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Keywords: 'revisionism' (this phrase)
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HB-273711-21

Jinah Kim
California State University, Northridge (Northridge, CA 91330-0001)
Against Forgetting: Memory, Care, and Feminist Arts across the Transpacific

Writing resulting in a book length study of Korean diasporic practices memorializing the “Comfort Woman” experience.

The NEH grant will allow me to finish writing my book, “Against Forgetting: Memory, Care, and Feminist Arts across the Transpacific" which focuses on how memorials and public memorializing threaten powerful systems of historical revisionism and silencing around the Comfort Women, nearly 200,000 young girls taken as sexual slaves by the Japanese military in the WWII era. In less than 9 years over 40 statues and memorials have been erected that commemorate Comfort Women history. I argue that artists and activists have positioned themselves as protectors of the Comfort Women and inheritors of their silenced history, activating a language of care.The transpacific aspect of this organizing is significant because the Korean diaspora in the US can intervene and enable the homeland to negotiate contested and painful histories.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Communications; Communications; Gender Studies

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$42,500 (approved)
$42,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2021 – 6/30/2022


FT-264843-19

Yinan He, PhD
Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA 18015-3027)
Domestic Enemies, National Identity Mobilization, and China's Attitudes toward Foreign Others

Writing a book about Chinese approaches to the “foreign other” in domestic and foreign policy in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

To stoke fear and hatred of foreigners for internal needs is a recurring pattern in modern Chinese nationalism. Anchored in interpretive analysis of elites’ political rhetoric, party documents, and propaganda materials, the book is a macro-historical study of Chinese national identity discourse from the 1890s till the 2010s. Rather than being constantly antagonistic toward foreign imperialism, China has undergone cycles of seeking cooperation with foreigners and demonizing them. When facing severe political challenges, Chinese elites often tried to exclude domestic enemies in national identity mobilization. However, if targeting domestic others alone was politically inconvenient or unappealing, they would promote antiforeign identity to reinforce internal battles. By linking China’s domestic politics with attitudes toward perceived foreign adversaries, this study revises dominant views that emphasize historical grievances or external threat in explaining modern China’s antiforeignism.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; International Relations

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2019 – 7/31/2019


FEL-262726-19

Thomas Austin Graham
Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York (New York, NY 10027-7922)
The Unknowing of American History: Past, Present, and the Historical Novel in the U.S.

Research and writing of a book-length study on how American historical novels function as forms of historical inquiry.

A book on U.S. historical fiction and the U.S. historical profession in the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on the ways in which American history has not been remembered, not been faced, and not been known.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Literature; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020


HB-262738-19

Sandra Zalman
University Of Houston (Houston, TX 77204-3067)
Monuments to Modernism: Museums of Modern Art and the Contest for Cultural Space

Preparation for publication of a book about the relationship between four museums in New York City—the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Gallery of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art—that shaped debates about modernism from 1959 to 1966.

In 1961, Art in America's special issue posed the question "What Should a Museum Be?" As arts administrators grappled with the role of the museum in contemporary life, they increasingly turned to design to make the case that museums were no longer repositories of venerated objects, but sites of cultural discourse. My book project analyzes how four prominent museums in New York City negotiated this increasingly politicized terrain, as they marshaled innovative architecture to forge competing versions of modern art for public consumption between 1959 and 1966. With chapters focusing on the Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Gallery of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, I investigate how museums expanded their visibility in the urban fabric while historicizing recent art – not as esoteric or obscure, but as a tool that had the potential to advance cultural agendas amidst the socio-political turmoil of the 1950 and 60s.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Architecture; Art History and Criticism; Cultural History

Program:
Awards for Faculty

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


FT-57934-10

Alexandre Erik Dauge-Roth
President and Trustees of Bates College (Lewiston, ME 04240-6028)
Who Speaks Behind the Archive? Witnessing and Documenting Personal and National Reconciliation in Post-Genocide Rwanda

Departing from other works that have attempted to assess the process of reconciliation in terms of success or failure, my analysis privileges the plurality of meanings and social practices that make up "reconciliation" in Rwanda today. Furthermore, my research aims to fill a void within Genocidal Studies and Francophone Studies since no major scholarly work has been published on the documentaries and testimonies recounting the genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda. Most scholars in Francophone studies have worked on the literary representations of this genocide while testimonies and documentaries have been neglected genres. "Who Speaks Behind the Archive?" examines testimonial and filmic strategies used by survivors to create narratives and visual archives that offer counter-archives inviting us to reflect on the limits of the current archiving process, the relation between memory and forgiveness, and the challenges of reconciling the many dissenting voices coexisting within Rwanda.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
African Studies

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 9/30/2010


FB-54966-10

Christopher Hager
Trinity College (Hartford, CT 06106-3100)
A Colored Man's Constitution: Emancipation and the Act of Writing

My project examines the writings of marginally literate former slaves during the era of emancipation. It investigates how the acquisition and practice of written literacy shaped African Americans' self-conception during their transition from slavery to freedom. I analyze manuscript writings by ordinary African Americans during and shortly after the Civil War (many of which I identified through the NEH-funded Freedmen and Southern Society Project). These sources, though known to historians, have not been considered as literary texts. My book manuscript (a new project undertaken since my doctoral dissertation) introduces readers to this largely neglected moment in the history of African American writing and argues that, whereas Frederick Douglass's famous narrative associates literacy with an individualistic conception of freedom, ordinary African Americans' struggles to write led them to imagine freedom as a collective responsibility.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
American Literature

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011


FB-53968-08

Manuel Vargas
Regents of the University of California, San Diego (San Francisco, CA 94117-1050)
Beyond Atomism and Monism: A Revisionist View of Moral Responsibility

My aim is to answer recent philosophical and scientific puzzles about when, whether, and how we can be morally responsible. My account emphasizes three distinctive claims. First, I reject ATOMISM, or the view that the proper analysis of responsibility proceeds from analysis of the characteristics of agents, isolated from the social and physical contexts of action. I argue that responsible agency is partly constituted by social and psychological contexts. Second, I reject MONISM about free will, or the view that there is some single capacity or structure of agency that marks responsible agency. Instead, I argue that such agency is constituted by a varied set of capacities, picked out by our diverse practical interests in ascribing responsibility. Finally, I argue for REVISIONISM, the idea that an adequate theory of responsibility will depart from some parts of common sense. Together, these ideas provide a new framework for resolving ancient and recent problems of responsibility.

[Grant products][Prizes]

Project fields:
Philosophy, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2009 – 6/30/2010


FB-29428-92

Thomas A. McIver
Cedar-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles, CA 99999)
Holocaust "Historical Revisionism" as a Belief System: The Cultural and Ideological Context

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$25,364 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/1992 – 1/31/1993


FI-20298-86

Dianne J. Cowan
Secondary School
Historical Revisionism About the First Duke of Marlborough

No project description available

Project fields:
European History

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95

Division:
Fellowships and Seminars

Totals:
$1,800 (approved)
$1,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1986 – 8/31/1986


FT-27713-86

Jerome Slater
SUNY Research Foundation, Buffalo State College (Buffalo, NY 14222-1004)
Vietnam Revisionism Reassessed

No project description available

Project fields:
International Relations

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$3,000 (approved)
$3,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1986 – 9/30/1986


FT-22119-82

Richard H. Hudelson
University of Minnesota, Duluth (Duluth, MN 55812-2403)
Positivistic Marxism: Studies of a Revisionism

No project description available

Project fields:
History of Philosophy

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1982 – 9/30/1982


FB-*0607-80

Richard A. Melanson
Kenyon College (Gambier, OH 43022-5020)
Cold War Revisionism and American Diplomacy

No project description available

[Grant products]

Project fields:
American Government; International Relations; U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$9,911 (approved)
$9,911 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1980 – 6/30/1981


FS-*0004-78

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Bell I. Wiley (Project Director: May 1977 to October 1990)
THE AMERICAN SOUTH 1800-1865: SLAVERY, SECESSION AND CIVIL WAR

A seminar on the South from 1800 through 1865, with emphasis on slavery, secession, and Civil War. Attention will be given to changing interpretations as reflected in writings of the last half century, and to influences, national and regional, that have contributed to revisionism.

Project fields:

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$45,612 (approved)
$45,612 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1979 – 9/30/1979


FS-10172-76

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Bell I. Wiley (Project Director: January 1976 to present)
The American South, 1800-1865: Slavery, Secession and Civil War

A seminar on the South from 1800 through 1865, with emphasis on slavery, secession, and Civil War. Attention will be given to changing interpretations as reflected in writings of the last half- century, and to influences, national and regional, that have contributed to revisionism.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$40,161 (approved)
$40,161 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1976 – 8/31/1976


FS-10334-76

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Bell I. Wiley (Project Director: January 1976 to present)
The American South, 1800-1865: Slavery, Secession and Civil War

A seminar on the South from 1800 through 1865, with emphasis on slavery, secession, and Civil War. Attention will be given to changing interpretations as reflected in writings of the last half-century, and to influences, national and regional, that have contributed to revisionism.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$43,100 (approved)
$43,100 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1976 – 8/31/1976