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PW-285095-22

Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)
Jessica Richard (Project Director: July 2021 to present)
Maria Edgeworth Letters

Planning for the creation of a fully searchable corpus of Maria Edgeworth’s letters through crowdsourced transcription, expert annotation, and TEI-encoding. Her letters are held at 26 libraries across the United States and United Kingdom, and this would be the first effort to unite them digitally.

The Maria Edgeworth Letters project provides open access to the thought and wide-ranging correspondence network of an extraordinary woman writing at the turn of the nineteenth century whose ideas on gender, race, religion, education, and science have important ramifications today. The grant would support the early stages of development of a digital edition of the letters of Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849), an Anglo-Irish novelist and educational theorist who was more famous in her day than Jane Austen. Her letters, held at archives around the world, have never been comprehensively edited or accessible; this digital project will gather the scattered letters and create their associated metadata, allowing for network and other analyses. This collaborative endeavor between four universities provides research and learning opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students and engages the public through the Zooniverse crowdsourcing initiative.

Project fields:
British Literature; Women's History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$58,005 (approved)
$58,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2024


BR-285415-22

Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-3102)
David Favaloro (Project Director: August 2021 to present)
The Joseph and Rachel Moore Tenement Home

Implementation of a sixty-minute guided tour and interactive media exploring the lives of African Americans and Irish immigrants in nineteenth-century New York City.

The Tenement Museum seeks a $400,000 Public Humanities Projects implementation grant to complete permanent exhibit fabrication and tour development for the “Joseph and Rachel Moore Tenement Home.” The new permanent exhibit takes the form of a recreated apartment in the Museum’s 97 Orchard Street tenement. Today a National Historic Landmark, the building was home to nearly 7,000 people from 15 different nations between 1863 and 1935. Now the Museum will recreate the tenement home of Joseph and Rachel Moore, a Black family who lived in Lower Manhattan during the 1860s. The exhibit will trace Joseph’s history from his free Black community of Belvidere, New Jersey, through his family's migration to New York City for economic opportunity, and the community they built in their neighborhoods and workplaces. It will also employ interactive digital storytelling to examine the era’s Black press, contextualizing both the Moores’ story and the Museum’s research.

Project fields:
African American History; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Historic Places: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 4/30/2023


FT-286068-22

Jill Colleen Bender
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Assisted Emigrants: Irish Female Migration Projects and the British Empire

Research and writing leading to a book on Irish female migration to Canada, Australia, and South Africa in the nineteenth-century. 

Assisted Emigrants examines state efforts to remove women from Irish workhouses and relocate them to British colonies in Australia, Canada, and South Africa. At the height of Ireland’s Great Famine, colonial officials advocated for assisted migration projects as a remedy for both the island’s catastrophic situation and the labor shortage plaguing Britain’s other colonies; young women from Ireland’s workhouses accounted for the majority of these emigrants. At the local level, however, commissioners frequently struggled to implement the plans, as some women refused to participate and colonial officials deemed others unfit. By exploring state-assisted female migration within an imperial context, this project highlights both the construction of power relations crucial to imperial control and also the role of Irish women in Britain’s imperial project.

Project fields:
British History; Immigration History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 7/31/2022


FT-286382-22

Christopher Piers Gillett
University of Scranton (Scranton, PA 18510-4501)
Catholicism and Revolution in the British World, 1630-1673

Research and writing leading to a book examining the influence of Catholics on liberty of conscience during the seventeenth century.

Scholars often describe liberty of conscience as an enduring legacy of the revolutionary upheavals in the mid-seventeenth-century British world, situating its emergence in a puritan context. My book, Catholicism and Revolution in the British World, 1630–1673, expands our understanding of these developments, by arguing that Catholics of various ethnicities residing in the British world — British, Irish, European, indigenous American, and Kongolese — contributed to these debates. Utilizing new archival evidence, I examine how Catholics used both colonial experimentation and revisions of the explicitly anti-papal Oath of Allegiance to try to secure liberty of conscience. But I also analyze how these projects had the unintended consequence of inspiring a competing revolutionary program — one that viewed Catholic toleration as a serious threat. My work reveals how global Catholicism informed political discourse that have been understood as quintessentially English and Protestant.

Project fields:
British History; History of Religion; History, Other

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 6/30/2022


FT-279180-21

Anne Blankenship
North Dakota State University (Fargo, ND 58102-1843)
Religion, Race, and Immigration: How American Jews, Catholics, and Protestants Faced Mass Immigration, 1882-1924

Writing two chapters on religious responses to immigration in the United States, 1882-1924.

This book will explore how Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant leaders and organizations faced the mass immigration to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century and the subsequent immigration restrictions that peaked with the National Origins Act of 1924. Protestants inspired by the social gospel fought for just immigration reform and established settlement houses to aid and Americanize new immigrants. Other Protestants joined groups to restrict immigration and promote white Protestant supremacy. The challenge of mass immigration was more complicated for Irish Catholic and German Jewish Americans. As established American citizens they revered many of the same cultural values as Protestants, and the habits and beliefs of their co-religionists from eastern and southern Europe threatened to destabilize the acceptance they had gained in a Protestant-dominated society. While most sought just immigration policies, they disagreed on how new immigrants should fit with American society.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Religion, General; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FT-270917-20

Ashley Wright
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Gender, Law and Colonial Rule in British India and Burma, 1858-1915

Research and writing leading to a book analyzing legal conflicts in colonial India and Burma that involved women displaced by the expansion of British imperial power between 1858 and World War I.

This project analyzes a series of legal conflicts in colonial India and Burma, occurring between the beginning of direct British rule in India in 1858 and the First World War. Each conflict involved the imperial regime and women who were, in different ways, displaced by the forces of empire: ‘orphans’ from an Irish Catholic military family in North India, a Bengali indentured labourer in Assam, ‘European’ barmaids working in Rangoon and Calcutta at the turn of the century, a Malay Muslim mother and daughter in Burma, and a Burmese woman married to a Chinese man in colonial Rangoon. In every case, the life circumstances of the woman or women involved in the conflict were shaped by the migrations that accompanied the expansion of British imperial power. I analyse these legal conflicts to show what each one reveals about the social world of the woman at its centre and about the nature of imperial governance in India and Burma.

Project fields:
British History; South Asian History; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/15/2021 – 7/15/2021


HAA-271718-20

East Carolina University (Greenville, NC 27858-5235)
Thomas Leslie Herron (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Castle to Classrooms: Developing an Irish Castle in Virtual Reality

The design and testing of teaching modules built in virtual reality for an existing 3-D digital model of Kilcolman Castle, Ireland, home of English poet, Edmund Spencer.

This Level II "Prototype" grant will adapt into Virtual Reality a digital 3-D model of an Irish castle for teaching purposes. Kilcolman Castle, now in ruins, was the adopted home of the early modern English poet and administrator Edmond Spenser (1552-1559). Spencer's career and famous writings, which often focus in controversial ways on his life as a plantation settler in Ireland, make the castle a fascinating subject of study. This grant will focus on Spenser's castle and writings through innovative undergraduate and high school teaching modules in history, architecture, archaeology, Irish studies and English literature. These modules with VR applications will highlight the artistic accomplishments of Spenser as well as the cultural diversity of the castle and its surroundings. Spenser's activity in Ireland is a crucial element in our understanding of the historic impact of colonial imperialism. The project will educate and appeal to both students and the general public alike.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Renaissance Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$93,121 (approved)
$86,740 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 6/30/2022


PY-263659-19

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Butte, MT 59701-9206)
Ellen Crain (Project Director: May 2018 to December 2021)
All Nations: Preserving the Ethnic Heritage of Butte, Montana

Four, two-day digitization workshops to collect local history materials from the Hispanic, German, Finnish, and Jewish communities of Butte, Montana.  The city has invested in the Butte-Silver Bow (BSB) Public Archives, since the public voted in favor of a $7.5 million bond issue to improve, expand, and modernize its archives in 2007.  The archives hosts a series of “All Nations” exhibits to honor the ethnic communities that have shaped the city’s history since its founding as a mining camp in the 1860s.  In partnership with the Montana Preservation Alliance, the workshops would combine digitization of cultural heritage materials with oral history collection and public programming, to include presentations by a local author and faculty from the University of Montana, Rocky Mountain College, and Montana State University.  The “All Nations” digital collection would be made available for research on the BSB Public Archives website.

All Nations: Preserving the Ethnic Heritage of Butte, Montana is a project to preserve and celebrate the heritage of ethnic communities that are important within the culture of the city's rich history. This grant will support staff of the Butte-Silver Bow Public Archives and the Montana Preservation Alliance to conduct outreach with the last four communities to join the project -- the Hispanic, German, Finnish and Jewish communities of the city. The Archives and MPA will lead a digitization workshop with each community to capture and preserve significant elements of their material culture. Work with all communities will result in digitized files of documents, artifacts, artwork, recordings and historic places materials that will be added to the widely accessible collections of Butte Silver Bow Public Archives, and serve as the basis for a 10-week exhibit on each community that draws people of the community together, and celebrates and promotes broader understandings of their heritage.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


FEL-262705-19

Dinyar Phiroze Patel
University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Shaking the Empire: Dadabhai Naoroji and the Birth of Indian Nationalism

Research and writing a biography of Indian politician Dadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917).

My book manuscript details the life of Dadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917), an Indian nationalist leader whose economic ideas transformed global anti-colonialism in the late Victorian era. Naoroji was the most significant Indian nationalist leader before Mahatma Gandhi. In 1892, he became the first-ever non-white elected to the British Parliament, from where he championed political reform for India. By developing the “drain of wealth” theory, Naoroji rubbished claims of colonial benevolence and instead demonstrated how British rule was responsible for a spate of deadly famines that killed millions of Indians in the nineteenth century. My book will be the first comprehensive study of Naoroji’s career. It situates Naoroji as a global leader, someone with a conscious commitment towards broader emancipatory politics worldwide. Consequently, my study reorients our understanding of how modern politics emerged in India, emphasizing its uniquely cosmopolitan foundations.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Intellectual History; Political History; South Asian History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2019 – 4/30/2020


FEL-262924-19

Sarah Elizabeth McKibben
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Tradition Transformed: Bardic Poetry and Colonialism in Early Modern Ireland, c.1560-1660

Completion of a book-length study on Irish bardic poetry and British colonialism in Early Modern Ireland.

This project offers a sequence of historicized close readings of early modern Irish bardic poems that confront epochal social change with political savvy, pathos and wit. Long the high-status defenders of native norms, Ireland’s bardic master-poets became targets of the aggrandizing Tudor-Stuart state, joining their lords in insurgency or strategic accommodation. The resulting creative ferment—the grimmer, Irish version of the Renaissance—drew upon deep intellectual roots to formulate a complex response to the unfolding colonial cataclysm that vindicated traditional learning, defended Irish civility and critiqued English impositions, thus remaking bardic tradition. Once represented as stubbornly resistant to change and oblivious to larger political transformation, still rarely included in mainstream discussions of early modern Ireland, bardic poets emerge as both compelling change agents and tradition bearers whose voices critically define this dramatic period in Irish history.

Project fields:
British Literature; Literature, Other

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2020 – 6/30/2021


FT-264461-19

Jason Knirck
Central Washington University (Ellensburg, WA 98926-7500)
Learning Democracy: Political Opposition in the Irish Free State

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the history of parliamentary opposition in the Irish Free State (1922-1937).

This project studies the development of parliamentary opposition in the Irish Free State. The normalizing of such opposition is a crucial aspect of the success of any democracy and Ireland had no traditions or notions of a loyal parliamentary opposition when the Free State was created. The major Irish pre-revolutionary party sought to leave the Westminster parliament via Home Rule and often used obstructionist tactics to achieve that end. The revolution had placed a premium on unity and the post-revolutionary division of Irish politics into parties was often depicted as a deplorable fall—motivated by base desires such as greed or ambition—from the previous state of revolutionary unity. In addition, those hostile to the revolutionary settlement took up arms against the new Irish parliament and initially abstained from it. The development of notions of opposition in the face of these many obstacles proved a key factor in explaining the ultimate perseverance of democracy in Ireland.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; Political History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


RQ-260882-18

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Andrew Kuster (Project Director: December 2017 to present)
Music of the United States of America (MUSA)

Preparation for publication of five volumes in the series Music of the United States of America. (36 months)

Music of the United States of America (MUSA) is a series of scholarly editions of music that aims to represent the depth and diversity of our nation’s heritage by publishing musical works of exemplary artistic quality and historical significance, targeting scholars, performers, students, and the general public. MUSA seeks to expand the art of critical editing beyond classical concert music to include new genres and styles previously unaddressed by the discipline, including music created by women and minorities, and other composers historically excluded from academic research. MUSA is a project of the American Musicological Society (AMS), the premier organization in the United States devoted to musical scholarship, and is guided by its Committee on the Publication of American Music (COPAM), which serves as MUSA’s editorial board. Each MUSA edition is exhaustively researched by expert Volume Editors and typically is newly engraved by the award-winning music publisher A-R Editions.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$251,000 (approved)
$251,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 2/28/2022


FT-259830-18

Sean Michael Farrell
Northern Illinois University (DeKalb, IL 60115-2828)
The Trillick Railway Outrage: Making Sectarianism in Victorian Ireland

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on religious conflict in 19th century Ireland.

This book examines an 1854 assassination attempt in northwestern Ireland. One of the world’s first “train wreckings,” Trillick received widespread newspaper coverage. Commentators assumed this was a sectarian crime, and seven Catholic railway workers were arrested soon after the crash. Despite their best efforts, officials determined there was insufficient evidence to go to trial and released the men, who quickly left the region, disappearing into Ireland’s global diaspora. The first book-length study of this dramatic event, my work highlights the constructed nature of Catholic-Protestant division in nineteenth-century Ireland. I do this by focusing on the ways that Trillick impacted four individuals linked to the crash. This microhistorical approach is designed to detail the ways that sectarian narratives conceal the complexity of human experience. This Irish story has obvious contemporary relevance, given the prevalence of religious violence in divided societies around the world.

Project fields:
Cultural History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2018 – 9/30/2018


HB-251199-17

Robin Runia
Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125-1056)
Displaced Britons: Africans and Creoles in the Work of British Author Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on the Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) and her views of race and national identity.

With this reduction from my teaching load, I will complete research and write new material on Maria Edgeworth’s plays, Whim for Whim (1798) and The Two Guardians (1817). This work will comprise two chapters of the monograph, Displaced Britons. The completion of these chapters and the revision of the entire manuscript for publication submission contributes to current efforts to develop a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of race in the Atlantic world. Specifically, this project offers close and historically contextualized readings of dramatic and fictional works by the late eighteenth- early nineteenth-century Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth. Its purpose is to introduce some of Edgeworth’s largely neglected works and to correct previous and partial interpretations of some of her more well-known writing. By focusing on works that depict the practice and consequences of the British slave trade in Jamaica, this book argues that Edgeworth offers a model of inclusive national identity regardless of race.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$37,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


AK-255350-17

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
James W. Malazita (Project Director: October 2016 to May 2022)
Rebecca Rouse (Co Project Director: March 2017 to May 2022)
Building a Humanities Minor: Construction and Critique in Digital Technology

A two-year interdisciplinary faculty project to develop a four-course minor that integrates critical humanities analysis with applied computer science.

This proposal develops a new, 4-course minor titled "alt.code," to be housed in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. The goal of the project is to develop a humanities curricula that leverages the techno-centric passions of both Humanities and STEM students in our Engineering-Centered Institution, while also providing those students with a critical lens to historicize, contextualize, and deconstruct the roles, values, and histories of digital technology.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Humanities Connections

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$64,670 (approved)
$44,805 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


HZ-254255-17

Syracuse University (Syracuse, NY 13244-0001)
Alice Randel Pfeiffer (Project Director: September 2016 to February 2022)
Humanities Open Book Program-Syracuse University Press

Digitization and creation of freely accessible ebooks for 23 titles originally published by Syracuse University Press in Irish studies and New York State regional studies.

In preparing to celebrate its 75th anniversary, Syracuse University Press seeks support through the joint NEH-Mellon Humanities Open Book program to digitize and make openly accessible electronic versions of approximately 23 important out-of-print humanities books from select areas of its editorial program. We will use this funding to research the books’ provenance and current rights status; to digitize and convert them to EPUB, Mobi, XML, and PDF formats; and to work with Syracuse University Libraries and Project MUSE, among other partners, to publicize and make them readily discoverable and available on any e-reading device to the general public and to a global community of students and scholars.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Literary Criticism; Native American Studies; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Humanities Open Book Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$58,291 (approved)
$58,291 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 3/31/2019


FZ-256501-17

Heather Lenore Clark
CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
The Light of the Mind: A Biography of American Poet and Novelist Sylvia Plath (1932-1963)

A biography of American poet and novelist Sylvia Plath (1932-1963) that emphasizes her literary development and her important place in American letters.

I am writing a biography of the American poet and novelist Sylvia Plath (1932-1963). Although several biographies have been published since her death in 1963, a definitive, critical biography of America's best-known, 20th-century woman poet still does not exist. Because biographies of Plath tend to be inaccurate and sensationalist, there is a need for an in-depth, meticulously researched biography that resists caricature and helps restore Plath to the prominent place she deserves in American letters. Sylvia Plath: The Light of the Mind will recover Plath the writer.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018


HT-251006-16

Folger Shakespeare Library admin by Trustees of Amherst College (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Edwin Williams (Project Director: March 2016 to November 2019)
Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis (EMDA2017)" institute

A two-week summer institute and follow-up workshop for 12 participants to explore network analysis approaches to early modern studies. The institute would be hosted at the Folger Shakespeare Library with a variety of visiting experts.

The Folger Institute proposes to host a two-week institute on “Early Modern Digital Agendas: Network Analysis” in summer 2017 (EMDA2017). Under the direction of Professor Jonathan Hope and Dr. Ruth Ahnert, this institute will introduce humanities scholars, alt-ac builders, and librarians (both digital and traditional) to an expert visiting faculty—computing specialists, social historians, network analysts, literary historians, linguists, and visualization designers—to model best practices for the design and implementation of quantitative network analysis. EMDA2017 will be an opportunity for 12 scholarly practitioners to consider the ways this approach may be shaping the very nature of early modern research through intensive application and analysis.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 9/30/2018


FA-232786-16

Breandán Mac Suibhne
Centenary College (Hackettstown, NJ 07840-2184)
At the Famine Pot: A Whispered History of Ireland's Great Hunger, 1845-1851

Preparation of a book length study of the various ways the poor experienced and responded to the Irish Famine (1845-1851).

Studies of Ireland’s Great Famine (1845–51) have been burdened by a preoccupation with what was done to and for the poor—by the state, landlords and charities. Here, innovative recent writing on the Famine (and famine generally) informs a new approach, which directs attention to what the poor did to and for each other. Hence, the focus is on a) agency—protests by the poor, and practical self-help endeavors; b) poor-on-poor violence, theft, the unequal allocation of food within families, and also cannibalism; c) accommodation, including 'souperism,' conversion to obtain food from evangelicals; and d) exploitation of the poor by people who were not themselves much better off. Central to the book are accounts of the Famine collected from survivors and their children. As such, it is a 'whispered history,' attentive to that of which the poor spoke, albeit quietly, and it bears comparison to recent work on China’s Great Famine (Zhou Xun) and reflections on ethics in extremis (Primo Levi).

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Economic History; European History; Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2016 – 8/31/2017


PY-234437-16

Holyoke Public Library Corporation Incorporated (Holyoke, MA 01040-4858)
Eileen M. Crosby (Project Director: June 2015 to October 2021)
Nuestros Senderos: Las Historias de Nuestras Vidas en Holyoke [Our Paths: Stories of Life in Holyoke]

Two day-long digitization events in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods of Holyoke, Massachusetts, to digitize cultural heritage materials held by members of the Latino community. The applicant would target community organizations and elders, and would hire both a short-term outreach consultant and a bilingual outreach assistant. Digitized materials from the digitization days would be made available to the public with donor permission through Massachusetts’ Digital Commonwealth portal. At a public program event following the digitization days, speakers from Hunter College’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies and the University of Puerto Rico would present on Puerto Rican and Latino history in the United States and Holyoke. Displays created by community members illustrating their experiences and incorporating digitized materials from the digitization days would also be included in the public programming. In addition, oral histories would be gathered at the public program event, and attendees would have the opportunity to make written contributions to a collection that would be preserved in the History Room of Holyoke Public Library.

The history and culture of Holyoke, Massachusetts, are marked by its role as the destination of people seeking new opportunities. While many Irish, Polish, and Canadian immigrant family stories are preserved at our library, those of Holyoke's numerous families of Hispanic heritage (nearly 50% of the current population) have never been systematically gathered or preserved. This project, “Nuestros senderos: Las historias de nuestras vidas en Holyoke [Our Paths: Stories of life in Holyoke],” aims to begin to rectify that omission by reaching out to community members of Hispanic origin and inviting them to share their family histories through photographs and documents at digitization events, by partnering with local cultural organizations to promote these events and to identify cultural heritage materials in their possession, and by sponsoring a set of talks by scholars that will place the experience of migration to Holyoke in historical context.

Project fields:
Latino History; Public History; Urban History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2018


FA-233245-16

Amy C. Mulligan
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
A Landscape of Words: Ireland, Britain, and the Poetics of Irish Space, 700-1300

A book-length study on how topography in medieval Irish literature reflects authors' responses to events that threatened Irish land, sovereignty, and language.

Ireland is the only medieval European nation that formalized a distinct and substantive genre of “place-lore,” yet medieval Irish spatial discourses have received virtually no attention.  My project is the first to consider the full range of Ireland's medieval topographical literature (Latin and Irish, 700-1300), written by Irish and British authors, and to identify a unique Irish poetics of space and place. Through topographical discourses, the Irish disseminated a story of themselves as a unified people and ultimately, a nation; writers in Britain, from Anglo-Saxon Bede to the colonizing Cambro-Norman Giraldus Cambrensis, also relied on a poetics of Irish place to define Britain and English identity.  Situated in different linguistic, textual, and national traditions, the several discourses on medieval Ireland and its geography have rarely been linked in scholarly conversations; my study fills this critical gap by analyzing Irish geospatial writing from multiple periods and perspectives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature; Comparative Literature; Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FT-229215-15

Cian T. McMahon
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (Las Vegas, NV 89154-9900)
The Coffin Ship: Irish Migration, Mortality, and Memory in Global Perspective, 1845-1855

Summer research and writing on European, Immigration, and U.S. History.

In Irish America's rogue gallery of oppressive technologies, the "coffin ship" enjoys pride of place. Folklorists and grandmothers alike agree on the basic outline of that "miserable epic" yet few academics have tackled the subject. My goal is to reevaluate this timeworn symbol from a transnational perspective through archival research. Mid-nineteenth-century migrants traveled on a global shipping network designed, built, and operated in the service of modern capitalism. Using the Famine-era Irish as a case study, The Coffin Ship examines the ways in which migrants negotiated, and even shaped, this world system. This project has appeal for scholars and general audiences across the humanities. A critical phase in the history of globalization pivoted on the process of human migration, yet there exists no close study of the instrument that lay at its Irish heart. The Coffin Ship offers a new perspective on the history of mass migration: from the decks of the ships themselves.

Project fields:
European History; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 6/30/2015


PG-52456-15

Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)
Tanya Zanish-Belcher (Project Director: May 2014 to September 2016)
Facilities and Storage Assessment for Special Collections and Archives in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library

A preservation assessment of the library’s archives and special collections, with particular attention to its storage facilities.  Materials include 11,000 linear feet of historical records and manuscripts along with 70,000 rare books, with particular strengths in Irish, modernist, and African American literature.  Sources include papers of author, poet, and Civil Rights activist Maya Angelou, who taught at Wake Forest from 1982 to 2011, along with records of several North Carolina Baptist churches and associated worldwide missionary efforts.

This NEH Preservation Grant will hire a facilities consultant, Tom Wilsted. He will conduct an assessment of the physical facilities and issues relating to preservation and security for Special Collections and Archives in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University. At this point in time, the storage facilities are substandard, lacking climate control, possessing antiquated and inadequate shelving, poorly enclosed spaces, and lack security and fire suppression. The consultant will provide recommendations based on archival standards for storage. Fundraising is currently underway for the renovation of the Department’s public spaces, and this is an opportune time to examine the spaces housing the Department’s collections, to consider how they interact with new public spaces, and how they can also be renovated and improved.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,400 (approved)
$5,304 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


RQ-230555-15

Penn State (University Park, PA 16802-1503)
Sandra W. Spanier (Project Director: December 2014 to March 2022)
The Letters of Ernest Hemingway

The preparation for print publication of volumes 3-5 of a projected 17-volume edition of American author Ernest Hemingway's complete letters. (36 months)

The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, being published by Cambridge University Press, is a comprehensive scholarly edition of the some 6,000 surviving letters of Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), about 85% previously unpublished. Winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize in Literature, Hemingway made a profound impact on modern prose. His life and work still command enormous popular as well as scholarly interest worldwide. The letters not only provide important new biographical information and insights into the artistic achievement of this most influential American writer, they constitute a running eyewitness history of much of the twentieth century. The edition is planned for publication in 17 volumes at two-year intervals. Volumes 1 and 2 (spanning 1907-1925) were published in 2011 and 2013. The Project is requesting three-year funding (October 2015-September 2018) to see into print volumes 3 and 4 and complete the manuscript of volume 5, encompassing Hemingway's letters from 1926 through 1934.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$225,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 9/30/2018


ES-231140-15

Immaculata University (Immaculata, PA 19345-9903)
William Watson (Project Director: February 2015 to April 2017)
Duffy's Cut: Immigration, Industrialization, and Illness in Nineteenth Century America

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on Irish immigration, public health, and nativism in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The proposed summer institute for middle and high school teachers will be held on July 11 – July 29, 2016, at Immaculata University in suburban Philadelphia. The three week Institute will examine the tragic events that occurred at Duffy’s Cut in 1832 in which fifty-seven Irish immigrant railroad workers lost their lives as a result of violence and disease. This historical event encompasses several enduring themes, including immigration and nativism, industrialization, and epidemic disease. Participants will examine these timely issues not only as they apply to the events of Duffy’s Cut but also as they relate to today’s changing demographics and the cultural, economic, and political divide that exists between immigrants and natives in the 21st century. The Institute will investigate the importance of the humanities in understanding contemporary issues in America and will serve as a model for teachers on how to incorporate the arts and sciences into the teaching of history.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Institutes for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$158,201 (approved)
$151,224 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


PG-52501-15

Old Merchants House of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10003-7003)
Margaret Halsey Gardiner (Project Director: May 2014 to September 2016)
Collections Preservation with Light Protection at Merchant's House Museum

The purchase and installation of ultraviolet light filtering shades to protect the furnishings of the Merchant’s House Museum, built in 1832 and purchased by wealthy merchant Seabury Tredwell (1780-1865) in 1835.  The museum’s 3,000-object collection contains furnishings dating from 1830 to 1860, including 12 side chairs attributed to designer Duncan Phyfe; a textile collection of over 800 items including dresses, unfinished quilts, needlework panels, dress alterations, and sewing accessories; a circa 1845 Pianoforte made by Nuns and Fischer of New York; and a fine art collection of engravings, paintings, and photographs of the Tredwell family and friends.  The museum also holds the Tredwell Family archives, including correspondence, legal documents, albums, scrapbooks, and schoolbooks created by the Tredwell family and their relatives and friends.  The collections are used for educational programs, including lectures in the 19th-Century Lifeways series on topics related to 19th-century New York, such as the Yellow Fever epidemic, the Irish immigrant experience, and the New York Draft Riots.

As the only family home in NYC to survive virtually intact from the 19th century and filled with a collection of materials of direct Tredwell provenance, the Merchant’s House Museum offers a rare glimpse into the domestic life of the mercantile class in mid-19th century New York that is unparalleled in its authenticity. The furnishings, decorative arts, fine arts, textiles, books and documents allow the Museum to present many humanities-rich topics through educational programs, exhibitions, publications, and period room interpretation. The Museum is seeking a grant of $5,228 for the purchase and installation of UV shades. The goals of the project are to guarantee the long-term preservation of this important collection and further along our preservation efforts.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,228 (approved)
$5,228 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 6/30/2016


FA-57954-14

Barbara Haggh-Huglo
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Of Abbeys and Aldermen: Music in Ghent to 1559

In a three-part book, the first comprehensive study of music in pre-modern Ghent, I demonstrate that profound changes in European history occurred with unusual intensity there, with music an essential ingredient. A first part on the two Benedictine abbeys traces their music from Carolingian reforms to the adoption of the Roman liturgy at St. Bavo's, transformed into a cathedral. A second part assesses hundreds of records of benefactions for music in the virtually complete run of Ghent city council registers, with analyses of benefactors, their musical preferences, locations of performance, performers, and cost, and statistics showing the rise and fall in use of different music. This nearly complete reconstruction of church music in late medieval Ghent will be made freely available as an online interactive database. Part three describes the "soundscape" of the city's churches and streets, using local music identified in manuscripts or through archives.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval History; Music History and Criticism; Renaissance History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 5/31/2016


HJ-50173-14

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Peter K. Bol (Project Director: May 2013 to May 2017)
Automating Data Extraction from Chinese Texts

The development of the Automating Data Extraction from Chinese Texts platform to allow scholars to transform texts written in classical Chinese into highly structured data suitable for the application of text mining techniques. The project is led by humanities scholars and computer scientists from Harvard University (US) and King's College, London (UK) with additional expertise provided by scholars from National Taiwan University and Academia Sinica, Taiwan. The UK partner is requesting £125,000 from the UK funding consortium.

The Automating Data Extraction from Chinese Texts Project aims to provide humanists and social scientists with a means of transforming 2200 years of Chinese texts into structured data. The project will fully develop an open-source platform that allows its users to apply sophisticated text-mining techniques, hitherto the domain of information scientists, to a wide variety of historical and literary texts. Users interested in biographical data, for example, will be able to tag and extract personal names, dates, place names, official titles and postings, kinship ties, and other social relationships. The platform will be tested against 2000 local histories spanning an 800-year period and 19,000 letters and 500 notebooks dating from the seventh through the thirteenth century. Data extracted from the sample repositories will be used to enrich text-mining applications and will also be made available in English and Chinese for research through open-access online databases and data archives.

[White paper][Grant products]

Project fields:
Computer Science; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Digging into Data

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$125,000 (approved)
$125,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2014 – 1/31/2017


PF-50437-14

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Julie E. Arnott (Project Director: December 2013 to December 2015)
Liz Dube (Project Director: December 2015 to December 2016)
University of Notre Dame, Rare Books and Special Collections, Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

A planning grant to address significant environmental factors--in particular, an aging HVAC system--that pose a threat to the applicant's Rare Books and Special Collections, which contain 175,000 volumes of printed books and periodicals dating from the 15th century to the present with topical strengths in Catholic Church history and theology, Irish Studies, Latin American Studies, Italian literature, and sports history.

The University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries requests $50,000 to develop a plan to address significant environmental factors posing a threat to the long-term preservation of its Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). The Collections are housed in a dedicated underground vault area. The HVAC system that serves RBSC is original to the fifty-year old building and is not purpose-designed to serve the space: the zoning does not appropriately isolate work and collection storage. The heating, ventilating and cooling (HVAC) infrastructure is unable to meet the preservation needs of the collections and struggles to maintain even the broadest range of tolerances with respect to temperature and relative humidity (RH). The collaborative project team includes eight Notre Dame staff from the Libraries, Facilities, Utilities and the Office of Sustainability. This team will work closely with two environmental specialists from the Image Permanence Institute.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Italian Literature; Medieval History; U.S. History

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$48,711 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 6/30/2016


FS-50390-14

CSU, Bakersfiled (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Charles William MacQuarrie (Project Director: March 2014 to May 2016)
The Irish Sea Cultural Province: Crossroads of Medieval Literature and Languages

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty to study the cultural and linguistic confluence of five distinct but related populations of the medieval British Isles.

The purpose of this five-week NEH summer seminar for college and university teachers is to provide participants with a rich and detailed scholarly experience and discussion of the linguistic and cultural confluence which characterizes the British Isles, Man, and Ireland (the Irish Sea cultural province) in the Middle Ages. The five-week seminar is designed to balance scholarship and field experience; we will explore important archaeological material that is challenging to access and interpret, and also face the considerable linguistic and literary challenges of texts from five distinct but related cultures and languages. We will explore too the fraught civility within this multi-cultural nexus, and the dynamic, especially as it is expressed in the literature, both between cultures and within particular cultures to prevent blood feud and vengeance from reducing provisional peace and order to bloodshed and destabilization.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,260 (approved)
$149,260 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


RZ-51635-13

Claudia Jensen
University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)
The Russian Court Theater in the Late 17th Century and its Context in Trans-national Information Exchange

Research, writing, and preparation for print and e-book publication of a volume of essays, journal articles, and conference papers relating to diplomacy and theater in 17th-century Russia. (36 months)

Why did the Russian tsar create a court theater in 1672? In order to answer this, we turn to sources that have rarely been used in the study of early Russian culture: newspapers and diplomatic reports. As our work shows, the origins of Russia’s theater are embedded in the communications revolution that took place throughout Europe in the 17th century. Our project makes important contributions not only to theatrical history, but also to broader historical issues. These include gender (the roles of the Russian royal women); the relationship between official diplomatic channels and the newspaper presses of the West; and communications and information exchange between Russian and Western diplomatic networks. Finally, in revealing the true origins of Russian theater in the 17th century, our work makes important contributions to the debates about “Westernization” in Russia, and the extent to which this pre-dates the well-known reforms of Peter the Great, beginning in the 18th century.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$290,000 (approved)
$289,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2017


RA-50129-13

Library Company of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5679)
John C. Van Horne (Project Director: August 2012 to April 2015)
Richard S. Newman (Project Director: April 2015 to June 2021)
Emily Guthrie (Project Director: June 2021 to September 2021)
NEH Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Library Company of Philadelphia

Fourteen months of stipend support (2 to 3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The Library Company of Philadelphia seeks a grant of $249,300 to fund up to 18 post-doctoral fellowship months each of three years. In 1987 the Library Company established a fellowship program, which now has more than 600 "alumni." Fellowship opportunities each year include about three dozen one-month grants; several long-term post-doctoral and dissertation fellowships through the Library Company's Program in Early American Economy and Society; long-term dissertation fellowships endowed by a local foundation; and several long-term post-doctoral fellowships funded by a FPIRI grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Our residential research center in a renovated historic townhouse adjacent to our main building provides the kinds of facilities and amenities needed to support long-term NEH fellows and sustain a community of scholars. Our very positive experience with the previous NEH Fellows encourages us to apply for continued funding of this invaluable program.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$198,900 (approved)
$188,073 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2017


PJ-50116-13

Connecticut State Library (Hartford, CT 06106-1569)
Jane F. Cullinane (Project Director: January 2013 to July 2019)
Gail Hurley (Project Director: July 2019 to September 2021)
Anna Newman (Project Director: September 2021 to present)
Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project

Digitization of 100,000 pages of Connecticut newspapers, dating from 1836 to 1922, as part of the state's participation in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).

From 2019-2021, the CT State Library will digitize an additional 110,000 pages of newspapers, with the support of the CT and Litchfield historical societies, Yale Univ., Bridgeport and Putnam libraries, who will lend film. We request $263,921 from NEH and will contribute 35.6% in cost share. The Advisory Board would like to select newspapers from the early 19th century and 1930-40 and will narrow the choices after the film is inspected and copyright checked. The Board includes 2 historians, an academic/journalist, state archivist, librarian, educator, and humanities representative and will not consider their own research interests but the wider needs of the project. Staff will follow LOC’s Technical Guidelines for quality review and deliver digital files, metadata, updated MARC records and duplicate negatives to LOC for access in Chronicling America and will do outreach to new and established audiences.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Library Science

Program:
National Digital Newspaper Program

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$1,399,009 (approved)
$1,251,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2013 – 8/31/2023

Funding details:
Original grant (2013) $274,034
Supplement (2015) $250,000
Supplement (2017) $320,536
Supplement (2019) $258,711
Supplement (2021) $147,734


RQ-50627-12

Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)
James Woolley (Project Director: December 2011 to March 2022)
Jonathan Swift's Poems: A New Scholarly Edition and Online Archive

The preparation for print and online editions of the complete poems of the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), and of a digital archive of ancillary works. (36 months)

We propose to complete a four-volume edition of Jonathan Swift's poems and to mount the first stage of a complementary online archive. Not since 1937 have Swift's poems received full scholarly editing. That edition gives a misleading, incomplete idea of what Swift wrote, and its annotations are entirely inadequate. Our edition will accurately present all of Swift's poems, excluding spurious accretions while adding recently discovered authentic pieces. Our digital archive will present fully searchable and downloadable texts of all poems in the printed edition as well as ancillary poems that the printed edition cannot accommodate. Our edition will be the first to take account of every known eighteenth-century printed and manuscript text of every poem. Swift's poems, in addition to their literary interest, are primary sources for scholars working on eighteenth-century British or Irish economics, politics, history, and religion.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$225,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2015


PG-51717-12

Asheville Art Museum Association, Inc. (Asheville, NC 28801-3521)
Frank Thomson (Project Director: May 2011 to March 2014)
Environmental Monitoring Systems to Preserve Art and Archival Collections

The purchase and installation of environmental monitoring equipment for a collection of 3,060 works of art that includes American paintings and prints of the 20th and 21st centuries as well as art and crafts documenting the diverse cultural heritage of western North Carolina: Cherokee, German and Scotch-Irish, and African American. The museum also holds nearly 5,000 drawings of the Asheville Architecture Archives.

The Museum currently holds 3,060 works of art in all media and 4,905 architectural drawings. The Museum’s collections represent the unique diversity of cultures and movements that have influenced Western North Carolina and beyond. The Museum’s role is to research, collect and explore the artifacts of these traditions through innovative exhibitions and public educational programs. By developing exhibitions and programs for its patrons, the Museum educates audiences of all ages, explores aesthetic and cultural issues and integrates the arts and humanities into everyday life. In order for the Museum to properly monitor humidity, temperature and lighting conditions and protect these significant exhibited and stored works, the Museum requests $4,839 to support the purchase of new environmental monitoring systems for the Museum’s collections and galleries, including 10 PEM2 dataloggers, associated software, one PEM2 flash drive, one ELSEC 764 Environmental Monitor and all shipping costs.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,839 (approved)
$4,839 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 1/31/2014


FV-50353-12

CSU, Bakersfiled (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Charles William MacQuarrie (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
The Irish Sea Cultural Province: Crossroads of Medieval Literature and Languages

A four-week seminar in Britain for sixteen school teachers to explore the cultural, literary, and linguistic diversity of the British Isles in the Middle Ages.

The purpose of this four-week NEH summer seminar for school teachers is to provide participants with an enriched appreciation for the linguistic and cultural confluence which characterizes the British Isles (the Irish Sea cultural province) in the Middle Ages. While early British literature and culture is sometimes thought to be exclusively Anglo-Saxon, the entire region was, in fact, rich in cultural and linguistic diversity. In this seminar we will focus on the extent and the significance of this linguistic, cultural, and physical multiplicity as we explore conflict and resolution among Briton, Saxon, Gaelic, Norse, and Latinate culture. There will be brief introductions to the languages and manuscripts of the medieval texts we will be reading, but all the texts, except the Middle English Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, will be read in translation.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$128,000 (approved)
$121,861 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 9/30/2013


FB-56142-12

Henry Hart
College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
Irish Poet Seamus Heaney (b. 1939): A Critical Biography

I am currently writing a critical biography of the Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet Seamus Heaney. Although numerous scholarly books exist about Heaney, there is no substantial biography. Over the past three years, I have completed research at the Special Collections library at Emory University, which purchased over 50 linear feet of Heaney's letters and manuscripts. I have also corresponded with a number of his friends and former teachers and colleagues in Ireland, England, and the U.S. My book focuses on the way Heaney has addressed socio-political conflicts in Northern Ireland--the country where he grew up--and how he has worked, both in his life and in his writing, to reconcile violently opposed factions. I explain how he has conferred universal significance on the themes of conflict and reconciliation by representing his region with great poetic skill. So far I have written 440 pages of a rough draft that covers Heaney's career up to 1990.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013


BH-50492-12

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. This workshop focuses on Lowell, Massachusetts, the first planned industrial city in the United States, as a means to study changes in work, economics, society, culture, and the environment that occurred between 1820 and 1860. To address the key themes that a study of Lowell invites, Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context, Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system, Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) discusses the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy, Gray Fitzsimons (GGF Historical Consultants) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French Canadian immigrants, Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order, Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century, and Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. Participants directly examine Lowell's rich historic fabric such as the Suffolk Mill, the Boott Cotton Mill and Boarding House, and other mill sites along the Merrimack and Concord Rivers. Site visits to Old Sturbridge Village and the town of Concord put the industrial developments in a wider context. In addition to readings by workshop scholars, the participants read selections by historians Thomas Dublin, Patrick Malone, and Brian Mitchell; the period literature of Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and the writings of young women who worked in the mills. The university provides online support through Blackboard, and teachers develop lesson plans, the best of which are posted on the workshop's website.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,861 (approved)
$177,182 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 6/30/2014

Funding details:
Original grant (2012) $169,430
Supplement (2013) $7,752


RA-50107-12

National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-0152)
Geoffrey Galt Harpham (Project Director: August 2011 to November 2012)
Elizabeth C. Mansfield (Project Director: November 2012 to October 2016)
Fellowships at the National Humanities Center

Four nine-month fellowships a year for three years at the National Humanities Center. Grant funds support fellows' stipends and help defray expenses related to the process of selecting fellows.

The National Humanities Center requests support for fellowships for advanced study in the humanities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$473,400 (approved)
$473,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2016


FT-58542-11

Oliver Michael Hennessey
Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA 70125-1056)
W. B. Yeats and the Appropriation of Shakespeare in the Context of the Irish Literary Revival

This project is a continuation of my Ph.D. dissertation; the final product will be a book I have tentatively titled "Making Yeats-speare: Culture, Politics, Magic." Yeats was the most significant of the group of writers comprising the "Irish Literary Revival," a cultural nationalist movement centered in Dublin, Ireland, at the turn of the twentieth century. The goal of this group was to revive indigenous Irish literature, which had been suppressed over centuries of British rule. My project studies Yeats' contribution to this movement, and specifically his paradoxical use of Shakespeare, that most "British" of literary icons. This under-researched area is of vital interest to literary historians and Shakespeareans, since it analyzes the strategies that writers from oppressed nations develop to subvert and appropriate the cultural capital of colonial powers. Yeats used Shakespeare as a model for his revival of an Irish national drama and even claimed that "the bard" was really Irish.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 7/31/2011


FS-50279-11

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Joseph E. Bristow (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
Oscar Wilde and His Circle

A five-week seminar for sixteen college and university faculty members to explore the life, work, and cultural milieu of Oscar Wilde.

"Oscar Wilde and His Circle" is a five-week summer seminar that allows participants to explore the life and work of Oscar Wilde in relation to the largest archive devoted to this legendary Irish writer in the world. The archive, which is also titled "Oscar Wilde and His Circle", is housed at UCLA's William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. The seminar aims to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of the development of Wilde's often lively career from his time as a gifted undergraduate at Oxford to his post-prison exile in France and Italy. Particular attention will be paid to manuscript and archival sources that throw unique light not only on his literary writings but also such events as his widely publicized year-long lecture tour of Canada and the United States in 1882. Especially significant is the experience participants will acquire in using the resources of a major rare book library when conducting advanced research in the humanities.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$136,856 (approved)
$136,502 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 9/30/2012


RQ-50550-11

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Richard Crawford (Project Director: November 2010 to December 2014)
MUSA (Music of the United States of America)

Preparation for publication of volumes 24-28 in the Music of the United States of America series, and editorial work on one additional volume. (36 months)

Applying the principles of critical editing to a variety of American idioms, including jazz, psalmody, popular song, nineteenth and twentieth-century symphonic and chamber music, art song, Native American ceremony, and the Broadway show, MUSA (Music of the United States of America) is devoted to expanding the legacy of American music available for study and performance. MUSA is publishing a 40-volume series of scholarly editions of American music. In addition to musical notation, each volume includes a substantial essay and a critical editorial apparatus. By bringing notated music and scholarly interpretation together in the same volume, each MUSA volume seeks to place the sounds of music making in the United States within the context of the nation's cultural life. Founded in 1988, MUSA is a collaborative venture administered by the American Musicological Society through its Committee on the Publication of American Music (COPAM) and is published by A-R Editions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$135,000 (approved)
$135,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2014


RQ-50566-11

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Lois More Overbeck (Project Director: November 2010 to May 2017)
The Letters of Samuel Beckett

Completion of editing of Volume III and IV of a four volume critical edition and preparation of a one volume edition for a general audience. (36 months)

This selected edition is the first comprehensive collection and contextual presentation of the letters of Irish-born writer and world-playwright Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) whose work is held in the highest esteem by a large, diverse, and international audience. Pivotal for scholarship in the humanities, The Letters of Samuel Beckett published by Cambridge University Press will enrich all readers with fresh perspective on twentieth-century culture. This NEH proposal seeks support to complete the editing of Volume III and IV, and to prepare a one volume edition.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$310,000 (approved)
$310,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2016


RZ-51352-11

George Washington University (Washington, DC 20052-0001)
Tyler Anbinder (Project Director: November 2010 to May 2017)
Moving Beyond "Rags to Riches": New York's Irish Immigrants and Their Surprising Savings Accounts

Creation and preparation for online publication of a database of 19th-century Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank records and related materials, as well as related data analysis for articles and a book based on this research. (36 months)

One of the most enduring paradigms in American popular culture is that of "rags to riches," the belief that in the United States, people are able to rise from poverty to wealth more so than anywhere else in the world. Immigrants, in particular, are said to have come here to pursue their rags-to-riches dreams. Our study, a joint undertaking of historians and economists, will be the first to reliably analyze the wealth accumulation of pre-Civil War Americans.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$290,000 (approved)
$289,862 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 8/31/2016


FA-56265-11

Stephen Edwin Karian
Mizzou (Milwaukee, WI 53233-2225)
Annotating the Irish Contexts of Jonathan Swift's Poems

I will research and annotate the Irish contexts of Jonathan Swift's poems for a four-volume edition of his poetry that is part of the Cambridge Edition of the Works of Jonathan Swift being published by Cambridge University Press. I not only will consult the relevant works of modern scholarship on Ireland in the 1720s and 1730s (when Swift wrote the bulk of his Irish-related poems), but also will research primary printed and manuscript sources to discover topical references to people, places, and events. Doing so will clarify the meaning of individual lines of the poems as well as Swift's purposes for having written them. Because Swift's topical references encompass many fields of knowledge, this research will help produce an edition that will be a major resource for scholars of eighteenth-century literature, history, politics, religion, economics, and culture.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


BH-50445-11

University of Massachusetts, Lowell (Lowell, MA 01854-2827)
Sheila Kirschbaum (Project Director: March 2011 to April 2016)
Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

"Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers. The program is offered by the Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and the Lowell National Historical Park, and focuses on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. During the workshops, historians and other scholars lead lecture/discussions on key themes in Lowell's history. Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context; Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system; Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) talks about the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy; Gray Fitzsimons (formerly National Park Service) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French-Canadian immigrants; Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order; and Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century. Participants visit historic sites around Lowell and Concord such as Walden Pond and Minute Man National Historical Park; they also visit Old Sturbridge Village. Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. The participants read selections by historians including Thomas Dublin, Merritt Roe Smith, Jack Larkin, Patrick Malone, Chad Montrie and Brian Mitchell, and writings by Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and young women who worked in the mills.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$172,880 (approved)
$172,880 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 6/30/2013


FA-55319-10

Lucy E. Salyer
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Crossing Borders: The Fenians and the Crisis over Citizenship

"Crossing Borders" tells the story of the Irish American Fenians, who launched attacks on Canada and traveled to Ireland in the 1860s to foment rebellion -- all in the unsuccessful effort to win Ireland's independence from British rule. The Fenians were arrested and, despite their status as naturalized American citizens, tried for treason as British subjects. The British treatment of the Fenians provoked an uproar in America, and prompted a major change in the history of citizenship law. For the first time, the United States and England explicitly recognized the right of expatriation, that is, the individual's right to give up his citizenship and pledge allegiance to a new sovereign. Expatriation was revolutionary in emphasizing the power of individuals to choose their political homes. Yet, the new laws were also tied to "state-building" campaigns in the United States and Western Europe, as emerging nation states formed new "rules of exit" for their own strategic reasons.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$46,200 (approved)
$46,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


RA-50089-10

Library Company of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5679)
James N. Green (Project Director: August 2009 to April 2016)
Postdoctoral Research Fellowships at the Library Company of Philadelphia

The equivalent of one twelve-month and one six-month fellowship a year for three years.

The Library Company of Philadelphia seeks a renewal grant of $320,400 to fund 18 post-doctoral fellowship months for each of 3 years. The Library Company's fellowship program, established in 1987, now boasts over 550 alumni. The Cassatt House, the Library's residential research center, helps to sustain this community of scholars, and the availability of the collections of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the proximity of the still larger community of scholars at Penn's McNeil Center for Early American Studies further enhance the fellowship experience. The Library Company's first NEH FPIRI grant was awarded in 2004 and renewed in 2007. In view of the success of the program and the sharply increased number of applicants, this application seeks to double the number of fellows to 2 per year, or 4 if one-semester awards are made. NEH fellowships have played an invaluable part in the Library Company's research program, and we believe the time is right to expand their role.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$244,800 (approved)
$244,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2015


FT-57438-10

Marc A. Hight
Hampden-Sydney College (Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943)
The Correspondence of George Berkeley

I am engaged in a scholarly project to collect, edit, and critically annotate the correspondence of George Berkeley (1685-1753), Irish philosopher and later Anglican Bishop of Cloyne (1734). My research will produce a necessary reference volume that fills gaps in the field (no complete edition of the collected correspondence exists, and several of the published letters that are available contain errors). Cambridge University Press has already expressed interest in publishing the project. I am seeking support for primary source research in scattered locations around Ireland and the United Kingdom. Among other places I will do research in the British Library and at Trinity College, Dublin -- places where most of the original letters are held. I propose to visit these locations in order to examine the original letters and related documents to complete an accurate draft of the correspondence.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


FT-57739-10

Nicholas Wolf
Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA 23284-9005)
Hidden Community: A Social History of the Irish Language and its Speakers, 1800-1870

Scholars have used the expression "hidden Ireland" to refer to the Irish-speaking populations of the 19th century, a description that arises from the near-invisibility of this community both to the increasingly English-speaking society of the time and to modern historians as well. Put simply, there have been few attempts to bridge the gap between history, which tends to treat language as an addendum to culture, and fields like sociolinguistics, which recognize language contact as a varied social phenomenon that contribute to how humans conceive of class, gender, and ethnicity. Ireland thus presents an extraordinary case study in recovering the history of linguistic heterogeneity and minority languages. My proposed project aims to advance preliminary findings in Irish- and English-language historical sources that suggest the continued vitality of the Irish language in early nineteenth-century political and religious spheres despite a context of decline.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


RQ-50388-09

American Council of Learned Societies Devoted to Humanistic Studies (New York, NY 10017-6706)
James A. Secord (Project Director: November 2008 to April 2016)
The Correspondence of Charles Darwin

Preparation for the print publication of Volumes 18-20 of the British naturalist Charles Darwin's correspondence, covering the years 1870-72. (36 months)

This proposal seeks funding from the NEH for the period of August 1, 2009 through July 30, 2012, to support the scholarly edition The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. The Darwin Correspondence Project is an independent, binational scholarly undertaking, jointly managed by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and Cambridge University, with the object of providing the definitive edition of letters to and from Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century. The Project's output is in the form of both a comprehensive print edition, The Correspondence of Charles Darwin (F. Burkhardt et al. eds), and a fully searchable Online Database (http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/); letter texts and explanatory notes are incorporated into the Online Database four years after print publication. When complete, the print edition will comprise thirty volumes, two of which will be two-part volumes.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$215,000 (approved)
$215,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2009 – 7/31/2013


BC-50486-09

Maine Humanities Council (Portland, ME 04102-1012)
Victoria B. Bonebakker (Project Director: May 2009 to July 2011)
Immigration in America and in Maine

Funding will support a variety of programs that will explore the significance of immigration in the United States and in Maine including the performance and discussion program,"As Maine Grows," New Books, New Readers and Let's Talk About It reading and discussion programs, a literatured-based training for early childhood educators, and one-day teacher seminar.

Immigration in American and in Maine will engage a variety of audiences, through a variety of programs, in learning about and reflecting on the significance of immigration in the history of our country and state. Maine has always attracted immigrants, and many of today's residents are descendants of French speaking Canadians,Irish or Italians who came to Maine in the mid 19th century to work in factories and industries such as lumbering. At the time, they were not always welcomed by the primarily Protestant Mainers of English and Scottish descent, and Maine's history includes anti-catholic demonstrations by the KKK. More recent immigration to the state includes people from Asia, Africa and South America, and Portland High School now has students who speak 81 different languages. Maine, historically one of the whitest states, is now beginning to be as richly diverse as the rest of the country. It is time to engage all Mainers in a conversation about who we are now and how we got here.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$84,110 (approved)
$84,110 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2009 – 5/31/2011


FB-54286-09

James Woolley
Lafayette College (Easton, PA 18042-7625)
The Canon and Chronology of Swift's Poems

For the several hundred poems attributed to the great Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), this project seeks to relate them to their personal, social, and political occasions and, partly by dating these occasions, to date the poems themselves. A tightly related goal is to say which of the poems are probably by Swift. Dating a poem very often increases or decreases the likelihood that Swift would have, or even could have, written it. The resulting new and chronologically ordered canon of Swift's poems is a stage in the preparation of a full new scholarly edition and annotation, usable by both the general reader and the specialist. This edition, to be published by Cambridge University Press, will help to reshape our understanding of Swift as a poet: what he knew, what he cared about, what he wrote, and how he wrote. This revised understanding is likely, in turn, to be embodied in new general studies of Swift that anthologists, teachers, and students at every level will use.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2009 – 8/31/2009


RA-50075-09

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Paul J. Erickson (Project Director: August 2008 to April 2016)
NEH Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

The equivalent of three fellowships a year for three years.

This application seeks continued funding for the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) under the NEH's initiative supporting Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions. Previous grants since 1975 have helped support a rich and growing body of scholarship in fields including American history, literature, religious history, art history, musicology, and the history of the book. The funding requested reflects the increased level of NEH fellowship stipends, and would include funds to award three full-year fellowships at the maximum stipend annually for three years. For more than three decades, the AAS-NEH fellowship program has made AAS's unparalleled resources for the study of American history, literature, and culture through 1876 accessible to scholars from throughout the nation, has fostered a culture of collegiality and scholarly interaction among fellows and staff, and has enabled AAS to more effectively promote humanistic scholarship in and about the United States.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$471,600 (approved)
$466,005 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013


FT-56528-09

David T. Brundage
Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
The United Irishmen and Abolition: A Transnational Investigation

The project focuses on an early and important strand of the history of Irish abolitionism, placed in a broad transnational context: the nature of the antislavery commitments of the United Irishmen, both in Ireland and in the United States, where many of them ended up following their defeat in the massive Irish rebellion of 1798. The study seeks to explain (1) the various transatlantic links that shaped the deep antislavery commitments of the organization; and (2) the causes for the widely divergent positions on slavery that the various United Irish exiles adopted over the course of their lives in the new American republic. The results of the research will take the form of a scholarly article and may also serve as the first section of a full (book-length) history of Irish abolitionism.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 8/31/2009


FT-57249-09

Nicholas Jay Smith
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Apologies in Law

In 2008 I published I Was Wrong: The Meanings of Apologies with Cambridge University Press. I Was Wrong provides a nuanced framework for the ethical meanings of apologies from individuals and collectives. I have discussed I Was Wrong on NPR (an hour-long interview with Diane Rehm), CNN, BBC, CBC, Philosophy Talk, and various other national and international programs. I now seek support for Apologies in Law (Cambridge University Press). Apologies in Law will apply the framework for the ethical meanings of apologies from I Was Wrong to acts of contrition in civil and criminal law. As a recently tenured J.D./Ph.D. experienced as a litigator in a major Manhattan law firm and as a staff attorney for the U.S. Court of Appeals, I hope to use my upcoming sabbatical to complete a draft of Apologies in Law. I will revise the draft during the summer of 2009.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 7/31/2009


FV-50198-08

Henderson State University (Arkadelphia, AR 71999-0001)
Clinton P. Atchley (Project Director: March 2008 to March 2010)
The Isle of Man: Crossroads of Medieval Cultures and Languages

A five-week seminar in Britain for fifteen school teachers to explore the cultural, literary, and linguistic diversity of the Isle of Man in the Middle Ages.

The purpose of this five-week NEH seminar for school teachers is to provide participants with an enriched appreciation for the multicultural reality of the British Isles and Ireland (the Irish Sea cultural province) in the Middle Ages. While early British literature and culture is sometimes thought to be exclusively Anglo-Saxon, Britain was, in fact, rich in cultural and linguistic diversity. During the seminar, we will focus on five distinct cultures: the Irish, the Scots (and Picts), the Welsh, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Norse. Situating ourselves in an important nexus of these cultures on the Isle of Man, we will focus on the Irish Sea as a microcosm of cultural connection rather than as a barrier. The ultimate goal of the seminar then is to make Medieval literature and culture accessible to high school teachers and to utilize this avenue to make the variety and complexity of the Middle Ages accessible to their students who will ultimately be the primary beneficiaries.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$114,564 (approved)
$114,564 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 9/30/2009


PG-50260-08

American Frontier Culture Foundation, Inc. (Staunton, VA 24402-0629)
David Puckett (Project Director: May 2007 to April 2010)
Frontier Culture Museum Preservation Assessment of Humanities Collections

A preservation assessment of the Frontier Culture Museum's collection of artifacts and archival materials that are used at the living history museum to explore the contributions of Indian, French, German, English, Irish, and African settlers to life in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.

The American Frontier Culture Foundation, whose sole mission is to support the needs of the Frontier Culture Museum, will support a preservation assessment of the Museum's permanent humanities collection. A professional consultant will conduct an on-site survey of the artifact and archival collection and prepare a report that will serve as the basis of the Museum's preservation plan. Through visits and interviews Ms. Jessup will evaluate the general state of the collection in storage, including security, environmental controls and conditions, environmental monitoring equipment, storage furniture, and policies and procedures relating to the collection. Ms. Jessup will also assess the effectiveness of prior improvements made to the primary collections storage room in the Visitors Center. Her final report will indicate areas that need improvement and include specific remedies. The consultant will also provide recommendations for furnishing future storage facilities.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


FA-54332-08

Susan Schreibman
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
A Social and Cultural Biography of Thomas MacGreevy, Irish Poet, Art Historian, and Critic, 1893-1967

I am applying for funding to write a biography of Thomas MacGreevy (1893-1967), Irish poet, critic, translator, art historian and Director of the National Gallery of Ireland (1950-1963). MacGreevy is one of the pivotal figures of Irish Modernism; his links with Irish, British, American and European writers, artists, art historians, and politicians was so extensive that an examination of his life provides a unique window onto cultural and artistic interconnections for the first three quarters of this century.This biography proposes to tell MacGreevy's story against a backdrop of the political, cultural, and social forces that shaped his life, drawing on a range of secondary sources, from contemporaneous accounts of the Royal Field Artillery during the Great War, to recent scholarship in modernism and Irish culture and society.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2009


PG-50232-08

Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. (Washington, DC 20007-2924)
Leslie Buhler (Project Director: May 2007 to July 2008)
Conservation Survey of Paintings and Miniatures

A conservation assessment of paintings and miniatures in order to identify treatment priorities and recommendations for rehousing. Tudor Place was the home of Thomas Peter and Martha Parke Custis Peter, the granddaughter of Martha Washington, and was occupied by six generations of one family until 1983. The works of art to be surveyed include many early portraits, such as a 1794 miniature in watercolor on ivory of George Washington, which was painted by Walter Robinson at the request of Martha Custis Peter upon her engagement.

The paintings and miniatures collections includes approximately 122 objects. Of these, close to 40 paintings are framed and 62 are unframed. The paintings and miniature collections span the centuries, from the early years of the new nation well into the 20th century. The paintings collection includes works by Joseph Wright, W. Menzler, Paul Wayland Bartlett, G.P.A. Healy, Eliphalet Andrews, and M.M. Andrews. The significant miniature collection includes 9 watercolors on ivory, 1 watercolor on porcelain, 5 watercolors on paper, 4 gouaches on ivory, and 1 enamel on copper. The collection includes portraits of family members from the 19th - early 20th century, as well as landscapes and genre paintings. Artists represented in this collection include Sebastian Ricci, itinerant Irish painter Walter Robinson, William Russell Birch, and Mara.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


RQ-50327-08

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Richard Crawford (Project Director: November 2007 to April 2016)
Music of the United States of America (MUSA): A National Series

Preparation for publication of volumes 19-24 and continued editorial work on four other volumes. (36 months)

The American Musicological Society, through its Committee on the Publication of American Music (COPAM), has planned, organized, and is now publishing a national series of scholarly editions of American music. Funds are sought to continue the salary of the executive editor, who maintains the project's headquarters, assists the volume editors in their work, and acts as principal developmental editor and copy editor for the MUSA series.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$130,000 (approved)
$130,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2011


RQ-50332-08

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Lois More Overbeck (Project Director: November 2007 to July 2013)
Letters of Samuel Beckett

Preparation and final editing of Volumes II and III of a four-volume edition of selected letters of Samuel Beckett. (36 months)

This is the first comprehensive collection and contextual presentation of the letters of Irish-born writer and world-playwright Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) whose work is held in the highest esteem by a large, diverse, and international audience. Pivotal for scholarship in the humanities, The Letters of Samuel Beckett will enrich all readers with fresh perspective on twentieth-century culture. This NEH proposal seeks support for the editing of Volume II and Volume III of the four volume edition being published by Cambridge University Press.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$160,000 (approved)
$153,758 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 10/31/2012


FS-50183-08

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Christopher B. Fox (Project Director: March 2008 to March 2010)
Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800

A five-week summer seminar for fifteen college and university teachers on the social, cultural, political, and literary contexts of Anglo-Irish identities in the early modern period.

The Keough Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame seeks the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities for a five-week Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers from June 22 to July 24, 2009. Professor Christopher Fox, director and co-founder of the Institute, will lead an interdisciplinary Seminar entitled "Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800." The Seminar will explore the complex and contested cultural, political, and ideological identities of a group we have come to call the Anglo-Irish. How did they define themselves as a group and differentiate themselves from others? The proposed Seminar will examine this question of identity and difference in some representative writers, including Edmund Spenser, William Molyneux, Jonathan Swift, George Berkeley, Maria Edgeworth, and Edmund Burke. Each participant will also have an opportunity to present work in progress and to interact with several visiting faculty who are key figures in the field.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$139,301 (approved)
$139,301 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 9/30/2009


BH-50208-07

Eldridge Street Project, Inc./Museum at Eldridge Street (New York, NY 10002)
Annie Polland (Project Director: March 2007 to February 2009)
Immigration, Religion, and Culture on New York's Lower East Side

Two one-week workshops for 100 school teachers on the development and interaction of Jewish, African American, Italian, Irish, and Chinese communities in the Lower East Side of New York City.

Border Identities will feature 2 one-week sessions for 50 teachers per week led by scholars T. Michels, H. Diner, C.P. Moore, and J. Tchen that delve into the rich immigrant stories of the various immigrant groups that have made the Lower East Side (NY) their home - - African American, Irish, Italian, Chinese, and East European Jewish immigrants - - in a way that examines the particularities of the respective groups, the shared dynamics of adapting to Lower Manhattan and the interactions among them. Tying these strands together is a focus on how immigrant groups adapted their culture and religion to New York, and America. To this end, we will pursue two interrelated questions: (1) In what ways did their respective group(s) adapt their religion and culture to New York City? (2) What was the nature of their interactions with other groups on the Lower East Side like? Start date: 11/1/07. End date: 10/31/08. Scholars: J. Tchen, H. Diner, C.P. Moore, T. Michels.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History and Culture

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,152 (approved)
$160,152 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2007 – 9/30/2008


PK-50027-07

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Michael Keeble Buckland (Project Director: March 2007 to April 2011)
Context and Relationships: Ireland and Irish Studies

Development of a testbed of Irish studies materials and three open-source tools, broadly applicable to text-based collections, to serve as an Internet age "reference section" and to enable students, scholars, and librarians to establish scholarly context from digital collections.

Students, editors, researchers, and the public are necessarily concerned with the context and relationships of names and topics found when reading texts. What other documents relate this topic? Where and when did this happen? What else was going on around that time and place? Who were the people and institutions mentioned? How were they related? What else did they do? This project will develop three tools: A Context Finder will find information in reference works about names, words, or phrases found when reading; a Context Builder will annotate texts with the source of information for the next reader; and reference works will be enriched by Context Provider to show where the names or topics were mentioned in texts. An international collaboration between the University of California, Berkeley, and the Queen's University, Belfast will develop these tools for texts relating to Ireland.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Advancing Knowledge: The IMLS/NEH Digital Partnership

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$349,996 (approved)
$349,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2007 – 12/31/2010


FA-53473-07

Mary Ann Burgess Smyth
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
British Modernism and the Four Nations

Critical accounts of the complex landscape of British literary modernism have tended to model it as "high" or "low," "late" or "early," prewar or interwar. In this new study, I aim to re-configure British modernism by looking at the key ways in which nationality – Scottishness, Welshness, Irishness and Englishness – and national space provided the engine that drove literary and cultural developments. These developments, I argue, began the process that issued, politically speaking, in the "Break-up of Britain."

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 5/31/2008


CH-50421-07

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Anne W. Robertson (Project Director: May 2006 to November 2011)
Publishing Musicologal Research in the 21st Century

Endowment for publication subventions and an award program in musicology as well as fund-raising costs.

The American Musicological Society seeks an NEH challenge grant of $240,000, which with a 4:1 match will yield $1,200,000. These funds will endow four publication-related initiatives of the Society. The bulk of the funds ($900,000) will create a new subvention supporting the publication of first books by young scholars, whose work often represents the cutting edge of scholarly research, but whose careers are often at their most fragile or challenging point. The remainder will go primarily to existing publication subvention programs, supporting musicological books more generally ($125,000) as well as a monograph series sponsored by the Society ($100,000). These subventions aim to optimize the quality of the best scholarly books on music while keeping their prices affordable. Finally, we propose a new award for books on music in American culture ($50,000), a vital area of musical research that appeals to the broadest literary and musical public.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (offered)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2005 – 7/31/2011


PG-50082-07

Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)
Steve Dalton (Project Director: May 2006 to August 2008)
Consultation to Develop Digital Preservation Program

Consultation to devise a preservation program for the library's existing and future digital collections. The library houses special and archival collections related to Irish and British studies, including manuscripts by literary figures such as William Butler Yeats, Hilaire Belloc, and Graham Greene, as well as works published by or about the Jesuits, and materials that document Catholic liturgical movements in America.

The Boston College (BC) libraries will embark on a comprehensive strategic planning initiative early in 2007. Ongoing digitization of BC's significant humanities collections, primarily those in the John J. Burns Library, will undoubtedly be an important goal within that new strategic plan. As more of BC's humanities collections are made available digitally, the responsibility to preserve those digital assets will grow proportionately. In response, the BC libraries intend to adopt a centralized digital preservation program model on campus and now seek expert assistance in defining critical next steps toward development and implementation. This Preservation Assistance Grant will be used to contract with consultant Dr. Paul Conway, a renowned expert on digital preservation issues, who will provide the BC libraries with the assistance required. The proposed consultation will better equip BC's libraries to preserve and protect their humanities collections in digital form.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,080 (approved)
$4,080 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FT-54681-06

Mary Frances Wack
Washington State University (Pullman, WA 99164-0001)
Beyond Benbradagh: The Story of Middling Farm Families in Rural Co. Derry, 1790-1920

My book in progress, BEYOND BENDRADAGH, traces the story of two middling farm families in rural Northern Ireland as they encountered and responded to the forces of modernization sweeping the Irish countryside. It uses a unique combination of public and private records to develop a socially-focused narrative history and to reconstruct the hidden "mentalities of the townlands." Support is sought for completing several chapters on the Famine period 1840-1860, when these families prospered as never before or since in Ireland, while their compatriots died or emigrated in droves.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 10/31/2006


EE-50376-06

Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-3102)
Stephen H. Long (Project Director: October 2005 to October 2007)
Irish Immigration Education Materials

The development of K-12 educational materials and web-based resources in support of the museum's new exhibition, "An Irish Family in America."

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Teaching and Learning Resources and Curriculum Development

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2006 – 6/30/2007


FS-50107-06

UCLA; Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA 90024-4201)
Joseph E. Bristow (Project Director: March 2006 to October 2008)
The Oscar Wilde Archive: His Life, His Work, His Legend

A five-week seminar on Oscar Wilde giving fifteen college and university faculty access to the most extensive archive of Wilde materials in the world at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.

The proposed five-week Summer Seminar titled "The Oscar Wilde Archive: His Life, His Work, His Legend" aims to introduce fifteen college-level instructors to a broad selection of printed and unpublished sources held in one of the three principal collections belonging to the William Andrews Clark Library of the University of California, Los Angeles. The Clark Library's archive dedicated to the life and works of Oscar Wilde and his circle is the largest of its kind in the world (it holds each and every primary and full length secondary source relating to Wilde's productive professional life) and it provides an excellent resource for enabling seminar participants to acquire informed insights into how and why this distinguished Irish author remains the focus of much advanced research in the humanities.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$112,572 (approved)
$112,572 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 9/30/2007


FS-50120-06

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Christopher B. Fox (Project Director: March 2006 to April 2008)
Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800

A five-week seminar for fifteen college and university teachers on the social, cultural, political, and literary contexts of Anglo-Irish identities in the early modern period.

The Keough Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame seeks the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities for a five-week Summer Seminar for College and Univeresity Teachers from June 4 to July 6, 2007. Professor Christopher Fox, director and co-founder of the Institute, will lead an interdisciplinary Seminar entitled "Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800." The Seminar will explore the complex and contested cultural, political, and ideological identities of a group we have come to call the Anglo-Irish. How did they define themselves as a group and differentiate themselves from others? The proposed Seminar will examine this question of identity and difference in some representative writers, including Edmund Spenser, William Molyneux, Jonathan Swift, George Berkeley, Maria Edgeworth, and Edmund Burke. Each participant will also have an opportunity to present work in progress and to interact with several visiting faculty who are key figures in the field.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$135,623 (approved)
$135,623 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 9/30/2007


RZ-50569-06

Mizzou (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)
Kerby Alonzo Miller (Project Director: November 2005 to June 2010)
Religious Demography and Conflict in Ireland, 1659-1926

Conference papers, journal articles, and a monograph on religious/demographic change in Ireland, and its social, political, and cultural concomitants from 1659 to 1926. (36 months)

Ireland's partition and the recent "Troubles" in Northern Ireland are often viewed as inevitable results of struggle between two communal traditions--Protestant/British vs. Catholic/Irish--persisting, especially in Ulster, since the British plantations in the 1500s-1600s. Our study of Irish religious demography, 1659-1926, reveals that Irish history is much more complex than that binary model suggests. By charting the shifting boundaries between Irish Protestants and Catholics, we show that, especially in Ulster, economic and political conflict within the Protestant community was often the primary factor in shaping Irish society. Thus, our study suggests that better understanding Ireland's past may point to a less polarized future.

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 12/31/2009


FT-54152-06

Judith Ann Giesberg
Villanova University (Villanova, PA 19085-1478)
Northern Women, Work, and the U.S. Civil War, 1861-1867

Women working to serve soldiers and care for their own families during the U.S. Civil War created alternative and unorthodox sites for political engagement. I examine a number of these sites – Philadelphia’s streetcars; the streets of Boston’s Irish North End community; county courthouses in rural Pennsylvania; relief offices and almshouses in cities throughout the north; and the grounds of U.S. Army arsenals in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. The principal goal of this project is to understand how the war was fought in the spaces of everyday life, where women worked to affect its outcome abroad and to give it meaning at home.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 6/30/2007


FT-54671-06

Michael S. Silvestri
Clemson University (Clemson, SC 29634-0001)
Ireland and India: Nationalism, Empire and Memory

The imperial and colonial legacies of Ireland have been the subject of considerable controversy in recent years. My project explores the imaginative dimension of Irish-Indian relationships in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries through a consideration of three issues: relationships between Irish and Indian nationalists, the construction of Irishmen as British imperial heroes, and Irish nationalist commemoration of the mutiny of a regiment of Irish soldiers in India. My study will incorporate the perspective of Ulster Unionists as well as Irish and Indian nationalists.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2006 – 7/31/2006


FB-52636-06

Rebecca Edwards
Vassar College (Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0001)
The Life of Mary E. Lease, People's Advocate

This biography of Mary Lease (1850-1933), orator for the People’s Party in the 1890s, will be the first in-depth treatment of her life. An energetic participant in many American political movements, including those for temperance, labor rights, women’s suffrage, and international peace, Lease was hailed as one of the era's finest orators. The biography will trace connections and conflicts among various movements in which she participated. It will use Lease's speeches to explore the political issues that arose during her lifetime, as the United States became a modern industrial power, and also the ways in which Lease and her contemporaries defined and practiced democracy.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 6/30/2006


PA-51195-05

University of Wisconsin System (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Joan H. Hall (Project Director: July 2004 to December 2007)
Dictionary of American Regional English [DARE]

The compilation of the fifth volume of the "Dictionary of American Regional English" (DARE), which documents geographical differences in the vocabulary, pronunciation, and morphology of American English.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
English

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$600,000 (approved)
$600,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2005 – 6/30/2007


FV-50070-05

CSU, Bakersfiled (Bakersfield, CA 93311-1022)
Charles William MacQuarrie (Project Director: March 2005 to February 2008)
The Isle of Man: Crossroads of Medieval Cultures and Languages

A five-week seminar in Britain for fifteen school teachers to explore the cultural, literary, and linguistic diversity of the Isle of Man in the Middle Ages.

The purpose of this five-week seminar is to provide participants with an enriched appreciation for the multicultural reality of the British Isles and Ireland (the Irish Sea cultural province) in the Middle Ages. While early British literature and culture is sometimes thought to be exclusively Anglo-Saxon, Britain was, in fact, rich in cultural and linguistic diversity. By means of field experience, readings, and seminar discussions we will explore the extent and the significance of the linguistic, cultural, and physical multiplicity which characterizes the medieval period.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$104,042 (approved)
$104,042 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2005 – 9/30/2006


FT-53008-05

Kim Evangel Nielsen
University of Wisconsin, Green Bay (Green Bay, WI 54311-7003)
The Woman in the Teacher: A Biography of Anne Sullivan Macy

Though widely known as the worker of educational miracles in the life of the deaf-blind child Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan Macy remains an obscured historical figure. With this funding I intend to complete research and begin drafting a book-length biographical study of the famed educator. The increasingly extensive integration of people with disabilities into education, the workplace, and the public world make this project significant. Themes to be examined include Macy’s life-long efforts to shape her life, her complex relationship to her own disability, her educational methods, the professional opportunities available to women of her class and generation, and the vital relationship between the student Helen Keller and teacher Anne Sullivan Macy.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 8/31/2005


FT-53201-05

Sean C. Grass
Texas Tech University System (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)
Theft and the Commodification of Identity in Victorian Narrative

Between 1850 and 1870 in England, autobiography and sensation fiction emerged simultaneously as major sub-genres of narrative prose. But no study has explained why these sub-genres—apparently so different—appealed strongly to Victorian readers, nor whether they share cultural or ideological roots. “Portable Property” will employ the methodologies used by scholars of both sub-genres to make two new arguments about Victorian literature: (1) that the growing mid-century impulse to turn self-narration into a commodity produced deep cultural anxiety about the instability of identity; and (2) that this anxiety produced a new literary form—the Victorian sensation novel—obsessed with the consequences of making identity into “portable property.”

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 7/31/2005


FT-53327-05

Philip Freeman
Luther College (Decorah, IA 52101-1041)
The Latin Letters of St. Patrick

The two fifth-century Latin letters of St. Patrick provide scholars and students with a unique window into early Irish history, culture, and religion. My project will offer a revised Latin text of the letters along with an English translation and commentary. The edition will also include two seventh-century lives of Patrick by the Irish churchmen Muirchu and Tirechan, as well as short Latin and Old Irish supplemental texts from the early medieval period. This project has been accepted for publication in the "Library of Early Christianity" series from the Catholic University of America Press.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 7/31/2005


FA-51508-05

John Patrick Montano
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
The Cultural Roots of the Plantations in Ireland: Civility, Landscape, and Material Culture, 1550-1660

The project is concerned with how English and Irish perceptions of each other are rooted in their different attitudes towards property and landscape, it also considers many of the new ideas from the European continent about agriculture, cartography, surveying, and improvement from 1550-1690.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2005 – 7/31/2006


FA-51525-05

Michael Ragussis
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Ethnic Performance and National Identity in Georgian England

Arguing that the theater exerted extraordinary power in defining, maintaining, disseminating, and finally undermining ethnic stereotypes in Georgian England, I analyze why and how the theater invented specific forms and strategies for these purposes. While analyzing the emergence of numerous ethnic, colonial, and provincial character types, I focus on the stage Scot, Jew, and Irishman--"outlandish Englishmen"-- to explore how the theater and the culture at large responded to a crisis in assimilation and acculturation when ideas of national identity were at their most fluid and unstable. In this way I locate ethnic performance, both on stage and off, at the critical moment of nation-formation in Great Britain.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 6/30/2007


FA-51581-05

Karen Louise Jolly
University of Hawaii Systems (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
Two Languages at Prayer: Anglo-Saxon Bilingual Service Books

This request is for a fellowship to support the final year of writing a co-authored book that examines the complex relationship between language, culture, and religion. In the 7th century, Christianity brought its own ritual language, Latin, along with literacy to the Anglo-Saxons in Britain. By the 9th century, the Anglo-Saxons were producing Latin service books interlaced with Old English, thereby maintaining the received Christian tradition while creating a distinctive vernacular practice. This project uses paleographic analysis of 9th-11th century manuscripts with mixed Old English and Latin prayers, rituals, and remedies to reveal how bilingual voices act as transcultural agents in response to a globalizing religion.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 12/31/2005


FA-51655-05

Cheryl Temple Herr
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Understanding Everyday Life in British and Irish Film

My book offers a new approach to film in Britain and Ireland based on the depiction of social practices—the routine behaviors of everyday life such as making tea, answering a phone call, and catching the Tube--across the history of Anglo-Celtic cinema. Indigenous film critics have long struggled to define the four national cinemas (England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland) in terms of setting, characterization, or mode. My practice-oriented approach reconfigures the field to focus on lived customs, their history, and their role in identity-construction by way of the cinema. This project foregrounds the web of similarities and differences that constitutes a "practical community" in the Atlantic archipelago.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006


FT-52891-04

Penelope Anne Ingram
Auburn University (Auburn, AL 36849-0001)
The Outlaw Ned Kelly and Australian National Identity

I propose to examine changing conceptions of Australian national identity from the 19thC. to the present as articulated through cultural representations of the Australian outlaw Ned Kelly. Since his execution in 1880, Kelly has been the subject of 12 stage plays, numerous ballads and poems, 30 books, a famous series of paintings, and 10 films. He was also represented at the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games in Sydney in 2000. I wish to examine the significance and resurgence of the Kelly legend in various periods of Australian history, inquiring how Kelly becomes a template for prevailing national preoccupations, specifically the convict past, English/Irish relations, and the nation's ongoing debate about its ties to the British Crown.

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 8/31/2004


FV-50054-04

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Oswego (Oswego, NY 13126-3501)
Edward J. O'Shea (Project Director: March 2004 to October 2006)
W. B. Yeats and the Two Irelands

A four-week summer seminar for school teachers on the Irish poet William Butler Yeats, to be held in Galway, Ireland.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$94,345 (approved)
$94,345 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2004 – 9/30/2005


RA-50013-04

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
John B. Hench (Project Director: September 2003 to October 2005)
John B. Hench (Project Director: October 2005 to May 2009)
John M. Keenum (Project Director: October 2005 to October 2005)
NEH Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society

Three humanities fellowships each year for three years.

The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) seeks continued NEH funding for its long-term fellowship program. Previous grants have helped support a rich and deep body of scholarship in many fields and have stimulated the development of the history of the book. For three decades, AAS fellowships have made the Society's unparalleled resources for the study of American history and culture through 1876 more readily available to scholars from throughout the nation, have fostered a productive culture of collegiality among fellows and staff, and have enabled the Society to enhance its services to humanistic scholarship in and about the United States.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$378,000 (approved)
$378,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 5/31/2008


RA-50004-03

Folger Shakespeare Library admin by Trustees of Amherst College (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Gail Kern Paster (Project Director: September 2002 to April 2008)
Long-term Residential Fellowships

Three fellowships each year for three years.

The Fellowship Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library is an essential component of the Library's mission to render its collection accessible to scholars for advanced research. The program encourages ongoing cross-disciplinary dialogue among the scholars who use the collection. The Folger Shakespeare Library requests funding for 3 long-term (6-9 months) residential fellowship stipends up to $40,000 for the academic years 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, as well as for the costs of publicizing those fellowships and for selecting the fellows. NEH fellows will be joined each year by 2 or 3 long-term fellows and 20-30 short-term (1-3 months) fellows. Additional fellows are supported by funds from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and by the Library's endowments.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$378,000 (approved)
$378,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2003 – 6/30/2007


GM-50021-03

Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-3102)
Stephen H. Long (Project Director: September 2002 to August 2004)
An Irish Family in New York

Planning for the restoration and interpretation of an apartment at the museum's historic tenement house that was once occupied by a 19th-century Irish American family.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2003 – 4/30/2004


EX-50012-03

Linda M. Crowley
Encanto School (Phoenix, AZ 85013)
Shamrocks and Shillelaghs to Saguaros and Scorpions

A Humanities Teacher Leadership Program award to develop resources and lesson plans on the Irish famine for teachers who visit the Phoenix Irish Cultural and Learning Center.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Teacher Leadership Program

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2003 – 4/30/2004


EX-50055-03

Mel E. Sanchez
Santa Ana High School (Santa Ana, CA 92701-5599)
Famine Irish Immigrants in the Mexican American War

A Humanities Teacher Leadership Program award to convene a study group about Irish immigrants who fought in the Mexican American War.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Teacher Leadership Program

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2003 – 4/30/2004


FV-50018-03

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Timothy J. Meagher (Project Director: March 2003 to October 2006)
Famine Irish Immigrants: A Case Study in Immigration History

A five-week seminar in Ireland and Washington, D.C., for school teachers to study local and family history connected with Irish immigration during the Great Irish Famine.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$89,424 (approved)
$82,424 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2003 – 9/30/2005


FA-37647-03

Marilynn Josephine Richtarik
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA 30303-2538)
Stewart Parker: Belfast Playwright

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2003 – 5/31/2004


FB-38268-03

Janet T. Marquardt
Eastern Illinois University (Charleston, IL 61920-3099)
French National Heritage and Medieval Art History: Visualizing Cluny

No project description available

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2003 – 6/30/2004


FS-23277-02

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Christopher B. Fox (Project Director: March 2002 to February 2005)
Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800

A five-week seminar for college teachers on the construction of Anglo-Irish identities in the early modern period.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$112,332 (approved)
$112,332 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2002 – 4/30/2004

Funding details:
Original grant (2002) $107,694
Supplement (2004) $4,638


GP-30061-02

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4625)
Andrew H. Wyndham (Project Director: February 2002 to February 2006)
Re-Imagining Ireland: Transformations of Identity in a Global Context

A major conference of scholars, writers, politicians, artists, and commentators exploring how notions of Irish identity have emerged and are being transformed in Ireland, the U.S., and other countries affected by the Irish diaspora.

Project fields:
International Studies

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2002 – 10/31/2005


PA-24432-02

Providence Public Library (Providence, RI 02903-3219)
Shirley Long (Project Director: April 2002 to present)
Collections Level Survey

A conservation assessment of the library's Potter/Williams Collection on Irish Culture and the Wetmore Children's Book Collection.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$4,998 (approved)
$4,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2002 – 6/30/2003


GP-22228-01

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4625)
Andrew H. Wyndham (Project Director: September 2000 to October 2001)
Re-Imagining Ireland: Transformations of Identity in a Global Context

Consultation with scholars and journalists to plan a conference and festival on the changing notions of Irish identity and culture in Ireland, the U.S., and elsewhere.

Project fields:
International Studies

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2000 – 6/30/2001


FT-45937-01

Julie A. Costello
Hope College (Holland, MI 49423-3663)
Remembrance, Rebellion and the Bardic Nation: Irish and Scottish Romantic-Period Women's Writings

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,500 (approved)
$4,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2001 – 9/30/2001


FV-22403-01

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Timothy J. Meagher (Project Director: March 2001 to August 2003)
Famine Irish Immigrants and their Children: A Case Study in Family and Local History

No project description available

Project fields:
European History; U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$89,040 (approved)
$89,040 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2001 – 9/30/2002


FA-36150-00

Helen M. Burke
Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL 32306-0001)
Riotous Performances on the Dublin Stage, 1712-1784

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2000 – 12/31/2000


FS-23210-00

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Christopher B. Fox (Project Director: March 2000 to April 2003)
Anglo-Irish Identities, 1600-1800

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,444 (approved)
$100,444 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2000 – 9/30/2001


CH-20611-99

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
Christopher B. Fox (Project Director: May 1998 to November 2002)
Building Medieval and Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

To support endowments for two interrelated initiatives: 1)a Faculty Fellows Fund for Medieval and Irish Studies and 2)an acquisitions fund for Northern Medieval Vernacular Literature.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$450,000 (approved)
$450,000 (offered)
$450,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1997 – 7/31/2002


FA-35198-98

Mary Lydon
Board of Regents of University of Wisconsin System, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53211-3153)
Samuel Beckett's Bilingual Oeuvre in the Context of his Irish Identity

No project description available

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1998 – 12/31/1998


FT-43253-98

Maria Pramaggiore
North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC 27695-7003)
So Familiar and So Foreign: Contemporary Irish Film

No project description available

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1998 – 9/30/1998


RZ-20327-98

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
Stephen M. Watt (Project Director: September 1997 to February 2001)
Nationalism and a National Theatre: 100 Years of Irish Literary Theatre

To support a scholarly conference on the past hundred years of Irish theater and its contributions to concepts of Irish national identity and nationhood.

"Nationalism and a National Theatre" is a scholarly conference to be held at the Actors Theatre of Louisville and on the Indiana University Southeast Campus in November, 1998. It will bring together some thirty scholars to discuss the past century of Irish theatre and its contributions to concepts of nationhood and national identity. It will be held in conjunction with a joint venture of the Actors Theatre and the Abbey Theatre of Dublin in the production of a season of Irish drama and other related cultural events. Bringing together the work of both younger scholars and internationally-known scholar-critics, the papers delivered at the conference will then be collected in an anthology and published by an appropriate university press.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$36,118 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1998 – 8/31/2000


FV-22244-97

Trinity College (Hartford, CT 06106-3100)
Thomas M. Truxes (Project Director: March 1997 to March 1999)
The Great Irish Famine, 1845-52: A Case Study in the History of World Hunger

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$77,089 (approved)
$77,089 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1997 – 9/30/1998


GM-25769-97

University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Jacquelynn Baas (Project Director: December 1996 to October 2000)
When Time Began to Rant and Rage: 20th-Century Figurative Painting from Ireland

To support a traveling exhibition, public film series at Pacific Film Archive, catalog, and related public and scholarly programs concerned with 20th-century Irish figurative painting.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$250,942 (approved)
$250,942 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1997 – 4/30/2000


FT-42424-97

Janet A. Nolan
Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)
St. Patrick's Daughters: Education and Women's Mobility in Ireland and Irish-America, 1880-1920

No project description available

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1997 – 9/30/1997


FB-32716-95

Morgan T. Davies
Colgate University (Hamilton, NY 13346-1386)
Early Irish Texts from the Province of Leinster: A Translation with Introduction and Notes

No project description available

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$20,875 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1995 – 6/30/1995


FA-33423-95

John T. Koch
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Sources of the Early Irish Literary Tradition and Its Ideology

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$24,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1996 – 8/31/1996


GM-25312-95

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Gary G. Roth (Project Director: June 1994 to May 1997)
Gaelic Gotham: The Irish and New York

To support a temporary exhibition and public programs on the history of New York's Irish community.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1995 – 1/31/1997


FJ-21200-94

Julie S. Gibert
Canisius College (Buffalo, NY 14208-1098)
Irish Society in the Anglo-Irish Novels of the 19th Century

No project description available

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Study Grants for College Teachers

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1994 – 6/30/1994


PS-20899-94

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
William J. Maher (Project Director: November 1993 to January 1998)
Preservation Microfilming of German and Latin American Literature and American and Irish History

To support the preservation microfilming of 6,700 embrittled monographs in German and Latin American literature; American history before 1900, including Lincolniana materials; and Irish history.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$633,331 (approved)
$601,463 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1994 – 11/30/1997


FT-39619-94

Donna B. Birdwell-Pheasant
Lamar University (Beaumont, TX 77705-5748)
Family Systems in Irish History: A Case and a Case Study

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1994 – 9/30/1994


FI-27394-94

Joshua R. Hershman
Secondary School
Moving Day: Intra-urban Migration of Brooklyn's Irish and Germans, 1850-1900

No project description available

Project fields:
Urban Studies

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,100 (approved)
$2,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1994 – 12/31/1994


FI-27397-94

Christopher F. Capobianco
Secondary School
Irish Influence on 19th-Century American Popular Music

No project description available

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,100 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1994 – 8/31/1994


FB-30308-93

Thomas M. Truxes
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Westbrook, CT 06498)
An Irish-American Transatlantic Partnership: An Edition of the Greg and Cunningham Letterbook, 1756-57

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/1993 – 7/31/1993


FB-30968-93

James M. Gallman
Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)
Receiving Erin's Children: The Response to Irish Immigrants in Philadelphia and Liverpool

No project description available

Project fields:
Urban Studies

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$20,662 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1993 – 5/31/1994


RP-21688-93

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
David J. McGonagle (Project Director: March 1993 to August 1995)
The Irish Constitutional Tradition: Responsible Government and Ireland since 1782, by Alan J. Ward

To support the publication of a study of the evolution of the Irish constitutional tradition from 1782 to 1992.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1993 – 3/31/1995


FE-28063-93

Kevin J. Donovan
Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001)
Early Irish Plays

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1992 – 11/30/1993


FE-27571-92

Catherine A. Curry
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (San Francisco, CA 94118)
Irish Immigrant Women and Social Action in 19th-century New York City

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 5/31/1993


FT-36918-92

Carmel Jordan
CUNY Research Foundation, Bernard Baruch College (New York, NY 10010-5585)
Manuscripts in Stone: Yeats and the Irish Landscape

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,000 (approved)
$4,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1992 – 9/30/1992


GM-24753-92

Museum of the City of New York, Inc. (New York, NY 10029-5287)
Robert R. Macdonald (Project Director: December 1991 to October 1994)
Sweet Recollections of Home: The History of the Irish in New York

To support planning for an exhibition and related publications and programs on the history of New York's Irish community.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$49,900 (approved)
$49,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1992 – 6/30/1994


FE-27563-92

Marianne S. Wokeck
Trustees of Indiana University, Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN 46202-3288)
German and Irish Immigration to Colonial America

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 5/31/1993


FI-24226-91

Jessica Wilson
Secondary School
Brigid and Other Daughters of Erin: Cultural Change among 19th-Century Irish-Americans

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$1,800 (approved)
$1,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1991 – 8/31/1991


FI-24578-91

Catherine O'Neill
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Patrick Ford and THE IRISH WORLD: A Study in Irish Immigration and Journalism

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1991 – 8/31/1991


FT-35056-91

Vera Kreilkamp
Pine Manor College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-2332)
The Big House and the Cabin in Colonial and Postcolonial Irish Fiction

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,750 (approved)
$3,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1991 – 9/30/1991


FE-25493-91

Laurel McKay Horton
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Quilts: The Irish Connection

No project description available

Project fields:
Folklore and Folklife

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1990 – 11/30/1991


FE-25622-91

Terence M. Odlin
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Cross-linguistic Influence in Irish English and Hebridean English

No project description available

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1990 – 11/30/1991


ER-21212-91

William George
Secondary School
Irish Literature, Myth, and History

No project description available

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
NEH Teacher-Scholar Program

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$28,500 (approved)
$19,379 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1991 – 6/30/1992


GN-24322-91

American Focus, Inc. (Charlottesville, VA 22902-4001)
Paul Wagner (Project Director: March 1991 to October 1995)
Out of Ireland - The History of Irish Emigration Film Project

To support production of a feature-length documentary film on the history of Irish immigration to America.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$796,238 (approved)
$796,238 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1991 – 11/30/1994


RP-21433-91

Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ 08540-5223)
Margaret H. Case (Project Director: April 1991 to December 1992)
Elizabeth I: War and Politics, 1588-1603, by Wallace MacCaffrey

To support publication of a study of Elizabeth I's reign during the years 1588 to 1603, focusing primarily on the war against Spain, the Irish problem, and the rise of the Earl of Essex.

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1991 – 3/31/1993


RP-21292-90

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
David J. McGonagle (Project Director: April 1990 to January 1994)
The Irish in America: A Guide to the Literature and Manuscript Collections, ed. by Patrick Blessing

To support the publication of a guide to the published literature and unpublished manuscript collections relating to Irish immigrants and their descendants in the United States.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1990 – 8/31/1993


GN-23943-90

American Focus, Inc. (Washington, DC 20008)
Paul Wagner (Project Director: September 1989 to April 1991)
The History of Irish Emigration to America Film Project

To support research and scripting of a one-hour documentary film about the history of Irish emigration to America.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$45,000 (approved)
$45,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/1990 – 12/31/1990


FI-23870-90

Regina D. Weaver
Goshen College (Goshen, IN 46526-4794)
The Cathleen ni Houlihan Archetype in Modern Irish Poetry

No project description available

Project fields:
Gender Studies

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1990 – 8/31/1990


FE-24847-90

Kathleen A. Quinn
Southern Oregon University (Ashland, OR 97520-5001)
Irish Women Dramatists

No project description available

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1990 – 11/30/1991


FE-25183-90

Eileen M. Kearney
Pomona College (Claremont, CA 91711-4434)
Anthology of Plays by Irish Women Dramatists

No project description available

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1990 – 5/31/1991


FE-25234-90

Bruce D. Boling
Regents of the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001)
Irish Emigrants' Letters

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1990 – 5/31/1991


FI-22693-89

Kathryn A. Conrad
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
The Myth of the Revolution on the Modern Irish Stage

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,200 (approved)
$2,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 8/31/1989


FE-22998-89

Michael B. Montgomery
University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
The Scotch-Irish Roots of Appalachian English

No project description available

Project fields:
English

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1988 – 5/31/1989


FE-23014-89

Jules Seigel
University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI 02881-1967)
An Annotated Edition of Thomas Carlyle's REMINISCENCES OF MY IRISH JOURNEY IN 1849

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1988 – 5/31/1989


FE-23429-89

James M. Cahalan
Indiana University of Pennsylvania (Indiana, PA 15705-0001)
A Study of the Short Stories of Liam O'Flaherty

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 11/30/1989


RE-20835-89

Wilfred S. Dowden
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Houston, TX 77024)
A Comprehensive Index to THE JOURNAL OF THOMAS MOORE

To support the preparation of a cumulative index for the five-volume edition of the journals of Irish poet Thomas Moore, (1779-1852).

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$7,600 (approved)
$7,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1989 – 3/31/1990


FT-32008-89

James M. Gallman
Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)
Receiving Erin's Children: Irish Immigrants in Philadelphia and Liverpool

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,500 (approved)
$3,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1989 – 9/30/1989


GM-23693-88

Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Inc. (New York, NY 10002-3102)
Ruth J. Abram (Project Director: December 1987 to June 1990)
The Lower East Side Immigrant Heritage Trail: A Social History Walking Tour Series

To support planning for a series of "living history" walking tours interpretingsix immigrant communities that existed on New York City's Lower East Side from 1850 to 1910.

The Conservancy seeks NEH funding to develop THE LOWER EAST SIDE IMMIGRANT HERITAGE TRAIL, a series of "living history", social history walking tours which present and interpret the lives of members of six immigrant communities which lived on the Lower East Side from 1850-1910: Free Afro-American, Irish, German, Jewish, Chinese and Italian. Set in the context of New York City, U.S. and world history, and led by costumed interpreters, the tours explore the daily lives of "ordinary" members of these six immigrant groups and the major institutions, events and leaders in their communities.

Project fields:
Museum Studies or Historical Preservation

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$69,970 (approved)
$69,970 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1988 – 6/30/1989


GN-23548-88

WGBH Educational Foundation (Boston, MA 02135-2016)
Peter S. McGhee (Project Director: March 1988 to May 1990)
TV Series, The Troubles

To support the rescripting of a completed six-part film series, THE TROUBLES, produced by Thames Television, which examines Irish history and the ongoing Anglo-Irish conflict from the 16th century to 1979.

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,320 (approved)
$40,320 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1988 – 11/30/1989


FE-22468-88

Lawrence F. Kohl
University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0001)
Irish-Americans in the Civil War

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1988 – 11/30/1988


FE-21224-87

James E. May
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (DuBois, PA 15801)
Bibliographical Research on Edward Young in Irish and English Libraries

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1987 – 6/30/1987


FT-29866-87

Dean W. Simpson
University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
The Notebook of the Irish Poet and Scholar Sedulius Scottus: An Edition

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Classics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,500 (approved)
$3,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1987 – 9/30/1987


RL-21117-87

Joan Newlon Radner
American University (Washington, DC 20016-8200)
Middle Irish Legends of Kings and Clerics

To support the translation of three llth- and 12th-century chronicles from the Middle Irish legends about the mysterious deaths of two sixth-century kings of Tara and about Irish kings and clerics of the period 600-7l0.

Project fields:
Medieval Studies

Program:
Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$29,000 (approved)
$29,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1987 – 9/30/1988


RC-21354-87

Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA 02481-8203)
Jean H. Slingerland (Project Director: November 1986 to October 1989)
The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals, 1824-1900 [WIVP]

To support production of a cumulative index as the last volume of the WELLESLEY INDEX TO VICTORIAN PERIODICALS. The index describes the contents of 19th-century British, Scottish, and Irish monthlies and quarterlies.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Reference Materials - Access

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$24,519 (approved)
$23,454 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1988 – 3/31/1989


FT-28508-86

James M. Cahalan
Indiana University of Pennsylvania (Indiana, PA 15705-0001)
The Irish Novel: A Critical History

No project description available

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1986 – 9/30/1986


FT-28037-86

Charles Fanning
Bridgewater State University (Bridgewater, MA 02325-0001)
The Fictional Self-Image of the American Irish

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1986 – 9/30/1986


FE-20444-86

Cheryl Temple Herr
University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
An Edition of Irish Historical Melodramas, 1880-1920

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1986 – 7/31/1986


FE-20037-86

Alan E. O'Day
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Great Britain)
Irish Parliamentary Nationalism, 1870-91

No project description available

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1986 – 5/31/1986


FE-20117-86

James E. May
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (DuBois, PA 15801)
Bibliographical Research on Edward Young in Irish & English Libraries

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1986 – 7/31/1986


FA-25214-85

Joel Perlmann
President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Education and Social Mobility in an American City: Providence, R.I. 1880-1945

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$26,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1985 – 6/30/1986


RY-21522-85

Lawrence J. McCaffrey
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Evanston, IL 60202)
Decline and Fall of the Irish Parliamentary Party, 1916-1918

To support research on the decline and fall of the Irish Parliamentary Party, 1916-18.

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1985 – 7/31/1985


RY-21661-85

R. Baird Shuman
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Champaign, IL 61820)
J.M. Synge's Creative Process in PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD

To support research on the Irish playwright J.M. Synge.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1985 – 7/31/1985


RY-20445-84

John F. Wrynn
Saint Peter's University (Jersey City, NJ 07306-5943)
Irish History Writing in the Eighteenth Century

To support research on Irish history writing in the 18th century.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1984 – 8/31/1984


RY-20798-84

James P. Walsh
San Jose State University (San Jose, CA 95192-0001)
A Comparative Study of the Vital Statistics of the Irish WhoStayed and Those Who Emigrated

To support a comparative study of the vital statistics of the Irish who stayed and those who emigrated.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; History, General

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1984 – 6/30/1984


FT-25320-84

Brian C. Mitchell
Anna Maria College (Paxton, MA 01612-1198)
Tha Paddy Camps: The Growth of Community among the Irish in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1821-1861

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1984 – 9/30/1984


FB-22808-84

Eamon Grennan
Vassar College (Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0001)
The Domesticated Muse: Irish Poetry After Yeats

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$12,500 (approved)
$12,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1984 – 12/31/1984


RC-20475-83

American Irish Historical Society (New York, NY 10028-0101)
Lisa M. Hottin (Project Director: June 1982 to October 1990)
Processing American Irish Records

To support the arrangement and description of archival and manuscript collections that document the contributions of the American Irish to American history.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; History, General

Program:
Reference Materials - Access

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$19,800 (approved)
$19,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1983 – 6/30/1984


GM-20832-82

Western Carolina University (Cullowhee, NC 28723)
S. Aaron Hyatt (Project Director: January 1982 to October 1990)
Migration of the Scotch-Irish People: An Exhibition

To support implementation of a traveling exhibition, a slide-tape show, and a guidebook on the causes, the course, and the effects of the Scotch-Irish migration from Scotland and Ulster to western North Carolina.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$33,709 (approved)
$31,812 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1982 – 12/31/1983


GY-20604-82

Coleen V. Barry
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Scituate, MA 02066)
A Cultural Study of the Irish Mossers of Scituate: Farmers of the Sea

To support research for and production of a slide and tape presentation on the vanishing culture of "farmers of the sea," the Irish mossers of Scituate, Massachusetts.

Project fields:
Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$1,428 (approved)
$1,385 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1982 – 9/30/1982


FB-20945-82

Walter D. Johnston
Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC 27109-6000)
Irish Poetry After Joyce

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1982 – 7/31/1983


GM-*0332-81

Western Carolina University (Cullowhee, NC 28723)
Clifford R. Lovin (Project Director: July 1980 to October 1990)
Planning for Scotch-Irish Exhibition for Mountain Heritage Center

To support planning for a permanent exhibit on the causes, course, and effects of the Scotch-Irish migration from Scotland and Ulster to North Carolina, forming the earliest and most numerous European population in southern Appalachia.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Rural Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$11,410 (approved)
$11,079 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1981 – 8/31/1981


FA-*0631-81

Robert James Scally
New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Irish Society in the Age of Migration, 1815-1861

No project description available

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1981 – 8/31/1982


FA-*1724-81

Robert W. Buttel
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Irish Poetry Since Yeats

No project description available

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$19,290 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1981 – 7/31/1982


FA-*0337-81

Eric B. Ross
Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
The Economics of Ethnicity and Class: An Historical and Ethnographic Comparison of Irish Adapations in Liverpool...

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$16,731 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1981 – 12/31/1981


FB-*0364-81

John P. McCarthy
Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
The Irish Free State Government, 1922-1932

No project description available

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1981 – 6/30/1982


FB-*0564-81

Robert F. Garratt
University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, WA 98416-5000)
Irish Poetry Since Yeats

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$22,000 (approved)
$22,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1981 – 8/31/1982


GN-*1902-81

Newark MediaWorks, Inc. (Newark, NJ 07101-1716)
Christine Vogel (Project Director: January 1981 to October 1990)
Daughters of Erin

To support writing of one script and four treatments for a radio series of 30-minute programs examining the role and achievements of the Irish women of the Easter Rebellion of 1916.

Project fields:
British History; Gender Studies; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1981 – 6/30/1982


GZ-*1992-81

Worcester Public Library (Worcester, MA 01608)
Carolyn B. Noah (Project Director: May 1981 to October 1990)
Multicultural Folk Heritage

To support workshops for youth on folk motifs of local minority cultures, including, Irish music, Chinese puppetry, sign language, Afro-American storytelling, Scandinavian crafts, and children's literature. Participants will develop a performance for public agencies.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Folklore and Folklife; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Projects for Youth

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1982 – 6/30/1982


GN-*0281-81

Film Collaborative, Inc. (Newport, RI 02840-0306)
Mark Sottnick (Project Director: July 1980 to October 1990)
We All Have Tales

To support development of a half-hour television pilot script and additional treatments which will present oral literature from the ethnic traditions of Native Americans, Blacks, Cubans, Irish, Yiddish, and Chinese.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; Folklore and Folklife; Literature, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$33,343 (approved)
$33,343 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1981 – 6/30/1981


RT-*1505-80

Archdiocese of Boston (Boston, MA 02135-3101)
Donald M. Jacobs (Project Director: June 1980 to October 1990)
Archdiocese of Boston

To support the development of a computer-assisted indexing system for the Boston "Pilot," the oldest weekly newspaper in America. The index will providegreater access to its resource material on Irish-Catholic immigration to America.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Reference Materials - Tools

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$17,400 (approved)
$17,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1980 – 9/30/1980


FB-*0613-80

Alan E. O'Day
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Irish Nationalism, l886-l9l8

No project description available

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/1980 – 7/31/1981


GM-*1338-79

Museum of Our National Heritage (Lexington, MA 02420-0519)
Clement M. Silvestro (Project Director: May 1979 to October 1990)
Linenmaking - New England 1719-1836

A supplemental interpretive program in conjunction with the exhibit 'Scotch-Irish Linemakers of New England' organized by the Merrimack Valley Textile Museum.

Project fields:

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$1,650 (approved)
$1,650 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1979 – 5/31/1980


GY-*0418-79

Julie A. Henigan
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar (Springfield, MO 65807)
Field Study of the Irish Sean-nos Singing Tradition

To study the "sean-nos" song tradition chiefly through contact with those who perpetuate that tradition.

To gain a knowledge of the sean-nos song tradition chiefly through contact with those who perpetuate that tradition.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,578 (approved)
$2,578 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1979 – 10/31/1979


GY-*0436-79

Trustees of Hampshire College (Amherst, MA 01002-3359)
Lee Goodwin (Project Director: November 1978 to October 1990)
Cultural Analysis of Prizefighting in Boston, 1920-Today

A history of boxing and 20th-century boxers in Boston. With an emphasis on the role of prizefighting in the Irish Community.

To study the history of boxing and 20th-century boxers in Boston and publish related magazine and newspaper articles.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$1,718 (approved)
$1,718 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1979 – 11/30/1979


GY-*0492-79

Kathleen W. Buechel
Unaffiliated independent scholar
Cumman na mBan Oral History and Book Project

History of Cumann na MBan, militant women's group active in Irish Revolution, based on interviews with former members.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$6,619 (approved)
$6,617 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1979 – 8/31/1980


RP-*1164-79

University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288)
Iris Tillman Hill (Project Director: May 1979 to October 1990)
Paul Cullen & the Making of the Modern Irish Church, 1850- 1860

A study of political and church history in mid-19th-century Ireland, and its political ramifications. This volume con- stitutes the 4th of a series by Larkin.

Project fields:

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,204 (approved)
$5,204 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1979 – 2/28/1981


FB-003179-79

Bridgewater State University (Bridgewater, MA 02325-0001)
Charles Fanning (Project Director: September 1979 to present)
The Irish Voice in American Fiction

No project description available

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$19,931 (approved)
$19,931 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1979 – 8/31/1980


FA-010879-79

Vivian Mercier
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Anglo-Irish Literature, 1878-1978: A Critical History

No project description available

Project fields:
Literature, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1979 – 3/31/1980


GM-133879-79

Museum of Our National Heritage (Lexington, MA 02420-0519)
Clement Silvestro (Project Director: October 1979 to present)
Scotih-Irish Linenmakers of New England 1719-1836

To support supplemental, interpretive program in conjunction with the exhibit "Scotch-Irish Linenmakers of New England" Supported by the Merrimack Valley Textile Museum, the New Hampshire Historical Society, and the grantee.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1979 – 5/31/1980


FR-10374-78

John D. Born, Jr
Wichita State University (Wichita, KS 67260-9700)
The Scots and Scotch-Irish: A Comparative Study in Early American Ethnicity

The Scots and the Scotch-Irish who came to colonial America were, by and large, considered by the English to be an inferior variety of Briton. Finding most of the land along the Atlantic seacoast already inhabited, Scottish and Scotch Irish freemen and indentured servants moved into the west and southwest where they early developed two separate but similar patterns of ethnicity considered within the boundaries of their origins, language, education, religion, and association. To publish a monograph which will contribute not only to a better understanding of the Scots and Scotch-Irish colonial experience but to a comprehension of how the societal processes work within a framework of ethnicity and subsequent assimilation or pluralism.

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Residential College Teacher Fellowships, 1976-1981

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$10,725 (approved)
$10,725 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1978 – 5/31/1979


FT-14091-78

Richard H. Wojcik
Barnard College (New York, NY 10027-6909)
A Generative Grammar of Breton

A study aimed at establishing a generative-transformational description of spoken Breton (Tregor dialect), with primary emphasis on syntax. Little research has been done on the subject of the syntax of spoken Breton, so the results of this study will be of interest to linguists and Celticists. The Breton language, a Celtic language related to Welsh and Irish, is spoken by about a million people but is rapidly disappearing.

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FT-13697-78

Patrick J. Blessing
University of Tulsa (Tulsa, OK 74104-9700)
The Intellectual Life of Irish Immigrants inthe 19th Century United States

Project will attempt to identify Irish intellectual cultural brokers in all sections of the U.S. during the 19th century, to examine their ideas, and to gauge the effectiveness of those ideas in easing the eventual accommodation between the Irish and the larger society. Will refute the belief that the Irish in America during the 19th century were rural peasants, largely unskilled and unschooled.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FT-13745-78

Adele Dalsimer
Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3858)
Abbey Theatre: Plays and Politics

To interpret the Abbey plays (those of Yeats, Synge, the Fay brothers, and Lady Augusta Gregory) in an attempt to determine their relation to their social and cultural context and to define more accurately the Abbey's place in Irish political life. A careful examination of the political aspect of the Abbey's work should further understanding of the complex relationship between the literary and political life in Ireland--a relationship that is unique among the countries of Western Europe.

Project fields:
Theater History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FT-13865-78

John D. Ibson
California State University, Fullerton Foundation (Fullerton, CA 92831-3547)
Will the World Break Your Heart? A Historical Analysis of the Dimensions and Consequences of Irish-American Assimilation

To prepare for publication manuscripts of grantee's doctoral dissertation, a study of Irish-Americans from the 1840s to the present. The paper draws on a variety of published sources--autobiographies, biographies, histories, scholarly and popular works in the natural and social sciences, novels, plays and films--to show that the Irish have remained cultural strangers in the U.S., and that while their ethnicity has been repressed, it has not been obliterated.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FT-13885-78

Dale T. Knobel
Denison University (Granville, OH 43023-1100)
The Internal Migration: European Immigrants in Rural America, 1850-1880

To study the penetration of Hudson Township, Ohio, by German and Irish railroad laborers from 1850-1880 in order to discover the rural immigrant's process of adjustment. Economic and social incorporation into an agricultural community will be emphasized. Changing patterns of ethnic landholding, farm tenancy and nonfarm occupations, shares of community wealth, progress of ethnic intermarriage, and absorption of immigrants into the community's institutional life will all be examined in this study.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FT-14073-78

JoEllen M. Vinyard
Marygrove College (Detroit, MI 48221-2546)
Pre-Famine Emigration from Ireland to the United States

To do a study of ordinary men and women who belonged among the thousands that left the rural areas and towns of Ireland for the US in the first four decades of the 19th century, a time before the famine exodus so altered the character and impact of Irish emigration. Study will consist of 3 major parts: l) would examine characteristics of nearly 2,000 individual emigrants and relate these people to conditions to their own localities in Ireland; 2-3) would examine relationship between background in Ireland and adjustment in America as well as the varieties within the Irish-American experience.

Project fields:
Immigration History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1978 – 8/31/1978


FR-10324-78

Richard S. Sorrell
Brookdale Community College (Lincroft, NJ 07738-1599)
French Canadians in the United State: An Anthropological Approach

This study focuses upon the interrelationship between survivance (the French Canadian term for ethnic and national survival) and religion, the debate among French Canadian immigrants and their descendants (Franco-Americans) as to whether militance or moderation was the correcl way to maintain survivance, and consequent struggles between militant Franco-Americans and the Irish hierarchy of the Catholic Church. This study will be the basis for a larger project, "French Canadians in New England: Religion and Militant Survivance, 1870-1930."

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Residential College Teacher Fellowships, 1976-1981

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1978 – 5/31/1979


FA-12142-78

Lewis P. Curtis
Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
The Fall of the Irish Landlords, 1840-1925

To write a book on the fall of the Irish landlords from the 1840s to the 1920s. This book will combine both chronological and topical treatments of such major problems as the impact of the Famine on the landlords, the conflict between "Catholic democracy" and "Protestant oligarchy", the agricultural depression of the late 1870s, the Home Rule crisis of the 1880s, the land war, the contribution of the landlords to Irish Unionism, landlord indebtedness and the sale of estates and finally, the social and political upheavals associated with the advent of armed militants-north and south-and the involvement of the landlords in both guerrilla and then civil war.

Project fields:
British History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1978 – 6/30/1979


RC-*0384-78

University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN 55105-1096)
John B. Davenport (Project Director: November 1977 to October 1990)
CELTIC LIBRARY CATALOGING PROJECT

To catalog a valuable and presently unusable special collection of books (3,803 titles, 5,111 volumes), the Celtic Library, housed in the O'Shaughnessy Library of the College of St. Thomas. Collection consists of scholarly items on Irish history and literature.

Project fields:

Program:
Reference Materials - Access

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$20,664 (approved)
$20,664 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/1978 – 2/28/1981


RS-*0169-78

Illinois State University (Normal, IL 61790-3040)
Walker D. Wyman (Project Director: August 1977 to October 1990)
From Antagonism to Tolerance: Irish Laborers and Illinois Settlers-1840-50's

To understand the interaction between the Irish immigrants who dominated the construction of Illinois' canals and railroad s in the 1840s and 1850s, and other major population groups. Conflict between people of Irish and Yankee stock eventually gave way to tolerance by the 1860s. How conflict between groups is resolved, an ancient question for the humanities, will be the focal point of this work, which will interest students of labor and frontier history.

Project fields:

Program:
State and Local and Regional Studies

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$19,634 (approved)
$19,634 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/1978 – 5/14/1979


RE-*1113-78

Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
Anne E. Yentsch (Project Director: February 1978 to October 1990)
Publication of Plymouth Colony Wills and Inventories, 1633- 1691

To cover pre-publication costs for the probate records (475 wills and 630 inventories) filed during the years 1633-1691 in Plymouth, New England. Aged widows, spinster daughters, unmarried male and female servants, black slaves, Indians, soldiers, seafaring men, transient Irishmen, tenant farmers, and town paupers all appear in these records.

Project fields:

Program:
Editions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$52,700 (approved)
$52,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1978 – 5/31/1981


RE-*1308-78

Brown University in Providence in the State of Rhode Island (Providence, RI 02912-9100)
David Krause (Project Director: May 1978 to October 1990)
The Letters of Sean O'Casey, Volumes II and III

To edit and annotate volumes II