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3 matches

Organization name: Ramapo College
Keywords: The Hudson River (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
Division or office: Education Programs*
Sort order: Award year, descending

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BH-50639-14

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2014 to May 2016)
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers that use the Hudson River for a study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

This workshop focuses on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. By focusing on art, literature, and architecture alongside the developments in commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, the workshop reveals the several ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, discussions, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. Participants begin by considering the mouth of the Hudson as an estuary and economic gateway; they survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving, visit his home, Sunnyside, and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. A session on "Race, Labor, and the Landscape" illuminates the stories of African Americans in the Hudson River Valley. Finally, an afternoon boat trip--enhanced by readings in period guidebooks--enables participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Judith Richardson (English and American studies, Stanford University), Myra Young Armstead (history and Africana studies, Bard College), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in translating the Hudson River workshop to other local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,734 (approved)
$169,850 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


BH-50481-12

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Meredith Davis (Project Director: March 2012 to November 2014)
Stephen P. Rice (Co Project Director: August 2012 to November 2014)
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers that survey the Hudson River in an interdisciplinary study of modernization in nineteenth-century America. Ramapo College offers a workshop on the Hudson River as a case study of the scope of modernization in nineteenth-century America. The study of art, literature, and architecture, alongside the developments of commerce, industry, and tourism that emerged on the nineteenth-century Hudson, reveal the diverse ways in which Americans navigated the waterway. This approach also brings an interdisciplinary perspective to history and a humanities focus to environmental studies. Each day allows for a specific topic with lectures, readings, and site-based activities tied to a region of the river. The workshop begins by considering the mouth of the Hudson as estuary and economic gateway; participants survey New York Harbor by boat, walk the commercial district of Wall Street, and read Walt Whitman's poetry at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. Farther up river, they discuss short stories by Washington Irving; visit his home, Sunnyside; and compare this modest structure to Lyndhurst, its Gilded-Age neighbor and home of financier Jay Gould. They study the development of the steamboat and Erie Canal for the purpose of industry and commerce, and the Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole as romantic depictions of nature. Finally, a morning boat trip-enhanced by readings in period guidebooks-enable participants to interpret the river's dramatic geology, iconic vistas, and environmental change through a nineteenth-century lens. Project directors Stephen P. Rice and Meredith Davis are scholars of American studies and art history, respectively. Their expertise is supplemented by Elizabeth Hutchinson (art history, Columbia University), Roger Panetta (Curator of the Hudson River Collection, Fordham University), Judith Richardson (English, Stanford University), Thomas Wermuth (history, Marist College and Director of the Hudson River Valley Institute), and Stephen Stanne (Hudson River Estuary Program, Cornell University). In addition to place-based writing exercises, a session entitled "Teaching Your Place" assists teachers in the translation of the Hudson River workshop to local sites.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$179,876 (approved)
$176,276 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013


BH-50395-10

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ 07430-1623)
Stephen P. Rice (Project Director: March 2010 to June 2012)
Meredith Davis (Co Project Director: March 2010 to June 2012)
The Hudson River in the 19th Century and the Modernization of America

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty teachers that will use the Hudson River as a focus for the study of nineteenth-century intersections of art, culture, commerce, and nature.

The Hudson River is an American landmark of immeasurable historical depth and significance, and has aptly been called "America's River." The workshops we propose will explore American history and culture of the 19th century by focusing on the Hudson River as a site where art, culture, commerce, and nature collide. On one hand, the River is "conquered" in the 19th century by steam power, the Erie Canal, industrialization, and population growth. On the other, painters such as Thomas Cole and writers such as Washington Irving endowed the River with romantic, transformational power, the power to overcome human force. Each day of our program will include a lecture by a renowned scholar, a site visit, and a workshop with a Master Teacher where participants will work in small groups to develop lesson plans related to their teaching area. The workshops will be appropriate for middle and high school teachers of social studies, history, English, humanities, and environmental studies.

Project fields:
American Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$175,114 (approved)
$175,114 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $167,282
Supplement (2011) $7,832