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Organization name: Chicago Architecture Foundation
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GA-274716-20

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Michael Wood (Project Director: May 2020 to present)
Digital Transformation of CAC to Survive and Thrive in a Post-COVID reality

The retention of seventeen staff members to expand the virtual architecture tour program and the creation of online lectures.

The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged museums to think creatively about the way we engage our audiences. The Chicago Architecture Center (CAC) quickly introduced new approaches to digitally serving and engaging its audiences, and must now plan for the post-outbreak reality. To this end, CAC proposes a comprehensive plan to digitally transform our work. Over the next 6 months, the CAC will continue to re-calibrate its model for engaging audiences, developing and producing digital tours, programs, lectures, and events. Our proposal covers three principal activities: 1. Expand our existing architecture tour program to include a large virtual component for remote audiences. 2. Develop an app for our popular Open House Chicago program, which will allow us to adapt the festival during this crisis. 3. Create a comprehensive program of online lectures and classes that invite audiences into a rich discussion about architecture, and its intersection with culture and the humanities.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Public Programs)

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2020 – 12/31/2020


BH-267161-19

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Adam Rubin (Project Director: February 2019 to present)
Jenni G. Mushynski (Co Project Director: October 2019 to present)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

The Chicago Architecture Center will offer the workshop The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation to supplement and enhance the humanities lessons of teachers from across the nation. Buildings are primary sources that reflect who we are as a society at a moment in time. As such, architecture stands as one of the strongest tools for sharing the way we live our lives. The skyscraper is perhaps the strongest architectural legacy of America, and Chicago, as the home of one of the first skyscrapers, provides a powerful lens through which we can examine our culture, economy, history, and society. Through the context of skyscraper development in Chicago from the late 19th through mid-20th centuries, teachers participating in this workshop will use Chicago’s landmark buildings to explore the many forces that shaped Chicago into a center of architecture, how these developments impacted society and vice versa, and how this history continues to impact urbanization to this day.

Project fields:
Architecture; Interdisciplinary Studies, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2019 – 12/31/2021


ZH-258511-18

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Gabrielle Lyon (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2019)
Adam Rubin (Project Director: March 2019 to present)
Open House Chicago Teen Ambassadors

A program to involve 32 teens from minority and low-income groups in the study of the architectural history of Chicago’s neighborhoods.

The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) requests a Humanities Access Grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities to support a new Open House Chicago Teen Ambassadors program in 2018 and 2019. In this program, CAF will work with 32 teens over nine month periods during 2018 and 2019. Participating teens will: 1) conduct primary source research in Chicago’s neighborhoods; 2) create audio/visual artifacts that will be shared digitally; and 3) serve as ambassadors during Open House Chicago, the largest free architectural festival in the country. This Teen Ambassadors program will enrich the experiences of festival visitors while also arming teens with new skills in humanities-based research and interpretation.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
Humanities Access Grants

Division:
Challenge Grants

Totals (matching):
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (offered)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


BH-250947-16

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jennifer Masengarb (Project Director: February 2016 to May 2018)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

Skyscrapers define the physical landscape and shape social life of major cities. High-rise construction is a symbol of innovation, industry, and infrastructure. Chicago’s history as a center for development of the skyscraper from the late 19th through mid-20th centuries positions the city as an ideal place to explore the ways in which tall buildings reflect social, cultural and political changes related to urbanization. In two six-day workshops conducted by the Chicago Architecture Foundation, educators will investigate the skyscraper as a physical and cultural construct. The tall building in Chicago will serve as a lens for studying invention and innovation; urbanization; industrialization; segregation; technology; labor; gender, particularly the introduction of women to the workplace; and civic identity. Studying the myriad forces that shaped Chicago will support educators’ investigations and teaching of how people’s decisions continue to shape an urban nation.

Project fields:
Architecture; Urban History; Urban Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,800 (approved)
$160,800 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


BH-50559-13

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jennifer Masengarb (Project Director: March 2013 to March 2015)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper and its impact on the city of Chicago and on urbanization throughout the world. The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) offers a workshop to explore how the development of the skyscraper changed the city of Chicago and the world. At the close of the nineteenth century, a boom of new tall buildings in Chicago's city center, or "Loop," formed what became known as the "Chicago School" of architecture. Workshop participants examine the economic and technological factors that precipitated this boom as well as the social and aesthetic changes that it unleashed. They further consider the place of these now-historic buildings in twenty-first-century Chicago and the bold new superstructures in Asia and the Middle East. The workshop features several landmark buildings in the "Loop," such as the Reliance Building (D. H. Burnham & Co., 1895), the Chicago Tribune Tower (Raymond Hood, 1925), and the Federal Center (Mies van der Rohe, 1964, 1974). Aided by a series of exercises ("how to read a building," "how to sketch like an architect," and "how to use buildings as primary resources"), teachers learn how architecture conveys meaning. The study of original drawings and photographs shows how period images shaped public understanding and responses. Lectures and discussions are led by historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University); architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), and practicing architects. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronon's Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Daniel Bluestone's Constructing Chicago; Louis Sullivan's 1896 essay, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered"; and Carl Sandburg's 1916 Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's award-winning curriculum guide, Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$169,000 (approved)
$169,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


BH-50489-12

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jean Linsner (Project Director: March 2012 to September 2012)
Jennifer Masengarb (Project Director: September 2012 to November 2014)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of skyscrapers to urbanization.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of skyscrapers to urbanization. The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) offers a workshop to explore how the rise of the skyscraper stimulated and reflected change in American life. Between 1885 and 1895, rising land prices and technological changes such as the invention of the elevator and the steel frame made a new building type, the skyscraper, both commercially necessary and physically possible. In the heart of Chicago's city center or "Loop," a boom of new tall buildings formed what became known as the "Chicago School" of architecture. Workshop participants examine the interplay of economic, cultural, and aesthetic influences that transformed Chicago's built landscape from the 1880s through the present. Teachers visit several landmark buildings throughout the "Loop," such as the Reliance Building (D. H. Burnham & Co., 1895), the Chicago Tribune Tower (Raymond Hood, 1925), and the Federal Center (Mies van der Rohe, 1964, 1974). Sessions with historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University) and architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), as well as with practicing architects, advance exploration of the complexities of the tall building boom. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Daniel Bluestone, Constructing Chicago; Louis Sullivan's 1896 essay, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered"; and Carl Sandburg's 1916 Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's award-winning curriculum guide, Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$172,393 (approved)
$172,193 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


BH-50430-11

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jean Linsner (Project Director: March 2011 to October 2012)
Jennifer Masengarb (Project Director: October 2012 to April 2016)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the origins of the skyscraper in Chicago and its relationship to urbanization.

"The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of such buildings to urbanization. Between 1885 and 1895, as technological innovations (elevators, the steel frame, and fireproof building materials, among others) made tall buildings both physically possible and commercially feasible, Chicago experienced a skyscraper boom. This workshop hosted by the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) focuses on the central question: How does the rise of the skyscraper stimulate and reflect change in American life? Participants examine the city's geographical features, as well as the interplay of cultural, philosophical, and aesthetic influences that marked the evolution of Chicago's built landscape from the 1880s through the present. Teachers visit several landmark buildings and architectural firms throughout Chicago's "Loop." Lecture/discussion sessions with historian Henry Binford (Northwestern University) and architectural historians Katherine Solomonson (University of Minnesota) and Joanna Merwood-Salisbury (Parsons The New School for Design), as well as with practicing architects, advance exploration of the complexities of the tall building boom. Readings include selections from (among other works) William Cronan, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Donald Miller, City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America; Daniel Bluestone, Constructing Chicago; and Carl Sandburg, Chicago Poems. Participants receive CAF's Schoolyards to Skylines: Teaching with Chicago's Amazing Architecture.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$177,523 (approved)
$177,463 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


TD-50195-10

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Gregory K. Dreicer (Project Director: August 2009 to February 2012)
One Nation, Under Construction

Development of 15 programs for a new one-hour, internet-based radio show providing diverse perspectives on American architecture, cities, and urban infrastructure.

The Chicago Architecture Foundation requests an America's Media Makers Production Grant in support of "One Nation, Under Construction," a weekly web and radio broadcast program that engages people in learning the stories behind the building -- conceptual and physical -- of America's spaces, places, and structures. Each week, the show will address a humanities theme through exploration of architecture, infrastructure, urban history, planning, and landscape. While drawing on the latest scholarship, each 60-minute broadcast will surprise, engage, and move viewers as it investigates the link between the ways of building and the values of the builders. The innovative power of this project derives from its approach -- featuring the everyday voices and stories that illuminate humanities themes discussed by featured scholars and experts -- combined with an internet-based strategy linked to a national scholarly network and the Chicago Architecture Foundations extensive programming.

Project fields:
Architecture

Program:
America's Media Makers: Development Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2010 – 6/30/2011


BH-50321-09

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jean Linsner (Project Director: March 2009 to June 2011)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the development of the skyscraper in Chicago and the relationship of such buildings to urbanization.

The tall building gives American urban centers distinctive character. In every major city, the skyscraper defines the physical landscape and shapes land use. High-rise construction highlights the role of innovation in architecture and infrastructure across the United States and the world. Chicago's history as a center for the development of the skyscraper from the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries positions the city as the ideal place to explore the tall building's relationship to urbanization.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$162,951 (approved)
$162,951 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BA-50008-08

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jean Linsner (Project Director: April 2008 to January 2009)
Picturing American Demonstration Workshop

Three-day Picturing America demonstration workshop for Chicago-area teachers and librarians.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Education; U.S. History

Program:
Picturing America

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$28,109 (approved)
$28,109 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2008 – 8/31/2008


BH-50296-08

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Jean Linsner (Project Director: March 2008 to June 2010)
The American Skyscraper: Transforming Chicago and the Nation

Between 1885 and 1895, Chicago experienced a tall building boom as technological innovations such as the steel frame, elevators, and fireproof building materials made skyscrapers both physically possible and commercially feasible. Chicago's architects successfully brought together these new technologies to build higher than ever before, ushering in a new age of architectural innovation that transformed the way people interacted with their built environment. This new type of interaction illustrates how the urban landscape has shaped human experience through to the modern age.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$143,792 (approved)
$143,792 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 12/31/2009


GM-24829-92

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Carol J. Callahan (Project Director: December 1991 to April 1995)
An Interpretive Catalogue on Glessner House and its Collections

To support planning for a catalogue that will interpret Glessner House, designed by Henry Hobson Richardson in the 1880s, and its collections.

Project fields:
American Studies; Architecture

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$32,726 (approved)
$32,726 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1992 – 4/30/1994


GM-24430-91

Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL 60604-2505)
Carol J. Callahan (Project Director: June 1990 to July 1993)
Documentation of the Glessner House Museum Collection

To support documentation of the collections of Glessner house, designed in 1887 by the American architect H. H. Richardson.

Project fields:
American Studies; Architecture

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,859 (approved)
$40,859 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1991 – 2/28/1993