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Keywords: pursuit of happiness (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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FEL-272668-21

Stacy D. Fahrenthold
University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
Syrian Textile Workers in the Arab Atlantic, 1890-1934

Research and writing leading to a book on the development of working-class identity among Syrian textile workers, focused on cities including Lowell, Lawrence, and Boston, Massachusetts and Sao Paulo, Brazil.

This project is a global history of the Syrian working class, from the advent of mass migration to the Great Depression. Examining a generation of textile workers from the Arab Middle East, I argue that the shared experiences of transit/passage, proletarianization, systemic precarity in immigrant neighborhoods, and labor activism generated a uniquely Syrian working-class milieu. The work is situated in three locales, joined by the commercial circuits of the textile industry: Ottoman Syria (Homs, Hama, Mount Lebanon); New England (Lowell, Lawrence, Boston); and Brazil (Sao Paulo). The emergence of Syrian communities in these towns was complemented by the liquidity of labor among them, and Syrian workers (men and women) circulated the Americas in pursuit of higher wages. Whether in Brazil or Boston, Syria or Sao Paulo, Arab textile workers communicated across oceans to strike better working conditions for themselves, developing a cosmopolitan outlook that was authentically working-class.

Project fields:
Immigration History; Latin American History; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


FZ-280031-21

Miriam Udel
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Children's Literature and Modern Jewish Culture

Writing a book examining Jewish identity as constructed in Yiddish-language children’s literature. 

“Umbrella Sky: Children’s Literature and Modern Jewish Worldmaking” takes the aesthetically rich and historically indispensable corpus of nearly a thousand extant Yiddish children's books as a novel vantage point from which to observe key movements—political and geospatial—of Eastern European Jewry during the tumultuous early decades of the twentieth century. I extend theoretical reframings of childhood into the Yiddish-speaking sphere, foregrounding the role of children’s literature in the intertwined cultural renaissance and quest for social justice that animated secularist, interwar Jewish life. This project integrates a range of concerns, including a changing understanding of gender norms, child psychology, class consciousness and struggle, and the pursuit of racial justice. Focusing on broadly resonant motifs, themes, and nodes, this accessible book probes how writers and cultural leaders negotiated the tensions between traditional and emerging forms of Jewish identity.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature; Jewish Studies; Literature, Other

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PB-275149-20

Springfield Library and Museums Association (Springfield, MA 01103-1733)
Larissa Murray (Project Director: May 2020 to present)
A Glimpse into the Gilded Age: Discovering the Archives of the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum

The retention and creation of fifteen positions to rehouse, digitize, create online access, and incorporate into exhibitions the archives of the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum, which contain correspondence, photographs, and other documentation of its Gilded Age art collection.

This project preserves and connects the cultural contributions of an exceptional late 19th c. private collector art museum to a 21st century audience. Opened in 1896 as the first of five museums at the Springfield Museums, the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum is one of only a few remaining museums, similar to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, in which the building and the objects it houses form a unified whole, representative of a specific period in the history of humanities in the US. We propose to digitize and rehouse currently inaccessible photographs and documents relevant to the history of museums in America, and share them digitally through virtual exhibits, tours, and on-site kiosks. This will provide visitors with a newly designed and multi-layered way to engage with a historic Museum dedicated to the holding, preservation, exhibition, study and enjoyment of 6,000+ objects gathered from around the world by lifetime collectors, George Walter Vincent and Belle Smith.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; Arts, Other; Cultural History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (P&A)

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$141,300 (approved)
$138,413 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 2/28/2021


FEL-267666-20

Leor Edward Halevi
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Everyday Salafism in an Entangled World: The Saudi Spirit of Global Exchange in the Age of Bin Baz

Research and writing a book on the effects of economic pressures on religious principles, specifically how Salafist Islam has adapted to economic growth and globalization.

My book project is about the impact of global economic exchanges on an Islamic movement. Oil deposits and world trade radically changed Saudi Arabia, one of the poorest and most isolated nations in the 1930s, into one of the world’s leading importers of goods and services by the end of the twentieth century. I will analyze the effect of these and other economic changes on Salafism, a religious movement dedicated to reviving the doctrines and practices of the first Muslims. Specifically, I will focus on the codes of conduct that Salafist clerics designed to guide lay Muslims in everyday economic activities not only in Saudi Arabia but throughout the world. Political scientists and historians have studied the spread of Salafism across national borders and the emergence of rival Salafist schools. But they have not examined, as I will in this book, the ways that Salafists have tried to reconcile moral and material pursuits in the context of economic globalization.

Project fields:
History of Religion; History, Other; Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2020 – 7/31/2020


FEL-267755-20

Christina Bashford
University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Forgotten Voices, Hidden Pleasures: Violin Culture in Britain, c. 1870-1930

Research and writing leading to a book about the cultural history of violins and violin-playing in Britain, from 1870 to 1930.

My project identifies and rehabilitates a vigorous violin culture in Britain, c.1870-1930, through broad historical analysis of the practical and conceptual presence of the violin family there. The surge in musical activity, stimulated by newly affordable instruments, was underscored by changing social and cultural values that broke longstanding barriers of gender and class, and it was advanced by a growing commercial and educational infrastructure. It also endured, impacting the British compositional tradition and multiple performance spheres. Violin culture’s spread and vitality had a systemic and democratizing impact on music-making, its flowering bound up with ideas about the instruments that reflected contemporary concerns. Emphasizing amateur pursuits, mechanisms for learning, and structures that enabled or restricted the realization of professional ambitions, my work explores the meanings string instruments had for newcomer enthusiasts and gives voice to their experiences.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021


HB-267918-20

Rina Benmayor
California State University, Monterey Bay (Seaside, CA 93955-8000)
Emotion and the Pursuit of Restorative Citizenship - The Case of Spanish and Portuguese Sephardi Descendants

Writing an article about the role of emotion in the Sephardi dual citizenship laws passed by Spain and Portugal in 2015.

I seek 50% funding for 6 months to research, write, and disseminate an article on the centrality of emotion in claiming "restorative citizenship" among descendants of Iberian Sephardi Jews. In 2015, Spain and Portugal passed historic dual citizenship laws for Sephardi descendants, to repair historical injustices (expulsion and forced conversion) committed over half a millennium ago. Descendant responses reveal an intensity of emotion underlying this citizenship pursuit. I explore how emotion shapes ancestral and new identities and contemporary citizenship. I will use [approximately] 20 oral history interviews from a unique archive of 52 interviews that Dr. Dalia Kandiyoti and I have recorded. A handful of scholars have written about these laws but none has based work on in-depth multinational oral narratives. Journal (rather than book) publication offers a more timely contribution to the conversation on this phenomenon. The article will be in English, with a Spanish version for publication in Spain

Project fields:
History, Other; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Jewish Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2020 – 9/30/2020


PW-269420-20

University of Houston System (Houston, TX 77204-0001)
Emily Vinson (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Gulf Coast LGBT Radio and Television Digitization and Access Project

The digitization of nearly 6,000 hours of radio and television programs documenting the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community in Houston from the mid-1970s to the 2000s.

The Gulf Coast LGBT Radio and Television Digitization and Access Project proposes to digitize, transcribe, describe, and make available over thirty years of unique radio and television broadcast recordings created by and for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans communities. Drawing from UH Special Collections, and through a partnership with the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender History, Inc., four series have been identified for inclusion in this project, totaling thousands of hours of content not heard or seen since initial broadcast. Currently, these materials are inaccessible to researchers, and due to the fragile audiovisual formats, are at significant risk of loss due to deterioration. These recordings are primary documents chronicling the experience of the LGBT community in a major Southern city and stand as a testament to the role of radio and television broadcast in the LGBT movement’s pursuit for social acceptance and political equality.

Project fields:
History, Other

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$348,751 (approved)
$333,251 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2020 – 5/31/2022


AH-269887-20

National History Day, Inc. (College Park, MD 20742-0001)
Cathy Gorn (Project Director: September 2019 to present)
A More Perfect Union: A Semiquincentennial Cooperative Agreement

A three-year cooperative agreement that would extend and expand NEH’s partnership with National History Day, in response to NEH’s A More Perfect Union initiative.

With the National Endowment for the Humanities, NHD proposes a three-year cooperative agreement for educational programming that will inspire student learning by engaging students and their teachers with historical scholarship in the pursuit of civic engagement and responsibility. Programs and activities will focus on the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution and the founding of a new nation based on a constitutional democracy. As well, NHD programs and content will examine the ways in which our founding ideals have been applied, struggled over, and met from our founding to yesterday’s headlines. The agreement center on NEH’s new agency-wide initiative, “A More Perfect Union: NEH Special Initiative Advancing Civic Education and Commemorating the Nation’s 250th Anniversary.”

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Education)

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$450,461 (approved)
$450,461 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2022


FT-270715-20

Sarah Nelson
Regents of the University of Idaho (Moscow, ID 83844-9803)
The Correspondence of Italian-French Noblewoman Marie Mancini (1639-1715): A Digital Edition

Research and writing leading to digital publication of the transcriptions, translations, and annotations of approximately 25 letters written by Italo-French noblewoman Marie Mancini (1639-1715) as well as the creation of the project website.

Creation of a public website containing my transcriptions, translations, and annotations of 20-25 letters by Marie Mancini (1639-1715), as well as an analytical introduction. Mancini’s correspondence offers a window on the conditions of early modern women’s lives that other famous women letter-writers of the age do not provide, because Mancini also published a memoir. I produced the only modern English edition of her memoir, including extensive annotation. The comparison of her public and private writing allows analysis of her conscious fashioning of a public image and her strategic deployment of that image. The website will be a useful resource for scholars of literature, early modern women’s lives, gender studies more broadly, and European diplomatic history. It also has the potential to attract a broad audience of non-specialist readers, drawn by the dramatic adventure of Marie’s life and enticed, by rigorous scholarship and the author’s authentic voice, to further exploration.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; French Literature; Women's History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2020 – 6/30/2020


GI-271495-20

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Bentonville, AR 72712-4947)
Jen Padgett (Project Director: January 2020 to present)
Crafting America

Implementation of a traveling exhibition highlighting American craft since 1940.

A fresh perspective on American craft from the 1940s to today, Crafting America presents a bold statement on the past, present, and future relevance of craft to American identity. Featuring over 100 objects, this traveling exhibition showcases work in ceramics, glass, metal, fiber, wood, and other media. The exhibition traces skilled making across boundaries and asserts the vital role of craft in American history and culture since World War II. The intertwined nature of craft and American experience are foregrounded by the exhibition’s thematic structure, exploring the ideas of Life, Liberty, and The Pursuit of Happiness. This framework examines craft as an inherently democratic form, one that enables individuals from diverse backgrounds to realize the nation’s founding ideals in a broad and more inclusive way.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2020 – 8/31/2022


FZ-272316-20

Gregory E. O'Malley, PhD
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
The Escapes of David George (1743-1810): An Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom in the Revolutionary Era

Research and writing of a biography of David George (1743-1810), who was born a slave and whose pursuit of freedom intersects with major events of the Revolutionary Era.

The Escapes of David George offers a biography of a man born enslaved in Virginia, who ran away repeatedly—to backcountry settlements, to Native American communities, and finally to the British Army during the Revolutionary War. As a refugee, he then moved to Nova Scotia and finally to the British colony of Sierra Leone for emancipated slaves. Since George’s life spanned the revolutionary era, his story offers a counterpoint to the many biographies of America’s white founders. Instead of typical narratives about political freedom from British monarchy, George’s life presents a parallel quest for freedom from American slavery. To achieve his own independence, George fled the U.S. at its creation. As the NEH looks toward the 250th anniversary of American independence, David George offers a vantage point on the lines of exclusion that limited liberty in the new nation, while also providing an inspiring story of an enslaved man’s quest for the ideal that “all men are created equal.”

Project fields:
African American History; British History; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


FV-272518-20

Baylor University (Waco, TX 76798-7284)
Jackson Todd Buras (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
Phillip J. Donnelly (Co Project Director: July 2020 to present)
Disputatio and the Pursuit of Wisdom in the Humanities

A two-week summer seminar for school teachers exploring the disputatio, or disputed questions, as a tool for discussing the nature of wisdom.

We propose a two-week Summer Seminar for high school teachers exploring the disputatio, or disputed question, as a tool for engaging wisdom questions in the humanities. The first week focuses on understanding the various features of disputatio and the nature of wisdom questions. The project of the second week is to explore the potential of disputatio to aid the pursuit of wisdom in the humanities. Participants will engage a variety of literary and philosophical texts and develop a curricular application of disputatio suited to their individual teaching needs.

Project fields:
Ethics; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Literature, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$86,448 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2020 – 12/31/2021


FT-264458-19

Nicholas D. Smith
Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-8091)
Socrates on Knowledge, Virtue, and Happiness

Writing toward the publication of a book that argues for a new interpretation of Socratic virtue, finding happiness through honing a set of practical skills.

A book that articulates the connections Socrates makes (in Plato's early or Socratic dialogues) between knowledge, virtue, and happiness. In this project, I make the case that these connections have been misunderstood in the scholarly literature because scholars have insufficiently understood an important consequence of the Socratic conception of the relevant knowledge as craft or skill. Briefly, the achievement of skill occurs by degrees and with practice. I show how this effects the Socratic view of virtue and happiness, and how these are connected, in a way that is gradable. In the Socratic view, then, our project as human beings is to improve our life skills, our degree of achievement in virtue, and thus the extent to which we can be happy.

Project fields:
Classics; Epistemology; History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FT-265153-19

Wanjiru Mbure
Stonehill College (North Easton, MA 02357-7800)
The Tenacious Defenders, Offenders, and Inventors of African Beauty 1951-1971

Research leading to a book on The Drum, a pan-African magazine, and the definition and promotion of the idea of feminine beauty in Africa.

How did modern cosmetics triumph over enduring diverse perceptions and practices of beauty in Africa? How did new nations and their citizens make sense of new imaginations of beauty? How did they attempt to regulate this new product? Who were the main actors and what key events shaped the historical trajectory of African beauty? The answers to these questions offer a valuable historical context to understand contemporary challenges regarding easy access to injurious cosmetics, the use of beauty in pursuit of decolonization, and the impact of globalization on localized experiences of beauty. Set in South Africa, Kenya, and the United States, this project uses beauty to investigate how lawmakers, advertisers, media, and citizens created, maintained, and resisted notions of African beauty. The book offers new insights into the drama and passion of a vibrant era of African history and the people who gave us varying answers to the enduring question of the nature of beauty.

Project fields:
African History; Communications; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/14/2019 – 8/13/2019


RQ-266188-19

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Jennifer Steenshorne (Project Director: December 2018 to August 2019)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: August 2019 to present)
The Papers of U.S. President George Washington (1732-1799)

Preparation of publication of volumes 20 and 21 of the Presidential series and volumes 28 through 33 of the Revolutionary War series of the papers of George Washington (1732-1799). (12 months)

The significance of the Washington Papers project rests initially on the profound importance of Washington's correspondence, the project's productivity record, nearness to completion, and important digital ventures (notably the Digital Edition and the Financial Papers project). These efforts, along with active engagement with scholars, teachers, and the general public, keep the Washington Papers at the forefront of both documentary editing and the digital humanities. Washington's personal letters to and from family and friends reveal his dedication to public service, but they also expose a human figure, learning from mistakes in business, war, and politics to become his country's foremost leader. These letters also document the actions and aspirations of enslaved people, free men and women, Native Americans, frontier inhabitants, farmers, scientists, and many others. The addition of the Washington Family Papers Series to the project only expands this context.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$230,000 (approved)
$160,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 3/31/2021


TR-266341-19

Futuro Media Group (New York, NY 10027-4843)
Charlotte Mangin (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
UNLADYLIKE2020

Production of twenty-six animated short documentary films about little-known Progressive Era women who achieved success in science, business, aviation, journalism, politics, medicine, exploration, and the arts.

UNLADYLIKE2020 is an innovative multimedia series featuring little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, set to launch in 2020 for the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage. Our 26 animated documentary shorts will be released digitally on a weekly basis by PBS’s flagship biography series American Masters for the 26 weeks between March 1, the start of Women’s History Month, and August 26, 2020, a day known as Women's Equality Day, named to commemorate the 1920 ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, and also will be repackaged into a public television broadcast hour. Each 5-to-7 minute episode will profile a female trailblazer from the Progressive Era in U.S. history (1890s through 1920s) who broke barriers in then-male-dominated fields such as science, business, aviation, journalism, politics, medicine, exploration, and the arts.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Ethnic Studies; U.S. History; Women's History

Program:
Media Projects Production

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$700,000 (approved)
$700,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2019 – 12/31/2020


PG-266608-19

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Carey Weber (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
James Reed Print Collection Rehousing Project

The purchase of preservation supplies and environmental monitoring equipment for a recently-acquired collection of over 700 prints by leading French nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists such as Eugène Delacroix, Edouard Manet, and Odilon Redon. The prints encompass a wide range of subject matter and artistic expression, touching on still-life, portraiture, caricature, literary subjects, industrialization, urbanization, class and gender issues, and leisure pursuits. This collection and others at Fairfield University Art Museum are incorporated into interdisciplinary teaching, exhibits, and publications.

The Fairfield University Art Museum received a major gift of 700 19th-century French lithographs and etchings in 2017. The collection includes prints by preeminent artists, including Géricault, Delacroix, Daumier, Manet, Redon, and Fantin-Latour. Also included in the gift are 35 old master engravings, etchings and woodcuts by northern European artists. Prints have always been appreciated as primary source material in the humanities—their imagery and subject matter intimately relate to specific historical currents and events and literary themes and genres. The Reed Collection is extraordinary but the prints are not properly housed. This new Preservation Assistance Grant will allow us to re-house each print into archival solander boxes, placed into storage cabinets in our storeroom, with new dataloggers in place to actively monitor the room’s temperature and humidity.

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,312 (approved)
$8,312 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


FEL-257206-18

Paula L. Gottlieb
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Aristotle on Thought and Feeling

A book-length study on Aristotle's ethics.

Aristotle’s discussion of the motivation of the good person is both complicated and cryptic. Depending on which passages are emphasized, Aristotle may seem to be presenting a Kantian style view according to which the good person is and ought to be motivated primarily by reason, or a Humean style view according to which desires and feelings are or ought to be in charge. I argue that Aristotle thinks that the thought, desires and feelings of the good person are integrated in a way that is sui generis, and I explain what that is, discussing Aristotle’s view of the psyche, feelings, moral education, prohairesis (choice) and the obscure motivator, the fine, which I take to involve a musical metaphor. I also discuss how disintegration is possible for those who are not good, and how akrasia, acting voluntarily against one’s better judgment, is an ethical phenomenon, not just a problem in the philosophy of action, contrary to the views of modern philosophers.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics; History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2018 – 6/30/2019


FEL-257304-18

Eugenia Y. Lean
Columbia University (New York, NY 10027-7922)
A Chinese Man-of-Letters in an Age of Industrial Capitalism: Chen Diexian (1879-1940)

Research and writing leading to publication of a book on Chinese novelist, industrialist, and entrepreneur Chen Diexan (1879-1940).

By examining the early 20th-century endeavors of Chen Diexian, a novelist, amateur chemist, and manufacturer of toothpowder, this project shows how unlikely actors like Chen pursued industry and science in China in unconventional ways. Before the rise of modern expertise and formal professions, Chen tinkered with cuttlefish to make toothpowder, emulated foreign technologies while pursuing domestic copycats, and published manufacturing formulas as “common knowledge” in newspapers. Even as he drew from global circuits of chemistry and emerging international property rights law, Chen’s pursuits constituted a “vernacular industrialism” that was homegrown and informal and became part of the patriotic National Products Movement and the basis of Chinese success in challenging foreign competitors in pharmaceutical markets in East and Southeast Asia. Chen’s story reveals how Chinese actors were hardly “lagging” behind or mere “copycats,” but were able to navigate, innovate and compete in modern global capitalism.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; History of Science

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2018


ZH-258468-18

Illinois Humanities Council (Chicago, IL 60603-4048)
Chris Guzaitis (Project Director: May 2017 to present)
Sojourner Scholars Summer Humanities Institute: The Odyssey Project's High School Initiative

A Clemente Course in the Humanities for 25-30 Chicago high school students.

In the summer of 2016, the Odyssey Project piloted a summer humanities institute for high school students called Sojourner Scholars. Sojourner Scholars is a free college-readiness, college-credit earning program that provides students from four neighborhood Chicago Public School (CPS) high schools located on Chicago’s South Side the opportunity to take college-level courses in the humanities with local college professors over the span of three summers, beginning the summer following their freshman year. Students follow the Clemente Course in the Humanities curriculum and take courses in literature, U.S. history, philosophy, art history, and a capstone course that involves an intensive writing and research project. Students will complete a total of 110 hours of college-level classroom instruction and earn six fully-transferrable college credits in Humanities 100: Introduction to the Humanities from Bard College.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Access Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (offered)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


FT-259759-18

Erin Claire Cage
University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL 36688-3053)
The Science of Proof: Forensic Medicine in Nineteenth-Century France

Research for a book-length study on the relationship between forensic science and law in 19th-century France.

This book project examines the history of forensics, or legal medicine, in France during the nineteenth century. It analyzes how medical and scientific knowledge was constructed in relation to transformations in the legal and penal systems, shifting political configurations, class, and gender. Drawing upon records of hundreds of legal proceedings, medical reports, and forensic studies, my research reveals how the state, medical authorities, jurists, and lay persons negotiated the boundaries between doubt and certainty as well as innocence and criminality. “The Science of Proof” argues that the practice of forensic medicine was fraught with uncertainty and that the rise of forensic experts both bolstered and undermined the pursuit of justice.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FT-260081-18

Nathan Edward Suhr-Sytsma
Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
The Role of Poetry in Contemporary African Literary Communities

Research and preparation of an article on the role of poetry in African literary communities.

What is the future of literature? While the Internet revolution is often thought to call into question the future of literary reading in North America, African writing today suggests that the rise of digital media should not be confused with the decline of the literary. This project examines contemporary African poetry in English and the communities through which it circulates in order to ask in what sense this new poetry serves as a paradigm of the literary and its fortunes in the twenty-first century. In pursuit of a better grasp on literature’s cultural, ethical, and subjective work, the project probes the extent to which a writer’s location still matters in an era of digital publication. Drawing on fieldwork as well as theoretical discussions of lyric poetry and original textual interpretation, it foregrounds diverse African actors’ understanding of why the literary still matters for their current situation and possible futures.

Project fields:
African Literature; African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2018 – 7/31/2018


FZ-261408-18

Devoney K. Looser
Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ 85281-3670)
Biography of Sisters Jane Porter (1775–1850) and Anna Maria Porter (1778–1832), 19th-Century British Novelists

Research and writing of a book on British sister novelists Jane Porter (1775-1850) and Anna Maria Porter (1778-1832), contemporaries of Jane Austen.

Decades before the Brontës, Jane Porter (1775-1850) and Anna Maria Porter (1778-1832) burst onto the literary scene. The Porters unabashedly published as sisters, signing their names to dozens of novels, poems, and plays. They were pioneering, single career women at a moment of cultural change, negotiating the literary marketplace with the marriage marketplace. They were widely fêted and admired. But as they reveal in moving, unpublished letters, they paid a steep price. For a woman, Anna Maria concluded, public fame was the death knell of private happiness. To add insult to injury, their fall from popularity was so precipitous that few today have heard of them. My book, Sister Novelists, is poised to be the first biography of the Porter sisters, sharing for the first time stories of their accomplished, lovelorn, and complicated lives. It promises to shift understandings of struggles faced by the first generations of professional women writers in the age of Jane Austen.

Project fields:
British History; British Literature; Gender Studies

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019


FA-251018-17

Zachary Thomas Wallmark
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)
Timbre and Musical Meaning

Preparation of a book-length study about timbre (or tone color), music perception, and musical meaning.

Timbre (or “tone color”) is the most poorly understood attribute of music, despite its importance in the generation of musical affect and meaning. Combining methods from musicology and the cognitive sciences, this project explores how timbre shapes emotional responses to music by focusing on situations of listening that complicate the perceptual boundary between “musical” timbre and “noise.” My book-in-progress contributes three novel perspectives to music scholarship and the public humanities: it (1) advances a dynamic, transdisciplinary model for understanding the material and affective dimensions of sound; (2) investigates issues of timbre interpretation in three historical-cultural case studies (free jazz, Japanese music, and heavy metal); and (3) examines the social and ethical stakes of music listening and performance. The book will add to debates about musical meaning, embodiment, and emotion. An NEH Fellowship will support six months of full-time research and writing.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History, Criticism, and Theory of the Arts; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Psychology

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,200 (approved)
$25,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 12/31/2017


FA-252460-17

Sabri Ates
Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX 75205)
Sheikh Abdulqadir Nehri (d. 1925) and the Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan

A book-length study explaining why an independent or autonomous Kurdistan never came into being, anchored in the biography of the Kurdish leader Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri (1851-1925).

What historical conditions account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation? Constraining Kurdistan sets out to answer this question on the basis of a wide variety of primary sources in Modern Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Persian, English and French. Anchored in the biography of its protagonist, Seyyid Abdulqadir of Nehri, it explores efforts to establish or prevent the creation of Kurdistan as an independent state or autonomous entity starting in the mid 1870s. In particular, it focuses on the tumultuous period between 1880-1925, during which the creation of a Kurdish state emerged as a distinct possibility and then quickly unraveled. Moreover, it studies what role the Kurds themselves played in making or unmaking a state of their own.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2018


RZ-255598-17

Goucher College (Baltimore, MD 21204-2780)
Evan Dawley (Project Director: December 2016 to May 2021)
Tosh Minohara (Co Project Director: January 2017 to May 2021)
Beyond Versailles: Reverberations of World War I in Asia

A multinational symposium that will bring together contributors of an edited volume to explore common research questions on the legacy of World War I in Northeast Asia. (20 months)

This project is a collaborative inquiry into the events and implications of the year 1919 for states and peoples across Northeast Asia. It asks, how did Northeast Asians shape their own realities, and the broader global situation, in the post-Great War world? Collaborators will conduct original research and analysis, viewing this pivotal year through the lenses of diplomacy, nation-building, social and cultural change, and the aftereffects of war. The project will culminate in the publication of a volume of essays, a summary article for publication in an academic journal, and a public symposium, all to occur in the centenary year of the Treaty of Versailles to draw attention to our interpretation of new beginnings in Asia after the War. We will demonstrate that the diplomatic and military endeavors, intellectual pursuits, and nation-building efforts of individuals and groups within Northeast Asia challenged European and American hegemony, and wrought fissures within the world order.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; History, General

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,293 (approved)
$21,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


RZ-255635-17

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Lisa Ann Maher (Project Director: December 2016 to present)
Danielle A. Macdonald (Co Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan

Excavation and analysis of early settlements of hunter-gatherers at the Paleolithic site of Kharaneh in eastern Jordan. (36 months)

The transition from hunter-gather to food-producing societies in southwest Asia was a pivotal shift in prehistory. The 20,000-year-old hunter-gatherer aggregation site of Kharaneh IV exhibits multi-seasonal, prolonged and repeated habitation, making it the largest Paleolithic site in the region and one that evidences emerging sedentism and settlement, economic intensification, and ritual behaviors associated with dwelling, almost 8,000 years earlier than previously known. As a central hub of occupation for groups from throughout the region, this site is uniquely able to inform us about the construction of communities and interaction networks across a broad social landscape by exploring the nature and motivations for aggregation by reconstructing the spatial organization of domestic and symbolic activities, and undertaking comparative analyses of material culture at contemporary sites to trace how the site’s inhabitants were integrated into broader spheres of social interaction.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology; Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2018 – 2/28/2022


RQ-255714-17

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
William M. Ferraro (Project Director: December 2016 to October 2018)
Jennifer Steenshorne (Project Director: October 2018 to July 2019)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: July 2019 to present)
Papers of George Washington

Preparation for publication of volumes 20 and 21 of the Presidential series and volumes 26-32 of the Revolutionary War series of the papers of George Washington (1732-1799). (24 months)

The Papers of George Washington is a historical documentary editing project that is engaged in publishing a modern comprehensive edition of George Washington's public and private papers. The significance of The Papers of George Washington project rests initially on the profound importance of Washington's correspondence. This edition provides unique insight into Washington's activities as commander in chief of the Continental army, president of the Constitutional Convention, and first president of the republic.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$420,000 (approved)
$420,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2019


HAA-255979-17

University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Jeremy Wade Morris (Project Director: January 2017 to March 2020)
Eric Hoyt (Co Project Director: May 2017 to March 2020)
Investigating the Golden Age of Podcasting through Metadata and Sound

Prototype development and adaptation of open-source software tools to facilitate large-scale search and analysis of podcasts.

Despite an explosion of interest in podcasts - claims of a “Golden Age” of podcasts abound - sound remains mystifyingly difficult to analyze and the history of this emerging media form is already at risk of being lost. PodcastRE Analytics: Investigating Podcasting through Metadata and Sound aims to put podcasting’s data traces to work, making digital audio more usable, visible and audible than current archives. PodcastRE Analytics leverages the 120,000+ podcasts of the PodcastRE database (http://podcastre.org), a preservation collaboration between UW-Madison’s Libraries and Dept. of Communication Arts, to pioneer new techniques for the analysis and visualization of audio and metadata. While tools for data mining text archives exist, PodcastRE Analytics will allow users to explore audio in ways that are as familiar as textual resources. Using digital humanities methods, we can better research contemporary culture and investigate a new media form that has captured significant attention.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Communications; Communications; Media Studies

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,972 (approved)
$74,962 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 6/30/2019


AE-256242-17

Dean College (Franklin, MA 02038-1994)
David Dennis (Project Director: January 2017 to February 2021)
Jessica M. Pisano (Co Project Director: June 2017 to February 2021)
Making Humanities Matter

A two-year faculty and curricular development project to integrate humanities and science with experiential learning in history of science courses.

Dean College seeks funding to infuse the humanities into Core Distribution offerings by developing and piloting two courses in the history of science that incorporate hands-on labs: “History of Science” and “Henrietta Lacks: Medicine, Race, Class, and Gender in America.” We aim to create opportunities for faculty members in the history and science departments to study together in order to improve their capacity to teach the humanities; support our humanities Core Distribution courses; support humanities contributions to nursing and medical professionals; and disseminate our findings. The courses will showcase the humanities and their impact across the disciplines—especially in the sciences—emphasizing experiential learning. If we can contextualize science via the humanities, using critical thinking skills and knowledge about historical context vital to the humanities, then we will demonstrate how integral the humanities are to other disciplines.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History of Science

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$60,364 (approved)
$60,364 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/2017 – 3/31/2020


ZZ-253123-16

Council of Graduate Schools (Washington, DC 20036-1173)
Suzanne Ortega (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)
Next Generation Humanities PhD Consortium

A collaboration between CGS and NEH that will: 1) establish an advisory network of experts for Next Generation Humanities PhD grantees; 2) create a team-based communication platform for grantees; 3) develop benchmarking materials and timelines with each institution; 4) host virtual conversations, presentations, and webinars on relevant topics; 5) offer virtual office hours to coach grantee institutions; 6) provide opportunities for grantees to present at CGS events; 7) co-host Project Directors’ Meetings; 8) document preliminary “lessons learned” at planning grants’ completion; 9) offer suggestions to update guidelines for upcoming deadlines; and 10) evaluate and review the partnership for possible renewal.

This request seeks to establish a working relationship between the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) with the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to help administer a rich and supportive environment for grantees of the Next Generation Humanities PhD program. CGS and NEH will work with project directors, university deans, advisors, funders, and other entities to plan and execute high quality collaborative interventions that will support and amplify culture change in humanities doctoral programs across the United States. This culture change will by definition be difficult, since it has significant structural, methodological, and financial implications, among them curricular change, new models for graduate student mentorship, stipends for activities beyond research and teaching, and the possibility of a different dissertation product. To achieve far-reaching results that live up to the promise of the grant program, the intention is to build a strong esprit d’équipe among this first cohort of grantees.

[Grant products]

Project fields:

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Challenge Grants)

Division:
Challenge Programs

Offered (outright + matching):
$50,000

Grant period:
8/1/2016 – 4/30/2018


RA-247969-16

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Kathleen Lynch (Project Director: August 2015 to May 2017)
Amanda Herbert (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)
Long-term Residential Fellowships Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library

18 months of stipend support (2 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The Folger Institute of the Folger Shakespeare Library requests funds to support the Library’s long-term residential Fellowships Program. This 30-year-old Fellowships program animates the intellectual community at the Folger by bringing five Fellows per year to Washington, DC to conduct sustained research in our outstanding collections of English and Continental books and manuscripts from the period 1500-1800. The grant period will begin with selection in 2017; fellows will start their residencies in the academic year 2017-2018. Included in our request are funds to defray the expenses for lodging and travel associated with gathering an external committee of five scholars to select the Fellows. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$248,413 (approved)
$237,663 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2020


AQ-248180-16

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire (Eau Claire, WI 54701-4811)
Matthew P. Meyer (Project Director: September 2015 to November 2019)
Kristin P. Schaupp (Co Project Director: June 2016 to November 2019)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on Happiness

The development and teaching of a new course for first- and second-year college students on the topic of happiness.

“What is happiness?” The question of happiness is not a modern one, but a perennial one. It is not a Western question, but a universal one. This course will use sustained primary source readings from ancient and modern philosophy; religious texts from Christian, Islamic, Buddhist, and Confucian traditions; research from positive psychology; and sociological studies on happiness to explore this question. Being an enduring question, we do not hope to arrive at an answer to the question. But we will demand thoughtful engagement through extensive reading and “scaffold” writing assignments that ask the student to re-think the central question at different points of intellectual development throughout the semester. This new course will explore this question with an intellectually pluralistic account, demanding that students engage with the humanities while being able to apply what they learn to their own lives. We are sure this course will reinvigorate students’ interest in the humanities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$28,000 (approved)
$27,958 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2016 – 5/31/2019


FA-233217-16

Kathryn D. Temple
Georgetown University (Washington, DC 20057-0001)
Loving Justice: Blackstone's Commentaries and the Affective Origins of Anglo-American Conceptions of Justice

Completion of a book on literary and aesthetic conventions used by William Blackstone in his four-volume legal treatise, Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765-1769).

This project reinterprets William Blackstone's influential Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765-1769) as a literary text embedded in generic and aesthetic conventions, re-reading it through the lenses of affect and aesthetic theory. I argue that although the enormously popular Commentaries represented a brilliant application of Enlightenment reason to English legal history, "reason" and "history" alone do not explain its popularity or influence. Instead, the Commentaries relied on an affective aesthetics to convince readers that English law and justice were one. Making art of English law, Blackstone encouraged his readers to FEEL as much as reason their way to justice. Through chapters on desire/disgust, melancholia, terror/tenderness/torture, shame and happiness, I explain Blackstone's poetics in the literary context that magnified his impact on Anglo-American conceptions of justice.
 

Project fields:
American Literature; British Literature; Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


GE-235082-16

Corporation for Jefferson's Poplar Forest (Forest, VA 24551-0419)
Wayne Gannaway (Project Director: August 2015 to November 2017)
Paths to Freedom, Paths to Happiness: Site-wide Interpretive Exhibits at Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest.

Planning of interpretive media and visitor experiences at Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest retreat.

This project will conduct the planning work to develop Poplar Forest's first-ever professionally designed exhibits. The geographical scope of the work is site-wide for two reasons: first, it is based on a new interpretive theme and sub-themes developed during a recent master interpretive planning process; and two, because it will help create a visitor experience and interpret historic features along a new, planned visitor entrance road at Poplar Forest. The two-mile road will unlock heretofore inaccessible historic sites and landscapes related to Thomas Jefferson's Bedford County plantation and to the work spaces and lives of the more than 90 people enslaved here during his occupation of the site. Construction of the road is planned for late 2017. The outcomes of the project are design development plans for an orientation video, orientation signage, key historical figure cards, exhibits in the lower level of Jefferson's retreat house, wayside exhibits and interpretive signs.

Project fields:
African History; U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


FB-58289-15

Lisa Jane Graham
Haverford College (Haverford, PA 19041-1392)
Changing Social Norms in France during the Enlightenment

This book offers a fresh interpretation of the French Enlightenment as a collective response to the problem created by the unleashing of human desire from the traditional constraints of scarcity and sin. How do we reconcile this anxiety about desire with the Enlightenment promotion of the individual and the pursuit of pleasure? I answer this question by exploring legal debates about crimes of debauchery; aesthetic debates about the dangers of reading novels; medical debates about sexual health and marriage; and political debates about the costs of pleasure in a monarchy. By recovering these eighteenth-century debates, my book brings historical perspective to contested areas of contemporary democratic culture including the legal definition of marriage, the boundaries of private life, the role of the state in policing morality, and the cost of economic theories that depend on increasing consumption to secure growth.

Project fields:
Cultural History; European History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


CH-51222-15

American Philosophical Society (Philadelphia, PA 19106-3387)
Timothy B. Powell (Project Director: May 2014 to May 2016)
Patrick K. Spero (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)
Endowing a Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies

Endowment for the Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies.

The American Philosophical Society seeks a Challenge Grant of $500,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to establish a foundational endowment of $2 million for a new Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies, which will become a permanent division of the Society's research library. Plans for the Center are grounded in the Library's significant Native American ethnohistory and linguistics collections (including a newly established digital audio archive of extinct and endangered languages) and in the success of four prototype partnerships with tribes in the U.S. and Canada. The Center will promote Digital Knowledge Sharing as the linchpin of partnerships among archives and Native communities; establish a consortium of sister repositories (including emerging tribal archives) to undertake collaborative initiatives; and encourage a new generation of indigenous scholars to participate in academic pursuits as well as cultural revitalization projects.

Project fields:
Native American Studies

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2013 – 7/31/2019


GI-228421-15

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield, MA 01342-5004)
Timothy C. Neumann (Project Director: August 2014 to present)
Impressions from a Lost World

Implementation of a website, programming, and educational materials about the discovery of dinosaur tracks in Massachusetts and Connecticut in the 19th century and its impact on American culture.

"Impressions from a Lost World" website and related public programs will tell the story of the 19th century discovery of dinosaur tracks along the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts and Connecticut. The significance of these fossils extended far beyond the emerging scientific community, as they exerted a profound effect upon American arts, religion, and culture that reverberates down to the present day. The broad appeal of dinosaurs will engage a wide audience. The website will use stories of real people to engage visitors to think about relationships between science and religion, amateur vs. professional scientific pursuits and the role of specialization, participation of women in science, and the impact of new scientific ideas on American culture. Website visitors will draw connections of these important humanities themes to current issues. Accompanying public programs will attract diverse audiences and build interest in the website.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2015 – 3/31/2018


RA-228581-15

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Khalil Gibran Muhammad (Project Director: August 2014 to October 2017)
Kevin Young (Project Director: October 2017 to March 2021)
Long-Term Research Fellowships at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

18 months of stipend support (3 fellowships) per year for three years and a contribution to defray costs associated with the selection of fellows.

The New York Public Library and its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture respectfully request a grant to support stipend and selection expenses for its Scholars-in-Residence Program from January 1, 2016 through June 30, 2019. For nearly 30 years, the Scholars-in-Residence Program has nurtured and supported scholarship in the fields of African, African American and African Diasporan studies by offering six month fellowships to scholars whose work can benefit from extended immediate access to the rich resources of the Schomburg Center and NYPL's system-wide resources. (edited by NEH staff)

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$247,800 (approved)
$236,334 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2019


FT-229919-15

Michael Edward Genovese
University of Kentucky Research Foundation (Lexington, KY 40506-0004)
Finance and Feeling in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Summer research and writing on British Literature and Economic History.

My book manuscript argues that eighteenth-century British essayists, novelists, and poets promoted the search for profit, counterintuitively, as a means of constructing community through the simultaneous accumulation of money and shared feeling, or sympathy. In doing so, they rejected the emerging value of individualism, particularly as it referred to the pursuit of private profit and indulgence in emotional interiority. In contrast with scholars who frame the eighteenth century as a period trending forward toward modernity, I highlight its indebtedness to a past in which economic activity was still understood as an extension of emotional and public life. Throughout my book, I treat seriously the critical potential of this nostalgia to serve as a progressive critique of abuses of debt, credit, labor, and avarice that authors sought to preclude by imagining how interpersonal bonds, especially those among strangers, might be secured mutually by finance and sentiment.

Project fields:
British Literature; Economic History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2015 – 8/30/2015


FZ-231436-15

Linda Przybyszewski
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
The Unexpected Origins of Modern Religious Liberty

A book chronicling the 1869 Cincinnati school board vote to end Bible reading in public schools, which sparked mass protest across the nation and a lawsuit that lasted over four years.

In the fall of 1869, the Cincinnati school board took a vote to end Bible reading in the public schools, sparking mass protests, angry newspaper editorials across the nation, and a lawsuit that dragged on for four years. The Bible War has attracted attention from legal scholars, but they misidentify it as the simple triumph of secularists over religious believers, and miss its dramatic potential as a struggle over the meaning of religious liberty. The story of the Bible War sweeps us back to a time when Protestants and Catholics often saw one another as enemies and schooling as their weapon. It reminds us that arguments over the meaning of religious liberty and the value of religious pluralism are not new; they developed early in a country peopled by immigrants and spiritual seekers. The legal brief which won the case for the board reveals how religious faith could be more than an obstacle to the development of religious liberty; it was often essential to its defense.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General; Religion, General

Program:
Public Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


EH-50366-13

Georgia College and State University (Milledgeville, GA 31061-3375)
Bruce Gentry (Project Director: March 2013 to March 2015)
Robert E. Donahoo (Co Project Director: March 2020 to March 2015)
Reconsidering Flannery O'Connor

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to examine Flannery O'Connor's work through various critical and disciplinary perspectives.

Georgia College presents “Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor,” a four-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers, in July 2014. Against the quaint, historic backdrop of O’Connor’s alma mater in Milledgeville, Summer Scholars will dive into the culture and environment that inspired O’Connor, examining thorny and teachable issues of religion, race, violence and human consciousness, and cultural conflicts in her work. Distinguished scholars will lead students through a variety of seminars, lectures, and hands-on work in GC’s O’Connor Collection. The institute will stimulate Scholars toward their career goals, in part by supplying them with key primary and secondary texts for vibrant teaching and up-to-date scholarship; support them as they begin or improve their teaching of O’Connor; and inspire them to produce internet postings, conference papers, articles, and books about O’Connor and her contemporary relevance. Project period will be Oct. 1, 2013-Dec. 31, 2014.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$193,448 (approved)
$183,539 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


FS-50354-13

Lewis and Clark College (Portland, OR 97219-8091)
Nicholas D. Smith (Project Director: March 2013 to December 2014)
Socrates

A five-week seminar for sixteen participants to engage with recent scholarship on Socrates.

The seminar will begin with "the Socrates Problem," which concerns the difficulty in discerning what the historical Socrates was like from inconsistent ancient sources. The remaining four weeks will focus on the main areas that philosophers and scholars generally agree are the most interesting ones from the point of view of contemporary philosophy: Socrates' doctrine of obedience to civil law, which seems to oppose modern liberalism and its conception of individual autonomy; Socrates' profession of ignorance and its implications for human inquiry and for what human knowledge would be, if someone were to achieve it; Socrates' eudaimonism-the doctrine that value is to be understood in terms of human happiness or flourishing; and Socrates' commitment to intellectualism, both in the explanation of human motivation and also in terms of how virtue is to be understood, so that in either case, cognition, rather than emotion or some other desiderative element, will be central to explanation.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$108,252 (approved)
$98,496 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014


CH-51150-14

Loyola University Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21210-2601)
Douglas B. Harris (Project Director: May 2013 to June 2019)
Messina: Loyola University Maryland's First-Year Seminar Program

Endowment for faculty salary and co-curricular programming for a first-year undergraduate seminar program.

Loyola University Maryland requests funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities to build an endowment to support humanities instruction in and humanities-based co-curricular events for Messina, its new first-year seminar program. Loyola's first-year students will participate in two linked seminar courses, one each semester, that will offer them the opportunity not only to engage deeply in disciplinary learning, but also to come to see academic and intellectual pursuits as increasingly relevant and integral to their daily lives. Increasing the size and breadth of the humanities faculty, more than quadrupling the number of first-year seminars in the humanities, and enhancing humanities programming on campus, Messina will breathe new life into humanities education, promote inter-disciplinary conversations, and enhance the intellectual culture at Loyola in and out of the classroom.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$500,000 (approved)
$500,000 (offered)
$500,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2012 – 7/31/2018


AC-50204-14

University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)
Juliet M. McMullin (Project Director: July 2013 to present)
Narrative in Tandem: Creating New Medical and Health Humanities Programs

A two-year interdisciplinary project that would contribute to the development of a new program in health humanities at a newly established medical school.

Narrative in Tandem is organized around examining narrative in the humanities and medicine through three approaches of conveying, expressing, and understanding "the symptom." "The symptom" is defined to include both medical and social conditions impacting health experiences from patient/provider to connections with individuals and communities not physically present in the encounter. Over the course of two years, participants from disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and medicine will explore these issues through intersecting activities designed to: 1) contribute to knowledge of narrative in health and medicine; 2) develop narrative skills, including course syllabi and activities that can be applied in humanities and medical education; 3) compile seminar discussions to contribute to a larger strategy about integrating humanities and medicine; and 4) lay the groundwork for establishing a vibrant health humanities program at UCR.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$99,300 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 12/31/2016


PW-51607-14

University of South Carolina, Columbia (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)
Henry Fulmer (Project Director: July 2013 to September 2016)
Colin Wilder (Co Project Director: July 2014 to September 2016)
Plants and Planter: Henry William Ravenel and the Convergence of Science and Agriculture in the Nineteenth-Century South

The digitization and reunification of over 6,200 plant specimens and nearly 5,000 pages of documents collected or created by South Carolinian naturalist Henry William Ravenel (1814-1887). The resulting digital collection will allow full-text searching and browsing by subject heading for archival materials and provide a map to browse the locations where botanical specimens were collected.

Plants and Planter explores the life, business pursuits, and natural history interests of South Carolina planter, botanist, and agricultural writer Henry William Ravenel (1814-1887). Digitizing and reuniting over 6,200 botanical specimens collected by Ravenel with his voluminous and multifaceted journals and other primary source materials totaling almost 5,000 pages. Plants and Planter will digitize fragile archival and specimen materials; OCR text of archival materials to allow for full-text searching and geographic information visualization; establish a Web site accessible by the general public as well as researchers and students and powered by the Drupal 7 content management system which will unite the digitized materials and interpretive texts in an easy-to-use interface allowing for keyword and full-text searching, thematic browsing, and mapping of specimen locations. The Web site will allow for the research and teaching of 19th-century natural science and regional history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$84,870 (approved)
$83,894 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2016


AQ-50986-14

Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, PA 17603-2827)
Lee Aaron Franklin (Project Director: September 2013 to November 2019)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Examined Life

The development of a first-semester interdisciplinary seminar on the examined life.

The development of a first-semester interdisciplinary seminar on the examined life. A four-member faculty team develops a course for first-semester students that explores the question, What is the examined life? The course is organized into three historical units, framed by a prologue and epilogue. In each unit, a relevant example of period art supplements the core readings and a biographical case study encourages students to assess an examined life. With a deliberate focus on close reading, analytical writing, and group discussion, the course immerses students in the very practice they are studying. The prologue invites students to compare Ancient Near Eastern cosmology and Michelangelo's "Genesis" in the Sistine Chapel. In Unit 1, on antiquity, readings of Hesiod, Sophocles, Aristotle, and Polykleitos address themes of happiness, fate, and freedom. A study of Greek and Roman portraiture shows idealized versus realistic conceptions of physical beauty, and Socrates' trial and death provides the biographical lens. Unit 2, on the medieval world, uses Augustine's Confessions as the biographical case study. Students read the Rule of St. Benedict and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to compare monasticism and pilgrimage, and a study of monastic and pilgrimage architecture elucidates the different traditions. Students also compare the emerging liberal arts of al-Ghazali with the scholasticism of Aquinas. In Unit 3, on the modern era, Shakespeare and Rembrandt illustrate a new interiority and Nietzsche and Freud its later iterations. The social emphases of Austen and Marx are contrasted with the reclusiveness of Dickinson and Thoreau. Landscape painting shows nature as a place of solace and terror, and Darwin's letters supply a biographical view. Finally, in the Epilogue, students consider the contemporary world by comparing the ubiquitousness of self-representation ("selfies" and social media) with Foucault's portrayal of individuals in institutional settings. The faculty meet weekly to integrate the perspectives of their four disciplines (philosophy, religious studies, art history, and anthropology) into the final syllabus. They also develop a series of colloquia with guest speakers, films, and faculty debates as a means to bring the intellectual community of the course to the rest of the campus. They envision the course as a model for the new "Connections" curriculum, and work with faculty to develop additional courses in this vein.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$38,000 (approved)
$38,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2019


AQ-51002-14

University of Central Arkansas (Conway, AR 72035-5001)
Jesse W. Butler (Project Director: September 2013 to August 2017)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on the Pursuit of Self-Knowledge through Philosophy and Literature

The development of a first-year course that explores, through literature and philosophy, the pursuit of self-knowledge.

The development of a first-year course that explores, through literature and philosophy, the pursuit of self-knowledge. The freshman-level course, drawing in the main on philosophical and literary works, explores the human pursuit of self-knowledge and facilitates students' understanding of themselves in relation to diverse conceptions of self and identity. The course begins with core readings on two ancient figures who shaped world history through inquiries into their own nature: the Greek philosopher Socrates and the founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama. Students study Socrates' oracle-inspired quest to "know thyself," as portrayed in Plato's Apology and Phaedo, then turn to Siddhartha's pursuit of enlightenment through inquiry into his true nature, as depicted in the Anatta-lakkhana ("Discourse on the Not Self Characteristic") and Maha-parinibbana ("Last Days of the Buddha"). This course is grounded in the comparative exploration of these figures to highlight two influential yet quite different conceptions of the self: the identification of oneself as an immortal rational soul and the view that the self is a temporary illusion fabricated through desire. To bridge the ancients with modernity, students explore Aristotle's commentary on the soul, virtuous self-cultivation in Confucianism, Christian conceptions of the soul in the medieval period, and modern conceptions of self in Rousseau and Descartes. The course then turns to an exploration of personal identity in nineteenth- and twentieth-century North American literature, focusing on four largely autobiographical works: Henry David Thoreau's Walden, Crow medicine man Yellowtail's account of his participation in the Sun Dance, Helen Keller's The Story of My Life, and bell hooks's Bone Black: Memories of Childhood. A study of the contemporary frontiers of the human self via the intersections of the sciences and humanities includes Patricia Churchland's Brain-Wise: Studies in Neurophilosophy and Owen Flanagan's The Problem of the Soul: Two Visions of Mind and How to Reconcile Them and MindScience: An East-West Dialogue, the latter a compendium of conversations with humanistic scholars and scientists in the fields of religion, psychology, neuroscience, and medicine. The course concludes with Andy Clark's Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence, which argues that modern technology is nothing less than an extension of ourselves.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$21,913 (approved)
$21,912 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2014 – 4/30/2017


BH-50618-14

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045-0900)
Kevin B. Sheets (Project Director: March 2014 to June 2016)
Forever Wild: The Adirondacks in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers using the Adirondacks to understand the meaning and influence of wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

This workshop, directed by historians Kevin Sheets and Randi Storch (State University of New York College of Cortland [SUNY Cortland]), explores the social, cultural, political, and economic relevance of the Adirondack wilderness to the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, which is taught with an urban focus. Participants learn on-site at three Adirondack Great Camps (Camp Huntington, which now belongs to SUNY Cortland, and those of the Vanderbilts and J.P. Morgan) and two museums (Adirondack Museum and 1890 House Museum), as well as on contrasting walking tours in urban Cortland and on Adirondack camp trails. Monday's focus on "Innovation, Industrialization and Domestic Life of the Gilded Age" takes Cortland as a case study for understanding life in a nineteenth-century manufacturing town. Participants work with collections at the 1890 House Museum, modeling historians' process of inquiry and interpretation. Discussing novels (by Theodore Dreiser and, more recently, by Jennifer Donnelly) that fictionalize the 1906 murder of Cortland factory worker Grace Brown, they explore the interpretation of historical events through literature. The focus on Tuesday is the cultural and aesthetic ideal of the wilderness and how Americans of the era defined "wilderness" and "nature" in contrast with the urban experience. Primary source texts and period photographs in the archive and library at Camp Huntington help illuminate the role of "wilderness" in Gilded Age ideas of masculinity, class, and nation building. Wednesday's theme, "From Enchanted Forest to Lumber Mill," focuses on the economic interdependence of city and wilderness. Adirondack Museum curators guide participants through exhibits on the region's industries and help them engage with the museum's collections and historic structures, ranging from a nineteenth-century one-room log cabin hotel to a luxurious early-twentieth-century Pullman railcar. Thursday's topic turns to "Domesticating the Wild," with study of the Great Camps that industrialists built as "civilized" retreats in the wilderness for their leisure pursuits. On Friday, "wilderness" is considered as a focus of political conflict, most notably in the 1894 debate over protecting the Adirondack forest preserve as "forever wild" in the revised state constitution. Historian Rebecca Edwards (Vassar College) situates these contentions among industrialists, reformers, and naturalists in their Progressive-Era political context. Workshop readings include excerpts from primary sources of the era, as well as such secondary works as William Cronon's essay "The Trouble with Wilderness," and selections from book-length studies by Philip Terrie, Forever Wild: A Cultural History of Wilderness in the Adirondacks, and Gail Bederman, Manliness and Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$178,809 (approved)
$178,809 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


FA-57408-13

Stephen D. Dumont
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
The Two Affections of Will: From Anselm of Canterbury (d. 1109) to John Duns Scotus (d. 1308)

This project traces the history of the theory of the 'two affections of the will' from its first occurrence in Anselm of Canterbury to its most influential development in John Duns Scotus. The distinction places within the will two inclinations, one for happiness and the other for justice, establishing the will as a self-moving, autonomous power and the locus of morality. In its particular formulation by Scotus, who makes the affection for justice the primary sense of freedom, the doctrine of the two affections is seen to have broken from the eudaimonistic ethics of the Greeks. I reconstruct the largely ignored history of the two affections as it was inserted into the mainstream debates over free will in the thirteenth century, which then served as a main source for Scotus’s own theory. I give a historically more accurate interpretation of the two affections theory in Scotus and address its commonly assigned role in his ethics as rendering the moral law naturally accessible.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


AQ-50928-13

Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5200)
Dini Metro-Roland (Project Director: September 2012 to July 2016)
Jeffrey Jones (Co Project Director: January 2014 to July 2016)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What Is Human Flourishing?"

The development of an undergraduate honors course by two faculty members to explore the question, What is human flourishing?

This course is an invitation to explore the rich and multifaceted history and nature of the question What is human flourishing? Drawing from the disciplines of philosophy, history, literature and the social sciences, we introduce students to conceptions, visions and conditions of human flourishing, its changing nature across many periods of Western history, and its manifold expressions in contemporary life. An essential component of this course is making connections between the tradition of human flourishing and its practice in the local community. In addition to attending classes, students will participate in a series of site visits to various intentional communities, organizations, art exhibits, musical performances and speaking events, and listen to organizers and artists talk about conceptions of human flourishing and efforts to bring their visions to fruition.

[Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$21,365 (approved)
$21,364 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2013 – 4/30/2016


HD-51640-13

Catholic University of America (Washington, DC 20064-0001)
Lilla Kopar (Project Director: October 2012 to March 2015)
Nancy L. Wicker (Co Project Director: October 2012 to March 2015)
Project Andvari: A Digital Portal to the Visual World of Early Medieval Northern Europe

A two-day workshop bringing together an international group of humanities scholars, cultural heritage professionals, and technical experts to begin planning for an online resource that would facilitate access to digital collections of the art and artifacts of the early medieval period in northern Europe, drawn from a range of dispersed institutional holdings.

Project Andvari is designed to provide integrated access to dispersed collections of northern European art and artifacts of the early medieval period (4th-12th centuries). Our goal is to create a digital portal offering aggregated search options and enhanced metadata. Funding is requested to convene an international workshop for humanities scholars, museum professionals, and technology experts to refine the conceptual design of the proposed research tool and identify its technological requirements in preparation for a pilot project. Ultimately, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in art, archaeology, history, and literary and religious studies of the northern periphery of medieval Europe. It will allow users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries. Its innovative application of search methods will promote analyses of relationships of artifacts and cultures, and help us discover the hitherto unnoticed.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$27,921 (approved)
$24,457 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


FT-60947-13

Emily Stetson Van Buskirk
Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8559)
Reality in Search of Literature: Lydia Ginzburg's Documentary Prose

I propose to complete the first monograph in any language on the writings of Lydia Ginzburg (1902-90), an influential Russian thinker, literary scholar and creative writer, with the larger aim of shedding light on the much-discussed problem of the crisis of the subject and individualism in the 20th century. For seven decades, Ginzburg wrote prose fragments that document, analyze, and contemplate the life of the intelligentsia, while combining the genres of autobiography, fiction, and essay. My work will follow Ginzburg's pursuit of the connections between notions of the self and narrative forms, between human personality and literary character. I draw on archival materials in order to trace, in these inherently unfinalizable narratives, the genesis of Ginzburg's concepts of the self and their representations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Slavic Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 7/31/2013


RQ-50719-13

Pennsylvania State University (University Park, PA 16802-1503)
Sandra H. Petrulionis (Project Director: December 2012 to May 2018)
Noelle A. Baker (Co Project Director: December 2012 to May 2018)
The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition

Preparation for digital publication of the final thirty-six folders of the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson (1774-1863), American scholar and aunt of Ralph Waldo Emerson. (36 months)

Born in Concord, Massachusetts, on the eve of the American Revolution, Mary Moody Emerson (1774-1863) was a self-educated scholar and author whose intellectual production bridges the 18th and 19th centuries. Most widely known as the brilliant aunt of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mary Emerson anticipated her nephew's work and published her own pseudonymous essays; her most significant literary production is a series of unpublished manuscripts she called "Almanacks" (c. 1804-1855). Spanning over 50 years and 1,000 pages, these documents feature characteristics of the spiritual diary, commonplace book, and epistolary essay and reflect the ways in which early American women adapted traditionally "masculine" genres and subject matter, demonstrated their literary artistry, and engaged in emerging public spheres. The editors are collaborating with the Brown University Women Writers Project to publish a digital edition of the complete Almanacks in its subscription database, Women Writers online.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$290,000 (approved)
$290,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 9/30/2017


PF-50410-13

Monhegan Museum (Monhegan, ME 04852)
Jennifer Pye (Project Director: December 2012 to April 2016)
Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment

Planning for improved environmental conditions to protect a collection of art, photography, and material culture that chronicles the history of Monhegan Island, Maine, ranging from early Native American fishing sites to an art colony that has flourished from the mid-1800s to the present. The planning team would investigate non-mechanical options for reducing humidity and improving conditions in the historic Lighthouse Keeper's House and the Gallery, the museum's seasonal display facilities, and optimize the existing climate control systems in the off-season storage vaults to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy consumption.

The Monhegan Museum's Planning for a Sustainable Preservation Environment project will assemble a group of skilled professionals to work collaboratively to develop a plan that addresses several serious environmental issues that pose a threat to the long-term care and conservation of the Museum's varied and significant collection of artwork, documents, photographs, and artifacts chronicling the unique history and culture of Monhegan Island, Maine. This team's focus will be on two distinct areas of remediation, the first being the investigation and small scale implementation of effective non-mechanical climate-control options for the Museum's seasonal display facilities, and the second being the pursuit of optimizing the existing climate-control systems in the Museum's off-season storage vaults with an eye towards increased energy-efficiency, and ultimately, reduced energy consumption.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$25,500 (approved)
$25,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 2/28/2015


BH-50600-13

Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT 06824-5195)
Laura R. Nash (Project Director: March 2013 to May 2015)
Duke Ellington and American Popular Culture

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world. This workshop illuminates the life and music of Duke Ellington (1899-1974) in cultural and historical context, using eight compositions (including "Mood Indigo" and "Take the 'A' Train") as "anchor works" for the week's study. Under the direction of music professor Laura Nash, participants engage with Ellington's work and his world through lectures, discussions, hands-on musical participation, and two all-day visits to historic and cultural sites in New York City. Taking the A train to Harlem, participants visit the Sugar Hill Historic District, where Ellington lived, and are guided on a private tour of the National Jazz Museum by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg. The second day trip to New York features the resources of Jazz at Lincoln Center with curator Phil Schaap. Participants explore the role of Ellington's radio and television broadcasts at the Paley Media Center with Jim Shanahan (Boston University) and learn about Ellington's long form music at Carnegie Hall, where "Black, Brown, and Beige" premiered in 1943. A jazz show at Birdland Jazz Club and a performance of swing dance music conclude the day visits to New York. In Fairfield, historian and director of Black Studies Yohuru Williams provides relevant grounding in twentieth-century African-American history and addresses intersections of race and popular culture. During the days on campus, music professor and bassist Brian Torff leads a specially assembled live big band in presentations and performances to give participants direct experience with the anchor works and with improvisation, as well as opportunities for discussion with band members. Workshop guest faculty include jazz critic and journalist Gary Giddins; educator and composer David Berger (Juilliard), who transcribed and edited the majority of Ellington's works; and Monsignor John Sanders, trombonist and librarian for the Ellington Orchestra, who shares his first-hand knowledge of playing, working, and traveling with Ellington, and of developing the Ellington archives. Prior to and during the workshop, participants read Ellington's Music is My Mistress; Harvey Cohen's Duke Ellington's America; John Edward Hasse's Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington; and Mark Tucker's The Duke Ellington Reader. They also have access to a password-protected website with Ellington recordings, sheet music, and video clips.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Film History and Criticism

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,340 (approved)
$169,165 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


PJ-50106-13

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Jennie Levine Knies (Project Director: January 2012 to January 2015)
Babak Hamidzadeh (Project Director: January 2015 to June 2016)
Robin C. Pike (Project Director: June 2016 to August 2018)
Douglas P. McElrath (Project Director: August 2018 to September 2018)
Robin C. Pike (Project Director: September 2018 to present)
Robin C. Pike (Co Project Director: August 2018 to September 2018)
Rebecca E. Wack (Co Project Director: August 2018 to August 2018)
Douglas P. McElrath (Co Project Director: September 2018 to present)
Maryland Digital Newspaper Project

Digitization of 100,000 pages of Maryland newspapers, dating from 1836 to 1922, as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP).

The University of Maryland Libraries propose a two-year project to select, digitize and contribute to the Library of Congress' Chronicling of America collection approximately 100,000 pages from historically and culturally significant newspapers from across the state of Maryland

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
National Digital Newspaper Program

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$1,778,366 (approved)
$1,431,582 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2012 – 8/31/2022

Funding details:
Original grant (2013) $325,000
Supplement (2014) $290,000
Supplement (2016) $250,000
Supplement (2018) $264,000
Supplement (2020) $302,582


BH-50495-12

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Cortland (Cortland, NY 13045-0900)
Kevin B. Sheets (Project Director: March 2012 to March 2015)
Randi Jill Storch (Co Project Director: August 2012 to March 2015)
Forever Wild: The Adirondacks in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers using the Adirondacks to understand the interconnections of urban and wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers using the Adirondacks to understand the interconnections of urban and wilderness environments in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America. Directed by historians Kevin Sheets and Randi Storch (State University of New York College of Cortland [SUNY Cortland]), this workshop explores "the social, cultural, political, and economic relevance of the Adirondack wilderness" to the history of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, which has often been taught with an urban focus. Participants learn on-site at three Adirondack Great Camps (Camp Huntington, which now belongs to SUNY Cortland, and those of the Vanderbilts and J.P. Morgan) and two museums (Adirondack Museum, 1890 House Museum), as well as on contrasting walking tours in urban Cortland and on Adirondack camp trails. Monday's focus on "Innovation, Industrialization and Domestic Life of the Gilded Age" takes Cortland as a case study for understanding life in a nineteenth-century manufacturing town. Participants work with collections at the 1890s House Museum, modeling historians' process of inquiry and interpretation. Discussing Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy, which fictionalizes the 1906 murder of Cortland factory worker Grace Brown, they explore the interpretation of historical events through literature. The focus on Tuesday is the cultural and aesthetic ideal of the wilderness, and how Americans of the era defined "wilderness" and "nature" in contrast with the urban experience. Primary source texts and period photographs in the archive and library at Camp Huntington help illuminate the role of "wilderness" in Gilded Age ideas of masculinity, class, and nation building. Wednesday's theme, "From Enchanted Forest to Lumber Mill," focuses on the economic interdependence of city and wilderness. Adirondack Museum curators guide participants through exhibits on the region's industries and help them engage with the museum's collections and historic structures, ranging from a nineteenth-century one-room log cabin hotel to a luxurious early-twentieth-century Pullman railcar. Thursday's topic turns to "Domesticating the Wild," with study of the Great Camps that industrialists built as "civilized" retreats in the wilderness for their lesiure pursuits. On Friday, "wilderness" is considered as a focus of political conflict, most notably in the 1894 debate over protecting the Adirondack forest preserve as "forever wild" in the revised state constitution. Historian Rebecca Edwards (Vassar College) situates these contentions among industrialists, reformers, and naturalists in their progressive-era political context. Workshop readings include writings by Theodore Roosevelt on "the strenuous life" and selections from Philip Terrie's Forever Wild: A Cultural History of Wilderness in the Adirondacks, William Cronon's Nature's Metropolis, Edwards's New Spirits: Americans in the Gilded Age, Robert Cherny's American Politics in the Gilded Age, and Philip DeLoria's Playing Indian.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,279 (approved)
$159,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


FA-56763-12

Stephen F. Finlay
University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Confusion of Tongues: A Theory of Normative Discourse

My book in progress, Confusion of Tongues, offers an original philosophical theory of the meaning, use, and significance of moral and normative language. Against widespread views in contemporary moral philosophy, I argue that this language can be analyzed in other, "natural" terms. A linguistic approach is employed, looking at the full range of ways in which we use words like "good," "ought," and "reason." This yields a maximally simple and unifying semantics that accommodates all these uses, moral and nonmoral. I argue that many of the central metaethical puzzles that have led to rejection of the possibility of such analyses are a result of the complexity of the pragmatics of normative language, or how it is used in context in pursuit of speaker's ends. These puzzles can be solved by application of a single fundamental pragmatic principle. I propose to use a fellowship to complete the second half of this project.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2012 – 7/31/2013


AB-50120-12

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania (Lincoln University, PA 19352-9141)
Marilyn Button (Project Director: July 2011 to September 2015)
Chiekde Ihejirika (Co Project Director: December 2011 to September 2015)
Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy: a Humanities Initiative

A two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty would conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage.

"Lincoln University of Pennsylvania's Global Heritage and Legacy" consists of a two-year program of study, framed by two conferences, in which ten faculty members conduct research and develop teaching modules on Lincoln University's diasporic heritage. This project seeks to revive the humanities at what has become an increasingly science-dominated institution. It does so by shaping a program that harnesses Lincoln University's distinctive history as the first institution of higher learning for African Americans (1854), ample legacy of prominent graduates, and ongoing connections with Africa and the Caribbean. Lincoln University taught Liberian boys beginning in 1873 and, nearly a century later, students from the Caribbean and emerging African nations. It graduated the first president of independent Nigeria and the first prime minister of Ghana. Lincoln University's distinctive humanities alumni include Langston Hughes of the Harlem Renaissance; the late writer and musician Gil Scott Heron; Larry Neal, founder of the Black Arts Movement; and film historian Donald Bogle. The program opens with a four-day summer institute with topics including "Lincoln University poets and their impact on the world; the University's impact on African history and Africa's impact on the University; the University and the Civil Rights Movement; and Frederick Douglass as a catalyzing figure for humanities studies." Sessions also introduce faculty to the university's online archives and collection of African art. During the following academic year, ten core faculty, selected through competition, conduct research and develop course modules that build on the institute topics and university resources. They present this work at a two-day humanities conference in the fall of 2013. Though the summer institute and fall conference are be open to all faculty and the general public, priority for the core faculty would be given to those who teach first-year students in order to maximize the program's impact.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HBCUs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$100,000 (approved)
$100,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


AC-50156-12

University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Mayaguez, PR 00680-6475)
Dana L. Collins (Project Director: July 2011 to October 2016)
The Convergence of Culture and Science: Expanding the Humanities Curriculum

A series of faculty seminars and curriculum development activities on artificial intelligence; the confluence of philosophy, engineering, and technological choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution.

"The Convergence of Culture and Science: Expanding the Humanities Curriculum" is a three-year project at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, consisting of a series of faculty development seminars and related follow-up activities on artificial intelligence; the confluence of philosophy, engineering, and technological choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution. The project explores the intersection of the humanities and the growing density and depth of scientific discoveries and bourgeoning changes in technologies. Over the three years, faculty from the humanities, engineering, and the social, natural, and agricultural sciences read and discuss key texts with invited scholars in preparation for developing three interdisciplinary courses on artificial intelligence; appropriate technology: engineering, philosophy, and technology choice; and theism, cosmology, and evolution. In year one, participants read Descartes' Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy, Pamela McCorduck's Machines Who Think, and Tim Crane's The Mechanical Mind: A Philosophical Introduction to Minds, Machines and Mental Representation, among other works, to consider the social, philosophical, psychological, and technical aspects of the creation and use of artificial intelligence. In year two, guest scholars Carl Mitcham (Colorado School of Mines) and Indira Nair (Carnegie Mellon University) lead faculty in explorations of the philosophical and social aspects of engineering design and technological innovation, related questions of policy, and the "idea of 'progress,'" using such works as Mitcham's Thinking Through Technology: The Path Between Engineering and Philosophy and D. Riley's Engineering and Social Justice. Year three features scholars Jorge Ferrer-Negron (UPRM), Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Donald Pfister (Harvard University) in discussions of the history of theism, the philosophy of religion, the Big Bang and String theories of the origins of the universe, and Darwin's On the Origin of Species and its impact in the world. Teleconferences extend the academic exchanges with scholars.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Initiatives: HSIs

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$99,737 (approved)
$94,976 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2016


AQ-50581-12

CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay College (New York, NY 10019-1007)
Jonathan A. Jacobs (Project Director: September 2011 to May 2015)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "Is Virtue Its Own Reward?"

The development of an undergraduate course on the question, Is virtue its own reward?

Jonathan Jacobs, a professor of philosophy and the recently appointed director of the Institute for Criminal Justice and Ethics at John Jay College, develops an undergraduate course on the relationship between virtue and happiness. The matter, he argues, "is among the most fundamental and enduring concerns for any reflective person." Sub-themes under the general question include the varieties of moral value and how they are realized, what makes an excellent life, whether morality is "desirable and enjoyable for its own sake," and "whether vice and moral corruption undermine happiness and damage prospects for it." The course utilizes sources from Jewish, Islamic, Christian, and non-religious philosophical traditions as well as works of fiction. It begins with ancient perspectives in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and progresses to "Eight Chapters" and "Laws Concerning Character Traits" by Moses Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas's "Treatise on the Virtues," and Alfarabi's "The Attainment of Happiness." The early modern period is represented by Adam Smith's The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Joseph Butler's "A Dissertation on the Nature of Virtue," and Immanuel Kant's The Doctrine of Virtue. The course then turns to Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim and Andre Gide's The Immoralist for literary treatments and to writings by Gabrielle Taylor, Thomas Nagel, and Bernard Williams on the concept of "moral luck." In justifying his use of the two novels, Professor Jacobs argues that they "are compelling studies of conscience, self-respect, moral aspiration, guilt, shame, love, friendship, the challenges of failures of integrity, and the effort to change one's character." The project director states that he stretches intellectually by investigating the subject of vice and weakness, learning how to incorporate literary narrative into his teaching with the help of colleagues, and closely studying several works on the course syllabus that are new to his teaching.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$24,991 (approved)
$24,974 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 12/31/2014


AQ-50610-12

New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Mark Walker (Project Director: September 2011 to September 2014)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What Is the Nature of Happiness?"

The development of an undergraduate seminar on the question, What is the nature of happiness?

Mark Walker, an assistant professor of philosophy, develops a course on "the nature, value and means to obtain happiness." He argues that "the nature of happiness is not as well understood as we might imagine or hope. Its value may not be what we think it is, and we may be mistaken in how to pursue it." The course utilizes insights from classic Western sources, contemporary social science, and Buddhism. Professor Walker notes that this course might be the first time that many of his students, a number of them first-generation undergraduates, tackle original texts; hence, it includes an introductory section on critical thinking. Then the course moves through a number of topics, first using Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and a recent psychological study, "The Benefits of Frequent Positive Affect: Does Happiness Lead to Success?" by Sonya Lyubormirsky and others, to complicate the question of whether the inhabitants of Huxley's "brave new world" are happier than we are. Next, it looks at the film The Matrix to see if the altered mental state of the character Cypher makes him "really happy." Plato's Myth of the Cave from the Republic and a recent article by Charles L. Griswold elaborate the mental state theory of happiness. The course then moves beyond such mental accounts to Plato's Philebus and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics to consider other bases of happiness in knowledge and virtue; the idea that there might be a difference between happiness and well-being will also be introduced. J. S. Mill's Utilitarianism then offers the view that people have a duty to maximize total happiness. Recent readings from social science and "positive psychology" by Lyubormirsky, Martin Seligman, and others allow the students to consider whether success leads to happiness or happiness to success. Political considerations regarding happiness are addressed through John Locke's Two Treatises of Government, and the Declaration of Independence. Readings from contemporary social science by Ed Diener, John Helliwell, and Haifing Huang explore whether public policy can be used to promote happiness. Finally, the class considers Buddhist perspectives articulated by the Dalai Lama about the root causes of happiness and unhappiness. In addition to standard classroom activities, the students are given opportunities to present papers to the undergraduate philosophy club and to set up a "philosophy booth" during one of the class periods to engage other students in the question. Professor Walker states that since most of his teaching is on contemporary sources, he wishes to use the course development time to improve his skills with historical texts and to increase his understanding of Buddhism.

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$24,995 (approved)
$20,806 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2012 – 4/30/2014


FT-59527-12

David C. Engerman
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2700)
The Global Politics of the Modern: India and the Three Worlds of the Cold War

This project explores the full global dimensions of the Cold War by integrating the perspective of the global south. Specifically, it traces India's efforts, under leaders from Jawaharlal Nehru to Indira Gandhi, to navigate between divergent US and Soviet visions in pursuit of Indian dreams of economic and political modernity. Five chapters on different forms of aid--from agriculture to industry and atomic energy, from economic expertise to military supplies--shed light on the complex relationship between India, as aid recipient, and competing donors. Examining new archival sources on Soviet and American efforts to bring India into closer alliance, the project also incorporates the Subaltern School's critiques of postcolonial state-building. It builds on scholarship from various subfields of history, political science, and economics to present a new approach to understanding the global implications of American-Soviet conflict in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 8/31/2012


FT-59618-12

David Landy
San Francisco State University Foundation Inc. (San Francisco, CA 94132-1722)
Kant's Inferentialism: the Case Against Hume's Theory of Mental Representation

I am seeking support for research that will contribute to the book I am writing on the theories of mental representation of Hume and Kant. Hume and Kant are two of the most important figures in the history of philosophy. Unfortunately, they have also been two of the most difficult philosophers to understand. Scholars have debated about what Kant's arguments are against Hume, whether these arguments are successful, and whether Hume has a satisfactory response to them. Each philosopher has been interpreted in turn as a metaphysician, epistemologist, cognitive scientist, and philosopher of science. I will show that none of these interpretations has been successful because both Hume's and Kant's philosophical systems begin with a question that is prior to any of these pursuits. They each begin with the question of how it is that a mental representation comes to be about whatever it is about. How is it that we form thoughts that are representations of whatever they are representations of?

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2012 – 8/31/2012


FT-59758-12

Laurie Dahlberg
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)
Photography and the Transformation of a Gentleman's Art, 1839-1900

This book project examines the 19th-century amateur in photography in France, Great Britain, and the United States, from the introduction of photography in 1839 through the watershed moment of the introduction of the Kodak #1 (1888) and its aftermath. I argue that the amateur functions as a barometer of the vicissitudes of class and culture as the compounding changes of industrial modernity brought the century to a close. More than any other visual medium, amateur photography allows us to witness the self-conscious exteriorization of the middle class, as photography grew from the rarefied pursuit of a handful of families on their estates to the constant companion of office workers and shop girls in their off-hours. The topic allows us a singular view to international debates of technological and social progress, inflected by the dynamics of class and gender. I seek support to finish the research and writing of Chapter Three, which deals with the arrival of Kodak and its repercussions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 7/31/2012


FT-60041-12

David Forman
Board of Regents Nevada System of Higher Education (Las Vegas, NV 89154-9900)
Kant on Freedom and the Limits of Moral Philosophy

The book presents a new interpretation of Kant's account of human freedom that showcases a neglected aspect of Kant's critical philosophy: how it is only by respecting the proper limits of our reasoning about moral obligation (thus respecting the limits of moral philosophy) that a suitable account of human freedom and responsibility can be defended.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2012 – 7/31/2012


HB-50124-11

Christina Maria Bueno
Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL 60625-4699)
The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1877-1910

With the support of an NEH Fellowship, I will complete the last three chapters of a book manuscript titled "The Allure of Antiquity: Archaeology and the Making of Modern Mexico (1877-1910)." This study examines the ways in which the Mexican government took control of the nation’s pre-Hispanic remains and used them for the purposes of state and nation building during the Porfiriato, the regime of Porfirio Díaz. It argues that the Porfirian regime was the first in Mexico to develop a concerted project to gather, preserve, and display pre-Hispanic antiquities. It underscores how this project stemmed from an elite counterimperial consciousness that sought to shape and defend Mexico’s national image. At the same time, however, it also reveals how the process of making the national archaeological patrimony reinforced patterns of domination.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Latin American History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


FB-55583-11

Eiko Maruko Siniawer
Williams College (Williamstown, MA 01267-2600)
A Cultural, Social, and Intellectual History of Frugality and Wastefulness in Postwar Japan

What is waste? This question is at the heart of this project--a cultural, social, and intellectual history of the concepts of waste and wastefulness in Japan from the early 1950s through the present. It asks why certain things, ideas, and people have been labeled and categorized as waste at particular moments of time, and reclaimed as not waste at others. It considers how and why understandings of waste and wastefulness were affected by the economic rollercoaster ride of the postwar era, and by societal and cultural shifts having to do with gender, work, and environmentalism. This history of waste will illuminate what various people deemed valuable and valueless, and what was considered worthy and not worthy of time, space, and money. The book manuscript will ultimately capture how various people in a postindustrial, consumerist Japan sought to determine what they valued--in everyday life, at home and in the workplace, in politics, in Japan's national identity and its place in the world.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012


RA-50098-11

Huntington Library (San Marino, CA 91108-1299)
Robert C. Ritchie (Project Director: August 2010 to April 2012)
Steve Hindle (Project Director: April 2012 to May 2016)
Research Fellowships at the Huntington Library

One twelve-month and two nine-month fellowships a year for three years.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is pleased to submit this request to renew NEH support for The Huntington's National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$405,000 (approved)
$403,172 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


RA-50105-11

Newberry Library (Chicago, IL 60610-3380)
David Spadafora (Project Director: August 2010 to October 2011)
Daniel Greene (Project Director: October 2011 to March 2014)
Diane Dillon (Project Director: March 2014 to June 2016)
NEH Fellowships at the Newberry Library

The equivalent of three twelve-month residential fellowships a year for three years.

The Newberry Library requests funding for three years of fellowship support to continue a highly successful program of residential humanities fellowships at the Newberry Library. Over three decades this program has generated a rich harvest of humanities scholarship while also serving as a catalyst for the creation of a dynamic intellectual community within this research institution. This proposal details the achievements and impact of the program and outlines the Library's procedures for publicizing the program, selecting the fellows, and fostering their scholarly activities.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$480,600 (approved)
$480,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2015


AQ-50363-11

Wheaton College (Norton, MA 02766-2322)
John Partridge (Project Director: September 2010 to April 2014)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What is the Good Life?"

The development of a first-year seminar on the question, What is the good life?

This course examines historical and contemporary reflections on the question, “what is the good life?” starting with Plato’s Apology. Socrates’ life and death inspired three ways of thinking about the best life. Accordingly, this course features three units: Happiness, Morality, and Meaning. Students will appreciate the breadth and complexity of each tradition and the implications of the different answers given within them. The course will enlighten students and empower them to pursue the good life as they see it. The principal texts exemplify the core commitments within each tradition, while additional works put the three traditions into conversation with one another. Finally, each unit includes a figure embodying something essential in each tradition. Students will study the life and work of Beethoven (happiness), Mother Teresa (morality), and Paul Gauguin (meaning), and will identify how the conception of the good life in each tradition informs these lives.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2013


AQ-50371-11

Centre College of Kentucky (Danville, KY 40422-1309)
William "Beau" Weston (Project Director: September 2010 to September 2014)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What is a Happy Society?"

The development of an upper level course on the question, What is a happy society?

What is a happy society? We will consider answers to this question from classic philosophical arguments and compare them with empirical studies from modern social science. We will first consider answers to this question from classical philosophical arguments (Aristotle, Jeremy Bentham, and John Stuart Mill). Next, we will study Tocqueville?s seminal work examining the birth and early development of a modern society. Finally, we will discuss the findings of new studies such as ?positive psychology? and ?happiness economics? concerning what makes people happy. Within this classical-to-modern context, we will explore the seeming elements of a happy society (e.g. service to others, a culture of trust, familial networks) and the role they play, either singularly or together, in creating a happy society.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Sociology

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$23,748 (approved)
$23,747 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 5/31/2014


FT-58516-11

Amy Dorothea Dooling
Connecticut College (New London, CT 06320-4150)
Representations of Labor Migration in Post-Mao China

The proposed project contributes to a book-length study on the relationship between internal labor migration and contemporary cultural production in post-Mao China. The study reveals the intense struggle rural migrants face in their pursuit of "opportunity" and the powerful creative impulse to give voice to these experiences by foregrounding and analyzing the diverse literary and artistic output of rural labor migrants in urban areas, from poetry and fiction published in self-funded magazines and online forums, to public performances of drama and music, to grassroots cultural festivals and exhibitions within migrant communities. The multifaceted and often political narratives of mobility, low-wage labor, and temporary urban existence expressed in migrant art are read as assertions of self-definition which, among other factors, challenge popular constructs of migrant naïveté and victimization circulating in mainstream Chinese and international media.

Project fields:
Asian Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2011 – 7/31/2011


TR-50286-11

Filmmakers Collaborative, Inc. (Melrose, MA 02176-3933)
Sarah Colt (Project Director: January 2011 to present)
Henry Ford and the American Dream

Production of a two-hour film that explores the life of Henry Ford, America's pre-eminent businessman and one of the most influential Americans of the 20th century.

This is a request to the NEH for funds to support the production of "Henry Ford and the American Dream", a two-hour film to be produced by Sarah Colt with the FILMMAKER’S COLLABORATIVE and a commitment for a national PBS broadcast from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. The film explores the life of America’s pre-eminent businessman, and one of the most influential Americans of the twentieth century. It tells the story of Ford’s role in the creation of the Model T; the assembly line, which revolutionized the industrial world; and the Five Dollar Day, which laid the foundation for a prosperous American middle class. It examines Ford’s role in shifting the American understanding of “the pursuit of happiness” to embrace consumption, and as a master publicist who transformed the uses of celebrity. It also explores the dark side of Ford, including his vehement anti-Semitism, ill-treatment of workers, militant anti-unionism, and his devastating cruelty to his son.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Media Makers: Production Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$600,000 (approved)
$600,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2011 – 10/31/2012


BC-50564-10

Oregon Council for the Humanities (Portland, OR 97205-2827)
Cara Ungar (Project Director: May 2010 to February 2013)
Carole Shellhart (Project Director: February 2013 to August 2013)
Adam Davis (Project Director: August 2013 to September 2014)
Looking at America: Globalism, Media and Consumer Culture, and Place and Community.

To support a teacher institute on "The Many Faces of Fundamentalism"; the Oregon Humanities Honors Symposium for high school students on the nature of happiness; a Humanities in Perspective free college-level could for low-income adults; and an issue of Oregon Humanities magazine focusing on the theme "Belong," exploring the effects of homogeneity, segregation, fundamentalism, and extremism on American history, culture, and identities.

Oregon Humanities? thematic categories of Globalism, Media and Consumer Culture, and Place and Community will be focused through four programs that will help more than 12,000 Oregonians think about issues integral to the American story. First, the Teacher Institute, "The Many Faces of Fundamentalism," will serve thirty teachers from all regions of the state. Second, Happy Camp: Oregon Humanities Honors Symposium is a three-day overnight think camp for high-school students throughout Oregon. Students participate in collective inquiry on the pursuit of happiness. Third, Humanity in Perspective will provide a free college-level course in the humanities for low-income adults that examines the foundations of democracy. Finally, an issue of our award-winning Oregon Humanities magazine will explore the impacts of homogeneity, segregation, fundamentalism, and extremism on American history, culture, and identities. These projects take place between September 1, 2010 and September 1, 2011.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals:
$105,560 (approved)
$105,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 9/30/2011


FA-55502-10

Mounira Maya Charrad
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Modernity within Islam: The Politics of Progressive Family Law Reform

In this project entitled "Modernity within Islam: The Politics of Progressive Family Law Reform," I consider countries and time periods in which policy makers have engaged in a discourse of modernity and pursued reforms of Islamic family law. I analyze three major examples: Turkey in the 1920s under Ataturk, Tunisia in the 1950s under Bourguiba, and Morocco in 2004 under Mohamed VI. All three cases are widely regarded by scholars as representing the most progressive legislation on family and gender among Muslim countries in the Middle East. I pose the following key questions: what features do these cases have in common and how do they inform us about the arguments that law makers and power holders have used to construct the discourse of modernity. I plan to analyze two kinds of texts: 1. the legal texts that constitute the reforms, and 2. the speeches made by power holders in presenting the reforms.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


PG-50884-10

City of Gloucester (Gloucester, MA 01930)
Dale T. Brown (Project Director: May 2009 to March 2011)
Assessment of WPA Mural Collection in Gloucester City Hall

The hiring of a conservator to assess the condition of 11 Works Progress Administration (WPA) murals installed in Gloucester City Hall in the late 1930s. Part of over 2,500 murals created nationwide, these murals by leading WPA artists Frederick Mulhaupt, Charles Allen Winter, Oscar Anderson, and Frederick Stoddard both record and form a part of the city's cultural and civic history.

This proposal would fund a preservation assessment of eleven WPA murals installed in the City Hall of Gloucester, MA. This important collection includes murals painted by Frederick Mulhaupt, Charles Allen Winter, Oscar Anderson, and Frederick Stoddard (attributed). The artwork reflects Gloucester's significant heritage as a center for artists in the early 20th century. The murals depict scenes of Gloucester's history, community life, industry and culture, as well as government pursuits and ideals. The murals and the WPA program are the subject of ongoing research and are the focus of tours and lectures. The proposal is submitted by the Gloucester Committee for the Arts, stewards of the City's art collection. The murals are in clear need of cleaning and conservation 80 years after their original installation in City Hall and in various City schools. If these murals were to deteriorate, Gloucester and the nation would lose a valuable cultural and historical resource.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


RA-50085-10

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
David Schalkwyk (Project Director: August 2009 to April 2013)
Michael Lawrence Witmore (Project Director: April 2013 to April 2014)
Kathleen Lynch (Project Director: April 2014 to April 2016)
Long-term Residential Fellowships at the Folger Shakespeare Library

The equivalent of one twelve-month and one six-month fellowship a year for three years.

The Fellowship Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library is an essential component of the Library's mission to render its collection of rare materials accessible to scholars for advanced research. The program encourages ongoing cross-disciplinary dialogue among scholars who use the collection. The long-term fellows form the core of a much larger international program of intellectual exchange about the early modern period. The Folger requests funding for 3 long-term fellows per academic year for residencies in 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, and requests funds to promote the program and to select the fellows.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$244,800 (approved)
$244,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 6/30/2014


AQ-50234-10

Ursinus College (Collegeville, PA 19426-2513)
Jonathan D. Marks (Project Director: September 2009 to April 2014)
NEH Enduring Questions Course on "What is Love?"

The development of an upper-level undergraduate course on the nature of love in works by Augustine, Shakespeare, Rousseau, Austen, Freud, and Darwin.

This course treats a question that cuts across the humanities disciplines - namely, 'what is love?" It contributes to our investigation of that question by drawing on multiple disciplines and by exploring what humanists can learn from non-humanists, including natural and social scientists, about love. Students will seek to develop a provisional understanding of love by considering these questions, among others: Is love an expansive feeling that one self-sufficient person feels for another, or is it a need that drives an incomplete person to seek someone to make him whole? Is love reasonable, so that we can inquire into whom we should love, or is it fundamentally mysterious and spontaneous, offering itself only to people who know reason's limits? Is loving another human being the ultimate end, or is it part of a bigger pursuit, of communion with God, or of happiness, or of immortality? Readings will include Plato's Symposium, Austen's Pride and Prejudice and Freud's Three Essays.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$24,808 (approved)
$24,808 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2010 – 5/31/2012


FT-58183-10

Emrys Westacott
Alfred University (Alfred, NY 14802-1205)
Frugality: A Philosophical Study

My project is a book-length philosophical examination of the concept of frugality, understood here to mean the virtue of living simply with few needs or expenses. Questions posed include: Why has frugality traditionally been considered a virtue? Should it still be regarded as a virtue today? Why is extravagance commonly seen as a vice? Is this view reasonable? Is there a connection between frugality and happiness? Is there a connection between frugality and wisdom. The book will draw from a venerable philosophical and literary tradition and connect up with contemporary research in the social sciences.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


RQ-50462-10

Pennsylvania State University (University Park, PA 16802-1503)
Sandra H. Petrulionis (Project Director: November 2009 to November 2014)
The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition

Preparation for publication of a scholarly, annotated, digital edition of the complete Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson. (36 months)

Born in Concord, Massachusetts on the eve of the American Revolution, Mary Moody Emerson (1774-1863) was a self-educated scholar, theologian, and author whose intellectual production bridges the 18th and 19th centuries. Most widely known as the brilliant aunt of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mary Emerson influenced her nephew's work and published her own pseudonymous essays; her most significant accomplishment is a series of unpublished manuscripts she called "Almanacks" (c. 1804-1855). Spanning over fifty years and one thousand pages, these documents feature characteristics of the spiritual diary, philosophical commonplace book, and epistolary essay and demonstrate the ways in which early American women adapted traditionally "masculine" genres and subject matter. The editors are collaborating with the director and staff of the Brown University Women Writers Project to publish a scholarly digital edition of the complete Almanacks in their subscription database, Women Writers Online.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$230,000 (approved)
$230,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 8/31/2013


BC-50531-10

Oklahoma Humanities Council (Oklahoma City, OK 73102-2215)
David Pettyjohn (Project Director: March 2010 to September 2014)
Oklahoma We the People 2010-2012

To expand the Council's regrant program for projects that explore a wide variety of topics in American history and culture, with particular emphasis on projects which stimulate discussion between diverse groups, projects in rural areas, projects which address underserved audiences, and projects which use innovative program formats.

To continue its advancement of the We the People initiative, the Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) will place a statewide call for proposals that focus on themes and events in American history.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals:
$104,880 (approved)
$104,880 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 12/31/2012


HD-51161-10

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Tanya E. Clement (Project Director: March 2010 to September 2013)
Professionalization in Digital Humanities Centers

A two-day workshop and online discussion resulting in recommendations for establishing professional standards for evaluating scholarship developed at digital humanities centers.

Since the 1990s, digital humanities centers have sprung up in increasing numbers to accommodate the challenges to the traditional humanities posed by new technologies, as well as the particular forms of knowledge and interdisciplinarity they entail. As these centers flourish, they are being staffed by a new kind of hybrid scholar, often with advanced degrees, who eschews traditional tenure track positions while nonetheless being deeply invested in the pursuit of innovative research. These scholars are not well represented by the normative humanities division between faculty research and service staff and even the most innovative digital humanities centers have been slow to evolve new standards and methods for their professional development. We are applying for a Digital Humanities Level 1 Start Up grant to support a two-day workshop and online discussion that will result in a white paper and a set of recommendations for establishing career paths within digital humanities centers.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$24,999 (approved)
$24,967 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


GI-50097-10

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Susan Dackerman (Project Director: September 2008 to June 2013)
Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe

Implementation of a traveling exhibition, a colloquium, a catalog, an interactive website, and educational and public programs exploring the alliance between printmakers and scientists in the 16th century.

The Harvard Art Museum will organize, present, and circulate a groundbreaking interpretive exhibition that will transform traditional assumptions about the role of artists in the production of new forms of knowledge during the Renaissance's Scientific Revolution. The museum requests funds for the implementation of the major traveling exhibition, Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe, and for support of its related publications and public programming. The exhibition, which opens jointly at Harvard's Sackler Museum and Wellesley College's Davis Art Museum, addresses the participation of such celebrated northern European artists as Albrecht Dürer, Hendrick Goltzius, and Hans Holbein in the scientific inquiries of the sixteenth century, especially as manifested in their printed works. Such an investigation reveals the previously unexamined close working relationships between the artistic and scientific communities, and the exchanges of influence between them.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Arts, General

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$350,000 (approved)
$350,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 12/31/2012


RQ-50373-09

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Esther Katz (Project Director: November 2008 to June 2012)
The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger: Book and Digital Editions

The final stages of preparation of volume 3, and preparation of volume 4, which will be the final volume of the print edition.

The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger, a four-volume book edition, highlights the events that propelled Margaret Sanger's (1879-1966) leadership of the birth control movement, the nature and direction of that leadership, and the strategies, ideas and controversies that characterized this crusade. This proposal seeks funding to complete our final volume, "'Round the World for Birth Control: 1920-1966" and develop the infrastructure for the digital publication of topic-based document groups that will link the narrative flow of the selected book edition with the breadth and comprehensiveness of the microfilm. Our goal in creating a digital Sanger Papers is not to replicate the book or the microfilm, but to take advantage of the unique strengths of the digital medium to create an innovative, fully searchable, documents-based publication that will meet the increased needs of scholars and students, and satisfy future expectations for dynamic publication.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Scholarly Editions and Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2011


AQ-50005-09

Roosevelt University (Chicago, IL 60605-1394)
Svetozar Yuliyanov Minkov (Project Director: November 2008 to April 2014)
Course on Happiness: under the Enduring Questions Pilot Course Program

Development of an undergraduate course on the nature of happiness and fulfillment, as explored through the works of Greek, English, and French theorists.

Design and teach at Roosevelt University (at least twice) a course on the enduring issue of happiness.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$24,143 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


AQ-50014-09

SUNY Research Foundation, College at Purchase (Purchase, NY 10577-1402)
Casey Haskins (Project Director: November 2008 to June 2011)
Questions of Happiness: Philosophy, Cinema, and Literature

The development of a course for undergraduates exploring the meaning and attainability of human happiness.

This course will examine the question "What is happiness?," using a variety of ancient and modern literary and philosophical works as well as films of diverse genres. Although this question is a staple of philosophical ethics courses, the importance of "Questions of Happiness" is that its approach will be both more interdisciplinary and "predisciplinary" than a traditional philosophy course. Its relation to larger issues in the humanities is methodological: rather than using strictly philosophical texts, it will use paired films and texts that will be juxtaposed along the axes of traditional vs. contemporary & philosophical vs. literary/cinematic. It is designed for all students, regardless of major, who seek to broaden their sense of the possibilities of human experience, as well as students who are already specifically studying film, literature, or philosophy.

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


AQ-50033-09

Scripps College (Claremont, CA 91711-3948)
Nathalie Rachlin (Project Director: November 2008 to June 2012)
What Is Happiness?

The development of a course that explores the question, What is happiness? by taking a historical overview of its changing interpretations from Greek antiquity to the present day.

Most people seem to agree that happiness is one of life's most important goals, yet they do not know how to achieve it. What is it about happiness that makes the concept and perhaps its reality so elusive? In the last two decades, social scientists, mostly psychologists and economists, have done much research on the topic that was once primarily the domain of philosophy, ethics, and religion. The "hard" science of happiness is still in its infancy, but neurobiologists are starting to understand the chemistry of happiness. Yet, for all our scientific findings, the concept of happiness remains as mysterious and contradictory as it was for the ancient Greeks. Through an exploration of the ways in which thinkers across time, across cultures, and across disciplines have tried to answer the question "What is happiness"?, this course aims to provide students with a set of conceptual tools and research findings that informs their own reflections on what it means to be happy.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Enduring Questions: Pilot Course Grants

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$21,000 (approved)
$21,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 12/31/2011


TR-50085-09

City Lore, Inc. (New York, NY 10003-9345)
Ric Burns (Project Director: February 2009 to present)
America, Whaling, and the World

Production of a two-hour documentary exploring the history, culture, and significance of the American whaling industry from 1620 to 1924.

INTO THE DEEP: America, Whaling & the World: a two-hour documentary film for national broadcast on PBS in 2010, directed by Ric Burns and co-produced by Steeplechase Films, American Experience, and WGBH/Boston, explores the history, culture and significance of the American whaling industry from its 17th century origins in drift and shore-whaling, through the golden age of deep ocean whaling in the 18th and 19th centuries, and on to the industry's demise in the decades following the American Civil War. Combining stunning archival material with powerful on-camera interviews, evocative live cinematography, dramatic reenactments, and underwater footage of whales at sea, the film will bring alive the complex reality and extraordinary experience of American whaling as the nation rose to the threshold of global power, all the while registering the larger forces, economic, social, cultural, technological and environmental, that shaped and propelled American Whaling from start to finish.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Media Makers: Production Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$725,000 (approved)
$725,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 3/31/2010


BR-50090-09

Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn, NY 11201-2711)
Kate Fermoile (Project Director: February 2009 to March 2014)
In Pursuit of Freedom

Implementation of a multifaceted program on the history of abolitionism in Brooklyn: including three exhibitions, permanent historic markers, walking tours, a website, and public programs.

In Pursuit of Freedom is a multifaceted public program tracing the history of abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in Brooklyn providing new resources for understanding this dramatic and profoundly significant chapter in American history. Comprising exhibitions, a permanently marked walking tour system, and a content-rich interactive web site, this landmark project will engage metropolitan and national audiences, transforming public memory of this critical chapter of the history of American freedom. The project will bring together the resources of three complimentary organizations the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Weeksville Heritage Center, and the Irondale Ensemble Project.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Interpreting America's Historic Places: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$400,000 (approved)
$399,984 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 11/30/2013


LL-50063-09

Norwalk Community College (Norwalk, CT 06854-1655)
Linda P. Lerman (Project Director: February 2009 to present)
Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries

The Norwalk Community College, (NCC) Everett I.L. Baker Library is well suited for hosting Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War. Showcasing the Lincoln exhibit at the Baker Library will ensure that it will reach people from wide and diverse backgrounds. Students, faculty, staff, senior citizens, historians and many others will learn how the Civil War was one of the greatest challenges faced by our nation. Although the conflict ended nearly 150 years ago, it is imperative that every citizen and resident understand the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War and President Lincolns central role. The exhibit is particularly significant in this bicentennial year of Lincoln's birth and the election and inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States. It is the "unfinished work" of community colleges to help America live up to the ideals of our forefathers and provide a chance for all to "pursue their full measure of happiness".

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Small Grants to Libraries: Lincoln, Constitution and Civil War

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2009 – 12/31/2013


FS-50234-09

Georgia Historical Society, Inc. (Savannah, GA 31401-4889)
W. Todd Groce (Project Director: March 2009 to April 2016)
The American Civil War at 150: New Approaches

A four-week college and university faculty member summer seminar for sixteen participants examining recent scholarship on the Civil War.

The Georgia Historical Society proposes to host a four-week, residential NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers entitled, "The American Civil War at 150: New Approaches" from June 6, 2010 - July 2, 2010 in Savannah, Georgia. Educators will be engaged in rigorous study and pursuit of scholarly exploration on the American Civil War through participation in scholarly lectures, targeted readings, directed research in the GHS's library and archives, and select site visit. The program has been designed to challenge participants' preconceived notions of the reasons behind, the players within, and the consequences of a war that threatened to undermine the American experiment as laid out by the Founding Fathers and that propelled a fledgling nation further forward towards the attainment of the ideals of liberty and justice for a growing and diverse citizenry.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,200 (approved)
$150,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 9/30/2010

Funding details:
Original grant (2009) $140,200
Supplement (2010) $10,000


BC-50464-09

Oregon Council for the Humanities (Portland, OR 97205-2827)
Cara Ungar (Project Director: March 2009 to February 2013)
Carole Shellhart (Project Director: February 2013 to August 2013)
Adam Davis (Project Director: August 2013 to March 2011)
Looking at America: Globalism, Media and Consumer Culture, and Place and Community.

The development of the Summer Teacher Institute, "The Unfinished Nation," the Summer Honors Symposium, "The Pursuit of Happiness" for high school students, a college-level course for low-income adults, "Humanity in Perspective," and a special issue of Oregon Humanities magazine that examines consumerism and American identity.

OCH's new thematic categories of Globalism, Media and Consumer Culture, and Place and Community will be focused through We The People towards four programs that reach different audiences, and help Oregonians think about issues integral to the American story. First, the OCH Summer Teacher Institute The Unfinished Nation -- July 17-19 on the campus of Southern Oregon University -- will serve 30 teachers from all regions of the state. Second, the OCH Summer Honors Symposium: The Pursuit of Happiness is a three-day overnight think camp for high-school students from all of Oregon. Third, Humanity in Perspective will provide a free college-level course in the humanities for low-income adults that examines the foundations of democracy. Finally, Oregon Humanities summer issue will examine how consumerism and the accumulation of "stuff" has become a part of the American identity. These projects will commence July 1, 2009 and end, including any evaluation, by June 30, 2010.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$105,560 (approved)
$105,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 8/31/2010


RA-50076-09

Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (Williamsburg, VA 23187-8781)
Ronald Hoffman (Project Director: August 2008 to August 2013)
Karin A. Wulf (Project Director: August 2013 to November 2014)
Postdoctoral Fellowships

The equivalent of one fellowship per year for three years.

The Omohundro Institute seeks to renew, through the Endowment's Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions, funds for two-year postdoctoral fellowships for the 2010-2013 grant period. The proposal requests support for three fellows who will conduct research in areas of early American studies with the goal of preparing manuscripts for book publication. They will be NEH fellows in successive twelve-month terms in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The Institute's sixty-three-year-old fellowship program has a well-deserved reputation for quality and productivity and is held in high regard by the historical profession. As a dedicated research center and a publisher of important work about the early American period, the Omohundro Institute provides an ideal setting for scholars working on their first book-length publications.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$160,200 (approved)
$160,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2014


RA-50080-09

New York Public Library (New York, NY 10016-0133)
Howard Dodson (Project Director: August 2008 to August 2011)
Khalil Gibran Muhammad (Project Director: August 2011 to April 2016)
The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture - Scholars in Residence Program

The equivalent of four fellowships each year for three years.

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of The New York Public Library (NYPL) requests a grant of $316,400 over four years from the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions to support its Scholars-in-Residence Program. Such a grant, in addition to cost share provided by the Library, will allow the Schomburg Center to make six- and twelve-month residency fellowships available to at least twelve scholars over three years.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$312,900 (approved)
$312,900 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2013


CH-50512-08

George Mason University (Fairfax, VA 22030-4444)
Roy Rosenzweig (Project Director: May 2007 to October 2007)
Jack R. Censer (Project Director: October 2007 to September 2013)
Robert I. Matz (Project Director: September 2013 to May 2015)
The Center for the History and New Media: A Proposal for the NEH Challenge Grant Program

Endowment for partial salaries for a digital historian, a web designer, a computer programmer, two graduate research assistants, as well as software and equipment acquisitions.

The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University has established an international reputation for its innovative work at the intersection of new technology and the more venerable pursuit of the past. This challenge grant will endow a $3 million CHNM Infrastructure and Innovation Sustaining Fund that would support staff, software, and equipment to allow us permanently to maintain projects launched with grant funding as well as to explore emerging possibilities and technologies. This is a particularly opportune moment for CHNM to create this endowment because it has established a strong track record in history and has demonstrated its ability to raise endowment funds with a prior challenge grant. In addition, Mason is about to launch a major capital campaign and will make CHNM an important fund raising target.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$750,000 (approved)
$750,000 (offered)
$503,822 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2006 – 12/31/2014


FA-53766-08

Fred A. Feldman
University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Amherst, MA 01003-9242)
A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Happiness

According to an ancient and still popular view, a person's well-being, or quality of life, is ultimately determined by his or her level of happiness. Yet the nature of happiness remains controversial. After a critical discussion of some of the main theories of happiness, I present and defend a form of attitudinal hedonism about happiness. On this view, to be happy at a time is to take pleasure in things at that time. I try to show that if we understand happiness as I propose, it becomes reasonable to suppose that a person's well-being is determined by his or her level of happiness. The view defended here has important implications not only for moral philosophy, but also for the emerging field of hedonic psychology. It also has immediate implications for pressing judgments concerning quality of life.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2008


FA-53805-08

Sotirios A. Barber
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)
American Constitutional Failure and Success

As ideological fissures weaken the foundations of civil life in America, constitutional theorists and social scientsts have begun to ask if the U.S. constitutional system is beginning to break down. At its present stage, this discussion is burdened by the absence of a general analysis of what might be meant by constitutional failure and success, the formal conditions for applying these concepts to concrete situations, and the different ways in which constitutions on the American model succeed or fail. The project proposed here is a book that will defend the importance of these second-order questions, survey alternative answers, and (borrowing from sources like Aristotle's Politics, The Federalist, and contemporary metaethics) propose answers of its own. The book will show that the capacity of institutions and political leaders to anticipate and provide for constitutional failure is central to the rational pursuit of constitutional ends and to constitutionalism as an ideology.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 6/30/2009


FT-55610-08

Ioannis D. Evrigenis
Tufts University (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)
Images of Anarchy: The Natural Condition of Mankind in Political Thought and Discourse

Any reasonable individual would seek an alternative to a life that is "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short." Such was Hobbes's simple yet ingenious solution to the problem of consensus--an absolute evil, rather than an elusive absolute good--and such was the birth of the "state of nature." Hobbes's concept of the natural condition of mankind became a point of reference for subsequent political thought, shaping the thought of emulators and critics alike, and has had a profound impact on our approach to understanding human nature, conflict, and international relations. Drawing on political science, history, philosophy, and the history of political thought, this book will trace the origin and development of the concept of the state of nature, and consider its impact on contemporary debates on human nature and sovereignty. During July and August 2008, I would like to conduct a final round of library and archival research in the United Kingdom.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2008 – 8/31/2008


FT-56339-08

Rachel Singpurwalla
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
The Metaphysics and Psychology of Unity in Plato's Ethics

The concept of unity animates Plato's ethical thought: he characterizes the happy and just city in terms of inter-personal unity and the happy and just individual in terms of intra-personal unity; some commentators argue that Plato holds that goodness itself is unity. This project is the first comprehensive inquiry into the nature and value of unity in Plato's ethics as presented in the Republic. I inquire into fundamental questions previously unaddressed: what is it to be unified? Is unity valuable for its own sake, or because it enables us to achieve something else? What is the phenomenology of being unified, both with oneself and with others? Is unity identical to goodness? I argue that unity is a teleological notion: an entity is unified when each of its parts contribute to that entity's realizing its particular goal. I argue further that unity is intrinsically valuable: happiness consists in both inter- and intra-personal unity, each of which precludes feelings of alienation.

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2008 – 8/31/2008


FA-53029-07

Daniel Michael Abramson
Tufts University (Somerville, MA 02144-2401)
Architecture in the Age of Obsolescence

This project brings together architectural, economic, urban, and social history towards the goal of exploring how the idea of obsolescence first came to be applied to the built environment in the early twentieth century, and then subsequently how this conceptualization of change came to be dominant through the 1960s across the developed world, productive of modernist visions and populist counter-reactions. It is one this project’s central arguments that obsolescence bridges capitalist and welfare state architecture, thus helping reassess relations between the two systems. Ultimately, this multidisciplinary project bears relevance for a humanistic understanding of culture and the built environment in society today.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2007 – 8/31/2008


FA-53416-07

Jewel Ann Smith
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH 45220-2872)
Music Education in 19th-Century American Female Seminaries: A Neglected History

In the early nineteenth century, a new type of female seminary emerged as an important institution for women’s education. These seminaries stressed a liberal arts education along with instruction in the ornamental arts. Along with a rigorous academic program, such institutions provided the most significant foundation for women’s music education. An examination of prominent schools—Litchfield, Troy, Hartford, Ipswich, Mount Holyoke, and Music Vale—represents the first musicological study of women’s music education in nineteenth-century American female seminaries. It also furnishes the historical, cultural, and educational material necessary for interdisciplinary study in nineteenth-century American history, education, and women’s studies.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FA-53567-07

Eric Sean Gregory
Trustees of Princeton University (Princeton, NJ 08540-5228)
Who is My Neighbor? Globalization and the Good Samaritan

My project will examine religious and secular interpretations of the Good Samaritan parable in light of recent debates over the nature and scope of morality in an age of globalization. Many praise the Samaritan for his compassion and his willingness to transcend cultural boundaries in order to meet the desperate needs of a stranger. But not everyone shares the same convictions about what human beings owe one another. Two primary questions arise: 1) are boundaries (literal and figurative) necessary for the pursuit of justice? and 2) what is love's relation to justice? I focus my inquiry on three topics that invite comparison of cosmopolitan approaches to political morality: immigration, global poverty, and humanitarian intervention.

Project fields:
Religion, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


EZ-50190-07

College of DuPage (Glen Ellyn, IL 60137-6599)
Eva Maria Raepple (Project Director: September 2006 to December 2008)
Philosophical Ideas and Artistic Pursuits in the Traditions of Asia and the West

A yearlong workshop for seven full-time and seven part-time humanities and fine arts faculty members to compare aesthetic concepts and beliefs in Asian and Western traditions through the study of philosophy and the fine arts.

College of DuPage, located in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, will plan and implement a year-long workshop series targeting seven full-time and seven part-time Humanities and Fine Arts faculty members. Faculty will participate in lectures which will set the stage for extensive dialogues with a group of distinguished scholars in the fields of philosophy, Asian studies, and fine arts. The intellectual framework is intended to foster comparative analyses of differences and convergences of aesthetic concepts and beliefs via exemplary arts and philosophies of Asian and Western traditions. The goal is to promote knowledge about global cultural contexts in a collegial work and learning environment led by highly qualified scholars in their respective fields.

Project fields:
Aesthetics

Program:
Faculty Humanities Workshops

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2007 – 6/30/2008


FT-54956-07

Chip Colwell
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc. (New York, NY 10017-5621)
Inheriting the Past: Arthur C. Parker and the Making of Archaeology's Moral Community

Arthur C. Parker (1881-1955) was the first Native American professional archaeologist, although his contributions to archaeology have been neither closely studied nor widely recognized. And yet, Parker’s experiences directly inform contemporary debates about the control and representation of Native American archaeological heritages--heated debates over the last two decades about questions of privilege, ownership, authorship, and participation. An interdisciplinary study of archaeology’s historical formation through the prism of Parker’s life, this work illuminates how the difficult choices scholars made more than a century ago built a community of archaeologists which continues to shape the discipline today.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 7/31/2007


CH-50421-07

American Musicological Society, Inc. (New York, NY 10012-1502)
Anne W. Robertson (Project Director: May 2006 to November 2011)
Publishing Musicologal Research in the 21st Century

Endowment for publication subventions and an award program in musicology as well as fund-raising costs.

The American Musicological Society seeks an NEH challenge grant of $240,000, which with a 4:1 match will yield $1,200,000. These funds will endow four publication-related initiatives of the Society. The bulk of the funds ($900,000) will create a new subvention supporting the publication of first books by young scholars, whose work often represents the cutting edge of scholarly research, but whose careers are often at their most fragile or challenging point. The remainder will go primarily to existing publication subvention programs, supporting musicological books more generally ($125,000) as well as a monograph series sponsored by the Society ($100,000). These subventions aim to optimize the quality of the best scholarly books on music while keeping their prices affordable. Finally, we propose a new award for books on music in American culture ($50,000), a vital area of musical research that appeals to the broadest literary and musical public.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (offered)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2005 – 7/31/2011


BB-50007-06

American Library Association (Chicago, IL 60611-2729)
Mary Davis (Project Director: May 2006 to May 2006)
Mary Davis Fournier (Project Director: May 2006 to December 2008)
We the People Bookshelf: The Pursuit of Happiness

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Bookshelf Cooperative Agreement, We the People

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$686,762 (approved)
$686,762 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 7/31/2008

Funding details:
Original grant (2006) $500,000
Supplement (2007) $186,762


HR-50262-06

Harald Christian Thorsrud
New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, NM 88003-8002)
Cicero's Ethics

Cicero embraces the Stoic view that knowledge is a harbor from the storms of fortune, and the means to happiness. Yet he also endorses the Academics' refutation of Stoic epistemology and remains skeptical with regard to how, or even whether, knowledge is possible. Thus the main problem I address in this book: How can philosophy achieve such great things if it does not succeed in fulfilling our desire for knowledge? In answering this question, I examine Cicero's portrait of Socrates as the model of both moral and epistemic virtue. I also discuss the ways in which Cicero adopts and modifies Stoic ethics in accordance with what he sees as our epistemic limitations.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Faculty Research Awards

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 6/30/2006


FA-52663-06

Eliga Gould
University of New Hampshire, Durham (Durham, NH 03824-2620)
Zones of Law, Zones of Violence: Britain, America, and the Legal Geography of the Revolutionary Atlantic

ZONES OF LAW, ZONES OF VIOLENCE examines the American Revolution's impact on the English-speaking Atlantic's "legal geography" between 1750 and 1815. It seeks to explain the shift in American and British perceptions of the extra-European Atlantic from a chaotic, stateless region "beyond the line" -- subject to its own brutal laws and customs -- to a place where Europeans (metropolitan as well as creole) and indigenous peoples could be expected to abide by the legal norms of Western Europe. Among the topics covered are American and British relations with indigenous groups in Africa, North America, and the West Indies; the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade; and the Revolution's impact on Anglo-American conceptions of international law.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2006 – 7/31/2007


FB-52306-06

Adam Stanley Potkay
College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA 23186-0002)
The Story of Joy: The Literary and Intellectual History of an Emotion

"The Story of Joy" will provide a literary and intellectual history of "joy" in the Western tradition, with particular emphasis on the early modern period and the "long eighteenth-century"(1660-1832). I contend that the Protestant Reformation ushered in an unprecedented concern with joy as a "fruit of the Spirit"(Galatians 5:22)and that the trajectory from Reformation to literary Romanticism may be understood as the ongoing dialectic between religious and naturalistic discourses of joy.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2006 – 6/30/2007


FB-52794-06

Jacqueline Anne Taylor
University of San Francisco (San Francisco, CA 94117-1050)
Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy

My book project provides a sustained treatment of Hume’s theory of the passions. I examine his theory both in its own right as a significant innovation in the modern period, and as a valuable social theory with resources to help us think productively about issues of practical identity as these arise in contemporary ethical theory. Hume’s theory of the passions provides: a core account of the passions as socially constituted; a richly detailed social theory focusing on connections between the passions, social power and identity; and attention to how we can cultivate reflective habits of valuing and desiring. I reconstruct a Humean account of our sense of humanity, and examine its importance for bridging socially constructed divisions.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 5/31/2007


RA-50039-06

American Institute of Indian Studies (Chicago, IL 60637-1539)
Ralph W. Nicholas (Project Director: September 2005 to July 2010)
Philip Lutgendorf (Project Director: July 2010 to July 2013)
Research Fellowships for Senior Humanists to Work in India

Three or four fellowships per year.

This proposal seeks support for the award of fellowships to post-doctoral scholars in all fields of the Humanities to enable them to undertake their research projects in India.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$334,800 (approved)
$334,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 12/31/2011

Funding details:
Original grant (2006) $228,000
Supplement (2008) $106,800


FT-54694-06

Andrew Neil Rotman
Smith College (Northampton, MA 01063-6304)
Thus I Have Seen: Visualizing Faith in Early Indian Buddhism

The Divyavadana ("Divine Legends") is an important collection of Sanskrit Buddhist narratives from the early centuries of the Common Era in India. These stories then spread worldwide, leaving an indelible mark on Buddhist thought and practice. However, unlike much contemporary Buddhism in both Asia and America, these stories map out a world in which seeing is an integral part of Buddhist morality. In trying to make sense of this connection between the moral and visual economies of the text, I focus on faith as a visual practice, and how this matrix of seeing, faith, and giving offers unique insight into Buddhist ethics.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2006 – 7/31/2006


BR-50019-06

Old Dartmouth Historical Society (New Bedford, MA 02740-6398)
Anne B. Brengle (Project Director: February 2006 to January 2008)
Madelyn Shaw (Project Director: January 2008 to January 2010)
From Pursuit to Preservation: The Global Story of Whales and Whaling

Implementation of a permanent core exhibition with an audio tour about the human fascination with whales and the history of whaling in New Bedford, Massachusetts, within a global context.

During much of the nineteenth century, whaling was one of America's major industries, reaching to the farthest corners of of the globe; and New Bedford, Mass. was its epicenter. The New Bedford Whaling Museum plans to interpret this compelling story in a long-term core exhibition, "From Pursuit to Preservation: the Global Story of Whales and Whaling." The exhibition will take full advantage of the ever-present human fascination with whales to explore a series of humanities themes relating to both American and world history. The exhibition is designed to incorporate a variety of presentation techniques and media to attract and engage a wide range of audiences. Scheduled to open in 2009, it will include more than 700 objects drawn from the Museum's rich and extensive collections that will be installed in a series of linked galleries totaling 20,000 square feet. The Museum is requesting an implementation grant of $350,000; the core exhibition's total cost is estimated at $3.5 million.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Historic Places: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 9/30/2009


FT-53358-05

Steven George Medema
University of Colorado, Denver (Denver, CO 80202-1702)
The Hesitant Hand: Market and State in the History of Modern Economic Thought

The NEH stipend would support the writing of a book entitled, The Hesitant Hand: Market and State in the History of Modern Economic Thought, which is under contract with Princeton University Press. The book is an intellectual history of the theory of economic policy from the late nineteenth century to the present. It traces this history from the demise of the laissez-faire views associated with classical liberalism in the latter part of the nineteenth century, through the rise of the overtly interventionist neoclassical welfare economics tradition, and on to the challenge presented to this approach by the rebirth of classical liberal economics in the second half of the twentieth century.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Economics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 8/31/2005


FT-53445-05

Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA 30303-2538)
George Jardine: Champion of the Democratic Intellect in the Scottish Enlightenment

I wish to produce a book-length historical reconstruction and analysis of George Jardine's works and sphere of influence in Great Britain and America. Heralded as the "contemporary spokesman for the Scottish [educational] system" (Chitnis), Jardine's educational plan merits scholarly attention. An examination of Jardine's works reveals a philosophical rationale and practical teaching plan for expanding introductory college classes to include components of what we now label enlightenment rhetoric. This study will offer rich insights into eighteenth- and nineteenth-century rhetorical theory and practice, while providing opportunities for present-day research in composition pedagogy, the rhetoric of science and religion, and political and social rhetoric.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 8/31/2005


FT-53772-05

Christopher Glen White
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA 30303-2538)
Psychology and the American Pursuit of Spiritual Assurance, 1850-1920

My project investigates the impact of sciences of mind and brain on American culture, showing in particular how these sciences generated new ways of thinking about experience and the problem of spiritual assurance.

Project fields:
History of Religion

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2005 – 9/30/2006


FA-50078-04

William M. Reddy
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
The Rule of Love: The History of Western Romantic Love in Comparative Perspective

This project aims to clarify what is unique, what is not, in Western practices of romantic love, and to offer a critical historical evaluation of these practices and their role in the shaping of modernity. The resulting book will be wide-ranging and comparative; it will also draw on primary research I have been carrying out since 1987 on French marital and family relationships. A remarkable outpouring of research and reflection on gender and sexuality in the last two decades has focused on legal norms, identity, and the relative worth and rights of persons. The issue of love has come up, but has seldom been explored in its own right. Emotions in general have been lost from view, because emotions are viewed as central to "subjectivity," a category widely regarded as a mere cultural construction. But, as I have argued elsewhere, emotions are not merely Western cultural constructions. In all cultures examined by ethnographers, emotions turn up as a crucial domain. The romantic love ideal in the West is just as important as explicit sexual norms and regulations. It has shaped the lives of many millions of people in ways just as vital as the formal prohibitions of church and state. A new examination of its role in Western culture is long overdue. "Love" in the abstract may be universal, but a uniquely Western distinction between love and lust first emerged in the twelfth century. I will show how this distinction has contributed to the elaboration of the modern idea of individual freedom and the pursuit of happiness. I will argue that this distinction is not grounded in nature but in an emotional skill that each of us learns. This distinction underlies many of the strengths of the current institution of marriage as well as many of the challenges it faces.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 8/31/2005


FB-50126-04

Julia Lynn Driver
Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH 03755-1808)
The Greatest Happiness Principle

The project is a book length manuscript on the moral evaluation of actions and character traits. The book discusses an approach to moral evaluation--"consequentialism"--which maintains that the moral quality of actions and character traits is determined by the consequences or effects produced by the actions or character traits. This approach is contrasted with other approaches which hold that moral quality is determined by some intrinsic feature of the act, and not anything produced by it. The author favors the consequentialist approach and develops an alternative that is sensitive to recent criticisms of consequentialism, as well as "impartial" ethical theories more generally.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2004 – 6/30/2005


FA-50240-04

Gabriela R. Carone
University of Colorado, Boulder (Boulder, CO 80302-7046)
Creating Happiness: Luck, Pleasure, and the Excellent Life in Plato's Laws

I intend to offer a new analysis of Plato's moral theory as presented in his last work, the Laws. I propose to focus on the complex relation of happiness to luck, pleasure and virtue therein, and the thesis that virtue is sufficient for happiness. I wish to argue that the Laws contains a most powerful and logically valid version of this thesis which can meet the most pressing objections to it that have been raised in the scholarly literature and makes the Laws central for an understanding of Plato's ethics and its possible contribution to contemporary discussions of virtue ethics and moral luck. In particular, I wish to show, in defiance of contemporary literature on the supposed fragility of human goodness, how the Laws views virtue partly as the capacity to deal with luck in an artful way, and can thus be seen as a call for activism rather than passive resignation about the circumstances we encounter.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2004 – 12/31/2004


FT-52412-04

Christopher Stephen Ivic
SUNY Research Foundation, College at Potsdam (Potsdam, NY 13676-2200)
The Subject of Britain, 1603-1660

My project explores the ways in which various seventeenth-century subjects responded to the emergence of a multi-national British state. My work is informed by the new British historiography, a plural political history that has paved the way for literary historians to glean valuable new perspectives on literary and extra-literary texts in light of the wider British context that informed, indeed enabled, their production. In pursuit of these rich possibilities, my project focuses on a range of cultural texts and artifacts devoted to Britain and Britishness produced between 1603 and 1660, a crucial period of cultural interaction in the British Isles.

Project fields:
British Literature

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 8/31/2004


BC-50226-04

Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (Providence, RI 02903-3308)
Sara J. Archambault (Project Director: May 2004 to September 2006)
The Pursuit of Happiness: An Inquiry into Our Nation's Founding Principles

A series of activities that explore the principles of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" including a grant program, a radio and public television series, and a student poster/essay contest.

Codifying the values that would guide our nation in the “Declaration of Independence, ” Thomas Jefferson named “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” among the fundamental rights guaranteed to Americans. Taking inspiration from these words, RICH will engage Rhode Islanders across the state in an investigation into our nation’s founding principles of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” beginning in September 2004. RICH seeks $44,330 in “We the People” funds to support: a regrants initiative, a public forums radio series, a film series, and a public television series.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Grants for State Humanities Councils

Division:
Federal/State Partnership

Totals (outright + matching):
$44,420 (approved)
$44,420 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 1/31/2006


RA-50004-03

Folger Shakespeare Library (Washington, DC 20003-1004)
Gail Kern Paster (Project Director: September 2002 to April 2008)
Long-term Residential Fellowships

Three fellowships each year for three years.

The Fellowship Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library is an essential component of the Library's mission to render its collection accessible to scholars for advanced research. The program encourages ongoing cross-disciplinary dialogue among the scholars who use the collection. The Folger Shakespeare Library requests funding for 3 long-term (6-9 months) residential fellowship stipends up to $40,000 for the academic years 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, as well as for the costs of publicizing those fellowships and for selecting the fellows. NEH fellows will be joined each year by 2 or 3 long-term fellows and 20-30 short-term (1-3 months) fellows. Additional fellows are supported by funds from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and by the Library's endowments.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$378,000 (approved)
$378,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2003 – 6/30/2007


RA-50005-03

Huntington Library (San Marino, CA 91108-1299)
Robert C. Ritchie (Project Director: September 2002 to December 2006)
NEH Fellowship Program

Three fellowships per year for two years.

The Huntington requests renewal of the Endowment's support for its NEH Fellowship Program. Such support will allow scholars to conduct research utilizing the extensive collections in the Library and Art galleries or to write while surrounded by the Huntington's resources. Selected by an independent peer review panel from a national application process, the NEH fellows will be compensated with a stipend enabling them to remain in residence for up to one year. They will also enjoy the support of Huntington staff, opportunities for dialog with other fellows, and the full schedule of conferences, lectures, and seminars.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$240,000 (approved)
$240,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2004 – 8/31/2006


FA-38086-03

Elisheva Carlebach
CUNY Research Foundation, Queens College (Flushing, NY 11367-1597)
Strategies of Religious Resistance in Early-Modern Yiddish Culture

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2003 – 5/31/2004


FB-37593-02

Lambert P. Zuidervaart
Calvin University (Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388)
Artistic Truth: Aesthetics, Discourse, and Imaginative Disclosure

No project description available

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Aesthetics

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2002 – 8/31/2002


RA-20223-01

American Council of Learned Societies (New York, NY 10017-6706)
Steven C. Wheatley (Project Director: September 2000 to September 2006)
American Research in Humanities in China (ARHC)

To support the equivalent of seven and a half fellowships in the humanities over a period of three years.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions

Division:
Research Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$225,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2001 – 6/30/2005


FT-46277-01

Steven M. Nadler
University of Wisconsin, Madison (Madison, WI 53715-1218)
Reason and Happiness: Maimonides, Gersonides and Spinoza and the Tradition of Jewish Rationalism

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$4,500 (approved)
$4,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2001 – 9/30/2001


CH-20626-00

American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA 01609-1634)
Nancy Burkett (Project Director: May 1999 to October 2003)
Building Endowment for Acquisitions.

Endowment for the acquisition of books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other items for the society's collections.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Challenge Grants

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$450,000 (approved)
$450,000 (offered)
$450,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1997 – 7/31/2003


ED-21762-00

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Adele F. Seeff (Project Director: October 1999 to June 2004)
Jubilee: In Pursuit of the American Dream of Equality

A SCHOOLS FOR A NEW MILLENNIUM implementation grant focusing on the ideas and history of the American Dream for all humanities faculty at high in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$170,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2000 – 12/31/2003


ED-21294-98

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Adele F. Seeff (Project Director: April 1998 to February 2001)
Planning for the New Millennium: Pursuit of the American Dream

To support a SCHOOLS FOR A NEW MILLENNIUM planning project on the creation of a curriculum reflecting cultural diversity, for a public high school in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$29,050 (approved)
$29,050 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1998 – 8/31/2000


FA-35065-98

Timothy D. Roche
University of Memphis (Memphis, TN 38152-0001)
Reason, Wisdom and Happiness in Aristotle's Moral Philosophy

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$20,898 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1998 – 12/31/1998


EH-22216-97

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
Jennifer E. Whiting (Project Director: March 1997 to September 1999)
Mind, Self, and Psychopathology

To support a six-week institute for 25 college teachers to study the implications of certain mental disorders for philosophical ideas of mind and self.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,982 (approved)
$180,152 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1997 – 4/30/1999


RO-22912-96

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR 97403-5219)
Steven Shankman (Project Director: March 1995 to February 1998)
Knowledge and Wisdom in Ancient Greece and China

To support the research and writing of a book comparing the meaning and pursuitof knowledge and wisdom in ancient China and Greece through close readings of texts that were important to these two classical cultures.

Project fields:
Comparative Literature

Program:
Basic Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$83,600 (approved)
$83,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1996 – 9/30/1997


FI-28093-95

Madeleine E. Lopez
University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Puerto Ricans, the Pentecostal Church, and the Pursuit of Social Justice in New York City

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1995 – 8/31/1995


FV-22035-95

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Richard D. Parry (Project Director: March 1995 to April 1997)
Virtue, Happiness, and the Common Good in Plato's REPUBLIC

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$65,330 (approved)
$62,049 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1995 – 9/30/1996


FD-22526-95

Laurie J. Shannon
Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Chaste Commixtures: The Pursuit of Autonomy and Affection in Renaissance Friendship

No project description available

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Dissertation Grants

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$14,000 (approved)
$14,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1995 – 3/31/1996


FB-31275-94

Stephanie Annette Finley-Croswhite
Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA 23529-0001)
Henry IV and the Towns: Urban Barriers to Absolutism in France, 1589-1610

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1994 – 12/31/1994


FV-21735-93

Rollins College (Winter Park, FL 32789-4409)
Daniel R. DeNicola (Project Director: April 1993 to May 1995)
Happiness and Freedom, Justice and Equality: The Life and Work of John Stuart Mill

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$74,118 (approved)
$72,501 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1993 – 9/30/1994


FV-21746-93

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Richard D. Parry (Project Director: April 1993 to February 1995)
Virtue, Happiness, and the Common Good in Plato's REPUBLIC

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$57,678 (approved)
$57,086 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1993 – 9/30/1994


FB-30455-93

Judith W. Decew
Clark University (Worcester, MA 01610-1477)
Privacy in Law and Ethics: A Study in the Philosophy of Law

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$27,773 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1993 – 5/31/1994


FB-29105-92

Suellen Hoy
Unaffiliated Independent Scholar
The American Pursuit of Cleanliness: A Cultural History

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$22,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1992 – 8/31/1993


FE-26603-92

Rudi P. Matthee
University of Delaware (Newark, DE 19716-0099)
The Silk Trade in Late Safavid Iran (1619-1722)

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Near and Middle Eastern History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/1991 – 11/30/1992


FV-21548-92

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Richard D. Parry (Project Director: April 1992 to January 1994)
Virtue, Happiness, and the Common Good in Plato's REPUBLIC

No project description available

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$56,126 (approved)
$56,126 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 9/30/1993


FI-25594-92

Thomas R. Cincotta
College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA 01610-2395)
Visions and Pursuits: A Comparative History of the Catholic Worker Movement and the Communist Party, 1920-60

No project description available

Project fields:
Labor Relations

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$2,400 (approved)
$2,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 8/31/1992


RP-21620-92

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14853-2801)
John G. Ackerman (Project Director: April 1992 to April 1994)
The Keys to Happiness: Sex and The Search for Modernity in Fin-De-Siecle Russia, by Laura Engelstein

To support the publication of a comparative study that explores how Western social attitudes helped to shape the political and cultural life of late tsarist Russia.

Project fields:
Russian History

Program:
Scholarly Publications

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$7,000 (approved)
$7,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 4/30/1994


FV-21400-91

Cornell College (Mount Vernon, IA 52314-1098)
Robert W. Sutherland (Project Director: April 1991 to May 1993)
The Pursuit of Happiness with Franklin and Washington in Adam Smith's THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS

No project description available

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$64,427 (approved)
$64,427 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1991 – 9/30/1992


GM-24373-91

Oakland Museum of California (Oakland, CA 94607-4820)
Kenneth R. Trapp (Project Director: June 1990 to May 1992)
In Pursuit of the Good Life: The Arts and Crafts Movement in California

To support planning for an exhibition, publication, and programs on the arts and crafts movement in California from the mid-1890s to the 1930s.

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1991 – 1/31/1992


FV-21166-90

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Richard D. Parry (Project Director: April 1990 to January 1992)
Virtue, Happiness, and the Common Good in Plato's REPUBLIC

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$52,235 (approved)
$52,032 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1990 – 9/30/1991


FS-22033-89

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Richard Herr (Project Director: March 1988 to January 1990)
Group Loyalties: The Conflict Between Individual Happiness and General Welfare in Western Societies

No project description available

Project fields:
Western Civilization

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$69,882 (approved)
$66,960 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1988 – 9/30/1989


FI-23085-89

Steven T. Cottreau
Secondary School
Justice as a Virtue and Its Relation to Happiness

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$1,800 (approved)
$1,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 8/31/1989


FE-23596-89

Andrew Lees
Rutgers University, Camden (Camden, NJ 08102-1405)
Perceptions of Moral Disorder and the Pursuit of Moral Reform in Urban Germany, 1880-1914

No project description available

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 11/30/1989


EH-21003-89

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Steven S. Hutkins (Project Director: October 1988 to January 1992)
In Pursuit of Wisdom: A Proposal for Three New Humanities Courses

To support a faculty study project that will focus on seminal humanities texts,with a view to designing new text-based courses for freshmen in the Gallatin Division.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$62,369 (approved)
$59,290 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1989 – 5/31/1991


FT-30564-88

Stephen White
Carleton College (Northfield, MN 55057-4044)
Aristotle on the Relation between Prosperity and Happiness

No project description available

Project fields:
Ethics

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,500 (approved)
$3,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1988 – 9/30/1988


FS-22031-88

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Leonard Barkan (Project Director: March 1988 to January 1990)
Imitation, Influence, and Inspiration: The Theory and Practice of Artistic Relations in the Renaissance

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Renaissance Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$81,878 (approved)
$78,378 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1988 – 9/30/1989


GM-23465-87

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Timothy R. Tomlinson (Project Director: December 1986 to September 1989)
Educational Programming for 'The Victorian Garden as Art and Artifact'

To support the implementation of a symposium, the publication of proceedings, and a lecture series, examining the Victorian garden as a reflection of the historic, scientific, and aesthetic pursuits of that era.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$37,400 (approved)
$37,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1987 – 3/31/1989


FE-21151-87

Gary Scharnhorst
University of Texas, Dallas (Richardson, TX 75080-3021)
The Pursuit of William R. Alger: An Experiment in Biography

No project description available

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$750 (approved)
$750 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1987 – 8/31/1987


FT-28414-86

Stephen D. White
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Disputes Over Monastic Property in Medieval Western France, 1000-1200

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1986 – 9/30/1986


FV-20548-86

Cornell College (Mount Vernon, IA 52314-1098)
Robert W. Sutherland (Project Director: March 1986 to October 1990)
Self-Command and the Pursuit of Happiness in Adam Smith's THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS

No project description available

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$60,452 (approved)
$60,452 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1986 – 9/30/1987


GM-23158-86

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA 19104-6205)
Timothy R. Tomlinson (Project Director: December 1985 to August 1988)
The Victorian Heritage in Society and Science: The Garden as Artifact

To support a major temporary traveling exhibition, on-site displays, public programs, and a variety of publications that examine the Victorian garden as a reflection of the historic, scientific, and aesthetic pursuits of that era.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1986 – 11/30/1987


GM-22146-85

Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY 10028-0113)
Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen (Project Director: March 1984 to August 1988)
In Pursuit of Beauty: An Exhibition on Americans and the Aesthetic Movement

To support implementation of a major exhibition and accompanying events on the theme of "Americans and the Aesthetic Movement."

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$125,000 (approved)
$125,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 12/31/1987


FV-20487-85

Agnes Scott College (Decatur, GA 30030-3797)
Richard D. Parry (Project Director: April 1985 to October 1990)
Virtue, Happiness, and Public in Plato's REPUBLIC

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$40,305 (approved)
$40,198 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1985 – 9/30/1986


FB-23240-85

Robert J. Gooding-Williams
Simmons University (Boston, MA 02115-5898)
Nietzsche's Pursuit of Dionysian Grace

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$27,500 (approved)
$25,030 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1985 – 6/30/1986


FS-21299-85

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Stanley M. Hauerwas (Project Director: September 1985 to October 1990)
Happiness, The Life of Virtue, and Friendship

No project description available

Project fields:
Philosophy of Religion

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$63,473 (approved)
$63,473 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 12/31/1985


GM-22045-84

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Boston, MA 02115-5523)
Vishakha N. Desai (Project Director: November 1983 to October 1990)
The Pursuit of Power and Pleasure: Secular Traditions in Indian Painting

To support implementation of a major temporary exhibition which will examine the concept of "realistic representation" as expressed in secular Indian painting. The exhibition will trace the evolution and development of this themefrom the 16th to the 19th century.

Project fields:
Art History and Criticism; History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1984 – 6/30/1986


RY-20359-84

John B. Weaver
Sinclair Community College (Dayton, OH 45402-1421)
Elusive Quest: John Sherman's Pursuit of the Presidency

To support research on the elusive quest: John Sherman's pursuit of the presidency.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Travel to Collections, 11/83 - 5/85

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$500 (approved)
$500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1984 – 8/31/1984


GM-22224-84

Edison Institute (Dearborn, MI 48124-4088)
Donna R. Braden (Project Director: March 1984 to November 1988)
Documenting Social and Cultural Change in American Leisure, 1800-1950

To support research and production of an interpretive catalogue of artifacts in the Edison Institute that document and reflect social and cultural change in American leisure pursuits between 1800 and 1950.

Project fields:
American Studies; History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$167,560 (approved)
$167,560 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1984 – 6/30/1988


GM-21566-83

Robert W. Woodruff Arts Center, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30309-3445)
Donald C. Peirce (Project Director: December 1982 to October 1990)
In Pursuit of Beauty: Americans and the Aesthetic Movement (Planning)

To support planning for an exhibition exploring nineteenth century American cultural and artistic history through decorative arts, painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Project fields:
Arts, General; History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$15,000 (approved)
$15,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1983 – 3/31/1984


GN-*1803-81

Global Village Video Resource Center, Inc. (New York, NY 10013)
Julie M. Gustafson (Project Director: January 1981 to October 1990)
The Pursuit of Happiness

To support production of a 60-minute documentary program, "Land," exploring the relationship between the natural resources of the North American continent and the concept of "the pursuit of happiness."

Project fields:
Ethics; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Public Administration

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$90,000 (approved)
$90,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1981 – 6/30/1983


GN-*1239-80

Global Village Video Resource Center, Inc. (New York, NY 10013)
Julie M. Gustafson (Project Director: March 1980 to October 1990)
The Pursuit of Happiness

To support a planning grant to explore the idea of the "pursuit of happiness" in America and to design a series about this idea for public television. The series will examine the lives of five different Americans focusing on work, love, play and meaning.

Project fields:
History, General; Philosophy, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1980 – 12/31/1980


RL-*0432-80

Chu Djang
Unknown institution
Manual for Local Magistrates in Seventeenth-Century China

To support translation of "Fu-hui ch'uan-shu (A Complete Book Concerning Happiness and Benevolence)". First published in 1699, this personal memoir of Huang Liu-hung served as a manual for local Chinese magistrates of the Ching period.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Translations

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$24,000 (approved)
$24,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1980 – 3/31/1982


GZ-*1069-79

Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Ralph T. Nelson (Project Director: February 1979 to October 1990)
Exploring the Cultural Heritage of Oregon

To provide activities which will involve young people in pursuits relating to the social and human sciences through study of Oregon's development. Activities will increase youth awareness of contributions of "non-mainstreams" Oregon people.

To increase youths' awareness of the contributions of non-mainstream peoples in the development of today's Oregon and to provide activities which will involve young people in pursuits relating to the social and human sciences.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Humanities Projects for Youth

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$21,380 (approved)
$21,380 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1979 – 10/31/1980


RC-*1445-79

New York State Education Department (Albany, NY 12234-1000)
Bruce Dearstyne (Project Director: May 1979 to October 1990)
Film Documentation Project

Supports processing of materials describing all films reviewed by the Motion Picture Division of the State Education Dept. in pursuit of its censorship activities from 1921-1965.

Project fields:

Program:
Reference Materials - Access

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$63,265 (approved)
$62,052 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1980 – 10/31/1982


FR-*1021-77

University of California, Davis (Davis, CA 95618-6153)
William M. Bowsky (Project Director: February 1977 to October 1990)
The Problem of Relevance in Pre-Modern W estern Civilization

To improve the presentation of ancient, medieval and Renaissance civilization by motivating students through consideration of parallel themes of the contemporary world and the pre-modern world, through examination of concerns and solutions that have been attempted in the past. The focus of the seminar will be on 6 themes: Education, Urban Civilization, Women, the Arts, Ethics and Politics, and Happiness.

Project fields:

Program:
Residential College Teacher Fellowships, 1976-1981

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$31,636 (approved)
$31,636 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/1977 – 6/30/1979


E0-*1103-77

Claremont McKenna College (Claremont, CA 91711-5929)
John K. Roth (Project Director: May 1977 to October 1990)
The Pursuit of Happiness: Two Courses

To sponsor 2 interdisciplinary, team-taught courses on "The American Dream" and on "The Holocaust" emphasizing the nature and purposes of human life.

Project fields:
History, General; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; Psychology

Program:
Humanities Institutes Program

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$19,007 (approved)
$19,007 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1978 – 6/30/1979


EP-*0499-77

College of Mount St. Joseph (Mount St. Joseph, OH 45233-1669)
Daniel Mader (Project Director: November 1976 to October 1990)
ORDER AND CHANGE IN HUMAN EXPERIENCE

To offer an interdisciplinary core program in the humanities, for freshmen and sophomores. The fres