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Funded Projects Query Form
11 matches

Project field: Politics: All
Keywords: technology (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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FO-283006-22

Benjamin Gosnell Bartlett
Miami University, Oxford (Oxford, OH 45056-1602)
Between Expertise and Bureaucracy: How Cybersecurity Policy is Shaped in Japan and the United States

Research and writing leading to a book comparing the factors that shape cybersecurity policy in Japan and the United States.

Why are some governments better able to adopt and implement cybersecurity policies than others? Despite facing similar challenges, states’ effectiveness in meeting these threats varies. The increasing reliance of governments, firms, and societies on information and communications technology (ICT) makes this a pressing concern for both scholars and policymakers. Yet, there has been surprisingly little work in the social sciences on what governments are doing to improve cybersecurity. This project will address this oversight by advancing our understanding of what determines the policies governments use to reduce the vulnerability of their countries to cyber threats by comparing Japan to a country with a very different approach, the United States. In particular, it looks at the ways in which cybersecurity policy is shaped through the interaction between a common international community of cybersecurity experts and the unique bureaucratic organizations in each country.

Project fields:
Comparative Politics; International Relations

Program:
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023


FT-278682-21

Swati Srivastava
Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040)
Algorithmic Empires: The Political and Ethical Implications of Data Extraction by Technology Companies

Writing two chapters for a book on the development and use of algorithms by big technology companies.

Big technology companies like Facebook and Google concentrate power over the world in “algorithmic empires” — the concept this book develops to describe the extraction of vast amounts of personal data to feed digital systems that structure what we know and how we are known. Algorithms convert individual experience into data, the most valuable global commodity, and generate artificially narrow content to capture our attention. Through mass surveillance and information manipulation, algorithmic empires contribute to an erosion of trust in technology and a misinformed citizenry. The book makes sense of algorithmic empires by: 1. Tracing the logic of algorithmic empires for resource extraction and social control and its relationship to “surveillance capitalism”; 2. Cataloguing Facebook scandals in privacy violations and microtargeting along with gaps in its global regulation; 3. Theorizing public responsibility that shifts our relationship to algorithmic empires from consumers to subjects.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; International Relations; Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2021 – 7/31/2021


FO-50251-15

Mary Alice Haddad
Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT 06459-3208)
Environmental Politics in East Asia: Strategies that Work

This project uses the Japanese experience to uncover and explain which environmental advocacy strategies are the most successful in generating pro-environmental behavior change among governments, businesses, and individuals. The study combines the quantitative analysis of two original large-n datasets of environmental organizations and events with qualitative case studies of environmental politics in Japan, the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China, and the Republic of Korea. It finds that the strategies that have been most effective in Japan and East Asia are also the most common and effective environmental advocacy strategies around the world although they have gained less academic attention than the strategies more prevalent in North American and Western Europe. The work will be a contribution to Japanese studies, comparative politics, and environmental studies, demonstrating how Japan can be a starting place for new theories and understandings of environmental politics.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Comparative Politics; East Asian Studies

Program:
Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$33,600 (approved)
$33,600 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 8/31/2015


CZ-50178-08

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Daniel Carpenter (Project Director: February 2007 to March 2016)
The American Republic Initiative at Harvard University

Endowment and bridge funding for a visiting faculty position in American Political Thought and Institutions, graduate student fellowships, and an annual summer institute for high school teachers.

Harvard University is applying for a We the People Challenge Grant of $1,000,000 to be matched by funds of a minimum of $3,000,000 we will raise in order to fund a new Program on the American Republic. Anticipated endowment income will be used for three core purposes: (1) a new faculty position in American Political Thought and Institutions, (2) two graduate student dissertation fellowships in the Study of the American Republic, and (3) an annual two-day summer institute for high school teachers, starting with the Boston Public School system. Near term funds will enhance the building and maintenance of an information technology infrastructure that can enhance education at Harvard and elsewhere, as well as grants for course development and educational technology and materials development. Existing funds (separate from this application) will support a related speaker series and an annual Conference on the American Republic.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Special Initiatives

Division:
Challenge Programs

Totals (matching):
$875,000 (approved)
$875,000 (offered)
$316,992 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 7/31/2014


ED-21254-98

CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)
Joanne Reitano (Project Director: April 1998 to January 2000)
Participation In Government

To support a SCHOOLS FOR A NEW MILLENNIUM planning project on using technology to promote civic participation for a high school in New York City.

Project fields:
American Government

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$31,221 (approved)
$31,205 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1998 – 6/30/1999


FA-32830-94

Jerry W. Weinberger
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
From Heidegger to Bacon: Rethinking Technology and the Origins of Modern Politics

No project description available

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1994 – 5/31/1995


ES-21057-85

University of Missouri, St. Louis (St. Louis, MO 63121-4401)
James F. Doyle (Project Director: May 1984 to October 1990)
Socrates and the High-Tech World: The Examined Life Updated

To support a one-year collaborative project for 60 teachers to study literature, history, and other humanities subjects in order to reinterpret the Socratic ideal of an examined life in a world increasingly influenced by high technology.

Project fields:
History, General; Literature, General; Political Science, General

Program:
Institutes for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,000 (approved)
$180,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1985 – 7/31/1986


FA-24639-84

Jerry W. Weinberger
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
A Study of Problem of Technology and the Tradition of Liberal Democratic Political Thought

No project description available

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Fellowships for University Teachers

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$25,000 (approved)
$25,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1984 – 6/30/1985


EH-*0933-80

Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS 39762-6156)
Donald R. Kelley (Project Director: November 1979 to October 1990)
Creation of Interdisciplinary Course on Technology and Society

To develop an interdisciplinary freshman/sophomore course on technology and society team-taught by a political scientist and aerospace engineer. Attention will be given to technologically induced changes in the region with emphasis onchanges in traditional rural/smalltown culture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Political Science, General; Sociology

Program:
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$2,065 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1980 – 2/28/1981


FT-13500-77

Henry S. Kariel
University of Hawaii Systems (Honolulu, HI 96822-2247)
Technology and Play

To inquire to what extent a commitment to playful forms of behavior might give desirable direction to actual and emergent technologies. PI seeks to explore non-instrumental, intrinsically rewarding activities which promise to promote that combination of self-discipline and sociability by which the forces of technology may be brought under control.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1977 – 7/31/1977


FT-12522-75

Langdon C. Winner
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, NY 12180-3590)
Technology and Society: The Viewpoints of Contemporary German Philsophy

To study discussions on technology and society carried on by contemporary German philosophers. Much of the best thinking on the topic of technology, society, and politics has been done by Germans and is available only in German.

Project fields:
Political Theory

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1975 – 8/31/1975