take root in the public sphere, how entrenched interests influence that process, and how seemingly hegemonic ideas are subject to appropriation and contestation. My project engages NEH’s Advancing Civic Education, Standing Together, and Independence initiatives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2020 – 5/31/2021


BH-267105-19

Old Dominion University Research Foundation (Norfolk, VA 23508-0369)
Yonghee Suh (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Brian J. Daugherity (Co Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Long Road from Brown: School Desegregation in Virginia

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on school desegregation in Virginia.

This project offers two one week long workshops on the topic of school desegregation in Virginia. Participants include 72 Grade 6-12 social studies/history teachers as a total. In these workshops, participants will visit significant historic sites associated with the topic, learn how to use primary sources in the archives and created their own curriculum on the topic. The first workshop will take place from July 12th through July 17th, 2020 and the second from July 26th through July 31st, 2020.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$204,729 (approved)
$204,119 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2022


HB-262749-19

Yiman Wang
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Cross-Media World in a Segregationist Era: Chinese-American Actress Anna May Wong (1905-1961)

Preparation for publication of an open access digital publication about Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1905-1961).

This is the first book-length study to focus on the cross-media performances of Anna May Wong—a pioneering Chinese-American actress who forged a transnational career prior to the Civil Rights Movement. Grounded in my eight-year multi-continental archival research, this book answers a pressing question: how might a marginalized ethnic performer, despite her precarious citizenship status due to the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, instigate a race-gender-informed rethinking of Euro-American film/media history, and resist social injustices through performances and audience engagement? Foregrounding Wong’s perseverant labor as an actress and an anti-Fascist activist, this book retools glamor-based star studies as performer-worker studies to illuminate contributions rendered by women, minorities and all those considered “minor” players in dominant media and society. This book speaks to humanities and social sciences engagement with (post)coloniality, citizenship, precarious labor, and agency.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Ethnic Studies; Film History and Criticism

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


FEL-263014-19

Abigail Krasner Balbale
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Memory, Genealogy and Power in al-Andalus: A Study of Rex Lupus, Medieval Islamic Ruler in Southern Spain

A book-length study about Rex Lupus, a 12th-century Islamic ruler in southern Spain, and the ways in which his memory was used by future Christian and Muslim historians.

This book explores how modern ideas about geography, ethnicity and religion have been cast backward to transform the medieval past. It focuses on a ruler in al-Andalus known in Arabic as Muhammad ibn Sa'd Ibn Mardanish and in Latin as Rex Lupus (r. 1147-74 CE), who was vassal to Castile and founder of a dynasty that fought the North African Almohads. Later scholars suggested that his alliances with Christians were born from his non-Muslim genealogy. But his own cultural production demonstrates his eastward orientation, as he imported motifs and architectural techniques from Abbasid territories and minted coins in the caliph in Baghdad's name. The book traces these two, opposing trajectories: material culture that linked Islamic west to east and historiography that separated al-Andalus from the rest of the Islamic world. Like al-Andalus itself, Ibn Mardanish's story was recast in the years after the Christian conquest to make it fit into narratives of an emergent Europe.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Medieval Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


FT-265259-19

Aaron Benyamin Retish
Wayne State University (Detroit, MI 48201-1347)
Russia Behind Bars: A History of Prisoners of the Russian Empire and Soviet Union, 1863-1932

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of prisons in Russia and the Soviet Union from 1863-1932.

“Russia Behind Bars” uncovers the experiences of prisoners in local prisons of tsarist Russia and the early Soviet Union. It shows how prisoners lived their lives both in and out of the prison regimen. It also examines how penal reforms that aimed to soften punishment and rehabilitate prisoners shaped prisoners’ experience and how lack of resources and state and prison officials’ visions of prisoners as recidivist criminals undercut these reforms, making punishment harsher. The study goes from the birth of Russia’s modern penitentiary system and follows reforms through the rise of the Soviet state in 1917 and ends with the imposition of a harsh, punitive penal system under Stalin. “Russia Behind Bars” emphasizes the importance of prisons as symbols of state power located in urban areas and as important alternatives to exile to the peripheries. I argue that to understand the modern Russian penitentiary system, we need also to account for convicts’ experiences in prisons close to home.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Legal History; Russian History; Urban Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265301-19

Kristina Lynn Richardson
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Race, Language, and Roma Culture in the Islamic Middle Ages

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Roma culture and language in the Islamic Middle Ages.

Historians of the Roma (Gypsies) work under the assumption that the earliest written records about their subject were produced in fifteenth-century Europe. My recent work identifying the classical Arabic term for Roma and Roma-affiliated groups (ghuraba’), along with reconstructing their medieval sin dialect and translating sin prose and poetry, will add complexity to the constructions of medieval racial categories, demographic studies, historical linguistics, and the social history of nomads. Sin is still spoken in Egypt and Sudan today. My proposed project of translating the minority Gypsy community’s language and culture into broader historical contexts will fundamentally transform histories of the Roma and conceptions of minorities and race in the broader premodern Middle East.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265510-19

Monica Lynn Mercado
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911

Research and writing a book on the experiences of young Catholic women in the United States during the 19th century.

Breaking from histories of 19th-century U.S. Catholicism that center anti-Catholic narratives about women and girls, my book project The Young Catholic: Girlhood and the Making of American Catholicism, 1836-1911, refocuses on Catholics’ own understandings of themselves. Using a rich but overlooked set of print and manuscript sources (the vast output of a vibrant U.S. Catholic publishing industry and the convent school pedagogies, book clubs, and reading retreats that grew up around it) I illustrate the formation of a Catholic cultural identity and argue for the special role of young women as makers of class and status for their upwardly mobile, second- and third-generation Catholic families. Given a recent resurgence of interest in the world of the convent school, and contributing to the rich historiography of U.S. Catholic laywomen, this project gives voice to the girls shaped in religious institutions, whose futures were expected to shape the Roman Catholic Church in America.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/10/2019 – 8/9/2019


FEL-262271-19

Louise Marlow
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Medieval Arabic and Persian Mirrors for Princes: An Anthology of Political Advice

Translation and writing toward the publication of an anthology of Arabic and Persia texts of political advice to rulers from the 10th to 12th centuries.

I wish to prepare an anthology that will present, in English translation, important texts drawn from the medieval Arabic and Persian ‘mirrors for princes’ literatures. Pre-modern Muslim societies saw the production of numerous 'mirrors for princes’ – writings that offer advice to rulers on their governance and comportment – first in Arabic, and later in Persian, Turkish and Urdu, across a terrain that stretched from Spain to South and Central Asia. Written by secretaries and administrators, historians, men of letters, religious scholars, jurists and judges, mirrors shed considerable light on the political and intellectual cultures in which they were produced. They complement and sometimes subvert other modes of political discourse, such as legal writings, philosophical treatises, historiography and panegyric poetry. My anthology provides a substantial introduction to the genre, in which I situate the selected textual examples in their historical, intellectual and literary contexts.

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History; Near and Middle Eastern Literature; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


FEL-262358-19

Eric Schluessel
University of Montana (Missoula, MT 59801-4494)
An Edition and Translation of Tarikh-i Hamidi, a 19th-Century Uyghur History of Eurasia

Translation from Chaghatay (a Central Asian language) of a 19th-century Uyghur history of Eurasia.

The Tarikh-i Hamidi is a history of the nineteenth century as written by a scholar living at the crossroads of Eurasia. Its author Mullah Musa Sayrami (1836-1917) belonged to what is now called the Uyghur people, the Turkic-speaking, Sunni Muslim majority of China’s Xinjiang region. Sayrami’s narrative of the nineteenth century in Xinjiang and beyond, including the origins of humanity and the history of China, reveal a complex colonial mentality from beyond the Western-dominated sphere, as his history adapts traditional Islamic historiography to explain his present world of Chinese rule and imperial competition. This project will produce a first-ever scholarly edition and English translation of this celebrated work of Uyghur history, which reveals the sociocultural changes that took place in this Muslim society at the turn of the century. The edition will facilitate research on this difficult text, and the translation will bring an eminent Uyghur writer’s work to a global audience.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Asian Languages; East Asian History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


HAA-261271-18

Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Amir Zeldes (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
Caroline T. Schroeder (Co Project Director: May 2018 to present)
A Linked Digital Environment for Coptic Studies

The creation and expansion of a suite of language processing tools to better analyze documents written in Coptic – the language of first millennium Egypt – and other ancient Near Eastern languages.

Building on our previous work in Natural Language Processing for Coptic, we will capitalize on recent advances in Digital Humanities & Computational Linguistics to strengthen tools & data available for Coptic. Specifically, we will harness Deep Learning methods to handle a variety of source materials, including OCR data & editions with varying orthography, enhance materials via Linked Open Data and automatic Named Entity Recognition, & integrate automatic syntactic analyses into our materials.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Linguistics; Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$323,767 (approved)
$323,767 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2022


HAA-261291-18

Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History (Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2303)
Della Pollock (Project Director: January 2018 to present)
The Northside Digital Commons

The development and documentation of a digital community archiving project focusing on the Northside community in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The Northside Digital Commons is a new initiative in community archiving. It goes well beyond preservation to engage users in both saving and making history. Our primary goal is to provide a virtual space through which historically black communities facing economic displacement and generational discontinuity can continue to grow and prosper. The proposed project uses innovations in digital historiography to mobilize a professionally curated body of oral histories and artifacts for community renewal and national reckoning. It focuses on the Northside community in Chapel Hill, which emerged as a segregated labor settlement serving the University, and will model possibilities for similarly endangered communities across the nation. Primary activities include web development, resource supplementation, guidance by a Community Review Board, integration into an existing k-12 curriculum, a large-scale launch event, and ongoing evaluation and revision.

[White paper]

Project fields:
African American History; Communications; Communications

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$79,000 (approved)
$79,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2020


FZ-261513-18

Timothy Judd Stiles
Unaffiliated independent scholar
The Believer: Theodore Roosevelt and the Reinvention of American Democracy

Research and writing leading to publication of a comprehensive, one-volume biography of American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

The Believer will be a comprehensive one-volume biography of Theodore Roosevelt, to be written in a literary style for the general public while incorporating the latest historiography. Drawing on extensive primary-source research, it will examine Roosevelt as a figure deeply rooted in older schools of liberal thought, Whig and Republican party philosophies, and New York merchant-patrician traditions of social leadership, showing how he synthesized these with antimonopoly politics, social science, and a belief in the human capacity to better the world through democratic action. In many ways, this was part of a reinvention of democracy. The book will also explore the unintended and undesirable consequences, including a disengagement from politics and government on the part of the partisan rank-and-file as civil-service reform eroded older spoils-system operations, and the disturbing application of specious scientific thinking to support eugenics and racial bigotry.

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Political History; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 8/31/2019


FT-259642-18

Martine Jean, PhD
University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in 19th Century Brazil, 1830–1890

A book length study on the development of prisons in Brazil between 1830 and 1890.

My monograph, "Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, 1830-1890," investigates the birth of the prison in Brazil with a focus on Rio de Janeiro’s Casa de Correção, the city’s penitentiary, and the Casa de Detenção, a remand prison, from 1830 to 1890. This era spans the post-independence period, the termination of the slave trade in 1850, and the protracted emancipation process that culminated in the abolition of slavery in 1888 and the fall of the Empire (1822-1889). The research highlights the seeming paradox that Brazil’s construction of the Casa de Correção represents in the global history of the penitentiary which is associated with industrializing societies and free wage labor whereas slavery was the basis of the Brazilian economy until 1888.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, Other; Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260283-18

Christopher J. Lee
Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)
A History of the Nighttime in 19th- and 20th- Century South Africa

Research and preparation of a book on the history of the nighttime in South Africa.

This research project addresses the history of the nighttime in South Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Its significance is that it promises to be the first such study. It aims to advance how we understand the time and place of historical change: how the night as a specific context was (and still is) a complex period of criminal danger and cultural freedom, state control and political activism, modern technology and celestial knowledge in the longue durée. Key questions that motivate this study include: what happens at night, and how have these activities changed over time; what are the uses of the nighttime, and how have perspectives on the nighttime evolved during the past two centuries; and, third, how has the nighttime itself influenced historical change, and how might it reshape South Africa’s historiography. This project argues that the nighttime has been an under-examined, yet vital, factor in the making of South African history.

Project fields:
African History; African Studies; Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


RQ-260760-18

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Aaron Glass (Project Director: December 2017 to February 2022)
Judith E. Berman (Co Project Director: December 2017 to February 2022)
Transcription and Translation of Franz Boas's Kwakwaka'wakw Field Notes for a Critical Edition of His 1897 Monograph

Preparation of print and digital translation-editions of anthropologist Franz Boas’s field notes on the Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) North American peoples. (12 months)

This Scholarly Editions and Translations grant will support transcription, translation, and interpretation of a large portion of Franz Boas's Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl) field notes as a key part of a critical edition of Boas's 1897 monograph, The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians. Boas recorded most of his field notes in an idiosyncratic German shorthand that we have recently deciphered for the first time. The project will address the field data that Boas incorporated into the book, as well as his later efforts to correct and revise it. A primary goal is to determine how much of a ground-breaking "eye-witness" narrative of ceremony actually developed out of Boas's field notes, and how much was drafted by Boas's Indigenous collaborator, George Hunt. The project will allow an unprecedented examination of Boas's fieldwork methods, primary access to the original sources of his data, and a new analysis of the role of this seminal book in Boas’s larger vision for anthropology and the human sciences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural Anthropology; Native American Studies

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$132,340 (approved)
$132,340 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2019


FA-251394-17

Stephen Vincent Bittner
California State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Wine Production and Culture in Tsarist Russia

A book-length study on the wine economies and cultures of the Black Sea during Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.

"Whites and Reds: Wine in the Lands of Tsar and Commissar" examines the two centuries of interaction between Russia and the wine economies and cultures of the Black Sea--Bessarabia (Moldova), Crimea, and Georgia. After the Russian Empire annexed these territories in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, wine became an increasingly important part of Russian and Soviet culture--as a luxury item, a mark of refinement, and an object of connoisseurship. Consequently, by the mid-1980s the Soviet Union was the world's fourth largest producer of wine, trailing only Spain, France, and Italy. "Whites and Reds" contributes to two of the most active arenas of debate in the historiography of Russia and the Soviet Union: studies of imperialism and consumption. I intend to use an NEH Fellowship to complete the research and writing of this untold and significant history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; History of Science; Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


FZ-256628-17

Michael Todd Bennett
East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
Howard Hughes, the CIA, and the Untold Story Behind Their Hunt for a Sunken Soviet Submarine

A book exploring intelligence oversight and accountability though a narrative account of the covert 1974 CIA operation to use Howard Hughes's ship Glomar Explorer to raise a sunken Soviet submarine.

What led the Central Intelligence Agency to think that it could ally with one of the world’s most newsworthy figures to secretly operate a giant ship capable of doing the impossible, all without getting caught? Based on interviews as well as newly declassified files, my book, Imagination Unlimited, studies one of the biggest covert operations in CIA history—the 1974 voyage of the Hughes Glomar Explorer, a spyship ostensibly owned by eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, to raise a sunken Soviet submarine—to address a small group of questions that remain almost as unresolved today as they were forty-plus years ago. What is the value of intelligence oversight? Does greater accountability harm the nation by discouraging the sort of blue-sky thinking that keeps the U.S. intelligence community one step ahead of the competition? Or, does it help by placing needed limits on that community’s overactive imagination?

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018


FA-252548-17

Leslie Paris
University of British Columbia (V6T 1Z1 V6T 1Z1 Canada)
American Children, Parents, and the State, 1960-1980

A book-length study on children’s experiences and parenting during two decades of political and social change.

My book project explores why and how children figured so centrally both as icons and as historical actors amid the cultural upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Both parenting and children’s experience were reconfigured in an era of political and social turbulence. During this period, challenges to traditional forms of authority took many forms. My work intervenes in the Americanist historiography by placing children, adolescents, and the adults who cared for them squarely at the center of this story instead of the margins to which they have generally been relegated. Using age as my central category of historical analysis, I explore the ways in which American children, their caretakers, and concerned policy-makers navigated an era of increasing options amid increasing rancor, and examine how these experiences differed across age and generational divides.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252595-17

Monica (Kittiya) Kittiya Lee
California State Los Angeles University Auxiliary Services, Inc. (Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226)
A Linguistic Study of Brasilica, the Hybrid Portuguese Language of Colonial Brazil

A book-length study of Brasílica, the linguistic middle ground in Brazil between speakers of indigenous and Portuguese languages.

My book is a social and cultural history that revises the historiography of colonial and imperial Brazil. It demonstrates that indigenous peoples, far from fading from sight, actively engaged society and shaped history. Through spoken utterance, the Indians infused the medieval Catholicism brought by the Portuguese with their own concepts and forged a syncretic religion. My detailed study of the translation manuals of the Brasílica, the lingua franca spoken between peoples of different languages, introduces new and understudied archival materials. It sheds light on linguistic evolution and on the relations sustained between colonizer and colonized. The heart of this project examines the social practices that reflect how peoples have dealt with diversity, and how variety innovated practices, constructed communities, engendered divisions, and so, molded identities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion; Latin American History; Native American Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


HAA-255979-17

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Jeremy Wade Morris (Project Director: January 2017 to March 2020)
Eric Hoyt (Co Project Director: May 2017 to March 2020)
Investigating the Golden Age of Podcasting through Metadata and Sound

Prototype development and adaptation of open-source software tools to facilitate large-scale search and analysis of podcasts.

Despite an explosion of interest in podcasts - claims of a “Golden Age” of podcasts abound - sound remains mystifyingly difficult to analyze and the history of this emerging media form is already at risk of being lost. PodcastRE Analytics: Investigating Podcasting through Metadata and Sound aims to put podcasting’s data traces to work, making digital audio more usable, visible and audible than current archives. PodcastRE Analytics leverages the 120,000+ podcasts of the PodcastRE database (http://podcastre.org), a preservation collaboration between UW-Madison’s Libraries and Dept. of Communication Arts, to pioneer new techniques for the analysis and visualization of audio and metadata. While tools for data mining text archives exist, PodcastRE Analytics will allow users to explore audio in ways that are as familiar as textual resources. Using digital humanities methods, we can better research contemporary culture and investigate a new media form that has captured significant attention.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,972 (approved)
$74,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


EH-256937-17

University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
David Z. Saltz (Project Director: March 2017 to March 2021)
Digital Technologies in Theatre and Performance Studies

A two-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on the impact of digital technologies on performance and on theatre history.

This institute introduces college and university teachers to ways digital culture is transforming theatre and performance studies. The first week focuses on the impact of digital technologies on performance scholarship, and the second, on digital performance practices. Both weeks balance lectures, seminars, and hands-on workshops. The project directors, David Saltz (UGA) and Sarah Bay-Cheng (Bowdoin College), are leading scholars in digital performance and historiography. They are joined by a visiting faculty consisting of twelve of the world?s foremost scholars and practitioners in digital humanities and performance, such as Philip Auslander (GA Tech), Peter Eckersall (CUNY), Derek Miller (Harvard), Kiri Miller (Brown), Ashley Ferro-Murray (Rensselaer) and Mark Coniglio and Dawn Stoppiello (Troika Ranch). HowlRound, a Boston-based online theatre commons, will livestream video and provide a platform for people around the world to engage with the institute?s faculty and participants.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$131,290 (approved)
$130,417 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


PW-253771-17

Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Grant Frame (Project Director: July 2016 to present)
Completing the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period

RINAP, which began in July 2008, has already posted online and published four volumes from the period 744-669 BCE, and will have a fifth posted online and ready for the publisher around the beginning of the proposed grant period. Its aim for the two-year period 2017-19 is to make available online all of the extant sources for Assyria's last kings, publish a sixth volume, complete work on a seventh and final volume, as well as to broaden the scope of the project's web content, making it more accessible to the general public. This will complete the work of the RINAP project.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$260,000 (approved)
$260,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 3/31/2021


RA-254161-17

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
Donald Bradford Hunt (Project Director: August 2016 to September 2020)
Keelin Burke (Project Director: September 2020 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Newberry Library

48 months of stipend support (4-12 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

Grants from the NEH’s Fellowship Program at Independent Research Institutions (FPIRI) have generously allowed the Newberry Library to invite outstanding scholars to pursue ground-breaking research using our extensive collections. A FPIRI grant and additional matching funds would allow the Newberry to begin to address high demand for scholarly use of our collections, enrich humanistic inquiry, and benefit the institution long after fellowship residencies. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; Literature, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$477,732 (approved)
$477,732 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2021


RA-235170-16

American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
Philip Lutgendorf (Project Director: August 2015 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships in India sponsored by the American Institute of Indian Studies

18 months of stipend support (2-4 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This proposal seeks support for the award of annual fellowships to post-doctoral scholars in all fields of the humanities to enable them to undertake their research projects in India for up to nine months. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Area Studies; South Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$245,175 (approved)
$245,175 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


FS-250826-16

University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Nancy Beck Young (Project Director: February 2016 to December 2019)
Gender, the State, and the 1977 International Women’s Year Conference

A one-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers on the National Women’s Conference of 1977 and its impact on American public life.

We propose to host a one-week summer seminar for college and university instructors, which explores the only federally funded policy convention devoted to women's issues. The National Women's Conference of 1977 provides an opportunity to study the juncture of gender, party politics, and the state in the late 20th century. Gender dynamics shifted alongside changes in cultural attitudes, institutional barriers, workplace practices, and political behavior. The conference offers a fresh vantage point through which to study the 1970s, a pivotal but understudied decade. This seminar will unpack the influences on and legacy of the conference. The seminar is designed to bring into conversation a broad range of political, legal, economic, and socio-cultural historiography, which we will read and discuss with the seminar participants. The seminar content will also draw together regional and transnational themes, and engage digital and public history alongside traditional methodology.

Project fields:
Political History; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$71,678 (approved)
$71,677 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 3/31/2018


FT-248676-16

Stefan Fiol
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Dialects of Dhol-Damaun: Drumming as Historiography in the Uttarakhand Himalayas

Research leading to the publication of a book with accompanying maps and musical notation documenting the role of ceremonial drumming in preserving the social and religious history of the central Himalayas.

This study investigates drumming as the performance of history in the central Himalayas of North India. Although drummers do not often think of themselves as historians, their rhythmic patterns carry information about the historical movements of populations and their cultural and religious practices. This research foregrounds the role of marginalized, lower-caste hereditary drummers in shaping local histories through the embodied processes of learning, remembering, organizing, transmitting, and adapting diverse sets of rhythmic patterns. By applying theoretical and methodological insights from music cognition, socio-linguistics, human geography, and collective memory studies, this study charts an innovative approach to historiography through the analysis and comparison of drumming patterns.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 10/31/2016


FT-249073-16

Jeffrey Levenberg
Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong 19047-8025 China)
Italian Compose Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613): Insights from Giovanni d'Avella's Regole di musica

Preparation of an article and monograph on the music of Renaissance composer Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613).

Italian Renaissance composer and prince Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613) composed both secular and sacred music, gaining notoriety due to the unusual style of his music as well as his scandalous personal life.  Gesualdo’s sacred music raised such controversy during his lifetime that the Church placed him under edict at the height of the Roman Inquisition.  While the style of his music remains difficult to understand, Gesualdo influenced later generations and thus remains important in the historiography.  Yet, lacunae among the primary source records from the Gesualdo castle and the Kingdom of Naples have precluded a complete understanding of the original conception and reception of his music, both secular and sacred.  A newly recovered Neapolitan treatise on music, however, stands to fundamentally transform current notions about Gesualdo’s life and works. Giovanni d’Avella penned a defense of Gesualdo after the public censuring of his music. The wide range of cultural contexts underpinning this singular document await exploration in the Franciscan Order’s archive in Naples.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Music History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FT-249114-16

Gregory Zinman
Georgia Tech (Atlanta, GA 30332-0001)
The Moving Image Without Photography

Writing and website development leading to publication of a book on the 19th- and 20th-century history of moving images created without cameras and an online supplement presenting related essays and videos.

Handmade: The Moving Image Without Photography reveals a new history of the moving image, told through its engagement with other media and art forms. Think of a Jackson Pollock painting that moves, or a hand-drawn score that produces music when read by a film projector, or a hand-crafted machine that fractures light and bends time without a camera. Through a traditional scholarly monograph complemented by a custom-designed digital companion, Handmade provides a historical and theoretical framework for understanding these artisanal moving-image works and the technologies that make them. Handmade moves from film to performance to video, crossing from the Americas to Asia, so as to demonstrate the global, cross-disciplinary impact of this seemingly anomalous subset of experimental films and practices. In doing so, Handmade also illuminates the intersection of global cinema with other arts, and fundamentally reorients our understanding of the moving image’s past, present, and future.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Film History and Criticism; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2016 – 7/31/2016


FA-232445-16

Eric Calderwood
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
The Memory of Al-Andalus and Spanish Colonialism in Morocco, 1859-1956

A book-length study on how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956).

My book explores how Spanish and Moroccan writers used the history of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) as a framework for understanding Spanish colonialism in Morocco (1859-1956). During the colonial period, Spanish writers revived the historical memory of al-Andalus in order to justify Spain’s colonial projects in Morocco. Moroccan nationalists appropriated the Spanish celebration of al-Andalus and repurposed it as a tool of anti-colonial resistance. Thus, the Spanish insistence on Morocco’s Andalusian legacy, which had served as a justification for Spanish colonialism, sowed the seeds of the Moroccan national culture that would supplant colonial rule. My book illuminates the surprising intersections of Spanish colonial discourse and Moroccan nationalist discourse, and it also highlights how the historical memory of al-Andalus has been used to structure debates about Europe’s evolving relationship with the Muslim world.
 

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Arabic Literature; Comparative Literature; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FO-232742-16

Max Ward
President and Fellows of Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Ideological Conversion and Thought Reform in Interwar Japan

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Japanese state’s efforts to reform political criminals in the 1930s.

My project explores the prewar Japanese state’s efforts to reform political criminals in the 1930s. In the existent literature, the suppression of political activists in the Japanese empire and their subsequent rehabilitation has been explained as a smooth process in which the imperial state skillfully used nationalist sentiments to induce activists to "ideologically convert." However, my research reveals the contingent way this conversion policy was deployed across Japan’s empire and how it was wrought with ambiguity. For officials attempting to “convert” ex-communists into imperial subjects, it was unclear what constituted Japan’s imperial essence and thus how one should properly reform as a loyal subject. This problem was most explicit in Japan’s colonies, where anti-colonial activists were urged to express loyalty to a uniquely Japanese emperor. To this end, my project engages with current debates about the nature of the prewar Japanese state and its colonial project.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Political Theory

Program:
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2016 – 8/31/2016


FA-232866-16

Yaron Ayalon
Ball State University (Muncie, IN 47306-1022)
Autonomous and Integrated: Jewish Life in the Ottoman Empire

A book-length social history of the Ottoman Empire from the 16th through the 19th century, based on a study of Ottoman Jewish communities.

I am seeking NEH support in writing my second book. It will be a social history of the Ottoman Empire from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century explored through the prism of its Jewish communities and focusing on such issues such as leadership, taxation, literacy, charity, and inter-communal relations. The book will consider key and misunderstood questions in Ottoman Jewish historiography; further our understanding of Jewish-Muslim relations; and explore everyday life in the Ottoman Empire from new angles. It will be based mostly on primary sources from the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem and the Ottoman archives in Istanbul. I have already carried out most of the research and published some preliminary findings. I will complete a first draft of the entire manuscript during the fellowship year. The book will serve historians and students of the Middle East, Ottoman Empire, and Jewish-Muslim relations.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017


FA-233201-16

Andrea Florence Bohlman
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
Fragile Sound, Silent History: Music and Unofficial Media in Communist Poland

Preparation of a monograph on the history of media and music in communist Poland, 1945 to 1990.

I will complete the research for a book project, Fragile Sound, Silent History: Music and Unofficial Media in Communist Poland. I argue that the precariousness of sound media in East Central Europe has contributed to the assumption of a logocentric--too often, silent--cultural history, obscuring a vibrant network of unofficial sound production and reproduction. In Poland, untrained recordists and engineers took recourse to sound media in order to critique top-down narratives, to disseminate music outside of the commercial market, and to commemorate traumatic historical events. The book is structured around three case studies: (1) reel-to-reel recordings in the 1950s, (2) homemade records in the 1960s and 70s, and (3) cassette tapes in the 1980s. In this first large-scale media history of East Central Europe, I reframe the discourse of Cold War music studies, now focused on ideological control and revolution, to a new historiography of music in everyday life under state socialism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethnomusicology; European History; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-233327-16

Andrew Barclay Chittick
Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, FL 33711-4700)
The Jiankang Empire in Chinese and World History, 200-600 CE

The writing of a book-length history of the Jiankiang Empire in China, 200-600 CE.

This project studies the evolution of the ethnic identity of the Han Chinese by focusing on a vitally important period in its development, the early medieval era (200-600 CE) which followed the fall of the Han Empire. Using insights from critical Han studies as well as GIS-based spatial analysis, I will analyze the environmental, cultural, military, and political genesis of the Jiankang Empire, a southern successor to the Han Empire which was one of the great Asian empires of its time. Its history has been submerged by traditional historiography’s focus on the political and military history of northern China, and the emphasis on cultural and ethnic unity. The resulting book will demonstrate the contingency of the evolution of a Han Chinese ethnicity and polity, the very real prospect of alternative ethnogenesis in East Asia, and the significance of this development for Chinese, East Asian, and world history.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Medieval History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FT-229663-15

Shaul Kelner
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Jewish Americans and the Movement to Free Soviet Jews: Cold War Culture, Identity Politics and Social Movement Mobilization

Summer research and writing on Cultural History, Jewish Studies and Sociology.

At the peak of détente, a global human rights campaign for Soviet Jews engaged Jewish Americans in what was at once a Cold War-era confrontation and a 1970s-era ethnic pride movement. Activists transformed ancient Passover rituals into moments of anti-Soviet protest and co-opted modern tourism to send Jewish Americans behind the Iron Curtain to contact Soviet Jewish dissidents. My book project on the cultural strategies employed by the Soviet Jewry movement advances 1) the sociology of social movements, by analyzing the contradictions that inhere in efforts to treat culture as a means to political ends; 2) the cultural history of the Cold War, by expanding our understanding of the diversity of American Cold War cultures; and 3) the movement's historiography, by breaking with the focus on policy efforts to highlight its cultural work. The stipend would support research at the American Jewish Historical Society, with materials made newly accessible by an NEH Preservation & Access grant.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; Jewish Studies; Sociology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 8/31/2015


RZ-230425-15

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Gordon H. Chang (Project Director: December 2014 to May 2017)
Shelley Fisher Fishkin (Co Project Director: January 2015 to May 2017)
Chinese Railroad Workers in North America: A Conference

An international scholarly conference on Chinese Railroad Workers in North America, to take place in April 2016 at Stanford University. (12 months)

This grant is requested to hold the "Culminating Conference of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project at Stanford University." Between 1865 and 1869, 10,000-15,000 Chinese migrants toiled at a grueling pace and in perilous working conditions to help construct America's first transcontinental railroad. The labor of these Chinese workers was pivotal to the development of the United States and to the founding of Stanford University. The Project seeks to recover and interpret the work of the Chinese railroad workers to remedy major historical neglect and lacunae in Chinese as well as U.S. history. The conference will be trans-national and multidisciplinary. Thirty scholars from North America and Asia will present original scholarship, based on four years of research. In addition, conference participants will take a three-day field trip to the Sierra high country to visit sites where Chinese railroad workers labored to build the railroad.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
American Studies; Asian American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$65,000 (approved)
$61,688 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


RZ-230434-15

Texas Christian University (Fort Worth, TX 76129-0001)
Max Krochmal (Project Director: December 2014 to February 2022)
J. Todd Moye (Co Project Director: January 2015 to February 2022)
W. Marvin Dulaney (Co Project Director: January 2015 to February 2022)
Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez (Co Project Director: April 2016 to February 2022)
Civil Rights in Black and Brown: Oral Histories of the Multiracial Freedom Struggle in Texas

The collection of 400 oral histories, the creation of a digital repository and website of videotaped interviews, and the writing and editing of a multi-authored book on civil rights movements in Texas. (36 months)

While most research on American race relations has utilized a binary analytical lens, examining either black vs. white or Anglo vs. Mexican, this project collects and interprets four hundred new oral history interviews with members of all three groups, simultaneously. Covering the period since the onset of the civil rights era, the interviews with African American, Mexican American, and white activists located in twelve sites throughout the large, diverse state of Texas will add new depth to the study of black/brown relations across the United States, past and present. The interviews will form the basis of a new, multi-authored book (with the look and feel of a scholarly monograph) that synthesizes and compares the black and brown freedom struggles in Texas from 1954 to the mid-1970s. Along the way, the project will also develop a free digital humanities website displaying video interview clips, each with its own metadata to allow for easy searching across the entire collection.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African American History; Latino History; U.S. History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2019


FT-229150-15

David Michael Alff
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Projects in British Culture, 1660-1730

Summer research and writing on British History and Literature, and Western Civilization.

My book manuscript investigates the idea of projects, concrete yet incomplete schemes for advancing British society during the 1600 and 1700s. Then, as now, a "project" was a discrete effort to achieve some goal, be it the construction of a bridge, the relief of the poor, or the composition of a poem. The word meant both a unit of human endeavor and a genre of writing for proposing new enterprise through specific literary devices and persuasive strategies. By attending to the rhetorical, material, and performative aspects of a broad range of proposals, my research argues for a more comprehensive British historiography attentive to old plans for futures that could have been.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Western Civilization

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 8/1/2015


FT-229259-15

Stephen Vincent Bittner
California State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Vineyard Colonies: Wine and Wine-making in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union

Summer research and writing on European and Russian History, and History of Science.

"Vineyard Colonies" examines the two centuries of interaction between Russia and the wine economies and cultures of the Black Sea--Bessarabia (Moldova), Crimea, and Georgia. After the Russian Empire annexed these territories in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, wine became an increasingly important part of Russian and Soviet culture--as a luxury item, a mark of refinement, and an object of connoisseurship. Consequently, by the mid-1980s, the Soviet Union was the world's fourth largest producer of wine, trailing only Spain, France, and Italy. "Vineyard Colonies" contributes to two of the most active arenas of debate in the historiography of Russia and the Soviet Union: studies of imperialism and consumption. I intend to use an NEH Summer Stipend to complete the archival research for this untold and significant history.

Project fields:
European History; History of Science; Russian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 7/31/2015


FO-50243-15

Jacques Hymans
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
The International Politics of Sovereign Recognition: The West and Meiji-Era Japan

In recent years, the international relations field has become increasingly interested in explaining the phenomenon of sovereign state recognition. Studying sovereign recognition goes to the heart of the broader debate about how we should understand the world of states overall: as a thin "system," or as a thick "society." This book project explores the international politics of sovereign recognition through a rigorous comparative case study of Western states' decisions to recognize the sovereignty of Japan at the end of the 19th century, a key turning point in international history. The project will make a substantial contribution both to international relations theory and to the historiography of the long 19th century. Specifically, during the fellowship year I will conduct historical archival research on the evolution of attitudes toward recognizing Japan in the four leading Western states of that time period: Great Britain, France, Germany, and the US.

Project fields:
Diplomatic History; International Relations

Program:
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


FB-57539-14

James Noggle
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Not Feeling the Power of Sensibility: British Literature in the 18th Century

The word "insensibly" recurs with peculiar readiness and regularity in British prose of the age of sensibility, the mid-eighteenth century. Such usages depict not obstacles to strong feeling but rather the unnoticed ways strong feeling comes to be, and are only one of many ways the period's writing evokes processes opaque to consciousness. This book will explore these secrets for the first time. Copiously used words such as "insensibly" and "imperceptibly," phrases noting how we may be "secretly conscious to ourselves" of matters crucial to us, refer not to states of affective lack but to the hidden production of affect, the way it mounts and alters without being felt itself. By analyzing the motif of unfelt affect in fiction, historiography, philosophy, and periodical literature, this book will explore the period's unique understanding of unconscious sexual, social, and ideological impulses and offer a new account of sensibility and its hidden undercurrents.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature; Intellectual History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2014 – 7/31/2015


RA-50144-14

Center for Jewish History (New York, NY 10011-6301)
Judith C. Siegel (Project Director: August 2013 to April 2016)
Christopher Barthel (Project Director: April 2016 to September 2017)
Melanie J. Meyers (Project Director: September 2017 to November 2017)
Judah Bernstein (Project Director: November 2017 to September 2018)
Malgorzata Bakalarz Duverger (Project Director: September 2018 to present)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Center for Jewish History

12 months of stipend support (1 fellowship) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The Center for Jewish History ("the Center") seeks renewed support for its NEH Research Fellowship for Senior Scholars. The establishment of another three-year period of support will provide opportunities for scholars of high merit to conduct research using the archival and library collections at the Center, which document 1,000 years of modern Jewish history through more than 100 million documents; 500,000 books, periodicals and microfilms; and tens of thousands of audio recordings, films, photographs and other works of art. The renewed support of NEH Senior Scholars at the Center is integral to the continued development of its interdisciplinary community of scholars whose research, writing and other academic and professional activities enrich the institution's intellectual culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$169,200 (approved)
$169,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


FT-62126-14

Molly Emma Aitken-Zaidi
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Montclair, NJ 07043-1117)
The Connoisseurship of Longing and India's Mughal Emperors during the 16th and 17th Centuries

I propose to devote two-months of research to my book project, "The Connoisseurship of Longing." The book probes the intellectual and social dimensions of the opulent visual culture for which India's Mughal emperors were famed. I examine the complex ways that Mughal-era men and women lived with their possessions from the perspectives of 16th- to 17th-century connoisseurs, especially the Hindu kings called Rajputs who served in the Mughal administration and army. A fundamental premise of my book is that objects were never satiating ends in themselves. I argue that Mughal-era entanglements with objects drew them into what I call a connoisseurship of longing, by which men and women explored the exciting and confusing friction between physical and metaphysical yearning to attain deeper experiences of the human heart and its relationship to the divine. The book enriches the historiography of connoisseurship, and its Hindu perspective adds significantly to studies of transculturation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; South Asian Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2014 – 8/31/2014


RQ-50842-14

Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Aaron Glass (Project Director: August 2014 to June 2021)
Judith E. Berman (Co Project Director: January 2014 to June 2021)
Edition of The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians (1897), by Franz Boas with George Hunt

Preparation for publication of an annotated critical edition of "The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians" (1897) by anthropologist Franz Boas, one of the first anthropological works based on ethnographic fieldwork. (36 months)

Under the rubric of a new Franz Boas Critical Edition book series, we propose to reprint and annotate Boas's important 1897 monograph "The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians" in both print and as a multimedia website, through a collaborative partnership that is international, interdisciplinary and intercultural in scope. Framed with critical scholarly essays and contemporary indigenous Kwakwaka'wakw perspectives, these new editions will re-unite the original text with the rich and diverse but widely distributed archival resources and museum collections associated with and resulting from the original monograph.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$307,000 (approved)
$307,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 9/30/2018


ES-50571-14

University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Joseph Brent Morris (Project Director: March 2014 to May 2016)
America's Reconstruction: The Untold Story

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history of Reconstruction and its aftermath in South Carolina, Georgia, and the Sea Islands.

This three-week institute will bring (30) k-12 teachers together from across the country to learn more about one of the most neglected and misunderstood periods in our nation’s history, and how that history has been shaped by episodes emerging from the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia. History will be interspersed with literature, and visual essays to demonstrate and provide a rich interdisciplinary experience. Three broad topics over the course of the institute will include: A prelude to Reconstruction, Reconstruction and its Aftermath, and Historical Memory and the Modern Civil Rights Movement. Each topic will cover significant issues, critical episodes, and turning points in American history. The actions and writings of key individuals and their impact on Reconstruction will also be examined.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$203,897 (approved)
$196,213 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FA-57651-14

Daina Ramey Berry
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
The Value of Human Chattel from Preconception to Postmortem

The Price for their Pound of Flesh explores public and private market transactions and appraisals of enslaved men, women, and children in the American domestic slave trade from before birth to after death. Structurally, this study examines slave prices during enslaved people’s "lifecycle" including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, the senior years, and postmortem. An important component of the study is its illumination of bondpeople’s reaction to being appraised, bartered, and sold. The book explores slaves as commodities and as people and it looks at the monetary values assigned to slaves at different phases of their lives. This study relies on a database of 81,182 individual enslaved values from nine states, of which 72,335 reflect appraisals and 8,847 represent market prices. This book also introduces the Domestic Cadaver Slave Trade, where deceased slaves were illegally sold to physicians and medical schools for anatomical research.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$48,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2014


FA-57922-14

Emily Zazulia
University of California, Berkeley (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Concept and Virtuality in 15th-Century Music

The notation of 15th-c. music often prescribes transformations of written material to be realized only in performance—from slowing down a melodic line to turning it backwards or upside-down, or even omitting certain notes or rests. Such elaborate instructions, which appear by turns unnecessary and confounding, challenge traditional conceptions of music writing that understand notation as an incidental consequence of the desire to record sound. My book accounts for how visual priorities complemented musical interests. Beyond the choirbook, I situate these notational practices in a culture of enigmatic writing that saw newfound interest in cryptography, emblems, and hieroglyphs. These examples attest to a widespread fascination with a semiotics of writing that balanced intentional concealment and eventual revelation. In viewing notation as a complex technology that did more than record sound, my project changes the way we think about music's literate traditions in the early Renaissance.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


FA-57954-14

Barbara Haggh-Huglo
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Of Abbeys and Aldermen: Music in Ghent to 1559

In a three-part book, the first comprehensive study of music in pre-modern Ghent, I demonstrate that profound changes in European history occurred with unusual intensity there, with music an essential ingredient. A first part on the two Benedictine abbeys traces their music from Carolingian reforms to the adoption of the Roman liturgy at St. Bavo's, transformed into a cathedral. A second part assesses hundreds of records of benefactions for music in the virtually complete run of Ghent city council registers, with analyses of benefactors, their musical preferences, locations of performance, performers, and cost, and statistics showing the rise and fall in use of different music. This nearly complete reconstruction of church music in late medieval Ghent will be made freely available as an online interactive database. Part three describes the "soundscape" of the city's churches and streets, using local music identified in manuscripts or through archives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval History; Music History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


FA-58054-14

Brigid Cohen
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Musical Migration and the Global City: New York, 1947-1965

This book is both a study of interdisciplinary avant-gardes and an exploration of migration and citizenship in the early Cold War, with a focus on New York as a center of transnational exchange. After World War II, New York's musical communities sustained a concentration of uprooted thinkers who confronted questions about citizenship, plurality, empire, commerce, and national violence. This study orients itself around key musical figures in these debates who helped to secure creative exchanges across the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Three experimentalists serve as exemplary cases: Egyptian-born electronic and concert-music composer Halim El-Dabh (b. 1921), jazz composer Charles Mingus (1922-1979), and performance artist Yoko Ono (b. 1933)--alongside many other musicians and artists with whom they were connected. This book is the first study to explore a full range of musical avant-gardes as constituted by, and critically responsive to, post-war processes of globalization.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Cultural History; History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


FB-57371-14

Sara Jean Brenneis
Amherst College (Amherst, MA 01002-2372)
A Cultural Study of Spanish Representations of the Mauthausen Concentration Camp (1940-2012)

My project is a monographic cultural study of Spanish representations of Mauthausen, the Nazi concentration camp. This volume provides a critical chronology of narrative fiction, film, memoir and historiography produced from the moment Spaniards began to be deported to Mauthausen in 1940 to the present day and inspired by the experiences of Spaniards detained or killed in Mauthausen during World War II. My study will be of value to scholars in the humanities because it treats the larger questions of how art represents history in the context of different political situations and how artistic representations form the tangible manifestation of a society's collective memory. Furthermore, this project delves into the circumstances surrounding the presence of Spaniards in concentration camps, information that has often been willfully overlooked or suppressed in Spain and is almost entirely absent in discourse about the Holocaust.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism; International Studies; Spanish Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 12/31/2015


RA-50126-14

American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
Philip Lutgendorf (Project Director: August 2012 to May 2018)
Research Fellowships for Senior Scholars in the Humanities to Conduct their Projects in India

Eighteen months of stipend support (2 to 4 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This proposal seeks support for the award of fellowships to post-doctoral scholars in all fields of the humanities to enable them to undertake their research projects in India.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$245,175 (approved)
$245,175 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2017


RA-50142-14

Consortium for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (Philadelphia, PA 19106-2426)
Babak Ashrafi (Project Director: August 2013 to March 2021)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science

8 months of fellowship stipends (1 fellowship) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science seeks support for fellowships in the humanities over a three year period for advanced study and research in the history of science, medicine and technology. Specifically, the Center requests funding for two long-term fellowships of nine months each per year, for a total of 18 months per year.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$121,800 (approved)
$113,753 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


RA-50143-14

Getty Publications (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Alexa Sekyra (Project Director: August 2013 to March 2021)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute

14 months of stipend support (1.5 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

This application seeks renewal funding from NEH to continue providing two residential postdoctoral fellowship opportunities for 9-months annually, over a period of three years at the Getty Research Institute (GRI) in Los Angeles. GRI-NEH fellows will receive cash stipends in the amount of $4,200 per month. The program value for two fellows annually is 18 stipend months ($75,600),and 54 stipend months (226,800)over the life of the program. The NEH funded stipend will be augmented by a non-cash stipend from the GRI in the total amount of $18,150 per fellow, which is the value of a furnished apartment unit in the Getty Scholar housing complex for 9 months, round-trip airfare to the Getty, and other amenities. NEH fellows will be selected annually by an independent selection committee convened by the GRI Scholars Program. While in residence, fellows will be part of the broader GRI scholar community, and will have priority access to the resources of the on-site GRI Research Library.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$197,400 (approved)
$194,954 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2018


RA-50127-13

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Adele Chatfield-Taylor (Project Director: August 2012 to June 2014)
Mark Robbins (Project Director: June 2014 to present)
Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellowships in the Humanities

Sixteen months of stipend support (1.5 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The American Academy in Rome requests an NEH grant of $442,800 for partial support of nine 11-month post-doctoral fellowships in the humanities (three in each of the following academic years: 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16), and of the costs of the juries convened to select the winners. These NEH fellowships, which have provided crucial opportunities for scholars since 1976, are at the core of Academy's mission of advancing and enriching American culture and scholarship by maintaining a residential center for independent study, research, and creative work in the humanities and arts while fostering cross-disciplinary exchange, a philosophy that has informed the Academy's program since 1894.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$228,600 (approved)
$228,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2017


RA-50128-13

Folger Shakespeare Library admin by Trustees of Amherst College (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
David Schalkwyk (Project Director: August 2012 to April 2013)
Michael Lawrence Witmore (Project Director: April 2013 to April 2014)
Kathleen Lynch (Project Director: April 2014 to May 2017)
Amanda Herbert (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Long-term Residential Fellowships at the Folger Shakespeare Library

Eighteen months of stipend support (2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated wtih the selection of fellows.

The Folger Shakespeare Library requests $365,700 in outright funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the Library's long-term residential Fellowship Program, which brings five Fellows per year to Washington, DC to research in our extensive early modern collections and to write critical monographs on any of the humanities subjects supported by primary sources. The grant period will begin with selection in 2014; fellows will start residencies in the academic year 2014-15. The funds will cover stipends for three fellows per year through 2016-17. Included in our request are funds to defray the expenses for lodging and travel associated with gathering an external committee of five senior scholars to select the Fellows.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$252,300 (approved)
$240,332 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2017


FT-60457-13

Edmund J. Goehring
University of Western Ontario (London, Ontario N6A 5B8 Canada)
A Troubling Genius: Early Mozart Reception and Modern Music Historiography

The creative genius as wellspring of art and history--this legacy of nineteenth-century thought has received sustained critiques from numerous disciplines. Important recent Mozart scholarship follows this path in regarding the ingenious Mozart as a Romantic myth that has clouded our understanding of his life and art. Casting aside the concept of genius has brought lasting gains to Mozart studies; even so, my proposal pursues a contrary hypothesis: that some leading objections to genius misread the historical record and raise their own conceptual hurdles. Supporting this counterclaim are early nineteenth-century documents, often little known, that approach Mozart's originality and exemplarity with bewilderment rather than idolatry. The deficiencies of these critiques have several conceptual sources: a tendency to read Kant via Nietzsche, to conflate aesthetic with scientific questions, and to draw too strict a separation between the world of art and that of material culture.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2013


FT-61131-13

Richard J. Bell
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Kidnapper and Slave Trader Patty Cannon (c. 1760-1829) and the Illicit Market for Slaves in the U.S.

Long before Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) fixed the depiction of man-stealers in the American imagination, there was Patty Cannon (c. 1760-1829). A kidnapper, enslaver and slave trader of unprecedented audacity and ambition, this Delaware woman died by her own hand in prison in 1829. Concluded decades before the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 brought the abduction of free black men and women to national attention, her repellent career offers a rare glimpse of slavery’s darkest secret: a black market underworld in which legally free people were kidnapped and traded as slaves; a reverse underground railroad of infamous repute in its day that has since been largely forgotten. I seek an NEH Summer Stipend to fund two months of extended primary source research at Duke University Library, Yale University Library and the American Antiquarian Society; the three archives best equipped to help me reconstruct Cannon’s illicit activities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 9/30/2013


FB-57150-13

Stewart Winger
Illinois State University (Normal, IL 61790-3040)
Abraham Lincoln, Public Power, and the Expansion of the Market Economy, 1835-1877

This project aims to produce a book as well as articles demonstrating the crucial role played by an active government at the national and especially the state level in promoting and transforming the market economy from 1835-1877. Research in Illinois Supreme Court and corporate records as well as standard sources will show that the "myth of a stateless American past" is just that, a myth. This work calls for a re-conceptualization of the market economy in this period, not as the absence of regulation, but as itself a regulatory scheme and incentive structure established by the state. While most legal historians continue to assume that the United States either suffered from or benefitted from a relatively weak state, this work bolsters the work of legal historians who have called that picture into question, while adding the crucial dimension of party politics on the high court. Lincoln's uniquely well-documented career provides an accidental window onto all of these developments.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013


FB-57287-13

Ronit Seter
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Fairfax, VA 22031-3533)
A History of Jewish-Israeli Music, 1940-2010

In 1940, when Tel Aviv was a threadbare community of European refugees, exiled concertgoers listened eagerly to equally uprooted composers. Today, their descendants enjoy music in which historic Jewish- and Muslim-Arab idioms denote Israelism. This book examines the music and ideas of composers Paul Ben-Haim, Josef Tal, Mordecai Seter, Shulamit Ran, Betty Olivero, and others from the nation's founding to the present. As in Bartok's work, nationalism, orientalism, and folklorism intersect in their music to define a national style. Israel's art music, however, treats these elements as dichotomies: it simultaneously defies and adheres to a distinct nationalist project; it embraces the Orient as both Self and Other; and its folkloric base is both local and international.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2013 – 7/31/2014


HB-50283-13

Dior Konate
South Carolina State University (Orangeburg, SC 29115-4427)
A History of Prison Architecture and Punishment in Colonial Senegal

This study explores the history of prison architecture in colonial Senegal as a way to illustrate the connection between penal architectural forms and punishment. First, it analyzes prison buildings and their changing architectural forms throughout the colonial period to understand how the French used prisons to control Africans through architectures. Second, it describes the connections between the internal layout of prison spaces and punishment to show how the design of prisons expressed the notions of punishment and reforms, and how inmates adapted to prison conditions, undermined or re-appropriated those spaces. Third, the study discusses the legacy of colonial prisons in independent Senegal. Its main contribution is to identify what was unique about the architecture of colonial prisons in Senegal and how it fitted into a larger architectural project designed by the French to control and discipline certain segments of the population and to segregate Europeans from Africans.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
African History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$42,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 3/31/2014


RA-50108-12

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: August 2011 to February 2017)
C. Brian Rose (Project Director: February 2017 to April 2017)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities at ARIT Centers in Turkey

Twelve months of stipend support a year for three years at the American Research Institute in Turkey. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and help defray expenses related to the process of selecting fellows.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities affiliated with the ARIT centers in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totaling 36 months per grant year, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015. Also requested are funds for a portion of the expense of selecting the ARIT NEH fellows, beginning in January 2013.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$175,500 (approved)
$175,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


FA-56613-12

Christopher James Otter
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Food, Nutrition, and the Making of Industrial Britain

This study examines a critical but understudied development in modern history: the transformation of the British diet in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A change to a diet rich in wheat, sugar and animal proteins, drawn to an unprecedented extent from a world market, had profound and lasting effects on every level, both within Britain and beyond. These effects ranged from the expanding waistlines of British consumers and the radically homogenized gene pools of wheat and cattle to transformed agrarian ecologies in Argentina, North America and Australasia and geopolitical and military strategy during the First and Second World Wars. The transformed British diet was thus causally connected to the emergence of world markets, industrialization and environmental transformation. Consequently, the new British food system has played a highly important, and clearly identifiable, role in modern world history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 8/31/2013


FB-56134-12

Michele Marie Greet
George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Transatlantic Encounters: Latin American Artists in Paris between the Wars

In the years between World War I and World War II Paris was at the center of the art world. Indeed, the very essence of twentieth-century art history stems from the movements and avant-garde experiments that emerged there. While numerous scholars have written about the arts in Paris during this period, none examine the participation of the more than two hundred Latin American artists living and working there even though these artists both contributed to and re-interpreted nearly every major modernist trend between the wars. Without the intense transnational dialogues that occurred in Paris between the wars, neither Latin American nor European modernism would have taken the forms it did. This book and accompanying website will examine Latin American artists’ intense interaction with European artists and critics as well as their major contributions to the international art scene in Paris.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 8/31/2013


FA-56438-12

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Professional Reading Circles, the Clerical Proletariat, and the Rise of English Literature

Even Richard II, the king under whom literary giants like Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland, and the Pearl Poet produced their mature works, owned no books in English. When he was deposed in 1399, English literary texts were still a minority interest among the educated or the social elites, as yet preferring to read in Latin or French. This was to change dramatically within a generation, and the proposed study attempts to account for the sudden rise of English literature by uncovering the earliest reading circles of this emergent national literature. Beginning in the reign of Edward III, London saw the immigration of a young, under-employed clerical population, trained or semi-trained for the church, but unable to find employment in it (and thus with complex attitudes toward it), who took jobs in the burgeoning Westminster and Dublin civil and legal services. Here London writers found their initial, most sophisticated audiences and their coteries.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013


FT-59978-12

Amanda Jaye Wunder
CUNY Research Foundation, Lehman College (Bronx, NY 10468-1527)
The Spanish Style: The Politics of Extreme Fashion in an Age of Empire, 1492-1700

Spanish fashion changed rapidly and radically with the ascent of the Spanish empire. The Spanish Style explores the impact of the imperial experience on Spanish society and culture through the development of a new national style of dress and the debates that it inspired between 1492 and 1700. This book offers a new narrative of the impact of the New World on the Old by examining materials textiles and clothing that were of utmost importance in the early modern world, although they have been marginalized in the historiography. Through visual, archival, and literary sources, this project explores the multiple perspectives of the men and women who made, wore, and debated the controversial extreme fashions that symbolized Spain at home and throughout the Spanish empire.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 7/31/2012


FT-60085-12

James M. Brophy
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
Democratic Publishers in Germany, 1770-1850

During the Age of Revolution, 1770-1850, ideals of constitutionalism, democracy, and civil society circulated widely in the Atlantic World. Printers met the brisk demand for newsprint, pamphlets, and books, creating a transnational circuit of political information that flowed through Western Europe and North America. But these networks also extended to German-speaking lands, a pattern of European print diffusion that remains under explored. Scholarship has yet to explain how the German book trade, in spite of censorship, inculcated rights bearing citizenship ideals. How publishers worked with writers, translators, binders, shippers, retailers, and a host of municipal, state, and federal officials to sell oppositional political literature is a story not yet told in German historiography. In doing so, these printers brought the public sphere of central Europe in step with that of the Atlantic basin. This history of printers throws new light on the broadened remit of democratic thought.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 8/31/2012


FS-50283-11

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Monica H. Green (Project Director: March 2011 to November 2014)
Rachel E. Scott (Co Project Director: March 2011 to November 2014)
Health and Disease in The Middle Ages

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to explore the intersections of religion, economics, and medicine in the midieval interpretation and treatment of disease.

“Health and Disease in the Middle Ages” will be a five-week seminar for college and university teachers to be held June 17-July 21, 2012, in London, England. Administered by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and based physically at the Wellcome Library in London—the world’s premier research center for medical history—this Seminar will gather scholars from across the disciplines interested in fundamental humanistic questions of health and disease. A primary goal of “Health and Disease in the Middle Ages” will be to explore how scientific technologies of assessing disease prevalence and identifying pathogens (particularly leprosy and plague) can inform humanistic methods (historical, literary, art historical, and linguistic) of interpreting health-seeking behaviors and cultural responses to disease. This Seminar, co-directed by a historian and a bioarcheologist, connects with the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures” initiative.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,757 (approved)
$166,081 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012

Funding details:
Original grant (2011) $0
Supplement (2011) $-1,677


FT-58537-11

Katherine Allen Smith
University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, WA 98416-5000)
Glossing the First Crusade: Biblical Exegesis and Holy War, 1099–c.1150

This project analyses three exegetical strategies by which clerical chroniclers carved out a privileged place for the First Crusade (1095-99) within salvation history: first, crusaders were associated with the ancient Israelites, whose ancient campaigns against unbelieving tribes foreshadowed the medieval holy war; second, the crusaders’ Muslim opponents were cast as reincarnations of the Philistines and Amalekites, ancient peoples whom the ancient Israelites had defeated with divine aid; and finally, the crusade narrative was inscribed onto an explicitly biblical landscape, in which nearly every landmark was associated with a holy figure or miraculous occurrence described in the Scriptures. In a larger sense, the project aims to shed new light on the relationship between history and exegesis, and the negotiation of Christian identity vis-à-vis non-Christian ‘others’ during the Twelfth Century Renaissance.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 7/31/2011


HD-51246-11

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Kevin Hamilton (Project Director: October 2010 to August 2013)
Re-Framing the Online Video Archive: A Prototype Interface for America’s Nuclear Test Films

The development of a prototype platform for studying and exhibiting digitized historical films, using government films documenting the development of the United States nuclear weapons program.

This project will prototype a new way of accessing, studying, and showing digitized historical films using archives of U.S. government films about nuclear weaponry. Working with a sample set of 16 films, the interface will aggregate existing online and offline data in a way that brings together collection, historiography, and exhibition in a single virtual space. A Collections frame will allow users to trace the contemporary dissemination of the films and to see them and their traces in a variety of settings. A Histories frame will provide primary-source documentation and peer-reviewed scholarship on the films. An Exhibits frame will provide a space for sub-collections, data-visualization, and forums for public comment. With close to 100 of these films currently available online, and about 6500 more in the process of declassification, this project will prepare the way for more comprehensive video archives of this corpus of films and offer a dynamic working model for video archiving.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$49,999 (approved)
$48,221 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2011 – 2/28/2013


HB-50100-11

Ethan Bumas
New Jersey City University (Jersey City, NJ 07305-1596)
Colonial Appropriations

My interdisciplinary book studies colonial Hispanic-Anglo relations, a conflict that persists in the political and cultural antagonisms of our hemisphere. It combines literature, historiography, and art history to promote a pan-American understanding of the origins of the idea and practice of America by uncovering the legacy of Spanish influence shared with Latin America. Long before the term American gained common usage, British politics defined colonial identity as not being Spanish. Primarily because of language differences, the teaching of American literature, in course selections and literary anthologies and histories, while allowing for the borders determined by the Mexican War, replicate the British colonial exclusion of the Spanish influence in our understanding of what being American is.

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


FA-56027-11

Kathryn A. Miller
Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Business with Infidels: Christian-Muslim Exchanges of Captives across the Mediterranean

The study of cross-cultural exchange is evolving into an interdisciplinary field that is attracting considerable scholarly attention. The redemption of captives in the medieval Mediterranean constitutes an extreme case of exchange, insofar as it handles human wares that obviously speak of discord and conflict. Through its lenses, I will examine the instruments of exchange, the forms of communication, and the mechanisms of collaboration between Christians and Muslims who worked as fakkak or alfaqueques (ransom exchange agents) who should have had, on political and religious grounds, only the means to distrust one another. "Business with Infidels" aims to contribute to a growing historiography on Mediterranean cross-cultural relations, on long-distance trade, on networks, and on how trustworthy partnerships can be forged across religious groups in the absence of formal international courts of law.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2012


FA-56087-11

Ramona Curry
Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Trading in Cultural Spaces: How Chinese Film Came to America

Cinema scholars have well documented how movies "made in the USA" have dominated screens internationally for 90 years, yet much needed are careful accounts of intra-regional and community-based media circuits around the globe that do not fit the “West to the Rest” model. I seek NEH support to finish my book “Trading in Cultural Spaces,” which draws on dense archival research to document individuals, practices, and locales comprising an unwritten strand of American film history: the trans-Pacific flow of Chinese movies into and within the U.S. From the early 20th century such films have challenged stereotypes and forged avenues for cross-cultural exchange. By recovering multiple Chinese American and supporting voices, images and multicultural networks, my project aims to refocus cinema history on its prior margins, to enrich transnational and national film and social histories and make intellectual contributions consonant with the new NEH "Bridging Cultures" initiative.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011


FB-55526-11

Samuel Joseph Liebhaber
President and Fellows of Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT 05753-6004)
Bedouin Without Arabic: Language, Poetry, and the Mahra of Southeast Yemen

My project will explore the sociolinguistic conundrum presented by the Mahri tribes of Southeast Yemen. On one hand, the Mahra embody the essence of “Arab authenticity” (asála) due to their preservation of a semi-nomadic lifestyle along the southern edge of the Empty Quarter. On the other hand, the Mahra do not speak Arabic, a key ingredient of “Arabness," but rather one of the few substrate languages left on the Arabian Peninsula: mehríyyet. Whereas scholarship on sociolinguistics and language diversity in the Arab world tends to focus on variation within the Arabic language community, my project will examine a rare situation in which indigenous language variation in the Middle East occurs outside of the Arabic language. Using Mahri poetry as my chief platform for analysis, I will investigate how the Mahra perceive themselves within contemporary discourses of “Arabness” and the strategies that they employ to negotiate their status as Arabs and citizens of the Republic of Yemen.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


FB-55603-11

Jeremy M. Schott
Trustees of Indiana University (Charlotte, NC 28223-0001)
Eusebius of Caesarea: Text and Tradition in Late Ancient Christianity

This intellectual biography of Eusebius of Caesarea [c.260-339 CE] offers a major reassessment of one of the most significant figures in the history of late antiquity and reveals this “father of church history” as a pivotal, though neglected, figure in the history of western literature, aesthetics, and intellectual culture. My study fills a crucial gap by offering the first focused study of Eusebius as a reader and writer. I examine Eusebius’s development of specific theoretical and practical approaches to textuality, and in turn, show how these strategies shaped subsequent readers and writers, both within and outside of the Christian tradition. By examining the aesthetics and metaphysics of textuality in Eusebius’s work, this study contributes to discussions across the humanities, particularly the history of the book and the historiography of literary and linguistic theory.

Project fields:
Ancient Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2012


FB-55874-11

Paul Buettner Berry
University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
The Rhetoric of Memory in Brahms's Songs and Small-Scale Chamber Music

An NEH Fellowship will support the completion of a monograph that situates songs and chamber music of Johannes Brahms within the intimate context of 19th-century music making. From a wide array of documents, many newly discovered, the project imaginatively reconstructs the interplay between Brahms’s compositional practice and the culture of private listening and performance characteristic of the initial audiences for his small-scale works. Its methods and findings contribute to multiple scholarly conversations regarding 19th-century musical and intellectual currents, and appeal to readers trained in disciplines ranging from musicology and music theory to ethnography and cultural history. Interdisciplinary issues addressed throughout the monograph include memory studies, connections between music and political ideology, the reception and influence of early music, the hermeneutic implications of the physical act of performance, and the rhetoric and historiography of musical borrowing.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


RA-50098-11

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens (San Marino, CA 91108-1299)
Robert C. Ritchie (Project Director: August 2010 to April 2012)
Steve Hindle (Project Director: April 2012 to May 2016)
Research Fellowships at the Huntington Library

One twelve-month and two nine-month fellowships a year for three years.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is pleased to submit this request to renew NEH support for The Huntington's National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$405,000 (approved)
$403,172 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


RA-50103-11

Getty Publications (Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688)
Katherine Zelljadt (Project Director: August 2010 to May 2011)
Alexa Sekyra (Project Director: May 2011 to June 2016)
NEH Postdoctoral Residential Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute

Two ten-month postdoctoral fellowships a year for three years.

This application seeks funding for the Getty Research Institute (GRI) to award three postdoctoral fellowships of ten months duration at a stipend of $45,000 annually for three years. For more than two decades, the Scholars Program has made the GRI's extensive resources for the study of art, art history, architectural history, archeology, the humanities, and social sciences available to scholars from throughout the nation and abroad, has fostered a productive culture of collegiality among fellows and staff, and has enabled the GRI to enhance its services to advance scholarly research and general understanding of the visual arts and visual culture taken in their widest possible significance in a multidisciplinary context.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$267,150 (approved)
$267,150 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


FT-58452-11

Christina E. Firpo
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (San Luis Obispo, CA 93407-9000)
"Abandoned" Children: The Crises in Racial Patriarchy and Eurasian Children in Colonial Indochina 1890-1956

I am applying for support for two months of research in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, to revise two chapters of my book manuscript "Abandoned" Children: The Crises in Racial Patriarchy and Eurasian Children in Colonial Indochina 1890-1956. This project will explore the social, political, and cultural reasons behind the French colonial government-led searches of the remote countryside for fatherless bi-racial children. I ask why did the colonial government remove--often by violent force--the children from their Vietnamese, Lao, and Cambodian mothers. I argue that the removals can be understood within a context of multiple perceived crises in the racial patriarchy. This project contributes to the study of humanities insofar as it focuses on contested identities, examining them in the context of the reproduction of race and nation as well as the process of governance. In effect, it is a case study that speaks to the tensions and conundrums of globalization and hybridity.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 8/31/2011


FT-57818-10

John Patrick Bowes
Eastern Kentucky University (Richmond, KY 40475-3102)
Northern Indian Removal: An Unfamiliar History

"Northern Indian Removal" addresses the foundations and consequences of American expansion and Indian removal policy within the Great Lakes region in the early nineteenth century. Over the course of eight chapters I will deal exclusively with the process of removal among the northern tribes. The impact of diverse colonial interactions within the Great Lakes region made a significant difference in the manner in which northern Indians handled both American expansion and the enactment of removal policy. I will present an assessment of northern removal that will provide insight into not only into those colonial experiences of individual tribes but also into the place and perception of American Indians in the antebellum United States. This work will appeal to scholars of both American Indian and American history because it responds to a gap in the historiography of Indian removal and places the experiences of Great Lakes Indians within the national narrative of American history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


FT-57973-10

Vladimir A. Solonari
University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
One More "East": Southern Ukraine under Romanian Occupation, 1941-1944

This project proposal requests funding to continue research in Ukraine on a book-length project. In 1941-1944, Romania occupied a south-western part of Ukraine. Between 220,000 and 300,000 Jews and about 10,000 Gypsies, both local and those deported from Romania, perished there as a result of the occupation. The book will cover, for the first time in historiography, the social history of this region during occupation. Its publication will contribute to debates on the wider issues of Romanian and Ukrainian history, such as the aims and dynamic of Romanian anti-Jewish and anti-Roma policy, the role of local Ukrainian population in the persecution of Jews and Roma (Gypsies), and the nature of collaboration and resistance in the occupied Soviet Ukraine. It will likely spur a public debate on those painful episodes from the national pasts of Ukrainians and Romanians, thus contributing to the "healing process" which might help alleviate those societies' deep-seated complexes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


FT-58061-10

Marlene Leydy Daut
University of Virginia (Claremont, CA 91711-5909)
Science of Desire: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865.

This project focuses upon the transatlantic literary history of the Haitian Revolution in the late 18th- to mid-19th-centuries, especially as depicted in novels, poetry, plays, memoirs, captivity narratives, and abolitionist pamphlets, and provides a revision to the popular historical understanding of the Haitian Revolution as being the outgrowth of Enlightenment philosophy. Instead, I show how 18th- and 19th-century writers most often used the language of scientific debates about race to explain the events of the Revolution. My study is most innovative in that it considers the writing of Haitian authors alongside U.S. American and colonial European writers. By bringing attention to an archive of materials that have often been overlooked in Haitian Revolutionary historiography, I hope to construct an alternative narrative of the events, one that exposes the deep connection between the image of the Haitian Revolution and 18th- and 19th-century understandings of race in the Atlantic World.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


FA-55487-10

Carlos Alberto Jauregui
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Going Native and Becoming-Other in Latin American Literature and Film

Using an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, at the intersection of literary criticism, cultural theory, and anthropology, this book-length project deals with several ethnographic, historical and literary narratives about identity transformation throughout Latin American cultural history. These are tales about colonial figures who face the predicament of becoming-other, suffering or enjoying their own collapse as they surrender themselves to other cultures. My study will show how colonial stories about civilized people becoming savages or, conversely, struggling not to go native, transcend the colonial period and become symbolic reservoirs for discussions about identity, nation building, cultural influence, and hybridity in the Americas. By examining cultural assimilation beyond the rhetoric of betrayal and alienation that sometimes permeates research around identity politics, this book will make a theoretical and anthropological argument about the ethics of identity formation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American Languages

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 12/31/2010


FA-55577-10

Cynthea Jean Bogel
University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)
A History of Japanese Woodblock Prints (Ukiyo-e)

Ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints of the Edo and Meiji periods (1615-1868; 1868-1912), are perhaps the most popular and most studied of any single genre within Japanese visual culture, yet there is no single book that presents the diverse cultural context for ukiyo-e, nor a book suitable for use in university courses as the primary guide to a study of ukiyo-e. I will develop an illustrated book with unprecedented emphasis on the relationships between visual culture and literature, content and audience reception (then and now), and the politics of image production in early modern Japan. The research and writing will take place in the U.S., U.K., and Japan. Existing literature comprises museum catalogues and artist monographs, not an overall survey. My book will fill a need recognized in the field for a theoretically and methodologically informed discussion of modern print culture, and break ground with the weaving of themes and historiography with traditional considerations of artists.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 11/30/2011


FB-55070-10

Pieter M. Judson
Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390)
Everyday Empire: A New History of Habsburg Central Europe, 1780-1948

I propose to write a new history of the Habsburg Monarchy and its successor states from the late eighteenth century through the mid twentieth century. I seek to write this history from a perspective that combines local histories with an analysis of the common political, administrative, and cultural institutions that united the diverse regions of the Monarchy, and that influenced them even after the Monarchy's demise in 1918. My project focuses on relationships between local daily-life practices, regional political cultures, and shared government structures of rule and administration. This narrative framework offers scholars a credible alternative to the fragmented nation-based accounts that have traditionally dominated the historiography of Central and Eastern Europe.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 4/30/2011


RQ-50455-10

University of Georgia (Athens, GA 30602-0001)
Amelia P. Hutchinson (Project Director: November 2009 to June 2022)
Fernão Lopes Translation Project: The Chronicles

Translation and annotation of four Medieval Portuguese chronicles written by Fernão Lopes. (36 months)

The objective of this project is to produce the first-ever translations of Fernão Lopes's chronicles into English and to make these fifteenth-century texts available to the international academic community as well as a wider general readership. By the end of this three-year long project, a team of specialists will have translated all four volumes: Crónica de D. Pedro, Crónica de D. Fernando and Crónica de D. João I, parts I and II; launched a website with information on the project, interactive maps and free release of glossaries to encourage similar projects; it will have held four meetings, one at the beginning of each year and one at the end of the three year grant period. These meetings are intended to plan, coordinate and evaluate progress.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$165,718 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2019


RA-50096-10

John Carter Brown Library (Providence, RI 02906)
Ted Widmer (Project Director: August 2009 to November 2012)
Margot M. Nishimura (Project Director: November 2012 to July 2016)
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

The equivalent of one twelve-month and one eight-month fellowship a year for three years.

The John Carter Brown Library is seeking funding for three long-term fellows to conduct research using the unique and rare collection of materials related to the Americas, north and south, during the colonial period, 1492-1825, for up to a period for 10 months each. The Library seeks to repeat this funding for this purpose every year for a period of three years. The result of the research conducted will be shared with other scholars via the curricula they organize at the institutions of higher learning with which they are primarily affiliated, in the classes they teach, in lectures, seminars, talks, conferences, web sites, pod casts sponsored by the Library and other institutions and will be shared with the public-at-large via publications and exhibitions and the Library and at other locations.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$270,000 (approved)
$267,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 6/30/2014


HR-50517-10

Andrew K. Sandoval-Strausz
Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Latino Landscapes: A Transnational History of Urban America, 1945-2000

The history of postwar urban America cannot explain the state of the nation's cities until it becomes both a Latino and a transnational history. I propose to study how Latin American immigrants have transformed urban America by analyzing their use of architectural and social space. This research will test three hypotheses: that Latinos have been essential to the urban renaissance of the past fifteen years; that they have led the way in the urbanization of suburbia; and that U.S. suburbanization has been a merely temporary exception to the larger process of urbanization throughout the Americas.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Faculty Research Awards

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


FS-50261-10

Regents of the University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
Alexander Gelley (Project Director: March 2010 to May 2014)
Walter Benjamin's Later Writings: The Arcades Project, Commodity Culture, Historiography

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university teachers to study Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project and its impact on technology, media, and history.

Walter Benjamin's career extended from the end of the First World War to the beginning of the second. In contrast to figures like Freud, Heidegger, or Foucault who enjoyed widespread recognition and influence during their lifetime, Benjamin's significance as a theorist and writer only came after his death. But like them, Benjamin may be characterized, in Foucault's words, as one of the "initiators of discursive practices," authors who "produced not only their own work, but the possibility and the rules of formation of other texts." What is more, Benjamin's reputation has been singularly colored by a legendary 'afterlife.' Admittedly, the 'legend' of a writer should not supersede the interpretation of the works, but neither may it be ignored in evaluating their historical impact. It represents an indispensable index of cultural-political currents at a given moment.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$124,703 (approved)
$124,703 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 9/30/2012


FW-50015-09

Anthony Kelsey Jensen
Providence College (Providence, RI 02918-7000)
Theory of Knowledge as a Foundation of the Humanities

With this fellowship, I will develop innovative interactions between my regular undergraduate Theory of Knowledge course and four academic fields to whose epistemological presuppositions it poses challenges. I will work in university libraries throughout southeastern Ohio, first, in order to amplify my knowledge in the grounding texts of psychology, historiography, natural science, and education theory. Second, I will work with my university's IT Department to develop a publicly accessible web database that hyper-links passages between our texts' philosophical arguments and their practical implementation as tacit assumptions within the texts of these other fields. Third, I will use this fellowship to invite local scholars interested in exploring the tacit theories of knowledge utilized by their own fields into the classroom in order that the students be given a tangible example of the interdisciplinary nature of the humanities.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Teaching Development Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$16,800 (approved)
$16,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 9/30/2009


RA-50076-09

Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, VA 23187-8781)
Ronald Hoffman (Project Director: August 2008 to August 2013)
Karin A. Wulf (Project Director: August 2013 to November 2014)
Postdoctoral Fellowships

The equivalent of one fellowship per year for three years.

The Omohundro Institute seeks to renew, through the Endowment's Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions, funds for two-year postdoctoral fellowships for the 2010-2013 grant period. The proposal requests support for three fellows who will conduct research in areas of early American studies with the goal of preparing manuscripts for book publication. They will be NEH fellows in successive twelve-month terms in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The Institute's sixty-three-year-old fellowship program has a well-deserved reputation for quality and productivity and is held in high regard by the historical profession. As a dedicated research center and a publisher of important work about the early American period, the Omohundro Institute provides an ideal setting for scholars working on their first book-length publications.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$160,200 (approved)
$160,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2014


RA-50078-09

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
G. Kenneth Sams (Project Director: August 2008 to March 2010)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: March 2010 to November 2014)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities in Turkey

The equivalent of one and a half fellowships per year for three years.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities affiliated with the ARIT centers in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totalling 18 months per grant year, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013. Also requested are funds for a portion of the costs of publicity and selection of the ARIT NEH fellows, beginning in July 2009.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$244,800 (approved)
$244,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2014


RA-50079-09

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Grossman (Project Director: August 2008 to September 2011)
Daniel Greene (Project Director: September 2011 to April 2014)
NEH Fellowships at the Newberry Library

The equivalent of three fellowships per year for two years.

The Newberry Library requests funding for three years of publicity and three years of fellowship support to continue a highly successful program of residential humanities fellowships at the Newberry Library. Over three decades this program has generated a rich harvest of humanities scholarship while also serving as a catalyst for the creation of a dynamic intellectual community within this research institution. This proposal details the achievements and impact of the program and outlines the Library's procedures for publicizing the program, selecting the fellows,and fostering their scholarly activities.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$314,400 (approved)
$314,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2012


FT-57120-09

Reuben Zahler
University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Honor, Corruption, and Liberalism: Justice and Legitimacy in Venezuela, 1780-1850

This book explores the transformation of Venezuelan political culture as it evolved from a Spanish colony into an independent, liberal republic (1780-1850). The study uses two avenues of investigation into the tension between political reality and the Enlightenment-inspired ideals of the elite: honor and corruption. These two facets of social and political power illuminate colonial legacies prevalent after independence as well as those social norms that lacked legal sanction but still affected political structures--factors that resound throughout developing countries to this day. The analysis illuminates the evolving amalgamation of traditional and liberal norms found among the elites, women, and the poor. This study will add to Venezuelan and Latin American historiography, which is wanting in studies of legal and political culture during this transitional period, and will be relevant to scholars of contemporary countries that are developing democracy and capitalism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 8/31/2009


FA-54688-09

Nancy P. Appelbaum
SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton (Binghamton, NY 13902-4400)
Mapping the "Country of Regions": Agustin Codazzi and the 19th-Century Colombian Chorographic Commission

Book manuscript on the Chorographic Commission, a geographic expedition in Colombia led by Agustin Codazzi throughout the 1850s. The book will analyze the Commission's maps, images, and documents as well as the fieldwork processes that produced these materials. I argue that a fundamental tension existed between the racial diversity that the Commission encountered in its fieldwork and the national unity for which its members yearned. The Commission attempted to resolve this apparent contradiction by portraying the nation as undergoing a beneficial process of racial mixture that absorbed ostensibly lesser races. In its texts and visual materials, the Chorographic Commission characterized some regions of the nation as "civilized" and others as "backward" based on the degree of racial mixture along with factors such as climate and economics. The Commission thus attributed national progress with race mixing while at the same time it reinforced racial and social inequalities.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 8/31/2010


CH-50657-09

Augustana University (Sioux Falls, SD 57197-0001)
Harry F. Thompson (Project Director: May 2008 to February 2014)
Strengthening the Endowment of Augustana College's Center for Western Studies

To Support: augmentation of the college's endowment for the support of the Center for Western Studies

Augustana College, a Christian liberal arts institution affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America seeks a challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to strengthen the Center for Western Studies' endowment. The Center is a department of the College with the mission of preserving and interpreting the history and cultures of the Northern Plains. As an archives, museum, academic publisher, and provider of educational programming and internships for the students and the campus, as well as the region, Augustana is seeking a $300,000 challenge grant matched by the College on a four-to-one basis for a total endowment campaign of $1,500,000. A successful campaign will increase the Center's endowment and provide dollars to support, enhance, and expand the Center's main program areas which include the Archives and Library Program, the Dakota Conference on Northern Plains, Educational Exhibits, the Publications Program, and the Building Fund.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (offered)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2006 – 7/31/2013


RZ-51115-09

Peter David Koret
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Bangkok 10406 Thailand)
The Annotated Translation and Analysis of a Lao Historical Work of Literature, "Pheun Kham Thaung Luang"

An annotated translation and analysis of a French colonial period work of Lao Buddhist historical literature. (24 months)

Our proposed project consists of an annotated translation and analysis of a work of Lao historical literature, Pheun Kham Thaung Luang. Recently discovered, this manuscript is an early 20th century account of the history of French colonization. Reflective of pre-modern Lao historiography, historical events and the evolution of human society are viewed from the context of a Buddhist world view. It is the lengthiest Lao historical document in existence, and the only known documentation of the colonial period recorded from the Lao perspective. It is the most thorough Lao (and perhaps Southeast Asian) work of millenarian Buddhism, and can increase our understanding of how pre-modern Buddhist societies responded to the beginnings of modernization. It is of value in the study of the impact of colonialism on non-western societies, the evolution of the relationship between Buddhism and politics, Asian literature, and pre-modern conceptualizations of history.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$105,725 (approved)
$105,725 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 3/31/2012


RA-50062-08

ARCE (Alexandria , VA 22314-1555)
Gerry D. Scott (Project Director: September 2007 to June 2013)
NEH Fellowships at the American Research Center in Egypt

The equivalent of one twelve-month fellowship a year for three years.

The American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) respectfully requests continuing support from the NEH for its fellowship program starting in July 2008 through June 2012 (academic years 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012). ARCE's fellowship program is a vital activity designed to foster and support American scholarly humanities-based research in Egypt; to create scholarly, professional, and personal links between American and Egyptian scholars; and to foster a deeper appreciation in the West of Egypt's extensive cultural heritage. ARCE is a mature, innovative institution that has been operating programs in Egypt and the United States for almost six decades. ARCE's prioritized activities include, but are not limited to, the facilitation of scholarly research in Egypt; a program of fellowships awarded for study and research in Egypt; scholarly publications; educational activities for the public and the general membership; academic exchanges; and preservation of Egypt's cultural heritage.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$164,633 (approved)
$164,633 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 9/30/2012


RA-50065-08

American Center of Oriental Research (Alexandria, VA 22314-2909)
Barbara A. Porter (Project Director: September 2007 to July 2013)
Fellowships in the Humanities

One six-month fellowship a year for three years.

The project will award three six-month fellowships to scholars who have completed their professional training. The project will take place at the institute in Amman and will support scholars with new projects or those with ongoing research and/or publication projects in the humanities relating to Jordan and the Middle East. Each award will be $27,800.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$86,400 (approved)
$86,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 8/31/2012


FT-55677-08

Sarah Brown Ferrario
Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Athens the Great? The Ascendancy of the Individual in Classical Greek Historical Thought

This book project employs literary and archaeological evidence to show that the 'great man' of later Greek historical thought (best exemplified by Alexander) is the product of traceable changes in ancient ideas about the meaning and impact of an individual life. At least as early as the birth of Athenian democracy, questions about the ownership of history were being publicly posed and publicly challenged. The responses to these questions, however, gradually shifted over time, in reaction to historical and political developments during the fifth and fourth centuries BC. These ideological changes are illuminated by portrayals of the roles of individuals and groups in significant historical events, as depicted in historiography, funerary monuments, and inscriptions. The emergence in these media of the individual as an indispensable agent of history provides an additional explanation for the unique reception of Alexander: the Greek world had long been preparing to understand him as it did.

Project fields:
Classical History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2008 – 7/31/2008


FT-56006-08

John Anderson Palmer III
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL 32611-0001)
An English Translation of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers

I have been invited by Princeton University Press to prepare a new English translation, with introductory and supporting materials, of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers. The ten books of Diogenes' Lives (3rd c. A.D.) constitute the only work surviving from antiquity to present a comprehensive overview of philosophy from its earliest origins down through the development of the major Hellenistic schools. It is thus the major extant example of ancient philosophical historiography. This new translation will be the first English version based on a critical edition of the Greek text. A reliable and modern English version of this seminal work will not only benefit specialists in philosophy, classical studies, and the history of European thought, but it will also be a valuable resource for the curious and intelligent lay reader. An NEH Summer Stipend will enable me to devote my attention full time to this ambitious project at a critical early stage.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 7/31/2008


FB-53760-08

Adele Lindenmeyr
Villanova University (Villanova, PA 19085-1478)
The Lives of Sofia Panina, Russian Citizen-Countess, 1871-1956

My project uses biography to understand the generation that made the Russian Revolution. Sofia Panina was one of Russia's greatest heiresses and a pioneering social reformer. She rose to unusual political prominence in 1917 when she became the only woman minister in the Provisional Government, then the defendant in the Bolsheviks' first political trial. Fleeing Russia in 1920, she contributed to the development of international refugee relief and emigre institutions. My book is the first scholarly effort to reconstruct Panina's life from widely scattered archival sources in Russia, Europe, and the U.S. I analyze her significance as a woman who constructed innovative institutions while resisting social and gender conventions. My book also examines why she has been appropriated as a political symbol at times of transition, both in the past and in Russia today. The audience for my book includes historians of Russia, women, and reform movements, and general readers.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2008 – 5/31/2009


RZ-50924-08

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Ernestine S. Elster (Project Director: November 2007 to June 2013)
The Scaloria Cave Project: Ritual and Landscape in the Mediterranean Neolithic

Preparation for publication of a technical and interpretive work on the Scaloria Cave, a Neolithic cult and burial site in the Puglia region of southern Italy. (16 months)

The Scaloria Cave Project is an interdisciplinary, international, collaborative project focused on the analysis and interpretation of unpublished data from a series of explorations of Grotta Scaloria, a double-chambered cave located on the edge of the Tavoliere Plain, Italy. The compilation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological and archival data from the Scaloria project will contribute significantly to studies of Italian prehistory and also to a broader understanding of Neolithic settlement and social relations, specifically to the role of cult, ritual and burial among early farming and herding populations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2008 – 12/31/2012


CH-50421-07

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Anne W. Robertson (Project Director: May 2006 to November 2011)
Publishing Musicologal Research in the 21st Century

Endowment for publication subventions and an award program in musicology as well as fund-raising costs.

The American Musicological Society seeks an NEH challenge grant of $240,000, which with a 4:1 match will yield $1,200,000. These funds will endow four publication-related initiatives of the Society. The bulk of the funds ($900,000) will create a new subvention supporting the publication of first books by young scholars, whose work often represents the cutting edge of scholarly research, but whose careers are often at their most fragile or challenging point. The remainder will go primarily to existing publication subvention programs, supporting musicological books more generally ($125,000) as well as a monograph series sponsored by the Society ($100,000). These subventions aim to optimize the quality of the best scholarly books on music while keeping their prices affordable. Finally, we propose a new award for books on music in American culture ($50,000), a vital area of musical research that appeals to the broadest literary and musical public.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (offered)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2005 – 7/31/2011


FT-55263-07

Ian Strachan Moyer
Regents of the University of Michigan (Claremont, CA 91711-4434)
“At the Limits of Hellenism: Egyptian Priests and the Greek World”

This project is an exploration of the ancient history and modern historiography of cultural exchange between Greeks and Egyptians in the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and the early Roman empire. Beginning with the second book of Herodotus’ “Histories”, I examine four texts that represent key encounters between the Greek world and Egyptian priests, the cultural and intellectual élite of Egyptian civilization. In drawing on both Greek and Egyptian sources, and engaging with contemporary anthropological and post-colonial studies, I rethink received models and narratives of cross-cultural interaction and identity in antiquity.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 8/31/2007


RA-50055-07

Trustees of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Princeton, NJ 08540-5232)
Irene Bald Romano (Project Director: September 2006 to June 2012)
NEH Fellowship Program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

The equivalent of two fellowships a year for three years.

The ASCSA seeks a total of $258,000 for a three-year program to continue support of two to four fellowships per year of five to ten months in duration, in a wide range of disciplines of the Greek world from prehistory to the present. The NEH Fellowship program aims to make the unique resources of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens accessible to a wider scholarly constituency: Blegen Library, devoted to Greek antiquity; the Gennadius Library, a collection of post-ancient Greek culture; and the primary materials accessible at the ASCSA's archaeological research centers in ancient Corinth and at the Athenian Agora. NEH Fellows add immensely to the intellectual life of the School, broadening and enriching the experience of students and scholars in the ASCSA community.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$258,000 (approved)
$258,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2011


FB-53335-07

Mary Ellis Gibson
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Empire and English Language Literary Culture in Bengal, 1780-1912

This study examines English language poetry in India from its beginnings to 1912. It surveys a crucial portion of the imperial archive and proposes a theoretical frame for understanding imperial literary relations. Critiquing nationalist historiography, I examine English language writing in three registers: material histories of uneven development; transperipheral histories of cultural institutions; and psychic histories accessible in literary conventions. Five chapters treat early periodicals; the literary friendship of Derozio and the British poet Emma Roberts; the rise of the literary annual in Britain and Bengal; the creation of an English language canon in schools and libraries; and the role of Indian poets in fin de siecle publishing.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2008 – 10/31/2008


FB-53390-07

David S. Peterson
Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA 24450-2116)
Power and the Sacred in Renaissance Florence, 1375-1460

An NEH Fellowship will enable me to complete my two-volume book manuscript on religion and the church in Florentine politics, 1375-1460. Volume I demonstrates how the Florentine government extended controls over the church and lay religious life over the course of the papal schism (1378-1417). Volume II shows how the church reasserted its control of the sacred and its role as a legitimizing agency in fifteenth-century Florentine social and political life. The study adds a religious component to the predominantly secular historiography of Renaissance Florence, and thus a new view of the context of Florence’s artistic Renaissance and of the understudied Italian church in the century before the Reformation.

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FA-53309-07

Kader Konuk
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Auerbach in Istanbul: Exile, Transnationalism, and Modernity

This project focuses on the Jewish German philologist Erich Auerbach, a pivotal figure in the humanities who after his dismissal from Germany in 1936 emigrated to Turkey. His itinerant life and the transnational nature of his work call for an investigation into the relationship between the humanities and concepts of modernity, nation, and exile in East and West. This book project raises questions about the role of the émigré in the Europeanization of Turkey, the metamorphosis of German philology in a transnational context, the impact of National Socialists on Turkish universities, and the place of the Jewish emigrant in Turkish historiography.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


RA-50048-07

American Council of Learned Societies Devoted to Humanistic Studies (New York, NY 10017-6706)
Saul Fisher (Project Director: September 2006 to March 2009)
Nicole A Stahlmann (Project Director: March 2009 to March 2012)
ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowship Program

The equivalent of four fellowships a year for three years.

This proposal seeks funding from the NEH for the period July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011 to support the program of ACLS/SSRC/NEH Fellowships in International and Area Studies. The ACLS has successfully administered this and predecessor programs since 1978. The program is integrated into the central ACLS fellowship competition, since multi-disciplinary research characterizes not only area studies but much work in the humanities in general; area studies scholarship benefits from evaluation in this larger context. Integration of the programs maximizes the number of NEH Fellows, who are supported both by grant funds and by ACLS endowment funds. The program offers 15 fellowships a year to post-doctoral scholars in all disciplines of the humanities working on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, East Europe, and the former Soviet Union.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$348,000 (approved)
$348,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 6/30/2011


FB-52289-06

Nara B. Milanich
Barnard College (New York, NY 10027-6909)
Families, Class, and the State in Chile, 1800-1930

The NEH grant will permit the completion of my book, THE CHILDREN OF FATE: FAMILIES, CLASS, & THE STATE IN CHILE, 1800-1930. In this case study of 19th-century Chile, I show how domestic practices are linked in integral ways to class hierarchy and state formation. I do so through an analytic focus on a group largely absent from Latin American historiography: children. With funding from NEH, I will conduct new research in the Chilean archives in order to deepen some of my arguments; write up this new research; and develop some of the comparative and theoretical implications of my findings. My monograph will be published by Duke University Press, where I have a contract contingent upon completion of the aforementioned research and revisions.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 12/31/2007


FV-50100-06

University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300)
Gerard M. Koot (Project Director: March 2006 to September 2008)
bcThe Dutch Republic and Britain: The Making of Modern Society and a European World-Economy

A five-week summer seminar, to be held in Great Britain and the Netherlands, for fifteen school teachers to study the rise of both the Dutch economic empire in the seventeenth century and the British economic empire in the eighteenth century.

The purpose of this five week (July 1-August 3,2007) NEH Seminar for School Teachers at the Historical Institute in London and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in Wassenaar is to investigate how a region of northwest Europe, centered around the North Sea, acquired the characteristics that historians have labeled modern. We will study how the national economy of the Dutch Republic rose to dominance in the new European world-economy of the seventeenth century, how Britain acquired this supremacy in the eighteenth century, and how it transformed itself to become the first industrial nation. Using a comparative method, we will study contemporary accounts, five seminal historical works and visit some of the key places that experienced this world-historical transformation. The seminar will allow teachers to explore the historiography of an important topic in European economic and social history and to appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of humanistic studies.

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$144,291 (approved)
$144,291 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 9/30/2007


FA-52353-06

Janet Marie Atwill
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Knoxville, TN 37916-3801)
The Role of Character in Greek Rhetorical Training

This book project examines the role of “character” in Greek rhetorical training in the Hellenistic Period (323-32 BCE) through the late second century CE. This era is generally viewed as a period of decline for the rhetorical tradition. My book challenges this interpretation by arguing that this period cannot be adequately assessed without considering its Hellenistic context, particularly the influence of Stoic thought in redefining the relationships between rhetoric, ethics, and philosophy and placing character education, what I call an “art of ethics,” at the center of the early liberal arts curriculum.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Composition and Rhetoric

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 5/31/2007


FA-52464-06

Diane Bette Wolfthal
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Hugo van der Goes: Historiography, Italian Patronage, and the Devotio Moderna

I am applying for an NEH Fellowship in order to complete three chapters of a monograph that I am writing on Hugo van der Goes, one of the greatest Early Netherlandish painters. No comprehensive study of this artist has ever been written in English, yet Hugo not only produced works of incredible beauty that have become canonical within the discipline of art history, but also deeply influenced the development of Netherlandish and Italian art. The three chapters that I will complete explore the historiography of Hugo van der Goes, and his relationship to Italy and to the Devotio Moderna, the popular movement in which he was a lay brother.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006


FA-52615-06

Daniel G. Prior
Miami University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Holy War, Tribal War, and Raiding in Kirghiz Culture, 1846-1916

Two rare examples of Kirghiz epic-style praise-poems from 1910 express starkly "revisionist" views on the Kirghiz' most popular epic heroes (Manas and others) and the nomads with whom they had considerable cultural memory in common, the Kazakhs. As part of a larger research agenda for examining conflict among the Kirghiz between 1846 and 1916, the present project seeks to answer the question of when and how oral epic poetry provided a genre framework for Kirghiz elites to express concepts of ethnic and religious difference within the matrix of Central Asian Muslim peoples of the Russian Empire.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 5/31/2007


FA-52711-06

William E. Klingshirn
Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Diviners and Divination in the Roman Empire

This project is designed to complete a monograph on diviners and divination in the Roman empire. It studies interactions between diviners and clients; links between divination and empire; the historiography of divination; attacks on divination; and changes in divinatory practice. The book begins in the 1st century BCE with Cicero's "De Divinatione." Chapters 1-5 cover the following three centuries, when a wide range of specialized diviners practiced across the empire. Chapters 6-8 examine changes in late antiquity that led to the marginalization of diviners, Christian adaptations of divination, and the continuation of traditional specialties where remnants of the empire persisted. A prosopography of diviners will be included as an appendix.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 4/30/2007


FA-52236-06

Ronald K. Rittgers
Yale University (New Haven, CT 06510-1703)
The Reformation of Suffering: Protestants, Plague, and Misfortune in Early Modern Germany

This project examines how the Protestant Reformation sought to effect a fundamental change in the way early modern Europeans understood and coped with suffering. An essential though understudied part of the Reformation program was the rejection of the late medieval approach to suffering and the development of a new approach in its stead. This project traces the Protestant “reformation of suffering” from its origins in the thought of the major reformers to its actual reception among the common folk. The project is related to two larger themes in recent historiography: the impact of the Reformation on lay piety and popular culture in early modern Europe and the role of the Protestantism in the secularization of western civilization.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 3/31/2008


RA-50039-06

American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
Ralph W. Nicholas (Project Director: September 2005 to July 2010)
Philip Lutgendorf (Project Director: July 2010 to July 2013)
Research Fellowships for Senior Humanists to Work in India

Three or four fellowships per year.

This proposal seeks support for the award of fellowships to post-doctoral scholars in all fields of the Humanities to enable them to undertake their research projects in India.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$334,800 (approved)
$334,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 12/31/2011

Funding details:
Original grant (2006) $228,000
Supplement (2008) $106,800


RA-50040-06

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
G. Kenneth Sams (Project Director: September 2005 to March 2010)
A. Kevin Reinhart (Project Director: March 2010 to June 2011)
Advanced Fellowships for Research in the Humanities in Turkey

The equivalent to 1.5 full-time fellowships per year for three years.

The American Research Institute in Turkey requests support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totaling eighteen months per grant period, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. Also requested are funds for a portion of the costs of publicity and selection of the NEH ARIT fellows, beginning in July 2006.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$198,000 (approved)
$198,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 12/31/2010


FT-53878-06

Anne Elizabeth Goldman
California State University (Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609)
Glass Half Full: Jewish American Culture in the 20th Century

The project is an expansive assessment of 20th-century Jewish American culture in two parts. Section one reconsiders rituals of mourning, definitions of exilic identity, and explorations of loss. The essays, critical and reflective, discuss intellectual history as bordered by familial history. Section two considers contributions in physics, painting, music, and literature.(Figures examined include Alfred Einstein, Richard Feynman, Mark Rothko, Marc Chagall, Stan Getz, George Gershwin, Henry Roth and Saul Bellow.) I wish to recast the nature of modern Jewish American historiography, conventionally inclined toward tragedy, as well as to reflect upon the relationships art imposes upon history and memory.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 7/31/2006


FT-54583-06

Ruth Mack
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Literary Historicity: Structuring Historical Consciousness in Eighteenth-Century Britain

My book project explores how eighteenth-century writers used literary form to conceive of history. Reading eighteenth- century texts in a variety of genres—what we now call fiction, the philosophy of history, historiography, and literary criticism—I argue that before the emergence of the philosophy of history as a formal discipline, the structures of literary texts offered writers the means to pose fundamental questions about how history is constituted as an aspect of consciousness.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 7/31/2006


FT-53519-05

Alka Arvind Patel
American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
The Ghurid Architecture of South Asia and Historiography at the Ends of the Islamic World

This project treats the Ghurid foundations in northern India and Pakistan, bringing them together for the first time in monograph form. The Ghurids, originally the Shansabani clan from Ghur, north-central Afghanistan, established the first Islamic government with enduring ambitions east of the Indus (modern India), thus beginning a succession of Islamic states based at Delhi through the mid-18th century. The architectural significance of Ghurid buildings is unquestionable, as these complexes set the course for South Asian Islamic buildings during the subsequent centuries. Moreover, investigation of Ghurid architecture provides a unique opportunity for discerning the development of the scholarly discourse not only on medieval Islamic architecture in South Asia, but also the discourse on South Asian Islam.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 8/31/2005


FB-51939-05

John Victor Tolan
Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR 97331-8655)
Francis of Assisi's Mission to al-Kâmil of Egypt in Western Art and Historiography

In September, 1219, Francis of Assisi went to Egypt to preach to Sultan al-Malik al- Kâmil. Though we in fact know very little about this event, writers from the thirteenth century to the twentieth have portrayed Francis alternatively as a new apostle preaching to the infidels, a scholastic theologian proving the truth of Christianity, a champion of the crusading ideal, a naive and quixotic wanderer, a crazed religious fanatic, or a medieval Gandhi preaching peace, love and understanding. My study of the varying depictions of this lapidary encounter will attempt to throw into relief the changing fears and hopes that Muslim- Christian encounters inspire in European writers over eight centuries.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 9/30/2005


FB-51578-05

Alejandra Beltide Osorio
Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Inventing Lima: The Making of an Early Modern Colonial Capital, 1535-1710

"Inventing Lima" plots the construction of Lima as the ceremonial and administrative center of the Viceroyalty of Peru under the Spanish Hapsburg Monarchy. Through the analysis of civic and religious ceremonies, and of a seventeenth-century dispute between Lima and Cuzco over their right to represent the viceroyalty, this study challenges a historiography which has depicted coastal Lima as a colonial enclave culturally and politically divorced from its Andean highlands. The study finds instead, that colonial Lima was concerned with projecting its image and power into the Andean interior. This projection was realized through the vehicle of a colonial baroque culture brought to America by Spain, but reworked in the colonial setting.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2006


FB-51791-05

Joshua A. Sanborn
Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)
Soldiers, Civilians, and the Ecosystem of War in Russia, 1914-1918

This project studies a new social formation that emerged in Russia's war zones during World War I. Through a study of the outlooks, relationships, and practices of soldiers, civilians, and social service personnel who lived in the regions placed under martial law, it will describe a process of violent desocialization in this region that would extend to the rest of the empire in the succeeding years of revolution and civil war. Special attention will be paid to mass migration and to violent interactions between soldiers and civilians. The study will also examine the peculiar economy of front-line areas and the impact of infectious disease on both military operations and war zone society.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 4/30/2006


FA-51941-05

Tara Elaine Nummedal
Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Alchemy's Contested Validity in Early Modern Europe's Holy Roman Empire

This project takes the problem of fraud as a point of entry into the world of alchemical practice in the sixteenth and seventeenth-century Holy Roman Empire. Fears of alchemical fraud responded to a vibrant market for alchemy in which ordinary practitioners flourished alongside learned alchemists. Drawing on criminal trials, patronage appeals, contracts and letters, this project reconstructs the lives of these ordinary alchemists who have been largely invisible in existing historiography. The debates about fraud, expressed in polemical treatises and in courtrooms, make it possible to examine how early modern Europeans distinguished true alchemists from impostors, as well as what was at stake in doing so.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2006


FT-52412-04

Christopher Stephen Ivic
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Potsdam (Potsdam, NY 13676-2200)
The Subject of Britain, 1603-1660

My project explores the ways in which various seventeenth-century subjects responded to the emergence of a multi-national British state. My work is informed by the new British historiography, a plural political history that has paved the way for literary historians to glean valuable new perspectives on literary and extra-literary texts in light of the wider British context that informed, indeed enabled, their production. In pursuit of these rich possibilities, my project focuses on a range of cultural texts and artifacts devoted to Britain and Britishness produced between 1603 and 1660, a crucial period of cultural interaction in the British Isles.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 8/31/2004


FB-50105-04

Markus P. Vink
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Fredonia (Fredonia, NY 14063-1127)
Dutch Slavery and Slave Trade in the Indian Ocean in the 17th Century

For most of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the Dutch were active participants in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean slave trade. For brief spells in the seventeenth century they even dominated the Atlantic slave trade, while for nearly two centuries they were the nexus of an enormous slave trade, the most expansive of its kind in the history of the Indian Ocean Basin. Whereas the Atlantic slave trade has been mapped out in relatively great detail in numerous studies, its Indian Ocean counterpart has remained largely uncharted territory and overlooked in Asian colonial historiography. Indeed, the sufferings of the slaves in Asia occurred mainly in silence, largely ignored by both contemporaries and modern historians. This project is a first step to "unsilence" their history and to correct or "re-Orient" the historiographical imbalance by looking at the organization and numerical aspects of Dutch slavery and slave trade in the Indian Ocean in the seventeenth century: the debate over the trade in human chattel between majority apologists and minority abolitionists in Europe and Asia; the markets of supply and demand or geographic origins and destinations of slaves; the routes to slavery or the diverse means of recruitment of forced labor; the miscalleneous occupations performed by slaves; the size of slavery and the accompanying annual slave trade; and the various forms of slave resistance and slave revolt. Where possible, findings will be placed in a comparative global perspective. Research for this project will be conducted in the deposits of the Dutch East India Company in the National Archives in The Hague, the Netherlands. The vast repository of the company, included in the UNESCO's "Memory of the World Register," contains unique quantitative and qualitative materials on this understudied, yet vital topic in the humanities.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2004 – 12/31/2004


FT-52688-04

Paul Walter Ludwig
St. John's College, Main Campus (Annapolis, MD 21401-1687)
Family and Community in Greek Political Thought: The Tragedy of Philia

My project studies the ancient Greek word and concept philia: the nonerotic love between family members and friends. I focus on philia as a bond of political association in Greek philosophy, drama, and historiography. In particular, I examine political and theoretical attempts to use the family (and familial love) as a model for the political community. At their most utopian, these attempts envisioned transforming the community into one great household that would bind citizens together with ties of philia. I attempt to assess the pros and cons of philia as a bond of political association in a variety of classical Greek discourses. To correct what I see as a lacuna in the scholarly literature, I focus largely on examples of dysfunctional philia.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 8/31/2004


RZ-50206-04

Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Marvin Paul Bolt (Project Director: November 2003 to March 2007)
Widening the Scope of Knowledge

Creation of an electronic database which would provide technical measurements of the 17th- and 18th-century telescopes to be examined in this project. Articles stemming from the project research would also be submitted to history of science journals.

In portraying the telescope's significant roles in astronomy, navigation, surveying, and military history, standard chronicles focus on the technical details of its optical evolution. We believe that these accounts ignore key contextual elements impacting the telescope's development, and thus misrepresent its history. Our proposal contains two components to correct this history and to address its attendant historiography. First, we propose to make technical measurements, calculations, and images of 17th and 18th century telescope optical components that will enable us to provide experimental data about their optical quality. Second, we propose to view the heavens through as many historic telescopes as possible in order to gauge directly the astronomical viewing quality of these artifacts. By providing a more informed history of the optical evolution of telescopes, including evidence that the technical limitations of early telescopes are less problematic than is usually claimed, we can demonstrate the importance of social and contextual influences on the development of telescopes and on its resulting histories.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$44,810 (approved)
$44,810 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2004 – 6/30/2006


HR-50048-04

Edward Paulino
CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Forgotten Crimes Against Humanity: The 1937 Haitian Massacre and Its Legacy

My project focuses on the long-forgotten 1937 Massacre of Haitians in the Dominican Republic. The mass slaughter of an estimated 15,000-20,000 innocent Haitian men, women, and children along the Dominican-Haitian border was ordered by the Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo. Thousands of Haitians were rounded up and killed by machete-wielding Dominican soldiers. Others escaped into Haiti becoming refugees. President Franklin Roosevelt was briefed in detail about the massacre but refused to condemn Trujillo for the sake of maintaining hemispheric solidarity in the face of Nazi aggression in Europe. For the last sixty-six years this atrocity has been forgotten by many, particularly Americans, who are at the forefront of publicizing the virtues of preventing and exposing genocides. My research project aims to resurrect this event to a wider audience by re-contextualizing it within the discourse of genocide and historical memory. First I plan to conduct archival research in Washington, DC, the Dominican Republic and Haiti to gain a clearer picture of how the Dominican, Haitian, and American governments viewed the Massacre and the subsequent transformation of the border. Second, since the majority of the traditional historiography on the massacre lacks personal testimonies from Haitian survivors and Dominican perpetrators, I aim to travel to the Dominican-Haitian border and conduct video interviews with the remaining elderly people who witnessed this event. The video interviews will fill a historical lacuna that for too long has existed in the narrative of the massacre. Third, to understand the legacy of the 1937 Haitian massacre on the island, I also plan to interview ordinary Dominicans and Haitians (including historians on both sides of the island) to examine how and why this event of ethnic cleansing is remembered by both groups.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Faculty Research Awards

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 8/31/2005


HR-50114-04

Akinwumi Olufisayo Ogundiran
Florida International University Board of Trustees (Miami, FL 33199-2516)
The Impacts of the Atlantic Economy on Cultural Change in Yoruba (Nigeria) Hinterlands

The goal of this research is to study the impact of the Atlantic economy on cultural transformations in Yorubaland, ca. 1500 to 1800, through an interdisciplinary approach that uses oral traditions, community rituals, material culture and archaeological data, as well as European travelers' accounts. The Upper Osun region will be used as case study because the upper reaches of River Osun were one of the earliest conduits for people, goods, and ideas that linked the Yoruba hinterlands to the Atlantic commerce on the coast during the first decade of the sixteenth century. By combining European documents and archaeological data with historical ethnography, the study will address how the incorporation of Yorubaland into the Atlantic economy restructured sociopolitical institutions, ideology and worldview, gender relations, sociopolitical networks and inter-group relations, social distinctions, and consumption patterns. This investigation is the final phase of the research for a book project titled "Cultural Translations of the Atlantic Experience in Yorubaland, 1500-1800". The book will significantly contribute to the Atlantic historiography given the fact that the hinterland portion of the African Atlantic basin has been largely neglected in transatlantic studies. It will also contribute to the general concerns in the humanities on the relationships between culture and history. The results of the research are primarily intended for publication in form of a scholarly yet readable monograph that could be adopted in courses on African history and anthropology. My goal is to complete and submit the manuscript to a major press in 2005.

Project fields:
Gender Studies

Program:
Faculty Research Awards

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 4/30/2006


FA-50545-04

Seth W. Garfield
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Soldiers and Citizens in the Rainforest: Brazilian Rubber Tappers during World War II and Beyond

The book examines the experiences of the rubber "soldiers," Brazilian migrant workers transported to the Amazon in a U.S.-funded wartime campaign, as a window into state planning in the Amazon, U.S.-Brazilian relations, interregional migration, rural populism and popular mobilization. Through consideration of public health projects, protectionist labor legislation, and state propaganda, the study explores efforts by Brazilian and American state officials to remake the rural poor and to "modernize" the Amazon. In a "top-down" analysis, the study adopts a transnational approach to reveal competing and overlapping agendas between Brazilian and American officials regarding state intervention in economic planning, and their attitudes--informed by racial, class, gender, "scientific," and populist ideologies towards the rural poor. In a "bottom-up" approach, the book analyses the strong historic links tying northeastern Brazil to the Amazon, the socioeconomic and environmental conditions in the sending regions, brutalizing and empowering aspects of wartime rubber tapping, and the postwar struggle for historic recognition and the social rights of citizenship. The book will not only inform American and Brazilian readers of a relatively unknown wartime episode, but document the historic origins of grass roots mobilization in the Amazon in the 1980s under the leadership of Chico Mendes. As such, I offer important revisions to the historiography of the Vargas era, Amazonia, and U.S.-Brazilian relations. In the process we come to reconsider our understanding of "traditional" peoples and, by extension, our historic ties to them.

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 8/31/2005


RA-50004-03

Folger Shakespeare Library admin by Trustees of Amherst College (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Gail Kern Paster (Project Director: September 2002 to April 2008)
Long-term Residential Fellowships

Three fellowships each year for three years.

The Fellowship Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library is an essential component of the Library's mission to render its collection accessible to scholars for advanced research. The program encourages ongoing cross-disciplinary dialogue among the scholars who use the collection. The Folger Shakespeare Library requests funding for 3 long-term (6-9 months) residential fellowship stipends up to $40,000 for the academic years 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, as well as for the costs of publicizing those fellowships and for selecting the fellows. NEH fellows will be joined each year by 2 or 3 long-term fellows and 20-30 short-term (1-3 months) fellows. Additional fellows are supported by funds from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and by the Library's endowments.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$378,000 (approved)
$378,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2003 – 6/30/2007


FT-51732-03

Kathryn Zabelle Stodola
University of Arkansas, Little Rock (Little Rock, AR 72204-1000)
The War in Words: Reading the U.S.-Dakota Conflict through the Captivity Literature

My monograph examines twenty-four key captivity narratives by whites, metis, and full bloods about the 1862 U.S.-Dakota Conflict. Literary critics have paid very little attention to the narratives of this war, which one historian calls 'the other Civil War.' The significance of my chosen accounts is their cultural inclusiveness and their aesthetic value. Together, they show competing views of this complex war and the variety of generic forms the captivity narrative encompasses.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2003 – 7/31/2003


RA-50003-03

American Research Institute in Turkey (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6324)
G. Kenneth Sams (Project Director: September 2002 to June 2009)
Advanced Fellowships in the Humanities for Research in Turkey

The equivalent of 1.5 fellowships each year for three years.

The American Research Institute in Turkey is requesting support for its fellowship program for advanced research in the humanities in Turkey. Funds for long-term fellowships (tenures from four to twelve months) totaling eighteen months per grant period, are requested from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the academic years 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2006-2007. Also requested are funds for a portion of the costs of publicity and selection of the NEH ARIT fellows, beginning in July of 2003.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$193,500 (approved)
$193,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2003 – 9/30/2008


FT-46993-02

Michael S. Agnew
Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Transformations in Late Medieval Spanish Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Spanish Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2002 – 9/30/2002


RA-20210-00

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
James R. Grossman (Project Director: September 1999 to November 2011)
Daniel Greene (Project Director: November 2011 to March 2005)
NEH Fellowships at the Newberry Library

The equivalent of four full fellowships each year for three years.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$270,000 (approved)
$270,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2000 – 8/31/2004


CH-20654-00

Encyclopaedia Iranica Foundation (New York, NY 10027-6820)
Ehsan O. Yarshater (Project Director: May 1999 to July 2002)
Encyclopedia Iranica.

Endowment for the completion of the Encyclopaedia Iranica and future projects.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1998 – 7/31/2003


GN-25819-99

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Melissa Winspear Banta (Project Director: February 1999 to January 2001)
The Murder of Dr. Parkman: A Documentary About a Famous 19th Century Crime and the Issues of Historiography It Raises

Scripting of a one-hour documentary film that uses the story of the famous 19th-century crime of the murder of Dr. Parkman as a case study in historiography.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$46,561 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1999 – 1/31/2000


RA-20186-97

American Academy in Rome (New York, NY 10021-4905)
Lester K. Little (Project Director: October 1996 to August 2002)
NEH Postdoctoral Fellowships at American Academy in Rome

To support three fellowships in the humanities each year for three years.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$282,500 (approved)
$282,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1997 – 8/30/2001


FT-42074-97

Henry H. Em
UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Nationalism and Democratic Thought in Korean Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1997 – 9/30/1997


FT-42811-97

Susan Wright Rather
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
William Williams, Teacher of American Artist Benjamin West: Historiography of Late 18th-Century American Art

No project description available

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1997 – 9/30/1997


PA-22846-96

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
David A. Woodward (Project Director: July 2000 to September 2004)
James E. Burt (Project Director: September 2004 to April 2005)
Matthew H. Edney (Project Director: April 2005 to October 2007)
History of Cartography [HOC]

The editing and final revision of the third of six projected volumes, CARTOGRAPHY IN THE EUROPEAN RENAISSANCE, which will trace the historiography of Renaissance cartography.

Project fields:
Geography

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$1,635,164 (approved)
$1,633,703 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1996 – 6/30/2007

Funding details:
Original grant (1996) $148,539
Supplement (1997) $50,000
Supplement (1998) $0
Supplement (2000) $332,450
Supplement (2001) $220,914
Supplement (2003) $347,800
Supplement (2004) $27,001
Supplement (2005) $306,999
Supplement (2006) $200,000


FD-22750-95

David Schaberg
UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
The Beginnings of Chinese Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Dissertation Grants

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$14,000 (approved)
$14,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1995 – 12/31/1995


FT-41926-95

Margot R. Winer
St. Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA 94575-2715)
Landscape, Text, and Power: Explorations in South African Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,750 (approved)
$4,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1996 – 7/31/1996


FJ-21276-94

Anne O. Fountain
San Jose State University (San Jose, CA 95192-0001)
Historiography of Jose Marti, 1895-1994

No project description available

Project fields:
Latin American Studies

Program:
Study Grants for College Teachers

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1994 – 6/30/1994


FS-22510-93

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Martin Stevens (Project Director: March 1992 to April 1994)
Chaucer in the 20th Century: Codicology, Historiography, Interpretation

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$117,471 (approved)
$108,845 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 9/30/1993


FS-22532-93

Regents of the University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)
Everett L. Zimmerman (Project Director: March 1992 to March 1994)
Eighteenth-Century Historiography and Fiction

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$77,919 (approved)
$77,919 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 9/30/1993


FI-25174-92

Andrew E. Costa
Trinity University (San Antonio, TX 78212-7201)
Models of Fortune in Renaissance Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,400 (approved)
$2,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 8/31/1992


FT-36689-92

Grant Hardy
Elmira College (Elmira, NY 14901-2099)
A Study of Ssu-ma Ch'ien's Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1992 – 9/30/1992


FA-30725-92

Alice A. Donohue
Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Studies in the Historiography of Classical Art

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$22,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 5/31/1993


FI-24524-91

Daniel R. Goodman
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Post-Newtonian British Natural Theology, ca. 1680-1720: A Critical Case Study of Kuhnian Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1991 – 8/31/1991


FT-35462-91

Paula A. Sanders
Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
The Medieval and Modern Historiography of the Fatimid State

No project description available

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,750 (approved)
$3,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1991 – 9/30/1991


FE-25995-91

Gabrielle M. Spiegel
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Romancing the Past: The Rise of Vernacular Prose Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1991 – 5/31/1992


RL-21705-91

Brendan Dooley
Institute For Advanced Study - Louis Bamberger And Mrs. Felix Fuld Fdn (Princeton, NJ 08540-4907)
Baroque Italy: Primary Sources

To support the translation of primary source readings from the Italian baroque on science, aesthetics, statecraft, and historiography.

Project fields:
Italian Language

Program:
Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$29,000 (approved)
$29,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1991 – 8/31/1992


RT-21212-91

Regents of the University of California, Irvine (Irvine, CA 92617-3066)
Theodore Brunner (Project Director: October 1989 to October 1995)
Thesaurus Linguae Graecae: Completion of Historiography, Lexicography, and Text Verification (TLG)

To support the expansion of the THESAURUS LINGUAE GRAECAE data bank to cover the addition of late Greek and Byzantine texts and scholia.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Reference Materials - Tools

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$430,309 (approved)
$419,630 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1990 – 6/30/1995


FT-33423-90

Michael Attyah Flower
Princeton University (Lancaster, PA 17603-2827)
Theopompus of Chios and 4th-Century Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Classical History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,500 (approved)
$3,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1990 – 9/30/1990


FA-29221-90

Thomas E. Postlewait
Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
The Criteria for Periodization in Theater History

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$23,010 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1990 – 12/31/1990


RX-20955-88

Trustees of Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
James A. W. Heffernan (Project Director: June 1987 to August 1990)
Conference on Representations of the French Revolution

To support an international conference that will analyze in an interdisciplinary way the different representations of the French Revolution through literature, art, and historiography.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; European History

Program:
Conferences

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$13,000 (approved)
$13,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1989 – 9/30/1989


GP-21439-88

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Robert M. Maniquis (Project Director: September 1987 to March 1992)
Humanities Program for the Bicentennial of the French Revolution

To support two lecture series, three symposia, and a touring film series on theFrench Revolution and its interpretations in historiography, literature, and film.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$275,903 (approved)
$275,901 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1988 – 5/31/1991


RL-21039-87

Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
Ehsan O. Yarshater (Project Director: June 1986 to September 1991)
Tabari Translation Project

To support the translation and annotation of al-Tabari's account of universal history to 915 A.D. This text is the most complete source on medieval Islamic thought and historiography.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$266,410 (approved)
$236,410 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1987 – 3/31/1991


FA-27466-87

Fred M. Donner
University of Chicago (Chicago, IL 60637-5418)
Early Arabic Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$27,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1987 – 6/30/1988


RX-20743-86

College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)
Deborah Boedeker (Project Director: September 1985 to October 1990)
Conference: Herodotus and the Invention of History

To support an international conference on Herodotus, which will focus on his position between the old world of oral tales and the new one of scientific historiography, examined in the light of recent scholarly developments.

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Conferences

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$10,178 (approved)
$10,178 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1986 – 8/31/1987


FI-20235-86

Timothy R. Hall
University of Vermont and State Agricultural College (Burlington, VT 05405-0160)
The Historiography of Hayden White: An Analysis of the Narrative and Literary Interpretations of History

No project description available

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1986 – 8/31/1986


FB-23840-86

Gary B. Miles
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Foundation and Refoundation: The Historiography of Titus Livius

No project description available

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$27,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1986 – 12/31/1986


FE-20862-86

Elton Daniel
University of Hawaii, Honolulu (Honolulu, HI 96822-2399)
Critical Analysis of Muslim Historiography

No project description available

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1986 – 7/31/1986


FS-21263-85

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
W. Roger Louis (Project Director: March 1984 to October 1990)
End of the British Empire

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$61,126 (approved)
$61,126 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 12/31/1985


FT-27182-85

Donald J. Wilcox
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
The Measurement of Time in Western Historiography before Newton

No project description available

Project fields:
Western Civilization

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1985 – 9/30/1985


FA-25082-85

Georg G. Iggers
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
History as a Scholarly Discipline in Germany 1760-1914

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$27,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1985 – 8/31/1986


FA-25282-85

John Van Seters
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350)
The Pentateuch and Ancient Historiography: The Yahwist as Historian